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Full text of "A genealogical and heraldic history of the commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, enjoying territorial possessions or high official rank; but univested with heritable honours"

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THE LIBRARIES 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



q rinJ[iml[iutl|iiJiinuD[ruiininininl| 



HJSTOin 



T 



OF THE 



COMMONERS OF GREAT BRl'iVMN 



AND IRELAND. 



VO!,. III. 




T o W 






(U)F 



-:aAM< 



GENEALOGICAL AND HERALDIC 

HISTORY 



OF 



THE COMMONERS 



OF 



GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, 



ENJOYING TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS OR HIGH OFFICIAL RANK ; 



BUT UNINVESTED WITH HERITABLE HONOURS. 



BY JOHN BURKE, ESQ. 

AUTHOR OF " THE HISTORY OF THE PEERAGE AND BARONETAGE,' 
" OF THE EXTINCT AND DORMANT PEERAGE," &C. 



IN FOUR VOLUMES. 

VOL. III. 



LONDON: 

PUBLISHED FOR HENRY COLBURN, 

BY R. BENTLEY: BELL AND BRADFUTE, EDINBURGH; J. GUMMING, 
DUBLIN; AND SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



5IDCCCXXNVI. 



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cH\i;i,i:s \vr;i riiNoii w. tuoks .oi iir, cmvcFi.v ihve. 



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TO 

GEORGE STANLEY GARY, ESQ. 

OF FOLLATON MOUSE, IN THE COUNTY OF DEVON, 

OF THE 
ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL FAMILY OF THAT NAME, 

Cti0 Siolumr, 

^\ ITfl SENTIMENTS OF SINCERE ESTEEM, 

IS 

RESPECTFULTA' INSCUIi3EI). 



PREFACE. 



In presenting the Third Volume of this Work, nothing remains for 
the Author beyond again reiterating his acknowledgments of the 
kind and liberal assistance which he continues to receive from his 
literary contemporaries, as well as the courtesy universally accorded 
him by those with whom he finds it necessary to communicate. The 
Work upon which he is engaged would have been undertaken in 
vain, by industry no matter how persevering, or exertion however 
enterprizing, were it not for such important aid ; but in this free and 
flourishing empire, every thing deemed of national usefulness is 
secure of national protection. 



ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Denne of Kent and Sussex. 

P. 20. Altliough several writers state 
William Denne, the first of Denne 
Hill, to be descended from Ralph de 
Dene, the father of Ela, who married 
Sir Jordan Sackville, yet the Dorset 
Roll calls Ela co-heiress with her 
sister or niece Sybella, and she is in 
Collins and elsewhere mentioned as 
co-heiress of her brother Robert. 
The Dorset Roll also assigns a dif- 
ferent coat of arms to Ralpli than 
that borne by the Dennes of Denne 
Hill. 
P. 21, col. 2 , I. 3 from bottom. Sarah 
Greenland, the wife of Thomas 
Denne, esq. died at Lydd, and not 
at Fairfield, as erroneously stated at 
page 21. 

Plumptre of Fredville. 

P. 76, col. 1, I. 22. John Plumptre, 
esq. of Nottingham, b. in 1679, who 
married Anuabella, eldest daughter 
of Sir Francis Molyneux, bart. had, 
with other issue, 

John, his heir, of Nottingham, 
M.P. grandfather of the present 
John Pembekton Plumptre, 
esq. of Fredville, M.P. for Kent. 
Robert, D.D. master of Queen's 
College, Cambridge, in 1773, who 
died in 1788, leaving 

Joseph, in holy orders, d. s. p. 

James, in holy orders, rector 

of Great Grandsdon, d. s. p. 

Robert, of Norwich, barrister- 

at-law, married, and has one 

daughter. 

Diana, m. 7th April, 1781, to 
Jier cousin, the Rev. John 
Plumptre, and d. in 1825. 

Anne, the authoress, died un- 
married. 

Lydia, > living- unmarried 

Arabella, $ in 1836. 

Jemima, m. to Frederick Lay- 
ton, esq. captain of marines. 
Septimus, who in. in 1763, at St. 
3. 



Michael's Royal, College Hill, 
London, Catharine Young, and 
left at his decease, 5th February, 
1782, aged sixty-four, two sur- 
viving sons and one daughter, 

1. John, b. 11th March, 1754, 
baptized at Mansfield 8th 
April following, vicar of 
Stone, in the county of 
Worcester, in 1778, vicar of 
Stoke Prior in 1788, pre- 
bendary of Worcester in 
1789, and dean of Glou- 
cester in 1808. He in. in 
1781, his cousin - germaa 
Diana, daughter of the Rev. 
Robert Plumptre, D.D. aud 
dying in 1825 left issue, 

John-Francis, b. 4th De- 
cember, 1781, fellow of 
Eton College, m. Caro- 
line, daughter of — 
Carter, esq. of Foxley, 
Wilts,andisnow(l836) 
livinff a widower with- 
out issue. 

Henry-Scawen, M.A, mi- 
nister of St. Mary's 
Chapel, Lambeth, and 
alternate evening prea- 
cher at the Foundling 
Hospital, b. Uth De- 
cember, 1789. 

Robert-Bathurst, b. 27tJi 
September, 1791, m. 
Susanna, daughter of 
the Rev. Iltyd Nicholl, 
and has issue. 

Tryphena-Mary. 
. Annabella. 

2. Charles, b. 13th February, 
1755, rector of Teversal, 
Notts, and afterwards of 
Longnewton, in the county 
of Durham, m. 14th Janu- 
ary, 1780, Mary, daughter 
of — Mellar, esq. of Mans- 
field, and d. in May, 1812; 
he ha<l issue, 

b 



ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Kaye-Fraiicis, t.ethJuly, i 
1784, d. miniarried in 
India about the year 
1805. 

Edward-Hallows, of tlie 
Temple, b. 27th Oc- 
tober, 1785, m. in Oc- 
tober, 1816, Eliza, dau. 
of the late Jacob Pit- 
field, esq. of Synionds- 
bury, Dorset, and has 
issue. 

Frederick-Charles, fellow 
of University College, 
Oxford. 

Frances, m. to George 
Hodgkinson, of South- 
well, Notts, and d. in 
1833. 
Maria, ) living unmar- 
Dorotliy,) ried in 1836. 
3. Edward, d. young in 1768. 

1. Dorothy, m. 7th April, 
1783, to Francis Evans, esq. 
of Nottingham, and is now 
(1836) living a widow. 

Wentworth of Woolley. 

P. 93. Godfrey Wentworth Went- 
worth, esq. of Woolley Park, died in 
1833, and not in 1826. 

Lucy of Chari.ecote. 

P. 97. Martha, third daughter and co- 
heiress of Francis Lucy, esq. (fifth 
son of Sir Thomas Lucy), by Eliza- 
beth, his wife, daughter and heiress 
of Bevill Molesworth, esq. of Hoddes- 
don, Herts, married Sir Samuel 
Eyre, knt. of Newhouse and Chil- 
hanipton (see page 291). 
P. 99. col. 1, 1. 10, for " Justice Slen- 
der," read "Justice Shallow." 

Whieldon of Springfield House. 
P. 116. The subjoined is a more cor- 
rect engraving of the Whieldon arms 
than that inserted at page 116: 




Ferrers of Baddesley Clinton. 

P, 129, col. 1, 1. 14 from bottom, for 
" George, Viscount Tamworth,^^ 
read " George, Earl of Leicester." 

D'Arcy of Kiltulla. 

P. 146, col. 1, 1. 12. Omit from "and" 

down to " Firbough." 

M'Kekrell of Hillhouse. 

P. 173. John M'Kerrell, esq. of 
Hillhouse, died in 1835. 

Corbet of Elsham. 

P. 190, col. 2, 1. 6 from bottom, for 
" the second son of Robert (by his 
wife Dorothy), Thomas Corbett ac- 
quired the estate of Nash," read " the 
second son of Robert, Thomas Cor- 
bett, acquired by his wife, Dorothy, 
the estate of Nash." 

Seymour of Castletown. 

P. 202. It is there stated that SiR 
Henry Seymour married Barbara, 
daughter of Thomas Morgan, esq. of 
Tredegar, a fact which admits of 
doubt, if not of refutation. Collins 
and Edmonson make Sir Henry to 
marry Barbara Morgan, and so does 
an inscription to the memory of Sir 
John Seymour in Great Bedwin 
Church, which in enumerating the 
issue of " the worthie knight," says 
tliat his second surviving son, "Sir 
Henry Seymour, married Barbara, 
daughter of ThoniasMorgan,Esquier." 
Other authorities, however, of equal 
credit, call the wife of Sir Henry, 
" Barbara, daugliter of Morgan 
Wolfe, esq." In a manuscript among 
the Harleian collections. No. 1529, 
occurs the following entry : " Hen- 
ricus Seimor, Miles = Barbara, f. 
Morgani Wolfe." This assertion is 
repeated by Sir Richard Hoare, in 
his History of South Wilts, thus: 
"Sir Henry Seymour, knighted 1546 
=Barbara, dau. to Morgan Wolfe." 
And in the Herald's College, the fol- 
lowing descent of Sir Henry's wife is 
given : " Sir Henry Seymour, of 
Marwell, com. Southampton, knight, 
second son of Sir John Seymour, of 
Wolf hall, by Margery Wentworth, 
married Barbara, daughter of Mor- 
gan Wolfe, by Gwenllian, daughter 
and heir of John de Barri. Morgan 
Wolfe was the son of Howell Wolfe, 
the son of John Wolfe, esq. the son 
of Sir William Wolfe, knt. by the 
daugliter and co-heir of Sir Majo Le 
Sore, of St. Fagans, by the daughter 
and heir of Huntley." 

Besides, in analysing the coat ar- 
mour of Sir Henry which is set up on 
the monument of his father in Great 



A LT K R A ri O NS A N D A D 1) I T IONS. 



XI 



Bcdwyn Cluudi, we liiid it to be as 
follows: (ill. two wings conjoined 
and inverted or, witli a crescent of 
tlie last for the s(M'ond son of Sry- 
Moi!R, impaling quarterly ; 

1. Arg. a fess between three mart- 
lets gu. on a chief sa. tiiree wolves' 
heads erased arg. for Wolfe of 
Gwerngotheyn. 

2. Per pale sa. and az. three fleurs- 
de-lys or, for Woi.i i>N kwton. 

3. Or, three wolves passant az. for 
Nanfant. 

4. Arg. on a chev. gu. between 
three stags' heads caboshed so. three 
bugle horns arg. stringed or, for Le 
Sore, of St. Fagans, Glamorgan- 
shire. 

Thus the arras and the inscription 
on the same monument disagree. It 
should be observed that the said mo- 
nument was erected by Edward, Earl 
of Hertford, fifty-four years after the 
death of Sir John, and twelve after 
that of Sir Henry, on the occasion of 
Sir .John's body being removed to 
Bedwyn from the ruined church of 
Easton Priory. 

MoRRiCE OF Betshanger. — The follow- 
ing is a more correct account of the early 
ancestry of this family than that given at 
pages 232 and 2.33 : 

Athelstan or Elystan Glodrydd, Prince of 
Fferlex, m. Gwladys, daughter of Rhun 
ap Ednowain, Prince of Tegengl. 

Cadwgan ap Elystan, m. Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Brochwel ap Aeddan, of Powys. 

I 
Hoedliw ap Cadwgan. 

I 
Rys ap Hoedliw. 

Hoedliw Goch ap Rys. 

I 
Gwrgenau ap Hoedliw Goch. 

Grono ap Gwrgenau. 

I ^ 
Griffith ap Grono. 

I 
Madoc ap Griffith. 

I 
Howel ap Madoc. 

I 
Philip Dorddfi ap Howel. 

Cadwgan, second son of Philip DorddA, m, 
Eva, daughter of Llewelyn Crygeryr. 

I ■ "^ ■ 

David ap Cadwgan, ?«. Tauglwyst, daughter 

of Griffith ap leuan Lloyd, descended from 

Llowdden. 



Philip ap David. 

leuan ap Philip, of Carm, m. Margaret, 
daughter of leuan ap Meredith. 

Rys or Rees ap Teuan, in. TNLilIt, daughter 
and co-heir of leuan (iwrgan. 

I 
Morgan ap Rees, »m. Gwenlli.in, daughter of 

David ap Guttin ap leuan Dd(\. 

Morys ap Morgan, vt. Ellen, daughter of 
leuan ap Griffith Ddu. 

William Morys, &c. as in the body of the 
work. 

Bray of Shere. 

P. 244. col. 2, 1. 46, for " Mary, m. to 
— Bluet, esq." read " Mary, m. to 
Edward Blewitt, esq. of Salford, in 
Oxfordshire." The issue of this 
Mary Bray, who married Edward 
Blewitt, was, 

1. Edmund -Reginald Blewitt, 
whose descendant is residing at 
Lantarnam. 

1. Mary Blewitt, ni. to .Joseph 
Newton, esq. 

2. Catherine Blewitt, m. to Wil- 
liam Durham, esq. and was mo- 
ther of Catherine Durham, who 
wedded Colonel Kingsmili Evans 
(see vol. ii. p. 244). 

Rees of Killymaenllwyd. — The follow- 
ing is a more correct account of the descent 
of this family than that at page 265. 

Urien-Rheged, Prince of Rheged in 
Wales, by birth a Cambro-Briton, was fifth 
in descent from Coel Codevog, King of the 
Britons. He built the castle of Carrey 
Cermin, in Carmarthenshire, although the 
erection of that edifice is ascribed by some 
to no earlier a date than the time of Henry 
I. The style of the architecture and the 
authority of the Golden Grove MSS. seem, 
however, to establish its ancient British con- 
struction. Urien, who bore for arms arg. a 
chev. sa. between three ravens ppr. sur- 
mounted by a crown, m. the daughter of 
Gwrlois, Duke of Cornwall, and was direct 
ancestor of 

Sir Elidir Dd6, knight of the Sepulchre, 
temp. Richard I. who »k. the daughter of 
Sysyllt, lord of Cantreselyf, and had a son, 

"^Philip ap Sir Elidir Doii, who m. 
Gwladys, daughter of David Vras (descended 
from Bledri, son of Cadivor Vawr, lord of 
Blaencych, who lived temp. William the 
Conqueror), and was father of 

Nicholas ap 1'hilip, of Newton, in Dy- 
nevor, who m. Jenett, daughter of Llewellyn 
Voethus, descended from Hllystan Glodydd, 



xu 



ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



Prince between Wye and Severn, and had 
a son and successor, 

Gkyffith ap Nicholas, of Newton, who 
had by his wife, the daugliter of Meredith 
Donne,* of Iscoed, two sons, Thomas, father 
of tlie famed Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K.B. 
lineal ancestor of the present Lord Dyne- 
VOK, and 

Owen ap Gryffith (whom some state to 
have been the eldest son of Gryffith, Golden 
Grove MSS.) He m. Alice, daughter of 
Henry Malyphant, esq. of Upton, in Pem- 
brokeshire, and had, with other issue, a son 
and successor, 

Morris ap Owen, esq. of Llechdwnny, 
who m. Elizabeth, daughter of Tliomas 
Lewis, esq. of St. Pierre, and had issue, 
John Bowen, of Bryn y Beirdd, m. 
Margaret, daughter of Howell David 
ap Einon ap David Vras. 
Thomas, from whom descended the 

Upton family. 
Rees, of whom presently. 

Jane, in. to Hugh Vaughan, esq. of 
Mdwelly, the father of John Vaug- 
han, esq. of Golden Grove, whose 
grandson, John Vaughan w^as created 
Earl of Carbery by James I. 
Elizabeth, m. to David ap Rhydderch 
Gwynne, esq. of Glanbran. 
The third son, 

Rees Bowen, of Llechdwnny, in Kid- 
welly Land, m. Jenet, daughter of Henry 
ap Owen ap Cadwgan of that place, and 
had (with two daughters, the elder, Jenet, 
m. to Rees ap Owen, and the younger to 
John Llwyd Aubrey), a son, 

Morris Bowen, esq. of Llechdwnny, 
w ho m. Catherine, daughter of Thomas ap 
Rhydderch Gwynne, esq. of Glanbran, and 
had issue, 

Rhys, his heir. 
Charles. 



• This Meredith Donne, or Dwn, was pater- 
nally descended from Meiric, king of Dyved, who 
was one of the four kings that bore the sword be- 
fore King- Arthur at his coronation at Caerlleon 
upon Usk. His descendant, Gryffith, from some 
jealousy, so frequent among the \\ elsh chieftains, 
and which facilitated the subjugation of the coun- 
try, took part with Morris de Londres, in his 
attack on Kidwelly, and was commander of the 
army in the battle fought near that town against 
Gwenlhan, wife of Griffith ab Rhys, Prince of 
South Wales, wherein herself and two sons were 
slain. The place where the battle was fought is 
called Maes Gwenllian, or Gwenllian's Phiin, to 
this day. Philip, the grandson of Griffith, how- 
ever, seems to have taken a different course ; for he 
fought a battle against the Anglo-Normans at a 
place called Cragg-Cyrn, near Kidwelly, in which 
he defeated tliem, and burnt that town. From 
these Donnes was descended Donne of TyGwynne, 
whose daughter Robert, brotlier to Hector Rees, 
married. 



Lucy, m. to David Read, esq. 
Elizabeth, m. to Henry Morgan, esq. 
The elder son, 

Rhys Bowen, esq. of Llechdwnny, m. 
Catherine, daughter of John Morgan, of 
Kidwelly, and had issue, 

Morris, of Llechdwnny, high sheriff 
of Carmarthenshire in 1615. He m. 
Maud, daughter of Sir John W'ogan, 
of Boulston, and had several child- 
ren, one of whom, Mary, m. John 
Brigstock, esq. to whom Morris, her 
fiither, passed the estate for a sum of 
money. Attached to the ancient 
property is a chapel on the south side 
of Kidwelly church, forming a wing 
to it. On tiu» opposite side is a simi- 
lar chapel, which belonged to the 
Mansels of Iscoed. 
John, of whom presently. 
Elizabeth, m. to David Lloyd, esq. of 

Llanstephau. 
Anne. 

Dorothy, m. to Thomas Philipps, esq. 
The younger son, 

John Bowen, esq. of Carmarthen, living 
in the early part of the 17th century, m. 
Eva, daughter of David Havard, of the 
same place, and w^as father of 
William Bowen, esq. whose son, 
Rhys William ap Owen, esq. of Kil- 
verry, was father of 

John Rees ap William, esq. who was *. 
by his son. 

Hector Rees, esq. b. in 1683, of Killy- 
maenllwyd, from whom the descent down to 
the present proprietor is correctly given at 
page 266. 

jfamtlB of ii^ugt)cs, 

ISorv represented by that of Rees. 

GwYNFARDD Dyved, who lived about the 
year 1038, temp. Edward the Confessor, 
was direct ancestor of Daniel Hughes, but 
the intervening line is too extended to be 
inserted here. We must not, however, 
omit, that it is mentioned in the Golden 
Grove MSS. that one of Hughes's ances- 
tors, " Howell Gawr was so surnamed for 
his valour, having overthrown the French 
king's champion (probably atChalons. where 
Edward L held the field at a tournament 
against all comers), and obtained for his 
arms gu. a lion rampt. or, in a true love knot 
arg. inter four delisses, their stnlks bending 
towards the centre of the cscocheon of the 
second." Daniel married, and had a son, 

Edward Hit.hes, esq. of Penymaes,* in 
Carmarthenshire, who m. Mary, daughter of 

* On the Demesne of Pen^-maes are the re- 
mains of a chapel, attached to the family house in 
Catholic times, and to whioli an avenue of stately 
tir trees led from the mansion. 



ALTERATIONS AND AUUITIONS. 



Mil 



Jolin Bowen, of Kiltie Hill, :iiul luul tlirt'C 
sons, Danm.i,, his heir; Hovvlaiul, who »«. 
the widow of John Mansel, esq. and Samuel. 
The eldest, 

Danii:l Hi c.uks, esq. of Penymaes, m. 
Mary, dau<;hter of the Rev. .Fames Davies, 
of liegelly, and was father of 

Aktiu'K IliKJiir.s, esq. of Penymaes, who 
VI. Judith, dauj;hter of the Rev. William 
George, reetor of Stackpool, and left a son 
and successor, 

Danikl HrciHKs, esq. of Penymaes, who 
m. Mary, daughter of Morris Lloyd, esq. 
and was *. by his son, 

Arthur Hihjhi^s, esq. of Penymaes, who 
m. Esther, daughter of Samuel Thomas, esq. 
of Pentowyn, and had issue, 

I. Daniel, of Penymaes, high sheriff of 
Carmarthenshire in 1708. He m. 
Amy, daughter of the Rev. Thomas 
Powell, rector of Llangunnor, and 
had an only daughter and heiress, 

Mary, in. to John Rees esq. of 
Killymaenllwyd. 

II. Lewis, from whom descend the Hugh- 
eses, of Tregib, Carmarthenshire. 

Jones or Bealanamore. 

P. 269, col. 1, 1. 3. Admiral Theophi- 
lus Jones died in November, 18.35. 

Burton of Mount Anville. 

P. 27 J. William Burton, the historian 
of Leicestershire, was buried in a 
vault in Hornhurji Church, not Tut- 
hury. 

P. 272. Joshua Burton did not die 
until 4th July, 1829. 

P. 273. Charles-James Burton mar- 
ried Eliza, daughter of William 
Boteler, not Belcher. 

BiDDULPH OF BiDDULPH. 

P. 280. John Biddulph, esq. of Bid- 
dulph, died in 1835. 

Nicholson of Ballow. 

P. .357, add after " Robert h. 22nd July, 
1809," B.A. of Trinity College, Dub- 
lin, in February, 1830. 

P. 358, col. 1. William Nicholson, h. 
in 1587, who m. Janet Brown, and 
had by her three sons, 

1. John, who d. before his father, 
leaving a daughter, Janet, living 
in 1665. 

2. Hugh, who succeeded his father, 
he was living in 1681, and was *. 
by his brother. 

3. \\ illiam, of Ballow, who jh. Miss 
Eleanor Dun lop. 

P. 358, col. 1, 1. 17, for " Isabella," 
read " Isabell" (she is so styled in 
the wills of her father, John Black- 
wood, of Bangor, her brother, John 
Blackwood, of Ballyleidy, and her 
husband, Alexander Hamilton). 



P. .)58. col. 1, 1. 21, for " 1797," read 
" 1787." 

P. 358, col. 1, 1. 40, for " Williaw 
Rose," read " Hiclinrd Rose." 

P. .3.>8, col. 1, 1. 43, for " — - Wells, ol 
Belfast," read " Georye Wells, of 
Belfast, merchant." 

P. 358, col. 1. John Steele, of Por- 
tavoe, was born about the year 1655, 
and died in 1721. 

P. 358, col. 2. John Steele, of Belfast, 
was born about the year 1689, an<l 
died in 1740. 

P. 358, col. 2, 1. 33, for " elder," read 
" onhj." 
O'Donovan of the county of Cork. 

P. 399, col. 1, 1. 7, for " the Rev. iMor- 
gan JJonovan, A.B. Oxon, born in 
1687," read " Morgan Donovan, esq. 
A.B. Oxon, /;. in 1687." Mr. Dono- 
van was not in orders nor any other 
profession, though a graduate of Ox- 
ford, and in the commission of the 
peace from George IL 
Chadwick of Mavesyn Redware. 

P. 438. Add to the issue of the pre- 
sent Mr. Chadwick, a son and heir, 
John de Heley, b. 30th Decem- 
ber, 1834, baptized at St. Mary's, 
Bathwick, near Bath. 

P. 443, col. 1, 1. 20, for " James Fort- 
rage, esq." read " James Fortrye, 
esq." 
Macpherson of Cluny jSLacphersox. 

P. 463, col. 1, 1. 3 from bottom, for 
" Ewan, 7iea-t brother of Dougal," 
read " Ewan, the wide of Dougal." 
Macleod of Macleod. 

P. 484, col. 2, 1. 30, for " 1831," read 
" 1821." 

P. 484, col. 2, 1. 39, for " John Leod," 
read " Harold John Leod." 

The late Macleod of Macleod had, be- 
sides the issue mentioned at p. 484, 
a son, Torquil-James. w ho died 3rd 
April, 1821, aged seven ; and a 
daughter, Eleanor-Anne, who died 
3rd December, 1830, aged thirteen. 
Penn of Stoke Park. 

P. 491, 1. 14, for" 1104," read "1804." 

P. 491, 1. 15, for " Sir William Gomoii, 
K.C.B." read " Sir William Go/h;«, 
K.C.B." 

P. 494, col. 1 . Sophia-Margaret, reli-t 
of the Hon. and Most Rev. William 
Stuart, D.D. Archbishop of Armagh, 
was daughter of Thomas Penn, esq. 
of Stoke Pogeis, and not of ^^ illiain 
Baker, esq. of Bayfordbury, as erro- 
neously stated in the body of the 
work. 
De Burgh of West Drayton. 

P. 502, col. 2, 1. 36, for " armed ar. a 
bugle honi az." read " stringed as a 
bugle horn az." 



XIV 



ALTERATIONS AND ADDITrONS. 



Bedingfeld of Ditchingham. 

p. 508, col. 2, 1. 7 from bottom, for 
" Oburfjh," read " O.rburgh." 
Trappes of NlDD. 

P. 523, The following is the early de- 
scent of the Trappes family. 

ILiiifage. 

The family of De Trappes, or De Trappe 
as it is sometimes found written, possessed 
in the beginning of the 13th century a castle 
called Delle-Weige, on the borders of Ger- 
many, near the Meuse, with a manor and 
jurisdiction appertaining to the said castle, 
which is proved by a verdict on the rolls of 
the said court, anno Domini, 1352. 

Severus De Trappe, of Delle Weige, be- 
came a Carmelite, and gave to his order at 
his profession a field called to this day " Pie 
des Carmes," part of the manor of Delle 
Weige, this Severus died anno 1314. 

William De Trappes, knt. called Delle 
Weige, bore arms, field argent, three cal- 
trops sable (2 and 1), surmounted with a 
crown, married Gertrude D'Ordingarne, of 
a noble family, of the county of Cologne, 
had issue, William de Trappes, Stephen de 
Trappes, and Severus de Trappes. Stephen 
de Trappes became a captain in the army of 
Edward III. by whom he was, after his wars 
in France, invited to accompany him to En- 
gland, and from whom he received a grant 
of lands in or near Theydonbois, in the 
county of Essex, from whence has descended 
the family of Trappes. 

The original branch of this family was 
still existent in the county of Liege, in the 
beginning of the 18th century, and was then 
allied to the family of Luxembourg. 

POYNTZ OF COWDRAY. 

p. 537. The present Mr. PoYNTz's 
two sons, William-Montague-Browne 
Poyntz, and Courtenay- John-Browne 
Poyntz, are both deceased. 
Rhodes of Bellair. 

P. 563, col. 2, 1. 8 from bottom, for 
" Xadsant," read " Cadsant." 

P. 567, col. 2, 1. 25 from bottom, for 
" Tanger," read " Zanger." 

P. 568, col. 1, 1. 14 from top, for " the 
only son," read "the eldest son." 



Vait.han of Burlton Hai.l. 

Vol. ii. p. 15, col. 1, lines from foot 24, 

30 and 31, for " Newton Chapel," 

read " Newtown Chapel." 
P. 15, col. 2, line 15 from foot, for 

" 1779," read " 1773." 
P. 239, col. 1, 1. 6, for " Ynir ap Cad- 

vioch," read "Ynyr ap Cadvioch." 
P. 239, col. 2, 1. 27 and 28, for " Gra- 

velkind Tenure," read " Gavelkind 

Tenure." 



P. 240, col. 1, 1. 20, for " 22nd May," 

read " 2nd May." 
P. 240, col. 1, 1. 14 from foot, for " Ar- 
thur Noneby," read " Arthur None- 
ley." 
P. 241, col. 2, 1. 24 from foot, for 

" Whittal," read " Whettal." 
P. 242, col. 1, 1. 33, for " 1804," read 
" 1803." 
Crawfurds of Scotland. 
In support of the curious hypothesis re- 
specting the origin of tlie Crawfurds, and 
tiieir descent from the old Eari.s of Rich- 
mond, given in vol. ii. p. xiv. we have to 
add the following remarks ; to shew, first, 
that Theobald, the reputed ancestor of the 
Douglases, and Baldwin de Biggar, who 
married the widow of the founder of the 
Crawfurd family in Scotland, were settlers 
in Yorkshire under the Earls of Richmond, 
previous to tlieir removal to Scotland, to 
which country they emigrated by following 
the fortunes of Reginald, youngest son of 
their patron Alan, fourth Earl of Richmond, 
and acquired lands contiguous to his in 
Strath Clyde and its vicinity : secondly, to 
adduce the case of the Vaux arms, as illus- 
trative of the fess heiny a mark of cadence 
from the bend: and thirdly, to confirm the 
preceding by the recorded relationship of 
John le Scott (who was nearly allied to the 
Earl of Richmond) with Galfridus de Craw- 
furd in a charter quoted by George Craw- 
furd. 

On reference to Clarkson's History of 
Richmond, compiled chiefly from Gale's 
Register Honorum Richmondae, it appears 
that a charter of Alan, fourth Earl of Rich- 
mond, is witnessed in 1145, among others, 
by Theobald and by Baldwin, and another 
similar charter in the subsequent year by 
Baldwin de Multon (Malton), in Richmond- 
shire, the patrimony of the Earls of Rich- 
mond. Baldwin would thus appear to have 
been connected with the Earls of Richmond, 
as holding lands under them, prior to tlie 
appearance of the name in connexion with 
Scottish record ; and, although the occur- 
rence of even one of tliose uncommon names, 
Theobald or Baldwin, on record in Eng- 
land, at a period so immediately preceding- 
its first appearance in Scotland, would lead 
to infer the probable identity of the indi- 
vidual bearing the appellation, that identity 
may surely be assumed as resting upon suf- 
ficient grounds when two individuals of such 
remarkable cognominals (from the same 
country) can thus be traced in mutual trans- 
actions in both kingdoms. And if the con- 
nexion thus apparent between Baldwin and 
the Earl of Richmond can be shown to 
have extended itself more intimately on the 
part of Baldwin with the family of Craw- 
furd, which, in ignorance of the present 
adduced facts, we have already traced on 



ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



XT 



entirely distinct <;rouiuls to those carls as its 
source, tlio fact of the connexion here siiewii 
between Baldwin and the Earl of Kicliniond, 
j)rior to lialdwin's settling' in Seothind, is, 
vvitli def(!renc(!, submitted as a singular cor- 
roboration, as will afterwards appear, of 
the correctness of our hypothesis, and in- 
teresting in point of anticpiarian research. 
But heraldry is the strong test that connects 
Baldwin with both countries, through the 
armorial bearings of his patron in the south, 
and of his son-in-law (his patron's kinsman) 
in the north. 

Chalmers, in Ins Caledonia, under La- 
narkshire, quotes a charter or grant of lands 
to Theobald Fleviaticns (ancestor of the 
Douglases), which is witnessed by Baldwin 
dc Bigyar (this is IJaldwin and Theobald's 
first appear.ance, as traced by Chalmers, in 
Scotland), and by bis son-in-law, John de 
Cravvfiird, inter 1147 and IIGO. He also 
states that this Jolin, who is the first he bas 
met with bearing the name of Crawfurd, is in 
various cliarters styled Priviyni Baldwini. 
It is thus manifest that tbe widow of the 
remote ancestor and founder of the family 
of Crawfurd in Scotland was married to 
Baldwin, whose connexiov, as already exhi- 
bited nith the Earl of' Richmond, affords 
another sinynlar and almost conclusive evi- 
dence as to the oriyin of the Jirst settler and 
founder of the family of Crawfurd, 

In our former statement we pointed out 
the close similarity of the arms borne by 
the Earls of Richmond and the Crawfurds, 
and there observed that the ermine whether 
carried in bend or fess is the same bearing, 
the difference being merely a brotherly dis- 
tinction. We might have added as an in- 
stance in point, the existence of a similar 
difTerence in the families of Vaux of Ti\yer- 
main and of Catterlen, as mentioned by Sir 
Walter Scott (see Notes to Triermain), and 
as displayed on Lord Brougham's quarter- 
ings of the arms of that family, where the 
fess is substituted for the bend by Catterlen, 
as representing a younger brother. A cele- 
brated northern peerage writer, Crawfurd, 
speaking of two separate branches of a 
family carrying for distinction, one the bend 
and the other the chevron, gives the prefer- 
ence in precedency to the former ; remark- 
ing, " that the chev. in heraldry generally 
denotes a junior brand), " meaning of course 
to the bend, of which he had been speaking, 
and as is seen in above instances of the 
fess. 

Galfridus de Crawfurd is termed Kins- 
man by John Le Scott, nephew to the king, 
in a charter quoted by George Crawfurd, 
along with his (John Le Scott's) two natural 
brothers, where they are all styled fratribus; 
which George Crawfurd, in ignorance of 
any other probable connexion, and under 
the impression that Galfridus must have 



married one of flieir sisters, translafi s bro- 
thers, no douiit the literal translation, uhich, 
but for the recent discovciries, might never 
have been < albd in ([uestion. It is, how- 
ever, submitted that such interpietation 
would have invalidated the deed, and that, 
had it been int<>nded to describe them as 
his brothers, the two latter would have been 
styled fnilrihiis carnulibus (a desigtiaticjii 
which in those days was not deemed oppro- 
brious), an<l the former affino. Now f rater, 
according to Ainswortb, means, besides bro- 
ther, cousin-german and kinsman, in which 
latter sense it is frequently used by the 
classics, and in the Latin translations of the 
sacred writings ; and tiiose deeds so fre- 
quently penned by churchmen will at once 
explain the sense intended, and the only 
interpretation which the term " fratribus," 
as here used, will bear, namely kinsmen, 
which term would exactly designate their 
various connexion with him. 

The absence of the double tressure in 
the armorial bearinys of liis descendants, of 
itself shows the erroneous interpretation 
which George Crawfurd gave to the con- 
nexion between the ancestor of the Craw- 
furds and John Le Scott ; for had they been 
thus descended, their ensiyns would, as it 
invariably occurs in cases of descent from 
the royal family of Scotland, have been so 
augmented. 

Chalmers mentions a Radolphl'S, styled 
Any liens, as witness to a charter of Kiny 
David, in 1 138, to the monks of Selkirk, at 
the period of the removal of their monastery 
to Kelso. Nisbet, Ragman's Roll, vol. ii. 
p. 11, makes mention of Radolphus de 
Crawforde, and remarks, " This is the 
same person with Reginald de Crawfurd, 
Viscomes de Air." If Radolphus and Regi- 
nald be, as Nisbet considers them, synony- 
mous, here then we have, in all probability, 
the identical son of the Earl of Richmond, 
whose establishment cannot be found in 
England, but which all the above demon- 
strate to have taken place in Scotland. 

In conclusion, we will draw the parallel 
of the present case with Chalmers's deduc- 
tion of the House of Stewart, and shew that 
the identity of the founder of the Crawfurds 
in Scotland rests upon much better proof 
than the limited grounds on which Chalmers 
built a theory held as incontrovertible with 
respect to the origin of that royal line. 

The proof of the origin of the Stewart 
family, as traced by Chalmers from the 
family of F'itzalan, rests upon the record of 
Walter, founder of the Abbey of Paisley, 
towards the end of the twelfth century, 
being styled in the charter of foundation 
filius Alani, coupled with the circumstance 
of his having peopled it by monks from a 
religious institution at Wenlock in Shrop- 
shire, where Alan, ancestor of the groat 



XVI 



ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS. 



fariiilv or Fitzalaii, afterwards tail of 
Arundale, then resided. This (though the 
proof of arms be wanting) was deemed com- 
plete wlien the Earl of Arundel (who a 
century or two afterwards accompanied Kin;i 
EdwuId to Scotland) sold for a thousand 
marks to his master his (so called) heredi- 
tary rio-ht to tlie stewardship of Scotland, 
thougli, as Chalmers shows, he could have 
had iio hereditary right thereto. 

In the present case there exists the ■proof 
of arms, and the most unquestionable testi- 
mony of their antiquity.* There is also, 
through Baldwin, an analogous connexion 
with the presumed root, similar to what was 
indicated by the source from whence Walter 
peopled his monastery ; rendering the points 
of comparison parallel, if not absolutely in 
favour of the present case. 

Considering the impossibility, in either 
instance, of further proof by charter, and 
considering the remote antiquity ot the point 
of connexion between those settlers and their 
more southern ancestors, much it must be 
allowed has in both cases beeu established ; 
sufficient it is presumed, when held conclu- 
sive in the one case, to confirm the other. 

VowE OF Hallaton.— The following is a 
more correct account of the later descents 
of the Vowe family than that inserted in 

vol. ii. p. 97. 

Leonard Vowe, who died in 1709, aged 
forty-five, married Martha Butler, and by 
her, who died in 1744, had issue, 

I. Thomas, in holy orders, of Hallaton, 
d. at Bath unmarried in 1738. 

II. Richard, of Leicester, who married 
a daughter of Mr. Smalley (whose 
son m. Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
Richard Halford), and had one son, 
John, of Uppingham, d. unmarried ; 
and three daughters, Martha, d. un- 
married ; Mary, m. first, to Mr. 
Spraggins, and secondly, to Mr. 
Mills, of Newark; and Lucy, the 
wife of the rector of Kebworth. 

III. William. 

IV. George, of Derby, who m. Miss 
Sutton, and was father of 

Thomas Vowe, esq. a cornet m the 
army, who m. Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of John Smalley, esq. of Lei- 
cester, by Elizabeth, daughter 
of Sir Richard Halford, bart. of 
Wistow, and left, with other 

issue, a son, 

Leonaud Vowe, who W.Anne, 

daughter of Thoroton Pock- 

liiigton, esq. and had, with 

a daughter, a son, 

Thomas Vowe, esq. now 

of Hallaton. 



* Contemporaneous with Stephen, third Earl 
of Richmond. 



COPPINGEK OF BaLLYVOLANE. 

P. 328. William Copfingeh, esq. of 
Ballyvolane and Barryscourt, who 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of John Gal- 
wey, esq. had issue, 

I. Stephen, who predeceased his 

father, unm. 
ji. William, father of the present 
William Cofpinger, esq. of 
Barryscourt. 

III. John, died unm. 

IV. Thomas, whom. Dorinda, dau. 
of Edmund Barry, esq. and had 
with other children, a son, Ed- 
mund, father of the present 
Thomas Coppinger, esq. of Rop- 
more. 

V. Richard, an officer in the Aus- 
trian service, d. s. p. 

VI. Joseph, who w.his cousin, Ali- 
cia, daughter of John Coppinger, 
esq. of Granacloyne, and has 
left a sou, Joseph-William Cop- 
pinger, esq. who m. Margaret, 
daughter of Henry O'Brien, esq. 
of Kilcor. 

VII. James, who wt. his cousin Ali- 
cia, daughter of William Cop- 
pinger, esq. of Cork, and had 
(witli four daughters, two of 
whom have taken the veil) six 
sons, viz. 

William, who m. first, Ellen, 
daughter of Richard Moy- 
lan, esq. of Cork, and had 
by her, who died in 1818, 
one son, James. He m. 
secondly, in Paris, Harriot, 
second daughter of the Rev. 
James Saunders, rector of 
Sawtry, in the county of 
Huntingdon, and has one 
son and a daughter, viz. 
William and Harriot Saun- 
ders. 
John, f who d. in the West 
James, i Indies. Stephen 
Stephen, L»(. Miss Usborn, 
of Trinidad, and has left 
issue. 
Tliomas, an officer in the royal 

navy. 
Richard, settled in Trinidad. 

Mil. A daughter, m. to Cornelius 
O'Brien, esq. of Kilcor. 

i\. Mary, 7n. to Dr. Callahan, of 
Cork. 

X. Elizabeth, a nun. 

XI. Teresa, m. to Pierce Power, 
esq. of Clonniel, and has a nu- 
merous family. 



HISTORY OF THE COMMONERS 



OF 



GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 



ABERCROMBY, 

Speaitcr of tfte l^ouse of Commons, 

ELECTED 19 FEBRUARY, 1835. 

ABERCROMBY, The Right Honourable JAMES, Speaker of the House of 
Commons, b. 7th November, 1776, m. 14th June, 1802, Mary-Anne, daughter of the 
late Egerton Leigh, esq. of West Hall, in High Legh, and has one son, 

Ralph, Secretary of Legation at Berlin, b. 6th April, 1803. 

Mr. Abercromby, who was formerly Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer 
in Scotland, and subsequently Master of the Mint, represents the city of Edinburgh 
in Parliament, and was elected Speaker of the House of Commons in 1835. 

Hintagt. 

Thomas Abercromby, of Abercromby, 
whose line continued till the reign of 
Charles I. anno 1649, when another Tho- 
mas Abercromby sold the barony to Sir 
James Sandilands, who,! upon his elevation 
to the peerage, in 1647, assumed the title 
of Baron Abercromby. A cadet of the 
Abercrombys of that Ilk, 

Humphrey de Abercromby, obtained, 
about the year 1316, a charter, from Robert 
Bruce, of the lands of Harthill and Ardun. 
He was father of 

Alexander de Abercromby, living in 
the time of David H. who acquired, from 
Patrick Hay, a half portion of the lands of 
Ardhuienyn. To him succeeded another 

Alexander de Abercromby, designed of 
Pitmithen, father of 

Alexander de Abercromby, of Pit- 
mithen, living in 1454. The next in suc- 
cession, 

James Abercromby, of Pitmithen, Ley, 
and Birkenbog, m. Margaret, daughter of 
B 




Thomas Abercromby, of that 'Ilk, temp. 
James II. of Scotland, who was one of the 
lords of session, or, as it was then called, of 
the committee of parliament, left, with a 
daughter, Margaret, m. to Maule, of Pan- 
mure, a son, 

3. 



ABERCROMBY 



Sir James Ogilvie, of Findlater, and is sup- 
posed to have fallen at Flodden. His son 
and heir, 

George Abercromby, of Pitmithen, left, 
by Christian, his wife, daughter of Barclay, 
of Gartlay, a son, 

James Abercromby, of Pitmithen, living 
in 1527, who ?n. Marjory Hay, said to be a 
daughter of William, Earl of Errol, and was 
succeeded by his son, 

Alexander Abercromby, of Birkenbog, 
living in 1550, who m. Elizabeth, daughter 
of Leslie, of Pitcaple, and was father of 

Alexander Abercromby, of Birkenbog, 
who wedded Margaret, daughter of William 
Leslie, of Balquhain, and had two sons, 
James, his heir, 

Alexander, of Fitterneir, whose son, 
Alexander, of Fitterneir, married 
Jean, daughter of John Seaton, of 
Newark, and had Francis, of Fitter- 
neir, created, by James Vlf. Lord 
Glassford for life ; and Patrick, 
M. D. author of the " Martial 
Achievements of the Scottish Na- 
tion." 
The elder son, 

James Abercromby, of Birkenbog, was 
father of 

Alexander Abercromby, of Birkenbog, 
falconer to Charles I. who m. Elizabeth, 
daughter of Bethune, of Balfour, and had, 
with a daughter, in. to Robert Grant, of Dal- 
vey, three sons, 

I. Alexander, his heir. 

II. John, of Glasshaugh. 

III. Walter, of Braconhills. 
The eldest son, 

Alexander Abercromby, of Birkenbog, 
who was created a baronet in 1636, m. 
first, Jane, daughter of Sir Thomas Urqu- 
hart, of Cromarty ; secondly, Jane Suther- 
land, of Kilwinity ; and thirdly, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir James Baird, of Auchmed- 
den. By the last lady he had two sons, viz. 

I. James, second baronet, of Birken- 
bog, great-grandfather of the present 
Sir Robert Abercromby, bart. of 
Birkenbog. 

II. Alexander, of whose line we have 
to treat. 

Sir Alexander was so zealous a partisan 
against King Charles L, that he is styled by 
an historian of the period " a main cove- 
nanter." In May, 1645, he joined Major 



Urry, and was at the battle of Auldearn ; 
but Montrose retaliated, by quartering him- 
self and some of his troops at Birkenbog. 
Sir Alexander was s. by his elder son. Sir 
James Abercromby, from whom the pre- 
sent baronet of Birkenbog ; while the se- 
cond son, 

Alexander Abercromby, settled at Tul- 
libody, in the county of Clacmannan, having 
inherited that estate from his cousin, George 
Abercromby, of Skeith. Alexander was s. 
by his son, 

George Abercromby, esq. of Tullibody, 
who wedded Mary, daughter of Ralph Dun- 
das, esq. of Manour, and had (with two 
younger ^sons, Barnet Abercromby, and Ge- 
neral Sir Robert Abercromby, K.B.) his 
successor. 

Sir Ralph Abercromby, of Tullibody, 
who so gloriously fell at the moment of vic- 
tory in the chief command of the British 
forces at the great and decisive battle of 
Alexandria, 28th March, 1801. This gallant 
officer /w. Mary-Anne, dau. of John Menzies, 
esq. of Fern ton, in the county of Perth, which 
lady, when an official account of the triumph 
and fate of her lamented husband reached 
England, was elevated to the peerage as 
Baroness Abercromby, with remainder to 
the male heirs of the deceased general. 
By Sir Ralph her ladyship had issue, 

George, present Lord Abercromby. 

(See Burke's Peerage.) 
John (Sir), G. C. B. a general officer, 

who died unmarried in 1817. 

James, Speaker of the House of 

Commons, and, ex-officio, the first 

Commoner in the United Kingdom. 

Alexander, C.B. a colonel in the army, 

born 4th March, 1784. 
Anne, married to Donald Cameron, esq. 

of Lochiel. 
Mary. 

Catherine, m. in 1811, to Thomas Bu- 
chanan, esq. 

Arms — Or, a fesse embattled gu. there- 
from issuant in chief a dexter arm embowed 
in armour ppr. garnished or, encircled by a 
wreath of laurel, the hand supporting the 
French invincible standard, in bend sinis- 
ter, also ppr. in base a chev. indented of 
the second, bet^veen three boars' heads 
erased az. 

Crest — A bee ppr. 

Motto — Vive ut vivas. 



GRANVILLE, OF CALWICH ABBEY. 



GRANVILLE, COURT, esq. of Calwich Abbey, in the county of Stafford, b. in 
1779, m. in 1803, Maria, dau<jhter of Edward Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clinton, in 
Warwickshire, and has issue, 

I. Bkrnard, h. in 1804, who m. first, Mathewana- 
Sarah, second daujijliter of Captain Onslow, of tlie 
Coldstream Guards, eldest son of Admiral Sir Richard 
Onslow, hart. K.C. U. and has, by her who d. in 
Auoust, 1«2J>, one dainihter, 

Joan-Frederica-Mathewana. 
Mr. Granville wedded, secondly, in 18.30, Anne- 
Catherine, daughter of Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, 
and has one son and a daughter, viz. 
Bevil, h. 20th January, 1834. 
Fanny. 

I -^ ^ 1 ... Granville- John, ft. in 1807. 

-^^^^ &1 £1 '"• Court, h. in 1808. 

' ^' ^' - Frederic, b. in 1810. 

Harriet- Joan. 

Mary. 

Lucy. 




II. 
III. 

IV. 

I. 
II. 
III. 



This gentleman, whose patronymic is D'Ewes, succeeded his father, Bernard D'Ewes, 
esq. of Wellesbourne, in December, 1822, and assumed in 1827, on inheriting- the 
estates of his uncle, the Rev. John Granville, of Calwich Abbey, the surname and 
arms of Granville. Mr. Granville is a magistrate and deputy lieutenant for the 
counties of Warwick and Stafford. 

Hmcagc. 



" It is a melancholy reflection," says Dr. 
Borlase, " to look back on so many great 
families who have formerly adorned the 
county of Cornwall, and in the male line 
are now no more; the Gkanvilles, the 
Carminows, the Champernownes, the Bo- 
drugans, Mohuns, Killegrews, Bevils, Tre- 
vanions, which had great sway and posses- 
sions in these parts. The most lasting fa- 
milies have only their seasons, more or less, 
of a certain constitutional strength. They 
have their spring, and summer sunshine 
glare, their wane, decline and death." The 
Granvilles claim descent from Rollo, the 
celebrated northern chieftain, who being 
driven from Norway by the king of Den- 
mark, made a descent upon England, but 
was repulsed by Alfred. He was subse- 
quently however more fortunate in a similar 
attempt upon Normandy. Invading that 
country in 870, he achieved its complete 
conquest in 912, and was invested with»the 
ducal dignity. He married Gilbette, daugh- 
ter of Charles the Simple, King of France, 
and had two sons. From the elder, Wil- 
liam, descended the Conqueror, and from 
Robert, the younger, created earl of Cor- 
beil, sprang two brothers, Robert Fitzha- 
mon, who reduced Glamorganshire, (be left 
an only daughter, Mabel, the wife of Robert 
de Courcil, natural son to Henry I.) and 



Richard, surnamed de Granville from 
one of his lordships, who came into England 
with Duke William, and fought at Hastings. 
This Richard, who, as heir male, inhe- 
rited the Norman honours and estates, was 
earl of Corbeil and baron of Thorigny and 
Granville. He likewise possessed the castle 
of Neath, in Glamorganshire. He jh. Con- 
stance, only daughter of Walter Giflard, 
earl of Buckinghamshire and Longueville, 
and at his decease, in journeying to the 
Holy Land, left a son and successor, 

Richard Granville, who held, temp. 
Henry II. the lordship of Bideford by half 
a knight's fee of the honour of Gloucester. 
He was direct and lineal ancestor of 

Sir Theobald Granville, who m. Joice, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Beaumont, knt. and 
had a son and successor, 

Theobald Granville, who wedded Mar- 
garet, daughter of Hugh Courtenay, earl of 
Devon, and had two sons, John and Wil- 
liam. The elder, 

Sir John Granville, received the ho- 
nour of knighthood from Richard II. He 
espoused Margaret, daughter and heiress of 
Sir John Burghurst, knt. but had no issue. 
Sir John, who resided at Stow, in Cornwall, 
and represented the county of Devon in 
parliament, died tctnp. Henry IV. and was 
s. by his brother, 



GRANVILLE, OF CALWICH ABBEY. 



WtLLTAM Granville, of Stow, who died 
about the year 1450, leaving by Philippa, 
his second wife, d;uiohter of William, Lord 
Bonville, a son and heir. 

Sir Thomas Granville, knt. of Stow, 
high sheriff of Cornwall 21st Edward IV. 
He m. Elizabeth, sister of Sir Theobald 
Gorges, and was s. at his decease, iu 1483, 
by his son. 

Sir Thomas Granville, of Stow, who 
took part in an insurrection against Richard 
in. but was pardoned. In the loth of the 
following reign, we find him an esquire of 
the body to the same monarch, and the next 
year he was made a knight of the Bath at 
the creation of Arthur, Prince of Wales. 
He died about 6th Henry VIII. and was 
interred at the east end of the south aisle of 
Bideford church, where his effigy in armour 
lies extended under an arch, with the figure 
of a dog by his side. By Isabel, his first 
wife, daughter of Sir Gates Gilbert, of 
Compton, in Devon, he had two sons and 
six daughters, viz. 

I. Roger, his heir. 

II. Richard, sheriff of Cornwall 1st and 
10th Henry VIII. 

I. Jane, m. first, to John Arundel, of 
Trerice ; and, secondly, to Sir John 
Charmond. 

II. Philippa, m. to Francis Harris, of 
Hayne. 

HI. Anne, m. to John Roscarrock. 

IV. Catherine, vi. to Sir John Arundel, 
of Lanherne. 

V. Mary, in. first, to Richard Bluet; 
and, secondly, to Thomas St. Anbyn. 

VI. Honor, m. first, to John Basset ; 
and, secondly, to Arthur Plantagenet. 

Sir Thomas wedded, secondly, Jane, widow 
of — Hill, and had by her one son, John, 
and a daughter, Jane, m. first, to — Batton ; 
and, secondly, to — Raleigh. His eldest 
son, 

Roger Granville, esq. of Stow, called 
the great housekeeper for his princely hos- 
pitality, was sheriff of Cornwall in the reign 
of Henry VIII. He m. Margaret, daugh- 
ter and co-heiress of Richard Whitley, of 
Efford, and had, with seven daughters, three 
sons, Richard, his heir; John; and Di- 
gory, of Penheale. He died in 1524, and 
was 4'. by the eldest. 

Sir Richard Granville, knt. of Stow, 
sheriff of Devon 24th Henry VIH. and 
subsequeiitly marshal of Calais. To tliis 
Sir Richard, wlio was of an active and daring 
spirit, and who served in the wars under the 
earl of Hertford, tlie king granted, in tlie 
33rd year of his reign, tlie manor of Buck- 
land and rectory of Moorwinstow, formerly 
belonging to tlie'monastery of Bridgewater. 
He TO. Matilda, second daughter and co-heir 
of John Bevil. esq. of Gwarnock, and had, 
with three ditughlers, two sons, viz. 



John, who died in his father's lifetime 

without issue. 

Roger (Sir), an esquire of the body to 

Henry VIII. He m. Thomasine, 

daughter of Thomas Cole, esq. of 

Slade, in Devon, and had three sons, 

Charles (Sir), who d. s. p. 

Richard (Sir), successor to his 

grandfather. 
John, who left no issue. 
Sir Richard d. in 1552, and was s. by his 
grandson, 

Sir Richard Granville, knt. of Stow, 
a gallant naval commander, who, at the age 
of sixteen, by permission of Queen Eliza- 
beth, served in the imperial army in Hun- 
gary, and attained high reputation for his 
achievements against the infidels. Return- 
ing soon after to his native country, he 
joined the troops employed for the reduc- 
tion of Ireland, and, there acquiring the 
confidence of the Lord Deputy Sydney, was 
appointed sheriff of the city of Cork. In 
1571, he represented the county of Corn- 
wall in Parliament, was subsequently high 
sheriff of that shire, and complimented with 
tlie honour of knighthood, but the bias of 
his mind, bent chiefly on the plans of fo- 
reign discovery, proposed by his relative 
Sir Walter Raleigh, preferred the enter- 
prize of a naval, to the quiet of a senatorial 
life. He accordingly, with a squadron fitted 
out for the purpose, sailed for the coast of 
Florida in 1585, where he left a colony of 
one hundred men, and then returned home. 
Many and successful were his subsequent 
voyages, and in the memorable year of the 
Spanish invasion he was entrusted with the 
care of Cornwall, which prevented, for a 
while, his distinction in a proper sphere of 
action. In 1591, however. Sir Richard was 
dispatched as vice admiral under Lord 
Thomas Howard, with eight men of war, 
besides small vessels and tenders, to inter- 
cept a rich Spanish fleet from the West In- 
dies. This convoy, protected by a very- 
superior force, unexpectedly appearing, 
Admiral Howard, considering the great dis- 
proportion of the rival squadrons, imme- 
diately put to sea, and the rest of his ships, 
in some confusion, followed his example, 
except the Revenge, the ship commanded 
by Granville, who having ninety men sick 
out of two hundred and fifty, and many 
otiiers on shore, could not weigh anchor for 
a considerable time, which prevented him 
from gaining the wind, and brought the 
hostile fleet on his weather bow. The 
Spanish admiral, with four other ships, be- 
gan a close attack at three in the afternoon : 
the engagement lasted till break of day 
next morning, during wliich the enemy, 
notwithstanding their vast superiority of 
force, were driven off fifteen times. At 
length the greater part of the English crew 



GRANVILLE, OF CALWICH ABBEY. 



being either killed or woiiiidt'd, and the 
ship reduced to ;i wreck, no hope oC escape 
remained. Far, however, from thinkini;- of 
a surrender. Sir Hichard exhorted his men 
rather to yield tliemselves to the mercy of 
heaven than to the Spaniards, and to blow 
the vessel up. But this desif^ii was frus- 
trated by tlie master, who went on board 
the Sjianish Admiral and made known their 
situation. As soon as tlu' Revenue was in 
the power of the Spaniards, the admiral 
gave orders to remove Sir Richard, wlio 
was grievously wounded, to his own ship, 
but the gallant officer survived only three 
days. John Evelyn, relating this heroic 
action, exclaims, " Than this what have we 
more .' What can be greater ? '' 

Admiral Granville m. Mary, daughter 
and co-heir of Sir John St. Leger,* of An- 
riery, in Devon, by Catherine, his wife, 
daughter of George, Lord Abergavenny, 
and had three sons and three daughters. 
The eldest son, 

Sir Bernaud Granville, of Bideford, in 
Devon, and of Stow, in Cornwall, was she- 
riff of the latter county in the 38th Eliza- 
beth, served in Parliament for Bodmin in 
the following year, and subsequently re- 
ceived the honour of knighthood. He 7)i. 
in 1603, Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of 
Philip Bevil, esq. and niece and heiress of 
Sir William Bevil, by whom he had issue, 

I. Bevil (Sir), his heir. 

II. Richard (Sir), a cavalier comman- 
der of great celebrity. This gallant 
soldier, who learned the rudiments 
of war under Prince Maurice in Ger- 
many, attended King Charles in his 
expedition to Scotland, and was sub- 
sequently employed in Ireland to 
quell the rebellion there, having 
under his orders his near kinsman, 
the famous George Monk. On the 
commencement of the civil war, he 
proceeded to London in order to ol)- 
tain some arrears due to him by the 
Parliament, and having effected this, 
he contrived, by amusing the Com- 
mons with the hope that he would 
accept the command of the horse 
under Sir William Waller, to join 
the king at Oxford with his whole 
regiment, and he thenceforward ad- 
vanced the royal cause, in an especial 
degree, by his consummate skill and 
chivalrous bravery. From Oxford, 

* Sir John St. Leger was son and heir of Sir 
Richard St. Leger, whose father was Sir James 
St. Leger, and whose mother was Anne, eldest 
daughter and co-heir of Thomas Butler, earl of 
Ormond, by Eleanor, his wife, daughter of Hum- 
phrey de Bohun, earl of Hereford, by the Lady 
Elizabeth Plantagenet, his wife, daughter of King 
Edward 1. 



Sir Richard marched on Saltash, 
which, with only seven hundred 
men, he stormed and captured, hut 
some differences having unfortu- 
nately arisen between him and Cla- 
rendon, he was removed from his 
command. Retiring to Jersey, he 
equipi)e<l some privateers, and greatly 
harassed the Hepublicans i)y sea. 
He eventually fixed his residence in 
France, and dying at Client, was in- 
terred in the English church, where 
this simple inscription marks the sa- 
cred s|)Ot: " Sir Richard Granville, 
the king's general in tlu' West." Sir 
Richard married Mary, daughter of 
Sir John Fitz, of Fitzford, by Ger- 
trude Courtenay, his wife, and liad 
one son, who was put to death by tlie 
Parliament, and one daughter, Eli- 
zabeth, 1)1. to Col. William Lenard. 
in. John, of Lincoln's Lin. 
IV. Roger, drowned in the king's ser- 
vice. 
!. Gertrude, 7n. to Christojiher Harris, 
esq. son and heir of Sir Christopher 
Harris. 
Sir Bernard Granville was s. at his decease 
by his eldest son, the celebrated 

Sir Bevil Granville, knt. of Stow and 
Bideford, one of the boldest and most suc- 
cessful of the cavalier leaders. This emi- 
nent person was educated at Exeter Col- 
lege, Oxford, and made so rapid a progress 
in learning, that the degree of bachelor of 
arts was conferred on him in 1613, when he 
was but seventeen years of age. In the 
two last Parliaments of James I. he repre- 
sented the county of Cornwall, and in all 
the Parliaments called by Chakle.s I. sate 
either for that shire or for Launceston. In 
1638, he raised, at his own expense, a troop 
of horse, with which he accompanied the 
king in his first expedition against the Scot- 
tish rebels, and on that occasion received 
the honour of knighthood. In 1642, on the 
first outbreaking of the civil wars, he joined 
the royal standard, and marching into Corn- 
wall, rescued that whole county from the 
Parliament, attacked the partisans of the 
Commons, who had risen in great numbers 
in the West, and routed them at Bodmin, 
Launceston, and Stratton. His last and 
most brilliant action was at Lansdowne Hill, 
near Bath, where he lell, in the arms of 
victory, on the 5th July, 16-13.* " On the 
king's part," says Clarendon, in detailing 
this engagement", " there were more officers 
and gentlemen of quality slain than com- 
mon men, and more hurt than slain. That 
which would have clouded any victory, and 



• A monument repaired in 1827 by the pre- 
sent Court Granville, esq. still remains at Lans- 
down to the memory of Sir Bevil. 



6 



granvillt:, of calwich abbey. 



made the loss of others less spoken of, was 
the death of Sir Bevil Granville : he was 
indeed an excellent person, whose activity, 
interest, and reputation, was the foundation 
of what had been done in Cornwall ; and 
his temper and affection so public, that no 
accident which happened could make any 
impression on him, and his example kept 
others from taking anything ill, or at least 
seeming to do so. In a word, a brighter 
courage and a gentler disposition were never 
mixed together to make the most cheerful 
and innocent conversation." 

Sir Bevil married Grace, daughter of Sir 
George Smith, knt. of Exeter, sole heiress 
to her mother, the daughter and co-heiress 
of William Vyol, esq. of Trevorder, in 
Cornwall, and had issue, 

I. Richard, b. in 1620, d. unm. 

II. John, who was created, in 1661, 
Viscount Granville, of Lansdowne, 
and Earl of Bath. His lordsliip m. 
Jane, daughter of Sir Peter Wyche, 
knt. and dying in 1701, left issue, 

1. Charles, second earl of Bath, 
whose son and successor, Wil- 
liam-Henry, third earl of Bath, 
d. unm. in 1711. 

2. John, created, in 1702, Baron 
Granville, who died without 
issue in 1707. 

3. Bevil, died unmarried. 

1. Jane. 7n. to Sir William Gower, 
ancestor of the present duke of 
Sutherland. 

2. Catherine, m. to Craveh Pay- 
ton, esq. of Lancashire. 

3. Grace, ?n. to Sir George Car- 
teret, Lord Carteret, and had 
issue. Lady Carteret, surviving 
her husband, was herself ele- 
vated to the peerage as Coun- 
tess Granville. Her ladyship's 
granddaughter, the Lady Louisa 
Carteret, married Thomas 
Thynne, Viscount Weymouth, 
and was grandmother of Thomas, 
present marquis of Bath, and of 
George, Lord Carteret : for a 
more detailed account of the 
ennobled branches of the Gran- 
ville family, refer to Burke's 
Extinct and Dormant Peerage. 

III. Dennis, living in 1686, dean of 
Durham, rector of Easington and El- 
wycke, and chaplain in ordinary to 
Charles IL He m. Anne, fourth 
daughter of John Cosyn, lord bisiiop 
of Durham. 

IV. Bernard, of whom presently. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to Sir Peter Prideaux, 
bart. of Netherton. 

II. Bridget, w. to Sir Thomas Higgins, 
knt. 



III. Johanna, m. to Colonel Richard 
Thornhill. 

IV. Grace, m. to Robert Fortescue, 
esq. of Filley, whose daughter and 
co-heiress wedded Sir Halsewell 
Tynte, bart. 

Sir Bevil's fourth son, 

Bernard Granville, esq. was master of 
the horse and gentleman of the bedchamber 
to Charles IL He wedded Anne, only 
daughter and heir of Cuthbert Morley, esq. 
of Haunby, in the county of York, and had 
issue, 

I. Bevil (Sir), governor of Barbadoes, 
d. unm. in 1716. 

II. George, of Stow, in the county of 
Cornwall, who was elevated to the 
peerage in 1711, as Baron Lans- 
downe, of Biddeford. His lordship, 
a poet of considerable reputation, 
married the Lady Mary Villiers, 
daughter of Edward, earl of Jersey, 
and widow of Thomas Thynne, esq, 
of Old Windsor, in the county of 
Bucks. By her he had four daugh- 
ters, his co-heirs, viz, 

Anne, d. unmarried, 

Mary, m. to William Graham, 
esq. of Flatten, in Ireland, 

Grace, m. to Thomas Foley, esq. 
of Whitley, in the county of 
Hereford, created, in 1776, Ba- 
ron Foley, of Kidderminster, 
Of this marriage Thomas, pre- 
sent Lord Foley is grandson, 

Elizabeth, d. unm. 

III. Bernard, of whom presently. 

I. Anne, m. to Sir John Stanley, bart. 
of Grange Gorman, in Ireland, but 
d. s. p. 

II. Elizabeth, d. unm. 

Bernard Granville d. in 1701, and was 
buried at Lambeth. His third son. 

Colonel Bernard Granville, of Buck- 
land, in the county of Gloucester, m. Mary, 
daughter of Sir Martin Westcomb, bart. 
consul at Cadiz, and by her (who d. in 1747, 
and was buried in Gloucester cathedral) 
had two sons and two daughters, viz. 

I. Bernard, his heir. 

II. Bevil, of Weedon, in Bucks, who 
7H. Mary-Anne, daughter of Richard 
Rose, esq. but d. without issue, 

I. Mary, TO. first, to Alexander Pendar- 
ves,esq.ofRoscrow, in Cornwall, and, 
secondly, to the Very Rev. Patrick 
Delany, dean of Down, but d. without 
issue in 1788. This lady, so justly 
celebrated for her great literary ac- 
quirements, was much esteemed by 
King George HI. and Qwec?! Char- 
lotte, and resided constantly with 
their Majesties both at Kew and 
Windsor. Her most curious per- 



GRANVILLE, OF C^ALWICH ABBEY. 



formaiice was the Hortus Siccus, 
(now in the possession of her niece, 
Mrs. \\ addin^ton), n work in ten 
volumes, folio, comprising tlie most 
admirable delineations in coloured 
paper of the dill'erent flowers. 

Mrs. Delany was tiie intimate friend 
of Doctor Burney, the Ducliess of 
Portland, MissSeward, Swift, Horace 
AValpole, &c. 
II. Annk, h. in 1707, 7H. at Gloucester 
in 1740, John D'Ewes, esq. of Wel- 
lesbourne, in the county of Warwick, 
and died in 17(51, leavino- issue, 

1. Court D'Ewes, died unm. 

2. Bernard D'Ewes, of Hagley, 
in Worcestershire, b. in 1743, 
married, in 1777, Ann, eldest 
daughter of John Delabere, esq. 
of Cheltenham, and by her, who 
d. in 1780, had one son and one 
daughter, viz. 

Court, successor to his uncle, 
the Rev. John Granville, 

and PRESENT POSSESSOR of 

Calwich Abbey. 
Anne, jh. in January, 1805, 
to George-Frederick Strat- 
ton, esq. of Tew Park, in 
Oxfordshire, deceased. 
3. John D'Ewes, successor to his 
uncle, Bernard Granville, esq. 
of Calwich Abbey. 

1. Mary D'Ewes, m. to John Port, 
esq. of Ham, in Staffordshire. 
Colonel Granville, of Buckland, d. in 1733, 
and was *. by his son, 

Bernard Granville, esq. who purchased 
from the ancient family of Fleetwood the 
estate of Calwich Abbey, in the county of 
Staflbrd, originally a cell of friars of the 
order of St. Benedict. Mr. Granville died 
unmarried in 1775, and bequeathed his 
estates to his sister Anne's third son, 

The Rev. John D'Ewes, M.A. vicar of 
Ham, in the county of Stafford, and of Nor- 
bury, in Derbyshire, b. in 1744, who as- 
sumed in 1786, upon inheriting Calwich 
Abbey, the surname and arms of Gran- 
ville. He wedded, in 1779, Harriott-Joan, 
second daughter of John Delabere, esq. of 
Cheltenham, and had one son, John, and a 
daughter, Harriet, who both d. unmarried. 
Mr. Granville died in 1826, and was 
succeeded by his nephew, Court D'Ewes, 
esq. who assumed the surname of Gran- 
ville, and is the present Court Granville, 
esq. of Calwich Abbey. 



;lFai«tl5 of ©'(PtDefi. 

The D'Ewes es of Wellesbourne, who be- 
came settled in the counties of W.irwick, 
Gloucester, and Worcester, about the com- 
mencement of the seventeenth century, are 



said to be a branch of the family of D'Ewes, 
originally seated in Sufl'olk, and of which 
Sir"simonds D'Ewes was so distinguished 
a mcnilier. 

W illiam D'Ewes, of Coughton, living 
in 1627, married and had two sons, Richard, 
his heir, and William, of Long Marston, 
in Gloucestershire, who d. 21st November, 
1717. The elder son, 

Richard D'Ewes, esq. of Coughton, es- 
poused Mary, daughter and co-heir of Ed- 
mund Court, esq. of Maplebury, in the 
county of Warwick, and by her, who died 
20th November, 1683, left at his decease in 
1678, (with two daughters, the elder, Eliza- 
beth, who died unmarried 12th July, 1681, 
and the younger m. to — Fortescue, esq.), 
a son and successor. 

Court D'Ewes, esq. of Maplebury, high 
sheriff of the county of Warwick, in 1714, 
who m. Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Dow- 
ley, esq. of Bradley, in Worcestershire, 
and by her, who died in 1743, had two sons 
and one daughter, viz. 

Court, of Maplebury, b. in 1693, and 

died, unm. in July, 1745. 
John, of Wellesbourne, in the county 
of Warwick, who vi. as already 
stated, Anne, second dau. of Bernard 
Granville, esq. of Buckland, and 
was grandfather of the present 
Court Granville, esq. of Cal- 
wich Abbey. 
Mary, ?n. to John Holyoake, esq. of 
Morton Bagot, in the county of War- 
wick. (See vol. ii. p. 598.) 
^,.^j_Quarterly, first and fourth, gu. 
three sufflues or organ rests or, for Gran- 
ville ; second and third, or, three quater- 
foils pierced gu. a chief vair. 

Cygst—On a cap of maintenance a griffin, 
or. 

3Iotto — Deo Patriae Amicis. 
Estates— Calwich Abbey, situated on the 
banks of the river Dove, in the county of 
Stafi'ord, and Wellesbourne Hall, in War- 
wickshire. 

^fa/5— Calwich Abbey, Staffordshire, and 
Wellesbourne Hall, Warwickshire. These 
two seats contain many specimens of the 
first painters; a splendid landscape by Rem- 
brandt, two by Murillo, by Winants, Wover- 
mans, Teniefs, &c. The lamily portraits 
are in direct succession, from Sir Richard 
and Bevil Granville, in 1640, to the present 
time, comprising paintings of Sir Bevil and 
Lady Granville, their son, the Earl of Bath, 
Lord Lansdown. liernard Granville, Col. 
Bernard Granville, and his wife. Lady 
Stanley, by Houseman, Mrs. Delany, by 
Opie, Bernard D'Ewes, Court D'Ewes, by 
Opie, John Granville and Harriet his wife, 
by Barber, and Mrs. Stratton, by Sir Tho- 
mas Lawrence, Sec. Sec. 







GRAY, OF CARNTYNE, 

jFormcrIg of HBalmatnocft. 

GRAY, The Rev. JOHN HAMILTON, of Carntyne, in the county of Lanark, 

b. 29th December, 1800, m. at Alva House, 23rd June, 
1829, Elizabeth-Caroline, eldest daughter of James 
Raymond Johnstone, esq. of Alva, in Clackmannanshire, 
(grandson of Sir James Johnstone, hart, of Westerhall, 
a family which, on the extinction of the male line of 
the Marquesses of Annandale, became chief of the ancient 
house of Johnstone,) by Mary his wife, sister of Sir 
Montague Cholmeley, hart, of Easton, in the county of 
Lincoln, an ancient branch of the great Cheshire family 
of Cholmondeley. The issue of this marriage is a dau. 
born at the baths of Baden-Baden, in Germany, on the 
26th June, 1833, and christened there, according to the 
rites of the Anglican church, on the 14th September, 
in the same year, by the names of Caroline-Maria- 
Agnes, to which has since been added the name of 

ROBINA. 

Mr. Hamilton Gray is a magistrate, and, since August, 1824, a deputy lieutenant 
of the county of Lanark. He was educated at the universities of Gottingen and 
Oxford, and in the latter he was of Magdalen College, where, in 1823, he took 
his bachelor's, and, in 1826, his master of arts degree. In 1824, he was called to 
the Scottish bar; in 1829, he entered into holy orders; and, in 1833, was presented 
to the livings of Bolsover and Scarcliil, in the county of Derby, He succeeded his 
father 12th November, 1833. 




Uinrage. 



This branch of the family of Gray has 
possessed estates in the county of Lanark 
for about thi*ee hundred years. Its ancestor, 
who held the lands of Tollcross towards the 
middle of tlie sixteenth century, had two 
sons, John, his heir, and James, who was 
bred to the law, and is said to have dis- 
tressed his brother with litigation, which 
necessitated a sale of the lands of Tollcross. 
The elder son, 

John Gray, of Tollcross, in Lanark- 
shire, lived about the close of the sixteenth 
century, and alienated the properly of Toll- 
cross. The name of his wife is unknown. 
He was father of 

William Gray, proprietor of the lands of 
Carntyne, in the county of Lanark, ante- 
cedently to the year 1595, who m. first, 
Margaret Craig, by whom he had a son, 
Archibald, his heir. He wedded, secondly, 
Marion, dau. of Ninian Hill, of Lambhill, in 
Lanarkshire, and had another son, John, 
successor to his brother. The Hills were 
in possession of extensive estates more than 
two centuries ago, part of which were ac- 



quired by marriage with a daughter of the 
family of Hutchinson.* Several most re- 
spectable male descendants of the Hills, of 
Lambhill, still exist, though what remains of 
the property has passed, in the female line, 
to Miss Lilias Graham, the present proprie- 
trix. William Gray was s. by his eldest son, 

Archibald Gray, of Carntyne, who es- 
poused Elizabeth Colquhoun, daughter of 
Colquhoun of Kenmure, a cadet of Col- 
qulioun of Luss, chief of the name, but 
having no issue, he resigned, in 1628, the 
lands of Carntyne to his brother, 

John Gray, who then became of Carn- 
tyne. Exactly half a century after, in 1678, 
he acquired part of the lands of Dalmar- 
nock, another portion continuing in tlie 
possession of the family of Woddrop, and 
thenceforward, for more than a hundred 
years, Dalmarnock became the principal 
designation of his descendants. Mr. Gray 

* Two members of this (tlie Hutchinson) family 
founded a magnificent charity at Glasgow, which 
still retains their name. 



(illAY, OF CARNTYNE. 



hefran to work co;il on Carntyiie, which 
has supplied a portion of the fuel c(jn- 
sumed in the city of Glasgow. He was 
a zealous covenanter, and his name is 
held in honour among the favourers of 
those principles, for having allbrdcd the 
shelter of liis roof to their ministers, and an 
occasional place of concealment to their 
proscribed members. He »«. Janet, daugh- 
ter of Anderson, of Dovehill, an ancient 
and opulent family in the neighbourhood of 
Glasgow, several successive generations of 
whicli filled the office of lord provost of the 
city, from 1654 until 1703. It appears now 
to be extinct in the direct male line, but 
among its descendants may be mentioned 
the lamented Sir Jolin Moore. John Gray 
was succeeded, in 1687, by his son, 

John Gray, of Dalmarnock and Carn- 
tyne, who wedded Anabella, daughter of 
Walter Gibson,* of Hillhead, in the county 
of Lanark, and had issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Ninian, who left a son, John, for 
many years minister of the parish of 
Camnethan. 

Ml. Andrew, who had issue, 

1. Margaret, tn. to James Wod- 
drop, a descendant of the Dal- 
marnock family. 

2. Anabella, m. to Peter Lowe, 
writer to the signet, in Edin- 
burgh, grandson of Dr. Peter 
Lowe, physician in ordinary to 
Henry IV., King of France, 
and to Henry, Prince of Wales. 

3. Elizabeth, in. to Robert Finlay, 
merchant, in Glasgow. 

John Gray died previous to the year 1715, 
and was s. by his son, 

John Gray, of Dalmarnock and Carn- 
tyne. The mind of this gentleman being 
strongly tinctured with sentiments of loyalty 
to the exiled royal family, he openly avowed 
himself a partisan of the Chevalier de St. 
George, and prepared to join the insurgents 
in 1715: — the arms which he procured on 
that occasion are still preserved in the 
family. He was saved, however, from open 
rebellion and its probable consequence, 
forfeiture, by the prudence of his wife, who 
gave information against him, on account 
of which he was imprisoned until the re- 
storation of peace. He m. Elizabeth, dau. 

* The family of Gibson, which formerly en- 
joyed great wealth and influence, still exists in 
the male line. Walter, one of the younger sons 
of the family, and brother to Anabella Gray, was 
the most eminent merchant of his time in Scot- 
land, and greatly contributed to improve the 
commerce of Glasgow, of which city he was lord 
provost in 1688. Another younger son was cap- 
tain of the " Rising Sun," which he commanded 
in the Darien expedition. 



of James Hamilton, of Newton, a scion of 
the family of Silverton Hill, by Elizabetli, 
his first wife, daughter of Gabriel Hamil- 
ton, of Westburn, cadet of Torrance, and 
had issue, 

I. James, his heir. 

II. John, *. to his father. 

III. Gabriel, of Eastfield, who m. Miss 
Baird, of Muckroft, and had a son, 
John Gray, esq. now of Eastfield. 

IV. Andrew, who m. Miss Cameron, 
daughter of a cousin of the Locheil 
family, and had John Gabriel, who 
d. s. p. Janet, and Elizabeth. 

I. Elizabeth, jn. John Spens, of Stone- 
law, in the county of Lanark, des- 
cended from Spens, of Kames, in 
Bute, a scion of Spens, of Wormis- 
ton, in Fifeshire, and had two sons. 
Lieutenant-general John Spens, of 
Stonelaw, and Capt. George Spens, 
and two daughters. 

II. Anabella, m. Henry Woddrop, of 
Westhorn, in Lanark, and had a 
daughter, m. to Capt. James Dennis- 
toun, of Westhorn. 

III. Rebecca, m. William Ross, son of 
Professor Ross, of the University of 
Glasgow, descended from the en- 
nobled house of Ross, but had no 
issue. 

IV. Jane, m. Thomas Buchanan, of 
Ardoch, in the county of Dumbarton, 
and had issue, (see vol. ii. p. .337). 

John Gray died 27th January, 1742, and 
was *. by his eldest son, 

James Gray, of Dalmarnock and Carn- 
tyne, who m. first, Elizabeth, daughter of 
his cousin-german, Elizabeth Hamilton, co- 
heiress of Newton, by William Gray, bro- 
ther to Gray of Welhouse, and secondly, 
Jane, daughter of John Corbett, of Tofl- 
cross, sister of Colonel James-Corbett- 
Porterfield, of Porterfield, and grand-niece 
to William, first Earl of Kilmarnock. Dy- 
ing, without issue, in 1778, Mr. Gray was 
s. by his next brother, 

John Gray, of Dalmarnock and Carn- 
tyne, born in 1715. This gentleman on his 
accession found the estates heavily encum- 
bered, and had only possessed them four 
years when he was induced most unfor- 
tunately to expose them for sale, in 1784. 
At that period, the value of land being much 
reduced, they brought a most inadequate 
price, and thus the properties of Dalmar- 
nock and Newlands, of yearly increasing 
value, were lost to the family. Whatever 
part of his once ample inheritance remained 
was owing to the judicious management of 
Mr. Gray's younger son, and ultimate suc- 
cessor, John Gray, who w. Isabella, dau. of 
John Chapman, esq. commissary of Glasgow, 
by Elizabeth his wife, dau. of Pollock, of 



10 



GRAY, OF CARNTYNE. 



Balgray,* an immediate cadet of Pollock, 
of Pollock, by a marriage with Marion, 
daughter of William Stewart, of Castle- 
mick. The Chapmans, originally of En- 
glish extraction, came, it is said, in the suite 
of a Duke of Lennox, to Scotland, where, 
though they never possessed landed pro- 
perty, they held respectable situations in 
the law. They are now exinct in the male 
line. Besides their intermarriages with the 
ancient families of Pollock and Trochrig, 
they were descended from the Woddrops of 
Dalmarnock. By Isabella his wife, Mr. 
Gray had issue, 

I. John, died young. 

II. James, b. in 1754, and d. unmarried 
in 1791. 

HI. Robert, heir to his father. 

I. Helen, m. William Woddrop, esq. 
of Dalmarnock, (sou of Henry Wod- 
drop, of Dalmarnock, and Lilias his 
wife, daughter of James Hamilton, 
of Aitkenhead) and has issue, 

1. Henry Woddrop, d. unm. 

2. John Woddrop, now of Dal- 
marnock and Gai-vald, in the 
county of Peebles, who, on suc- 
ceeding to the estate of Els- 
rickle, has assumed the additional 
surname of Allan. He m. 
Miss Hunter, of Kirkland, in 
Ayrshire, (see vol. ii. p. 602) and 
has issue. 

3. Isabella Waddrop. 

II. Margaret, d. young. 

III. Elizabeth, d. unmarried, in 1797. 
John Gray d. in 1796, and was s. in what 
remained of his property by his only sur- 
viving son, 

Robert Gray, of Carntyne, h. in 1756, 
who became, in 1823, representative of the 
ancient family of Hamilton, of Newton, on 



* By Margaret Boyd liis wife, daughter of 
James Boyd, of Trochrig, in the county of Ayr, 
descended from Adam Boyd, of Pinkhill, brother 
of Robert, third Lord Boyd. The most noted of 
the Trochrig family was Jame£ Boyd, Archbishop 
of Glasgow, who died in 1581. " During the 
Earl of iVIarr's regency," says Keith in his Ac- 
count of Scottish Bishops, " a new kind of epis- 
copacy having been set up, Mr. James Boyd, of 
Trochrig, a very wortliy person, received the title 
of the see of Glasgow, and he exercised the office 
of particular pastor at the cathedral church, the 
barony of Glasgow being then the parish that 
pertained to that cliurch. When the legahty of 
the episcopal function came to be first called in 
question by the assembly, in the year 1678, he 
learnedly and solidly, both from scripture and an- 
ticjuity, defended the lawfulness of his office ; 
yet, the animosities which he then perceived to 
be in the hearts of a great manv so far impaired 
his health, that he died in the month of June, 
1581. 



the decease of its last heiress, Mrs. Mont- 
gomery. He m. in 1799, Mary-Anne, 
youngest daughter of Gabriel Hamilton, of 
Westburn, (representative of Hamilton of 
Torrance*) by Agnes his wife, daughter, 
and at length heiress, of George Dundas, 
esq. of Duddingstouu, in West Lothian, 
(sprung from Dundas, of Dundas) by Mag- 
dalen Lyndsay-Crawford, granddaughter of 
John, sixteenth Earl of Crawfurd, and first 
Earl of Lindsay, niece to James and Wil- 
liam, first and second Dukes of Hamilton, 
and sister to John, Viscount Garnock. 
Mr. Gray had, by Mary-Anne his wife, 
one son, John, his heir. Mrs. Gray died 
6th January, 1809, her husband surviving 
until tlie i2th November, 1833, when he 
died suddenly, in the seventy- eighth 
year of his age. His whole life was spent 
in useful exertion, and in acts of disin- 
terested benevolence. He was cool in 
his judgment, unwearied in his kindness, 
and viewed with unmoved serenity the 
events of a life which various causes had 
saddened. Though laboriously occupied in 
the attempt to turn to good account the 
wreck of his family estates, he never re- 
fused his time and his exertions to the often 
ungrateful task of aiding his relations and 
friends ; and when full of years, and of 
respect, he was removed from this world, 
the unanimous voice of the poor pronounced 
upon him the eulogium, — " We have now 
lost our common good !" He was an active 
magistrate, and, for nearly forty years, a 
deputy lieutenant of the county of Lanark. 
His only son and successor is the present 
Rev. John Hamilton Gray, of Carntyne. 

jfamtlB of |[^amiIton, of KTctoton, 
Now represented by Gray, of Carntyne. 

The family of Silverton Hill, (whence 
Hamilton of Newton), is a scion of the il- 
lustrious house of Hamilton. 

Sir Walter de Hamilton, Lord of Cad- 
zow, in Lanark, in 1324, married Mary, 
daughter of Adam, Lord Gordon, and had 
two sons, David (Sir) and John (Sir), an- 
cestors of the Hamiltons of Innerwick, and 
Earls of Haddingtons. The elder 

Sir David de Hamilton, Lord of Cad- 
zow, m. a daughter of William, Earl of 
Ross, and had (with a younger son, Walter 
(Sir), ancestor of the Hamiltons of Cambes- 
keith and Grange) his successor, 

* The Hamiltons, of I'orrance, descended from 
Thomas, second son of Thomas Hamilton, of 
Darngaber, by Helen his wife, daughter of Sir 
Henry Douglas, of Lochleven, ancestor to the 
Earl of Morton, which Thomas, of Darngaber, 
was third son of Sir John Hamilton, Lord of 
Cadzon, by Janet his wife, daughter of Sir James 
Douglas, of Dalkeith. 



GRAY, OF CARNTYNE. 



II 



Sir David de Hamilton, Lord of Cad- 
Kow, who died before 1392, leaviiinj by 
Janetta liis wife, daughter of Sir William 
Keith, of (lalston, live sons, viz. 

John (Sir), his heir. 

David, wlience tlie Haniiltons of Bou- 

land. 
William, ancestor of the Haniiltons of 

lirathgate. 
Andrew, ancestor of the Hamiltons of 

Uldston. 
John, ancestor of the Hamiltons of 
Bardowie. 
The eldest son, 

Sir John Hamilton, Lord of Cadzow, 
wedded Janet, daughter of Sir James Dou- 
glas, of Dalkeith, and had issue, 

I. James (Sir), his heir. 

II. David, progenitor of the Hamiltons 
of Dalserf 

III. Thomas, of Darngalier, from whom 
sprung the Hamiltons of Raplock, 
Barnes, Torrance, Westburn, Ait- 
kenhead, the Earls of Clanbrassil, 
&c. &c. 

The elder son. 

Sir James Hamilton, Lord of Cadzow, 
wedded Janet, eldest daughter of Sir Alex- 
ander Livingston, of Callander, ancestor of 
the Earls of Linlithgow. Their eldest son, 
Sir James Hamilton, was created a peer, 
by the title of Lord Hamilton, and married, 
in 1474, Princess Mary, eldest daughter of 
James, second King of Scotland. Their 
second son. 

Sir Alexander Hamilton, of Silverton 
Hill, became ancestor of the Hamiltons of 
Silverton Hill, Cubardy, Newton, and 
Westport. The Hamiltons of Newton were 
seated on a picturesque estate at the con- 
fluence of the Clyde and Calder, in Lanark 
shire, which now belongs, in consequence 
of the will of the last heiress of the family, 
to Sir James Montgomery, of Stobo Castle. 
In 1694, the mansion house of Newton, to- 
gether with the title deeds of the property 
and family papers, was destroyed by fire, 
which accident renders it difficult to trace 
the earlier generations of this branch of the 
house of Hamilton. 

James Hamilton, of Newton, appears to 
have held his estate under his chief; for, 
immediately after the fire just alluded to, 
he obtained a charter of Novodamus of his 
lands from Anne, Duchess of Hamilton, the 
then head of the family. He ni. first, Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of Gabriel Hamilton,* of 
Westburn, by Margaret his wife, daughter 



• This gentleman was representative of Hamil- 
ton of Torrance, descended from Thomas Hamil- 
ton, third son of Sir John Hamilton, Lord of 
Cadzow, and uncle to Alexander, of Silverton 
Hill, progenitor of the family of Newton. 



of Cunninghame, of Gilbertfield, and had 
by her a daughter, 

Elizabeth, who was educated at West- 
burn, by her maternal uncle. She 
m. John Gray, of Dalmarnock and 
Carntyne, and was grandmother of 
Robert Gray, eventual representa- 
tive of Hamilton, of Newton. 
James Hamilton espoused secondly, Mar- 
garet, daughter of Robert Montgomery, of 
Macbiehill, in the county of Peebles, (des- 
cended from Robert, second son of Sir John 
Montgomery, of Eglinton and Ardrossan, 
created Lord Montgomery, in 1427,) by 
Jean his wife, daughter of Sir James Lock- 
hart, of Lee, in the county of Lanark, and 
had two sons, viz. James and Thomas. The 
elder, 

James Hamilton, of Newton, dying un- 
married, the estates and representation of 
the family devolved on his brother, 

Thomas Hamilton, of Newton, who m. 
the sister of Major Clelland, representative 
of the ancient family of Clelland of Clel- 
land, in Lanarkshire, and by her, who died 
in 1733, had issue, 

I. James, his heir. 

II. John, successor to his nephew. 

I. Dorothea, tn. to Andrew Gray, of 
W^ellhouse. 

II. Elizabeth, m. William Gray, bro- 
ther of Andrew Gray, of Wellhouse, 
and had issue, 

Elizabeth Gray, married to her 
mother's cousin-germau, James 
Gray, of Dalmarnock and Carn- 
tyne, and d. s. p. 
Janet Gray, m. to Col. Mont- 
gomery. Of this lady more 
hereafter, as heiress of New- 
ton. 
Thomas Hamilton was s. by his elder son, 
James Hamilton, of Newton, who m. 
first, Anabella, third daughter of Sir Robert 
Pollock, bart. of Pollock, in the county of 
Renfrew, by Anabella his wife, daughter 
of Walter Stewart, of Pardoran, and had 
by her an only son, 
James, his heir. 
He wedded secondly, a daughter of Bu- 
chanan of Drummakill and Ross, in the 
county of Dumbarton, and had another 
son, 

Thomas, who predeceased his elder 
brother. 
Mr. Hamilton died in 1769, and was s. by 
his son, 

James Hamilton, of Newton, at whose 
demise, unmarried, the estates and re{)re- 
sentation of the family devolved on his 
uncle, 

John Hamilton, of Newton, who died 
unmarried, in 1776, and was s. by his 
sisters. 



12 



HALE, OF KING'S WALDEN, 



Dorothea Hamilton ) co-heiresses of 
and [ Newton. The 

Elizabeth Hamilton,) elder married 

Andrew Gray, of Wellhouse ; the younger, 

William Gray, and had an only daughter to 

survive her, namely, 

Janet Hamilton, of Newton, who wedded 

Col. Richard Montgomery, cousin-german 

of Sir William Montgomery, bart. of Mac- 

bie Hill, and of Sir James Montgomery, 

bart. lord chief baron of Scotland. By him 

she had issue, 

James-George Hamilton, an officer of 
dragoons, d. unmarried, v. m. 

Elizabeth, d. unmarried, v. in. * 
Mrs. Montgomery survived her children 
many years, and died in 1823. By a deed 
of entail, she devised her estate of Newton 
to her deceased husband's cousin, Sir James 
Montgomery, bart. of Stobo Castle, in the 
county of Peebles. The representation, 
liowever, of the Hamiltons, of Newton, 
vested in Robert Gray, of Carntyne, in 
right of his grandmother, Elizabeth, eldest 



daughter of James Hamilton, of Nowton. 
Robert Gray, of Carntyne, was father of 
the present Rev. John Hamilton Gray, of 
Carntyne. 

Arms — First and fourth, gu. a lion ram- 
pant between three cinquefoils, all within a 
bordure engrailed, arg. for Gray, of Dal- 
marnock ; second and third, gu. a crescent 
surmounted of a star, arg. between three 
cinquefoils, pierced within a bordure ermine, 
for Hamilton, of Newton. 

Crests — An anchor, stuck in the sea, ppr. 
for Gray ; an oak tree, with a saw issuing 
out of a ducal coronet for Hamilton. 

Mottoes—'' Fast," for Gray ; " Through," 
for Hamilton. 

Estates — In Lanarkshire. 

Seat — Carntyne, in Lanarkshire. The 
Rev. Mr. Hamilton Gray's present place of 
residence is Bolsover Castle, a romantic 
feudal fastness belonging to the Duke of 
Portland, within the parish of Bolsover, 
and county of Derby. 




HALE, OF KING'S WALDEN. 

HALE, WILLIAM, esq. of King's Walden, in the county of Hertford, b. 5th June, 

1782; m. first, in February, 1815, Elizabeth, only 
daughter of the Hon. William Leeson, of the Node, 
son of Joseph, earl of Miltown, and by her, who died 
in jVpril, 1822, has one son and one daughter, viz. 

William, b. in August, 1816. 
Emily-Mary-Brand. 

He wedded, secondly, 28th December, 1824, Char- 
lotte, eldest daughter of Sir Richard- Joseph Sullivan, 
bart. of Thames Ditton, and has by her, 

Charles-Cholmeley, b. 9th July, 1830. 
Charlotte-Eliza. 

Mr, Hale succeeded his father 22nd April, 1829. 



Umeage. 




The family of Hale has been seated at 

King's Walden for more than two centuries. 

Thomas Hale, of Codicote, Herts, m. 

Anne, daughter of Edmund Michell, of 

that place, and had three sons, namely, 

Richard, his heir. 

William, who ni. Alice, daughter of 
Thomas Caulfield, of St. Paul's, Wal- 
den, and d. in 1594. 
John, who rn. the daughter of — Rolt, 
of Milton, in Bedfordshire. 
The eldest son, 

RicHARn Hale, purchased the estate of 
King's Walden, Herts, in the time of Eu- 



zabeth, and became of that place. He m. 
first, Mary Lambert, an heiress, by whom he 
had a eon, William, his heir, and secondly, 
Dyonisia, dan. of — Giflard, of Somerset- 
shire, by whom he had two other sons, 

Richard, high siieriff of the county of 
Hertford in 1632, who m. in 1601, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Dacres, of Cheshunt, and had issue, 

1. Robert, b. in 1610, 7n. Anne, 
daughter and co-heir of Sir Le- 
venthorpe Frank, knt. of Al- 
bury. 

2. John. 



HALK, OF KIN(iS WALUEN. 



i;{ 



1. Dyoiiisiri, m. to Edward Cole - 
mail. 

2. Mary, »«• to Thomas Franck- 
lyn, esii. 

3. Elizabeth, vi. to George Gent, 
esq. of Moyns, Essex, (see vol. 
i. p. 371). 

4. Martha. 

5. Katharine. 
Robert. 

Richard Hale, the purchaser of King's Wal- 
den and founder of the grammar school at 
Hertford, d. in IG'iO, and was *. by his 
eldest son, 

William Hale, esq. of King's Walden, 
who was high sheritV of Herts in 1()21. He 
wj. Rose, daughter of Sir George Bond, knt. 
lord mayor of London in 1587, and died in 
August, 1634, aged sixty-six, having had 
issue, 

I. Richard, b. 13th .January, 1596, pre- 
deceased his father, in 1623. 

II. William, 0. 12th March, 1597, d. s. 
p. in 1641. 

III. Rowland, of whom presently. 

IV. George, 6. 30th July, 1601. 

V. Thomas, b. l<i()6. 

VI. Bernard, b. at King's Walden, prin- 
cipal of Peter House, Cambridge, 
archdeacon of Ely, and D.D. d. 29tli 
March, 1663, and was buried in Peter 
House Chapel, Cambridge. 

VII. John (Sir), of Stagenhoe, knighted 
25th June, 1660, high sherilf of 
Herts in 1663, d. in 1672, m. Rose, 
daughter of Edmund Bale, esq. of 
Sadington, in the county of Leices- 
ter, and by her, who d. 5th August. 
1673, aged sixty-three, left, with 
other issue, who d. s. p. a daughter 
and heiress, 

Rose, b. 24th September, 1645, 7«. 
to Sir John Austen, bart. of Hall 
Place, Kent, M.P. for Rye, and 
conveyed to her husband the es- 
tate of Stagenhoe, in Herts. 

I. Alicia, b. 15th June, 1603, m. .John, 
son of Sir John Minne, of Surrey. 

II. Winefreda, b. 18th February, 1604, 
d. unm. in 1627. 

III. Anne, b. in 1609, m. 14th Decem- 
ber, 1626, Charles, son of Sir Thomas 
Hoskyns, and d. in 1651. 

IV. Dionisia, b. 17th March, 1611, m. 
Sir Tiiomas Williamson, of Great 
Markham, Notts, created a baronet 
in 1642, and d. s. p. 

The third, but eldest, son to leave issue, 

Rowland Hale, esq. of King's Walden, 
b. 8th June, 1600, served the office of sherifi' 
of Herts in 1647. He m. Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Sir Henry Garwey, knt. alderman of 
London, and by her, who died 9th January, 
16»9, in her seventieth year, lett at his 



own demise, 7th April, 1669, a son and 
successor, 

William Half., esq. of King's Walden, 
\\li() represented the county of Hertford in 
parliauK^nt in the 13th and 31st of Chaklkk 
if. This gentleman »m. Mary, dau. of Jere- 
miah Elwes, esq. of Roxby, in the county of 
Lincoln (see vol. ii. p. 465),by whom, who d. 
2Nth July, 1712, at tlie age of seventy-two, 
he had ten sons and four daughters, viz. 

I. Richakd, b. 4th November, 1659, 
m. 3rd April, 1684, lilizabeth, daugh- 
ter and heir of Isaac Meynell, esq. 
of Langley Meynell, in the county of 

' Derby, and by her (who wedded, se- 
condly, the Hon. Robert Cecil, second 
son of James, third Earl of Salis- 
bury) left at his decease, in 1689, 
(with a daughter, Mary, maid of 
honour to Queen Anne, who married 
Thomas Coke, esq. and was mother 
of Mary Cooke, the wife of Sir Mat- 
thew Lambe, whose son was elevated 
to the peerage as Viscount Mel- 
bourne,) a son and successor, 

William Hale, esq. M.P. for 
Bramber in 1708, and for St. 
Albans from March, 1715, until 
his decease, which occurred 2nd 
October, 17 17, at the age of thirty- 
two. He m. Katharine, dau. of 
Peter Paggen, esq. of Wands- 
worth, in Surrey, and had two 
sons, 

William, who died unmarried, 
16th February, 1741, in his 
twenty-ninth year. 
Paggen, M.P. for Hertford- 
shire, from 1747 until his 
death. He m, at White- 
hall, 20th November, 1742, 
Elizabeth, third daughter 
of Humphrey Morice, esq. 
M.P. of London, sub-gover- 
nor of the bank, but d. s. p. 
3rd April, 1755, aged forty. 

II. Rowland, b. 2nd January, 1661, 
living in 1669. 

III. William, b. 17th February, 1663, 
living in 1669. 

IV. John, b. I8th January, 1665, living 
in 1669. 

V. Jeremiah, b. 10th June, 1668, d. 
25th January, 1733. 

VI. Henry, i."22nd October, 1670, d. 
10th May, 1735. 

VII. Geoffrey, b. in 1676. 

VIII. Beknakd (Sir), of whom pre- 
sently. 

IX. Thomas, b. in 1678. 

X. GeolTrey, b. in 1680. 

1. Alary, b. 28th October, 1660, 7/1. 27th 
February, 1678, John Plumer, esq. 
of Blakeware, in Herts, and d. in 
1709. 



14 



HALE, OF KING'S WALDEN 



11, Elizabeth, t. 5th October, 1670, and 

died the following year. 
HI. Katharine, b. 15th September, 1673, 
m. nth December, 1695, to John 
Hoskyns, esq. of Reigate, in Surrey, 
a younger son of Charles Hoskyns, 
esq. of Oxled, in Surrey, and d. 5th 
March, 1704. 
IV. Elizabeth, b. 14th March, 1682, m. 
to Nicholas Bonfoy, esq. of Abbots 
Rippon, in the county of Hunting- 
don, and d. in March, 1763. 
The eighth son, but in whose descendant the 
representation of the family is now vested. 

Sir Bernard Hale, baptized at King's 
Walden, 18th March, 1677, having been 
called to the bar, and acquiring a high legal 
character, was constituted, in 1722, chief 
baron of the Exchequer in Ireland, and sub- 
sequently received the honour of knight- 
hood. He rn- Anne, dau. of — Thursby, 
esq. of Northamptonshire, and by her, who rf. 
at Kensington, 11th April, 1768, had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Richard, who rf. in Wimpole Street, 
London, 14th September, 1812, in his 
ninety-second year. 

III. Bernard, a general officer in the 
army, colonel of the 20th regiment, ap- 
pointed lieutenant-governor of Chel- 
sea hospital, 10th May, 1773, and af- 
terwards lieutenant-governor of the 
Ordnance, m. in Sept. 1750, Martha, 
second daughter of Richard Rigby, 
esq. of Mistley Hall, Essex, and d. 
13th March, 1798, leaving a son, 

Lieut. -Col. Francis Hale, M.P. 
who, upon inheriting the estates 
of his maternal uncle, the Right 
Hon. Richard Rigby, who died 
8th April, 1788, assumed, by 
sign manual, the surname and 
arms of Rigby. He »». Frances, 
dau. of Sir Thomas Rumbold, 
bart. governor of Madras, and 
had a daughter, 

Frances, m. in 1808, to Wil- 
liam Horace, third Lord 
Rivers. 

IV. John, of Plantation, near Gisbo- 
rough, in Yorkshire, a general officer 
in the army, and colonel of the 17th 
Light Dragoons, which regiment he 
raised at his own expense ; gover- 
nor of Londonderry and Cooimore- 
forts in 1781, >n. Mary, second dau. 
of William Chaloner, esq. of Gis- 
borough, and d. 20th March, 1806, 
leaving a numerous issue. 

I. Catherine, m. to Thomas Nugent, 
esq. common serjeant, of London. 

II. Jane, 7n. to the Rev. Martin Madan, 
eldest son of Col. Madan, by Judith 
his wife, daughter of Mr.' Justice 
Spencer Cowpcr. 



III. Anne, d. unm. 
Sir Bernard died in Red Lion Square, Lon- 
don, 7lh November, 1729, and was s. by his 
son, 

William Hale, esq. of King's Walden, 
who espoused, 23rd December, 1745, Eli- 
zabeth, youngest daughter of Sir Charles 
Farnaby, bart. of Kippington, in Kent, and 
by her, who d. 18th March, 1780, had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Paggen, a banker, in London, who 
m. at Hatfield, in Herts, 8th Feb- 
ruary, 1791, Miss Mary Keet, and 
d. s. p. 18th January, 1807. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to the Rev. Mr. Stil- 
lingfleet. 

II. Charlotte, m. first, to Thomas Dun- 
combe, esq. of Duncombe Park, in the 
county of York ; and secondly, to 
Thomas Onslow, now Earl Onslow. 

III. Sarah, married to the Rev. James 
Bowles, rector of Burford, in Salop, 
and d. in 1783. 

IV. Anne, m. 18th April, 1782, to Sir 
Edward Dering, seventh baronet of 
Turrenden Dering, in Kent. 

Mr. Hale d. at Chelsea, the 14th September, 
1793, aged seventy-seven, and was buried at 
King's Walden. His son and successor, 

William Hale, esq. of King's Walden, 
wedded 3rd April, 1777, the Hon. Mary 
Grimston, daughter of James, second Vis- 
count Grimston, and had four sons and two 
daughters, viz. 

William, his heir. 

Paggen, baptized 17th July, 1784, died 

at Pimlico, 7th November, 1814. 
Cecil-Farnaby-Richard, baptized 1st 
July, 1786, died at Jamaica, 17th 
January, 1801, a midshipman in the 
royal navy. 
Henry-Jeremy, baptized 15th January, 
1791, curate of King's Walden, 7n. 
Frances, daughter of John Sowerby, 
esq. of Putteridgebury, Herts, and 
died leaving two sons and three 
daughters. 
Charlolte-Bucknall, married her cousin, 
Cholniely Dering, second son of Sir 
Edward Dering, bart. of Turrenden 
Dering, and has issue. 
Elizabetli-Mary, nt. to George Proctor, 
esq. of Mardocks, Herts. 
Mr. Hale died 22nd April, 1829, and was s. 
by his eldest son, the present William 
Hale, esq. of King's Walden. 

Arms — Az. a chev. embattled, counter 
embattled or. 

Cj-est — A snake ppr. entwined round five 
arrows or, headed sa. feathered arg. one in 
pah', four saltier ways. 

Estates — Li Herts. 

Town Residence — Grosvenor Place. 

Seat — King's Walden, Herts. 



15 



ETTRICK, OF HIGH BARNES. 




ETTRICK, The Rev. WILLIAM, of High Barnes, in the county palatine of 

Durham, b. 17th May, 1757, A.M. some time fellow 
of University College, Oxford, late rector of Toners 
Piddle, and vicar of Aff-Piddle, in the county of Dorset, 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of William Bishop, esq. of 
Briants Piddle, in the last mentioned shire, and has had 
issue, 

-y William, h. 3rd July, 1801. 

/ Anthony, b. I5th September, 1810. 

Walter, b. 24th February, 1812. 

John, b. 18th April, 1814. 

Elizabeth, m. to Lieutenant Novosielski, R.N. of the 

city of Bath. 
Catherine, m. to Robert Shank Atcheson, solicitor, 

of Duke Street, Westminster, and has issue. 
Anne, b. 22nd July, 1804, d. 20th May, 1813. 
Isabella, ni. in 1825 to Robert Horn, esq. of Hunter's 

Hall,Bishopswearmouth, in the county of Durham. 
Hellen. 
Mary. 

Mr. Ettrick succeeded his father on the 22nd February, 1808. 




Uineage. 



The first of this family on record, 
Anthony Ettericke,* was of Barford, 
or Berford, in the parish of Winborn Min- 
ster and county of Dorset. He was born 
about the year 1504, and was captain of 
horse at the siege of Boulogne, when that 
place surrendered in 1544 to Henry VIII. 
Although this gallant person is the earliest 
of his family in Dorsetshire, probably in 
England ; and although of his ancestors or 
even the place of his birth no memorials 
remain, yet the station he filled in society 
and the place of his abode after his return 
from the French campaign prove that he was 
a gentleman of consideration. When we 
recollect the turbulent times which ushered 
in the sixteenth century, the contempo- 
raneous reigns of the eighth Henry of Eng- 
land and the fifth James of Scotland, the 
throes of the nascent reformation in both 
countries, such an uncertainty regarding a 
man of rank's origin will not be deemed sur- 
prising, nor was it indeed an unusual course 
to adopt as a matter of precaution, when a 
man's bitterest foes were often to be found 



• He is called William, by Surteks in his 
History of Durham, probably on the authority of 

HUTCIIINS. 



within liis own household. The circum- 
stance in the instance before us, however, 
adds a degree of plausibility to the tradition 
in the family descended from him, that he 
v/as a younger son of the Earl of Dun- 
barton, in Scotland, whose name was Doug- 
las, and who enjoyed amongst his other 
dignities the title of Lord Ettrick, but tliat 
being implicated in some of the family 
feuds, and the exterminating dissensions of 
his times and country, he was under tlie 
necessity of expatriating himself with tlie 
greatest secrecy and expedition, unencum- 
bered by aught save his good sword and 
armorial ensigns. Seeking a secure asylum 
in the land of his adoption, he selected the 
most retired and the most remote part of 
England ; and further to remove all identity 
assumed the name of Ettrick, somewhat 
altered too in the mode of spelling. Be the 
narrative true or false, however, with him 
commences the family line, as recorded in 
the books of the Herald's College. He m. 
Lucy, daughter of — Chettle, of Blandford 
St. Mary's, in Dorsetshire, and dying about 
1569, was s. by his son, 

Anthony Ettricke, of Berford, who in. 
Maud, daughter of Thomas Squibb, of 
Shapwick, in Dorsctsliire, and dying in 
1605, left a son and heir. 



IG 



ETTRICK, OF HIGH BARNES. 



William Ettkicke, of Berford, b. in 
ir)90, wi. Anne, daughter of William Willis, 
of Pamphill, in the county of Dorset, and 
had (with two daughters, one m. to — North- 
over, of Somersetshire ; the other to Sir 
William Cowthorp, of Ireland,) three sons, 
namely, 

1. Anthony, of Holt Lodge, in the 
Forest, county of Dorset, b. in 1625, 
M.P. for Christ Church, Hants, in 
1685. This gentleman, who was 
educated at Trinity College, Oxford, 
under the worthy, but singular. Dr. 
Kettle, was esteemed an excellent 
antiquarian and lawyer, and was the 
associate of the learned in his time. 
He contributed the additions to Dor- 
setshire in Gibson's Camden. He 
died in 1703, and his remains were 
deposited at Wimborn Minster in a 
coffin painted with armorial ensigns, 
clamped with iron, and inclosed 
within iron railing, being deposited 
under an arch excavated in the thick- 
ness of the wall of the church, under 
a window in the south aisle. In ac- 
counting for this curious selection of 
the place of his sepulture, Hutchins 
states, that on some dispute with the 
authorities of the place, Mr. Ettricke 
had made a vow that he would not 
be buried either in their church or 
churchyard, and the matter was thus 
compromised. The coffin was made 
in Mr. Ettricke's lifetime ; for the date 
1691, though partially erased, is yet 
visible. He obtained a license in 
1692 from the official at Wimborn to 
make this tomb, for which he con- 
ferred upon the church a perpetual 
rent charge of twenty shillings, which 
is paid by the corporation of Pool 
out of the tithes of Parkson, near 
that place, being part of a fee farm 
rent charge thereon. He m. in 1650, 
Anne, daughter of the Rev. Edward 
Davenant, D.D. of Gillingham, in the 
county of Dorset, and grandniece of 
John "Davenant, Bishop of Salisbury ; 
(this lady was educated by her father, 
and we are informed that she was 
" a notable algebraist ;") by whom 
he had issue, 

1. William, b. about 1652, of the 
Middle Temple, barrister-at- 
law, and M.P. for Christ Church 
from 1688 to 1714. He had 
previously represented Pool in 
1685.* He m. first, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Eden Bacon, 
bart. of Redgrave, in the county 



• The inscription upon his tomb is said to have 
been written by Prior. 



of Suffolk, and had a daughter, 
Elizabeth, who m. Philip Bote- 
ler, esq. of Woodhall, in the 
county of Herts. He wedded, 
secondly, Frances, daughter of 
Colonel Thomas Wyndham, of 
Witham, in the county of So- 
merset, and had another daugh- 
ter, 

Rachel, who d. unm. leaving 
the family estate by will to 
her maid - servant, Anne 
Powell, from whom the 
heir-at-law, William Et- 
tricke, recovered £10,000. 
He d. 4th December, 1716, and 
was interred at Wimborn Min- 
ster. 

2. Edward, b. in 1654, citizen and 
drysalter of London, d. in 1718, 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of Tho- 
mas Hooper, citizen and grocer, 
also of London, and had 

Anthony, b. 17th November, 
1683, who m. Anne, daugh- 
ter of Major Francis Seaton, 
and had (with a daughter, 
Elizabeth, who became the 
wife of a hosier at Bath,) a 
son, 

William, whose son, an- 
other 
William, recovered 
the £10,000 stated 
above from Anne 
Powell. He left 
isslie, 
Edward, d. unm. at Oxford. 
William, d. s. p. 

3. Anthony, d. s. p. in 1687. 

1. Anne, m. to William Player, 
esq. of Mangleford,in the county 
of Gloucester. Mr. Player pur- 
chased, in 1684, the Poyntz 
estate of Iron Acton, in Glou- 
cestershire. 

2. Lucy, m. to John Hoddy, esq. 
of Northway, in the county of 
Devon. 

II. Andrew, of Blandford Forum or 
Sturminster, in the county of Dorset, 
ni. Anne, daughter of Robert Barker, 
of Ashwell, in the same shire, and 
had two sons, 

Andrew, ) both in the royal navy, 
Robert, S and both died issueless. 
He died in 1679. 

III. Walter, of whose line we are 
about to treat. 

William Ettricke d. in 1666. His youngest 
son , 

Walter Ettricke, esq. of Sunderland, b. 



ETTRICK, 01- HIGH BARNES. 



17 



2Gth April, IG'28, and living- in tlir iinhapijy 
times of tiie civil w;ir and ('ronnvrll's nsnr- 
pation, distinguisliL'd liiniscli" amongst the 
most zealous supporters of the royal cause. 
W'liile yet a student at Oxford, tlie troops 
of the parliament were sent thither to purge 
tlie university, "hen many were imprisoned 
and some put to death, but Walter Ettrieke 
liad the good fortune to efl'ect his escape, 
and flying into Dorsetshire, his father i-ould 
only sustain him secretly, not daring to re- 
ceive openly a person so marked into his 
family. When the dissensions of the times 
subsided, he retired into the county palatine 
of Durham, and settling there became the 
founder of the third branch of the family. 
He purchased the estate of High IJarnes, a 
moiety of Barnes, formerly one of the ex- 
tensive possessions of the family of Bowes,* 
and he seems also to have been the first of 
liis family who held a valuable leasehold 
estate under tiie Bishops of Durham, eoni- 
l)rising the feri'y boats, nieetage, and tolls 
of Sunderland, for twenty-one years, renew- 
able every seventh year, and which remained 
in his descendants until an act of i)ar]iament 
was obtained by Rouland Burdou, esq. of 
Castle Eden, M.P. for the purpose of build- 
ing- a bridge of cast iron over the river 
Wear. Mr. Surtees makes mention of this 
leasehold so far back as 1665, and of Walter 
Ettricke negotiating with Bishop Cosins to 
change it from years into lives ; the bishop, 
liowever, declined to agree, apprehending 
similar applications. Walter Ettricke was 
some time collector of the customs at Stock- 
ton, and afterwards at Sunderland. He 
was register of the Court of Admiralty in 
1G61. He m. in 1659, Margaret, daughter 



* It appears, by existing; deeds, that the whole 
of the mniior of Barnes and Hamelden (now called 
Hnmillon Hill), with Pallion and Clowcroft, as 
well as the tithe of com -and grain of Ryhope, 
remained in the family of Bowes until the de- 
cease, in 1()62, of \\'illiam Bowes, a minor, and 
without issue. Tlie estate then descended to 
liis cousin, JMai-y l5owes, who married William 
Haddock, which gentleman sold, in 1668, the 
moiety of Barnes, called Low Barnes, to John 
Jenkins, sidjject to a moiety of the tithe, rent, or 
modus payable to the church of Bishop Wear- 
mouth, w-ith a title to one half of the pews and 
burying ground within the church, belonging to 
the wbole manor of Bai-nes. In 1673, \\ illiam 
Ikdrlock conveyed the other moiety of Barres to 
Walter Ettrick, esq. -with the other half of the 
right of the pews and burying ground belonging 
to the said manor, subject to a moiety of the modus 
afores-aid. In these deeds a reeitnl is made of 
the lease from the Bishop of Durham to \V alter 
Kttrick, of the Ferrv over the river ^\'ear, and of 
tlie meetage and tolls of Sunderland, dated 1st 
Februarv, 1694, at a rent of fortv sliillings a vear, 
tor twenty-one years, renewable every seventh 
vear with a fine. 

3. 



of William Sedgewick, esq. of Elvet, in the 
county o( Durham, and had six sons and 
li\c daughters, viz. 

I. Wii.i.lAM, I). 1st June, l()f)l, collector 

of the port of Sunderland, in. Eliza- 
beth, daughter and co-heir ofCeorge 
Middleton, esq. of Silksworth, in the 
county of Durham, and became of 
that place. He d. in I7.'J5, antl his 
widow on the IGth Eebruary, 1759. 

II. ANnioNY, of whom presently. 
Walt('r, 



in. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 



William, 
John, 
Ralph, 



all died in infancy, be- 
tween the years 1GG6 
and U)71. 



I. Margaret, bapt. 7th December, 1GG4, 
buried 1st September, 1G88. 

n. Dorothy, bapt. 7th December, 1GG9, 
buried 17tb July, 1G87. 

III. Elizabeth, bapt. 2nd June, 1G74, 
buried 24tbJM arch, 1G9(). 

IV. Anne, bapl. 28th October, 1G77, ?h. 
11th September, 1G98, to the Rev. 
Thomas Ogle, M.A. perpetual curate 
of Bishop Wearmouth, and had a 
son, 

Thomas Ogle, gent, of the city of 
Durham. 
She (I. in 1751, having been a widow- 
fifty years. 

V. Mary, bapt. 28th December, 1680. 

Walter Ettricke d. at Bath, on the 2nd 
August, 1700, and was s. at High Barnes 
by his second son, 

Anthony Ettricke, esq. of HighBarnes,f 
b. 16th August, 1663. This gentleman m. 



t This gentleman succeeded his father at High 
Barnes, by a deed of settlement made upon his 
second marriage in 1700. Owing to the disper- 
sion of the property . of the Bowes' family, the 
payments of the modus for the manor of Barnes 
and its appurtenances had fallen into confusion, 
and, in 1702, a suit w.is instituted in tlie court of 
Exchequer bv Dr. Kobert Grev, the rector of 
Bishopwearmouth, in which John Jenkins, An- 
thony Ettrick, and others were made defendr.nts. 
The aim of the suit was, not to invalidate the 
antiquitv of the modus, but to obtain a higher sum 
in the ))avment than had been latterly made hv 
the parties concerned : the dispute was ferniinfited 
bv establishing the ancient amount claimed bv 
Dr. Grey, and a form of receipt to be given bv 
the rectors was dictated by tha court in a decree 
dated 11th December, 1702, of a modus of 
.£14. 13s. 4d. for " all manner of tithes uhatsoever 
nrising fro)n the lands and manor of Bar7i£f, icith 
the appurtenances." Notwithstanding this decree 
of the Exchequer, of No tithe dve of any kind 
n-hatfoert'r. Dr. Smith, the next rector, set up a 
deniiuul of " Plow penny, Rook penny, and 
Peter's pence," on the plea that the modus 
exeinpt'.d the inhabitants from titlies arising from 



18 



ETTRTCK, OF HIGH BARNES. 



first, Jane, daughter and heiress of Richard 
Starling, esq. and great niece of Sir Samuel 
Starling, knt. alderman of London, by whom 
he had a daughter, 

Elizabeth, vi. first, to Musgrave Davi- 
son, esq. and secondly, to Thomas 
Medlycott, esq. of Venne, in Somer- 
setshire. 
He wedded, secondly, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Henry Coghill, esq. of Aldenham, Herts. 
By this lady, who wedded after his decease 
— Wittering, esq. he had two sons and 
three daughters, viz. 
William, his heir. 

Henry, a surgeon in the navy, died in 
the East Indies, aged thirty-one. He 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas 
Cartwright, a citizen of London. He 
left a son, 

Walter, who d. young. 

Sarah, d. unm. at the age of sixty. 
Elizabeth, living in 1698, unm. 



the land, but not from personal tithes. This de- 
mand was of course not admissible, and how the 
dispute was settled does not further appear, but 
Dr. Smith died 30th July, 1715, and no such 
tithe was ever paid, or even demanded by the 
rectors who followed, Bowes, Laurence, Stilling- 
fleet, Chandler, until the next, Dr. Henry Bland, 
who entered in 1735, made, in 1767, a vigorous 
effort to break through by a demand of " Easter 
offerings, oblations and obventions," yet acknow- 
ledging the ancient modus and its validity against 
pra?dial tithes, but not to the exclusion of per- 
sonal. The holy war raged in the courts for two 
years and upwards, and ended as previously, no 
such tithe having ever been paid before or since, 
and a regular receipt for the amount of three years 
suspended modus in the form prescribed being 
now found in the bundle of receipts, signed 
" Henry Bland," rector, 1769. 

In the year 1708 Anthony Ettrick entered into 
an engagement with the persons then entitled to 
Mr. Jenkins' moiety of Barnes, for the purchase 
thereof, on behalf of Lancelott Wardell, a quaker ; 
and he therein agreed to convey to Mr. Wardell 
"the site of the old mansion and other parts of 
the property adjacent at Low Barnes," which had 
belonged to his own moiety. By the same agree- 
ment Wardell was exempted from his proportion 
of the modus, which was then laid on High 
Barnes ; and certain lands and the other moiety 
of the pews and burving ground, with the portion 
of the modus rent, issuing out of the lands of 
Pallion, were conveved to Anthony Ettrick. Not- 
withstanding all this, when the body of the late 
owner of High Barnes, thus entitled to the whole 
space of burving ground appropriated to both 
moieties of Barnes, was to be buried, there re- 
mained barely room for one coffin ! the rest having 
been vaulted, and surrejititiously sold to another 
family. Thus the splendid monument, destined 
by the will of Mr. J^ttrick, to have been erected 
on his burial ground, was of necessity withdrawn 
from the church of Bishopweannouth. 



Hellen, lived at St. Albans, d. in 1786, 
unm. 
Anthony Ettricke d. in 1728, was buried on 
the 9th December, and s. by his elder son, 

William Ettrick, esq. of High Barnes, 
born 22nd December, 1701, in the commis- 
sion of the peace for the county of Durham, 
who m. in 1722, Isabella, daughter of Wil- 
liam Laugley, esq. of Elwick, in Norfolk, 
grandson of Sir Roger Langley, bart. of 
Sherift' Hutton Park, in the county of York, 
and had issue, 

I. William, his heir, 
n. John, b. in 1729, died in Jamaica, 
unmarried. 

III. Langley, died in 1735. 

IV. Anthony, b. in 1734, killed on his 
passage to Jamaica, unmarried before 
1761. 

V. Walter, b. in 1736, a midshipman in 
the Royal Navy, died unm. before 
1761. 

I. Rachel, died unm. in France. 

II. Philippa, b. in 1738. 

III. Judith, 7)1. first, to — Woodward, 
of London, merchant, and, secondly, 
to Hugh French, M.D. died in 1822. 

IV. Anne, m. to James Moor, gent, of 
London, and d. 16th September, 
1816. 

V. Elizabeth, m. first, to Edward Wed- 
dell, of Yarmouth, in the county of 
York, and secondly, to John Carter, 
esq. of the same place. By the latter 
she had a daughter, Jane Carter, m. 
to William Havelock, esq. of Ingress 
Park, in Kent, father of Major Have- 
lock. of the 11th Light Dragoons, a 
knight of the Royal Hanoverian 
Guelphic order, and aid-de-camp to 
Baron Alten, at Waterloo (see vol. i. 
p. 41). 

VI. Isabella, died in 1732-3. 

William Ettrick acquired, by his marriage, 
a considerable fortune, but following, with 
too much zeal, the expensive taste of im- 
provement, became involved in difficulties, 
and found it necessary to recall from his 
seafaring life, his eldest William, a gentle- 
man of great prudence and activity, to 
whom (six months previously to his decease 
in 1752) he resigned the whole estate, and 
who thereupon became 

William Ettrick, esq. of High Barnes. 
This gentleman, b. 14th May, 1726, passed 
the early part of his life in the naval service 
of his country, and, upon his retirement 
from that profession to take possession of 
his patrimony, became an active and highly 
respected magistrate for the county of Dur- 
ham. He enjoyed the estates for fifty-six 
years, and, by his excellent management, 



DENNE, OF KENT AND SUSSEX. 



ly 



not only left them uneiicuinbered, but accu- 
mulated likewise a large personal property, 
and erected in 1777-8, a handsome mansion 
upon the scite of the former family resi- 
dence. 

He wedded, in 1752, Catherine, daughter 
of Robert Wharton, esq. of Old Park, in the 
palatinate, and had by her (who died in 
Nov. 1794) one son and one daughter, viz. 

William, his heir. 

Catherine, m. William Budle, of Monk- 
wearmouth, and d. s. p. in 1821. 
Mr. Ettrick died 22nd February, 1808, aged 
eighty-two, and was succeeded by his only 
son, the present Rev. William Ettrick, of 
High Barnes. By his last will, he left a 
considerable sum to be expended on a 
family memorial ; and, in consequence, a 
beautiful cenotaph, which cost upwards of 
£oOO, was erected by his son, at High 
Barnes, with the following inscription, which 
himself suggested : 



To the memory of Williapi Ettrick, esq. 

late of High Barnes, in the county of Durham, 

and many years an active and uprijjht magistrate 

in the said county, 

who departed this lifi; on the 22nd February, 1808, 

in tlie eighty-third year of his age : 

and by his last will caused this sepulchral 

monument to be erected 

to perpetuate the memory of his father, William 

Kttrick, esq. 

and his grandfatlier, Anthony Ettrick, esq. 

and his great-grandfather, Walter Ettrick, esq. 

all of High Barnes, 

in an humble but grateful acknowledgment of the 

kind provision 

they have made for their posterity. 

Arms — Arg. a lion rampant, and a chief 
gu. 

Orest — A demi lion rampant gu. holding 
in the dexter paw a marshal's staff sable, 
tipped at each end or. 

Estates — In Durham. 

Seat — High Barnes. 



DENNE, OF KENT AND SUSSEX. 

DENNE, WILLIAM-JOHN, esq. of Winchelsea, in Sussex, b. in 1788; 7n. in 
July, 1817, Mary- Jane, daughter of Major Alexander Orme, of the East India 
Company's Bengal service, and has an only child, 

Mary-Jane. 

Mr. Denne succeeded his father in January, 1819. 



Hmeage. 




The Dennes were established in Kent, 
antecedently to the Conquest, by a Nor- 
man, 

Robert de Dene, who held large estates 
in Sussex and Kent, as well as in the 
duchy, and was Pincerna or butler to Ed- 
ward the Confessor. His son and heir, 

Robert de Dene, was father of 



Ralph de Dene, living in the time of 
William, the Conqueror, lord of Buckhurst, 
in Sussex, who wedded Sybella, sister of 
Robert de Gatton, and had a son, Robert, 
his heir, and a daughter, Ella,* m. to Sir 
Jordan Sackville, ancestor of the dukes of 
Dorset. 

This Ralph de Dene, who possessed large 
estates in Kent and Sussex, founded Otteham 
Abbey, for monks of the Premonstratensian 
order. His son and successor, 

Robert de Dene, inherited the Kentish 



* This Ella, who inherited by will from her 
father Buckhurst and other estates in Sussex, in 
her widowhood endowed Bayham Abbey. See 
charter in the British Museum, by which she 
gives permission to the abbot and community to 
remove their establishment from their convent at 
Otteham, founded by her father Ralph Dene, to 
Bnvhflm. 



20 



DENNE, OF KENT AND SUSSEX. 



estates. He married, and liad, with two 
daughters, Alice, who endowed Bayhain 
Abbey, and Agnes, wife of — De Icklisham, 
a son, 

William de Denn, of Denn Hill, in the 
parish of Kingston on Barham Downs, Kent, 
who was s. by his son, 

Sir Alured de Denn, of Denn Hill, a 
person of great learning, seneschal of the 
priory of Canterbury, and escheator of Kent 
nnnu 1234, who was appointed by Henry 
in. to enforce, in conjunction with Sir 
Henry de Bath, the laws of Roniiiey Marsh. 
He was s. by his son, 

Walter Denne, of Denne Hill, living- 
in 125G, whose son, another 

Walter Denne, of Denne Hill, alive in 
the 9th Edward I. was father of 

John Denne, of Denne Hill, in 1308, 
who %vas s. by his son. 

Sir William Denne, knt. of Denne Hill, 
who sat in Parliament for the city of Can- 
terbury 19th Edward II. and for tlie county 
of Kent in the 14th of the following reign". 
Sir William espoused Elizabeth, daughter 
and co-heiress of Hanio de Gatton, of 
Boughton, and left a son and successor, 

Richard Denne, of Denne, living in the 
16th Richard II. who m. Agnes, daughter 
of — Apuldrefield, of Clialfock,* and" had 
four sous, Thomas, Michael, John, and Ro- 
bert ; of whom the eldest, 

Thomas Denne, of Denne Hill, wedded 
Isabel, daughter and heir of Ro])ert de 
Earde,and had(with a younger son, Thomas, 
who died issueless in 1468), his successor, 

John Denne, of Denne Hill, who m. 
Alice, daughter of Richard Ardren, and had 
issue, 

Michael, his heir. 

Thomas, of Kingston, who m. Agnes, 
daughter of William Esliehurst, and 
had an only daughter and heiress, 
Avis, m. to John Crispe, of Quicks, 
in the Isle of Thanet. 
Parnell, m. to William Keale. 
The elder son, 

Michael Denne, esq. of Denne Hill, 
living in the reigns of {sdward IV. and 
Henry VH. espoused Christiana Coonibe, 
of Lymne, an heiress, and had issue, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. William. 

III. John, of Lymne, Kent, who m. and 
had four sons, viz. 

1. Michael, of Lymne, who il. in 
1569, leaving issue. 



• " This ancient family," says Philpot. " des- 
eemlpd from Homy do Aiuildrefiold, of Aijuldro- 
fioid, ill Coudhain, who was in tlie catalogue of 
those oniinoiit Kentish -nitleiii.n wlin we're en- 
L'ii'/i^d witli KicHAHi) I. lit the aieov of Aire, in 
ralestiiif." ^ 



2. Henry, mentioned in his bro- 
tiier ISIichael's will. 

3. John, 7)1. and had issue. 

4. Peter, m. and had issue. 

I. Isabella, wi. to Simon Quilter. 

The eldest son, 

Thomas Denne, esq. of Denne Hill, left 
by Alice Eshehurst, liis wife, three sons, 
viz. 

I. Thomas, of Denne Hill, who m. 
Alicia, daughter of Thomas Mett, esq. 
and had a son and heir, 

Robert Denne, esq. of Denne 
Hill, who Wi. Thomasin, daugh- 
ter and heir of Thomas Dane, 
esq. of Heme, and left (with 
four younger sons and two daugh- 
ters, Mary, tu. to Edward Os- 
borne, of Hartlipp, see Tylden, 
of Milsted and Torre Hill, vol. ii. 
p. 383, and Silvester, to Thomas 
Coppin, of Minster, in Thanet) 
a son and successor, 
Thomas Denne, esq. of Denne 
Hill, recorder of Canterbury, 
reader of the Inner Temple, and 
M. P. for Canterbury 21st James 
I. He m. Dorothy, dau. of John 
Tanfield, esq. of Margareting, 
in Essex, and dying in 1656, left 
issue, 

1. Thomas, of Gray's Inn, d. 
s. p. 

2. John, of the Inner Temple, 
barrister at law, buried in 
the Temple Church aniio 
1648, *. p. 

1. Thomasin, m. to Sir Nicho- 
las Crispe, of Quicks. 

2. Bridget, m. to Sir John Da- 
rell, of Calehill. 

3. Dorothy, m. to Roger Lu- 
kyii, esq. 

4. Mary, y/i. to Vincent Denne, 
sergeant at law, recorder 
of Canterbury, and M. P. 
for Kent, Avho became, 

jure tixoris, " of Denne 
Hill." He d. in 1693: she 
in 1701, leaving four daugh- 
ters, viz. 

Dorothy, who had the 
Wenderton estates, and 
»«. Thomas (Jirder, esq. 
Mary, m. to Stephen Ne- 
thersole, esq. of Ne- 
tiiersole. 
HoNEYWooD, who inhe- 
rited the Tarmested es- 
tate, which was sold by 
her husband, Gilbert 
I Knowles, esq. to Tho- 

mas Harris, of Canter- 
bur v. 



DENNi:, or KF.NT AND SUSSEX. 



21 



BiUD(iKT, of Di'iine Ilill, 
m. Robert IJcnkc, fj^cnt. 
by whose lu'irs Dimiiic 
Ilill was sold about 
1730. It is now (18.34) 
the seat of General Sir 
Henry Montresor. 

II. William, of wlioni presmtly. 

III. James, of Marley, Avho d. at King- 
ston in 1574, leavitig issne, by Agnes 
bis wife. 

The second son of Thomas Denne, of Denne 
Hill, by Alice Eshehurst his wife, 

William Dknnk, esq. of Kingston, in 
Kent, proprietor of extensive estates in that 
connty, espoused Agnes, daughter of Ni- 
cholas Tufton, es(|. of Northiam Place, in 
Sussex, great grandfather to the first earl of 
Tlianet, and by her, who d. in 1588, had 
issue, 

1. Vincent, of Kingston, LL.I). in. 
Joan Kettell, of London, and dying 
in 1591, left 

1. JoMN, of Gray's Inn, barrister 
at law, ?H. Lucy, daughter of 
Walter Aylworth, esq. of St. Ste- 
phens, and had, with two sons 
who d. s. p. four daughters, the 
youngest, Joan, ?». Henry John- 
son, esq. 

2. William, of Kingston and Bur- 
stead, in Bishopsbourne, ances- 
tor of the Dennes, of Elbridge, 
now extinct in the male line, but 
represented through female des- 
cent by Denne Denne, esq. of 
Elbridge. 

3. Thomas, of Canterbury, m. Su- 
san, daughter and co-heir of Ar- 
thur Honeywood, esq. of Len- 
ham, and had issue, 

Vincent, sergeantatlaw,M. P. 
who 7n. as above, his relative, 
Mary Denne, of Denne Hill. 
He d. leaving four daugh- 
ters, his co-heirs. 

William,) i ,, ,• . . ,„^„ 
John S living in 1663 

Elizabeth, m. to her cousin, 
Vincent Nethersole, esq. of 
Nethersole House, Kent. 

4. Henry, of London, merchant, 
and of Dane House, Kent, d. in 
1613. 

5. Vincent. 

1. Elizabeth, m. to Vincent Ne- 
thersole, esq. of Nethersole. 

2. Jane, m. to William Denne, 
esq. of Bishopsbourne. 

11. Thomas, of whom presently. 

I. Mary, m. first, to John Coppin, esq. ; 
and, secondly, to Thomas Boys, esq. 
of Evthorne. 



II. Catherine, w. in Tjiomas Gookin, 
esq. of Kippie Court, Kent. 
William Denne- (who ?h. Agnes Tufton) d. 
in 1572, and by iiis will, proved at Canter- 
bury, John ('oppyn, esq. and Sir Henry 
Crip]), knt. trustees, devised jnoperty at 
Adisham, Well, and Beaksbourne, to his 
second son, 

Thomas Denne, esq. a bencher of Lin- 
coln's Inn in IfAM, who m. Jane, daugliter 
of John Swift, esq. of Essex and London, 
and had (with several younger children, for 
whom see Visitation) 

I. Henry, of Adisham, a civilian and 
bencher of Lincoln's Inn, living at 
the Visitation in 1619. He wedded 
Mary, daughter of John Hyde, esq. 
of London, and had an only child, 
Helen or Elinor, who d. unmarried 
in 1669. 

II. John, of whom hereafter. 

III. William, of Bishopsbourne, who 
7H. his cousin Jane, daugliter of Vin- 
cent Denne, esq. LL.D. and d. in 
1616, leaving issue. 

The second son, 

John Denne, esq. baptized at Beaks- 
bourne 6th July, 1578, living in 1619 at the 
visitation of Kent, was of Patricksborne 
Court Lodge, in that county. He ?ti. and left, 
with a younger son, William, baptized at 
Adisham, the residence of his grandfather, 
in 1620, and a daughter, Elizabeth, b. in 
1624, his successor, 

John Denne, esq. of Patricksbourne 
Court Lodge, b. in 1619, who d. in 1690, 
aged seventy- one, and was buried at Pa- 
tricksbourne, leaving, by Elizabeth his wife, 
three sons, viz. 

I. David, his heir. 

II. Thomas, of Braboren Court, which 
he purchased in 1700. 

III. John, born at Patricksbourne in 
1668. 

The eldest son, 

David Denne, esq. of Bishopsborne, b. 
at Patricksborne 15th October, 1662; tn. 
Sarah, relict of the Rev. Mr. Shipwash, of 
Wye, and died in 1702, aged thirty-nine, 
leaving a daughter, Elizabeth, /«. to Tho- 
mas Hogben, and a son, 

Thomas Denne, esq. of Lydd, b. in Feb- 
ruary, 1701, who m. in 1741, Sarah, daugh- 
ter and co-heir* of Thomas Greenland, es(j. 
of Lydd, and had by her, who d. at Fair- 
field in 1783, five sons and two daughters, 
viz. 

• Mary, the other dau^ihter and co-heir ?n. 
Mark Skinner, esq. of Lydd, and lei't one daugh- 
ter, Wary, in. first, to Chamberlain Hopkins, esq. 
and, secomllv, to General Thomas Wurrav, son, 
of Sir David iMurray, of Stanhope. 



22 



FARQUHAR, OF GILMILNSCROFT. 



2. 
1. 

2. 
3, 



I. John, of Bath, b. in 1748, m. Miss 
Anna-Maria Heblewhite, and d. in 
1828, s. p. 

II. Richard. 
HI. David, of Lydd, who m. Katherine, 

daughter of Robert Cobb, esq. and 
d. in 1819, leaving issue, 

1. David, of Lydd, who m. Louisa- 
Anne, daughter of the late Rev. 
Thomas Cobb, of Ightham, and 
has issue. 
Thomas, of the Temple. 

Elizabeth, m. to the Rev. Wil- 
liam Vallance, of Sittingbourne. 
Cecilia, m. to the Rev. Mr.Nares. 
Katherine. 
4. Mary-Julia. 

IV. Thomas, who d. unmarried in 1783, 
aged twenty-seven. 

V. William, in the army, d. unmarried 
in 1783, aged twenty-one. 

I. Sarah, m. John Porker, esq. of Mus- 
well Hill, a banker in London, and 
dying in 1808, left issue, 

1. John Porker, of London. 

2. Mary Porker, m. to Sir John 
Peter. 

3. Elizabeth Porker, m. to Gene- 
ral George Cookson, R. A. 

4. Caroline Porker, m. to James 
Atkinson, esq. of Russell Square, 
and d. in 1810. 

6. Emily Porker, m. to General 
Sir Alexander Bryce, R. E. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to Richard Ruck, esq. 
of Gravesend, and d. s. p. 

Mr. Denne d. in 1777, possessed of consi- 



derable property at Lydd and Romney 
Marsh, in Kent, and at Winchelsea and in 
Sussex. His second but eldest son to leave 
issue, 

Richard Denne, esq. of Winchelsea, 
wedded, in 1783, Mary, daughter of Wil- 
liam Steer, esq. of Northampton, by Anne 
his wife, daughter of the venerable William 
Rastall, D.D. dean of Southwell, a lineal 
descendant of Chief Justice Rastall, and 
had issue, 

Willi AM-JoHN, his heir. 
Richard-Greenland, of the Inner Tem- 
ple, barrister-at-law. 
Anna-Maria, of Broadstairs. 
Frances, m. to Captain Ernest-Christian 

Welford, of the Royal Engineers. 
Mary-Jane, m. to Robert- William 
Newman, esq. of Mamhead, in De- 
von, late M.P. for Exeter. 
Mr. Denne d. in January, 1819, and was s. 
by his eldest son, the present William- 
JoHN Denne, esq. 

A7'7ns — Quarterly, first and fourth, az. 
three bars erm. in chief, as many fleurs de 
lys, or, (coat granted to Thomas Denne, esq. 
in 1580) ; second and third, azure, three 
leopards' heads couped or. 

C'7-est — On a chapeau vert, turned up 
erm. a demi peacock, wings expanded and 
elevated ppr. This crest was also granted 
in 1580, but has not been used from time 
immemorial. 

Estates — Romney Marsh and Wareham, 
in Kent ; Winchelsea, Icklesham, Rye, &c. 
&c. in Sussex. 

Town Residence — Upper Wimpole Street. 



FARQUHAR, OF GILMILNSCROFT. 



FARQUHAR-GRAY, JAMES, esq. of Gilmilnscroft, in the county of Ayr, m. in 

1801, Marg-aret-Cochrane, eldest daughter of 
Major James Baillie, of the 7th, or Royal Fusi- 
leers, and fort-major of Fort St. George, by 
Margaret Ross, his wife, eldest daughter of 
Lord Anchorville, late one of the senators of 
the College of Justice, and has issue, 

John. 

Margaret. 

Jane. 

Mr. Gray-Farquhar, Avho is lieutenant-colo- 
nel of the Royal Ayrshire Militia, succeeded to 
Gilmilnscroft upon the demise of his mother in 
1809. He had inherited, in 1801, a consider- 
able property in Northumberland on the death 
of Robert Farquhar, of Rothburry, lieutenant- 
colonel of the 8 1 St regiment. 




1-ARQiniAR, (')F (;iLMILN.SCItOFT 



23 



ILincaac. 



Tlie family of Farqi'hau has enjoyed 
its present possessions, in Kyle Stewart, 
for many generations. The first proprietor 
on record, 

RoBKRT Farquhar, must have been laird 
of Gilmilnscroft, in the latter end of the 
fourteenth century, for, in the commence- 
ment of the fifteenth, anno 1 107, an infeft- 
ment was granted by Agnes Wallace, 
gudewife of (jilmilnscroft, and relict of 
-Robert Fanpihar, to her son, 

Aluxander Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft, 
who was s. by 

Thomas Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft, who 
had a charter from Jamks I. king of Scot- 
land, in which he is styled son of Alexan- 
der Farquhar. He appears to have been 
father of 

John Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft, who 
had a charter in 1445, from the commenda- 
tor of the abbey of Melrose, of the lands of 
Castle Cavil. He wedded Margaret, dau. 
of the laird of Barquharrie, and was proge- 
nitor of 

Alexander Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft, 
who married and had, with a daughter Ca- 
therine, in. about the year 1546, to John 
Hamilton, of Camskeith, a son and suc- 
cessor, 

Andrew Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft, 
who died in 1556. He was father of 

Alexander Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft, 
who wedded, in 1586, a daughter of Charles 
Campbell, of Glaisnock (of the Loudoun 
family, in the deed of entail of Hugh, the 
first Lord Loudoun, dated in 1613), by whom 
lie left at his decease, in 1625, a son and 
successor, 

Robert Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft. In 
1641 Robert Farquhar of Gilmilnscroft, and 
George Reid, of Daldilling, had a ratifica- 
tion in parliament of the lands of Kyles- 
niure, to themselves and remanent vassals ; 
and in 1643 Farquhar was nominated by 
parliament among the commissioners of the 
county of Air, who " shall convein at the 
burgh of Ayr, with the wholl heritoures, 
lyferenteres, tacksmen, titulares, propper 
wad-setteres, pensiouneres, conjunctfieres, 
ladyterceres, and uthers, in order to assess 
themselves towards a loan of the general 
sum of 1,200,000 marks Scot; together 
Avith 100,000 marks of like money, for col- 
lecting the same over the kingdom at large, 
for defraying the expense that had been in- 
curred by the sending uf an army of 10,000 
soldiers to Ireland to suppress the rebellion 



there. Such have been the greate neces- 
sities and wants of that airmie, als vveill of- 
ficeres as souldieres, not only through de- 
fault of their ordinarie pay, but also of vic- 
tual in the spairest measure." The sum 
ordered thus to be lent, for Ayrshire, was 
£49,480. Scots ; also £7,068. for the more 
immediate use of the army within the king- 
dom. The first assessment or loan to be 
repaid by the parliament of England.* 
Robert Farquhar a])i)ears to have died some 
time in the year 1646, and was s. by his 
son, 

Robert Farquhar, of Gilmilnscroft, who 
under the designation of Guildmidscroft, 
Younger, was appointed one of the com- 
mittee of war for Ayrshire, for tiie further- 
ing of the service of the kingdom, on the 
11th February, 1646. He espoused, 22nd 
September, 1651, Elizabeth, daughter of 
James Ross, of Ballneill, in the county of 
Wigton, and with her received 8000 marks 
of tocher. The subscribing witnesses to the 
marriage contract were Mr. James Dal- 
rymple, of Stair ; John Macdowall, brother 
to Sir James Macdowall, of Garthland ; and 
Alexander Baillie, son to John Baillie. The 
Mr. James Dalrymplef here mentioned was 
subsequently raised to the peerage by the 
title of Viscount Stair. 

Gilmilnscroft appears to have died with- 
out issue, for, in 1670, 

Robert Farquhar, of Lightshaw (son of 
Mungo Farquhar, and grandson of Far- 
quhar of Gilmilnscroft) succeeded his cousin 



* Robertson's Ayrshire. 

+ James Dalrymple (Lord Stair), wedded 
Margaret, the eldest daughter of Ross, of Ball- 
neil, and was thus brother-in-law to Gilmilns- 
croft. Of this Margaret, who was a most extra- 
ordinary woman, many singular tales are told, 
amongst others, the following is to be found in 
Law's Memorial, " She lived to a great age, and 
at her death desired that she might not be put 
under ground, but that her coffin should stand 
upright on one end of it, promising that while 
she remained in that situation the Dalrymples 
should continue to flourish. It is certain her 
coffin stands upright in the aisle of the church 
of Kirkleston, the binivd-place belonging to the 
family ; and it is probable that this odd position 
of her corpse, and the sudden rise of so many of 
that name, without any verj' visible reason, might 
have given occasion to the vulgar conjecture that 
she was a witch." She is also thought to have 
been tlie prototype of Lady Ashton, in the Bride 
of Lammermoor, — " Oer trtie a tale." 



<) 



'24 



FARQUHAII, OF GILMILNSCROIT. 



Kobert Farquliar, flie preceding laird. This 
tientleman, who lived in the reigns of 
Charles II. and lus brother James, adhered 
steadfastly to tlie principles of the cove- 
nanters, yet conducted himself ivitii so much 
prudence as to avoid the resentment of the 
court, while he preserved the confidence of 
his own party. The colours which were 
borne by the JJalgain division at their dif- 
ferent rencounters with their opponents, 
were entrusted to his care in the intervals 
of repose, and remained concealed in the 
mansion of Gilmilnscroft until the revolu- 
tion in 1688, when they were publicly ex- 
hibited. At that time a new device was 
added : a Scots thistle, surmounted with an 
imperial crown, splendidly emblazoned in 
blue, scarlet and gold, under wliich was 
written in large golden letters, " For God, 
the Covenant, Presbyterianism, Reforma- 
tion, Crown, and Country. 1689." Tlie 
flag remains in good presex'vation, 

Gilmilnscroft m. Julian, daughter of 
Nisbet, of Greenholme, and had three sons 
and two daughters, viz. 

James, his heir. 

Hugh, a colonel in the army. 

George. 

Sarah, m. to John Reid, of Balloch- 

myle. 
Barbara. 

The eldest son, 

James Farqi'har, esq, of Gilmilnscroft, 
succeeded his father in 1698. He wedded, 
in 1700, Jean, daughter of William Porter- 
field, of that Ilk, by Annabella, his wife, 
daughter of Steward, of Blackball, and had 
issue, 

Robert, wlio predeceased his father. 
Alexandkk. 

Annabella, »h. to Andrew Brown, 
esq. of Water Head. 
Margaret, m. to Duncan Campbell, 
of Barbieston. 

III. Ann. 

IV. Jean, m. to John Whyte, of Neuk. 
\. Mary, ni. to Charles Campbell, esq. 

brother of Barbieston. 
Mr. Farquhar was succeeded by liis only 
son, 

Alexander Farquhar, esq. of Gilmilns- 
croft, who 7)1. first, Agnes, eldest daughter 
of John Campbell, of Whitehaugh, by Ca- 
tiierine Ferguson, his wife, a daughter of 
Auclienl)lain, but by her had no child. He 
wedded, secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Joseph Wilson, of Barnniir, provost of Ayr, 
by Isabella, daughter of Muir, of Blairs- 
touii, and had a daugliter, 
Jane, his heiress. 

He espoused, thirdly, Jean, daughter of 
Alexander Cunninghame, of Polquharnc, 



I. 
II. 



II. 



which lady died without issue, Gilmilns- 
croft was succeeded by his only child, 

Jane Farqi'har, of Gilmilnscroft, who 
wedded, in 1777, John Gray, esq. of Kil- 
merdenny (see family of Gray, at foot), and 
had issue, 

I. James, her heir. 

II. Alexander, formerly in the army. 

III. .lohn, lieutenant, 40th regiment, 
who died in consequence of wounds 
received at Salamanca. 

IV. William, a merchant in Glasgow, 

V. Andrew, comptroller of the customs 
at Irvine, who m. in 1820, Margaret, 
daughter of the late Benjamin Bar- 
ton, esq. late commissary-clerk of 
Glasgow, and has a son John, and 
other issue. 

VI. Robert, who died in 1807. 

I. Eliza, m. to John Ashburnham, M.D. 
of London. 

The heiress of Gilmilnscroft died in 1809, 
and was succeeded by her eldest son, the 
present James Gray-Farquhar, esq. of 
Gilmilnscroft. 

.iFanuIy of <ffiraj). 

This family derives from a common pro- 
genitor with the extinct ducal houses of 
Suffolk and Kent,* the baronial houses of 
Gray and Warwick, and the existing houses 
of Tankerville and Stamford, namely, from 
Anschetel de Croy, one of the companions 
in arms of the Conqueror. The Scottish 
barons sprung immediately from the Greys 
of Chillingham, in Northumberland. Of 
those, 

Andrew, third Lord Gray, living in 
1564, married, for his second wife, the Lady 
Elizabeth Stewart, sister, by the mother's 
side, of James II. and had several sons. 
The third, 

Andrew Gray, of Muirton, was grand- 
father of 

Thomas Gray, of Brighouse, whose son, 

Sir William Gray, of Pittendrum, was 
one of the greatest merchants of his time in 
Scotland. Adhering to the royal cause in 
the civil wars, he was fined by the parlia- 
ment of St. Andrews, for corresponding 
with Montrose, in the sum of 100,000 marks, 
and was imprisoned in Edinburgh Castle 
until the penalty was modified to 36,000, 
which he instantly paid. A loan of 
£10,000. was subsequently extorted from 
him, but never returned. Sir William did 
not long survive these hardships, but died 



* F'or a full account of the early Greys, sea 
EviiKi."? Kitiiict Peerage. 



FARQUIIAH, OF CII.MILNSCIIOIT. 



25 



ill IGt8. He married Ki^idia, sister of Sir 
Jolui Smith, of (Jrotliill and Kinj^'s Cra- 
moiid, lord provost of Ediiiburgli, by wlioni 
lu! Iiad six sons and twelve daninliters. Of 
these ten formed honoural)le alliances, es- 
pecially Agues, who wedded, first. Sir John 
Dundas, of New Liston, by whom she liad 
an only daugliter and heiress, Elizabeth 
Dundas, who espoused John, (irst Earl of 
Stair. Lady. Dnndas married, secondly, 
Sir Archibald Primrose, lord register, an- 
cestor of the noble family of Roseberry. 

Of the sons of Sir William Graj% 

I. William, the eldest, m. Anne, Mis- 
tress OF (J KAY, and on his marriage 
had 232,000 marks from his father. 
He was killed in a duel with the Earl 
of Southesk in 1660, leaving a son, 

Patrick, who succeeded his ma- 
ternal grandfather as ninth 
Baron Gray. His lordship vi. 
Barbara Murray, daughter of 
Andrew, Lord Balvaid, and had 
an only daughter, 

Marjory, Mistress of Gray, 
who 711. her cousin, John 
Gray. 

II. Robert, the second son, was killed 
at Inverkeithing, leaving a son, 

John, of Crichie, who married his 
cousin, Marjory, Mistress of 
Gray, and, by a peculiarity in a 
new patent of peerage, became, 
after her death, tenth Lord 
Gray, even in the lifetime of 
his father-in-law Patrick, the 
ninth lord, and as such took the 
oaths in parliament in 1707. He 
was direct ancestor of Francis, 
present Lord Gray. 

III. David, the third son, w-as slain at 
Tangier with the Earl of Teviot. 

IV. Andrew, the fourth son, minister of 
Glasgow, was ordained when only 
nineteen years of age, and died be- 
fore attaining his twenty-second, in 
1696. 

V. John, the fifth son, of whose line 
we are about to treat. 

The youngest, 

John Gray, was father of 
Andrew Gray, whose only son, 



John Gray, was minister of tlie High 
Church of Glasgow. He m. first, Margaret, 
daughter of the JU'V. Mr. Morton, minister 
of IJotiiwell, by his wife, a daughter of 
Porter, of Liviland, and had a son, An- 
drew, vvlio for many years was minister of 
New Kiipatrick, in Dumbartonshire, in 
which parish he aetpiired tin; lands and 
mansion of Kilmardenny, about five miles 
north-west of (Jlasgow. Mr. Gray wedded, 
secondly, Mary, daughter of Aird, of Mil- 
town, by Elizabeth, his wife, (huighter of 
Nisbet, of Greenholme, and by her had a 
son, 

James Gray, minister of Strathblane, 
the adjoining parish to that in which his 
half-brother Andrew was settled. He m. 
in 1769, Agnes, daughter of William Fogo, 
of Killorn, in Perthshire, by his first wife, 
Agnes, daughter of Campbell, of Ederline, 
in Argyleshire, (whose mother was a daugh- 
ter of Graham, of Killearn). By this lady 
he had two sons and five daughters, 

John, his heir. 

William, who died unmarried. 

Agnes. 

Mary, died unmarried. 

Elizabeth, m. to John Longmuir, esq. 

of Glasgow, and d. in 1809, s.p. 
Margaret, died unmarried. 
Jean, ni. to William Mayne, esq. of 

Glasgow, and died in 1810, leaving 

issue, 

Mr. Gray's eldest son, 

John Gray, married, as already stated, 
Jane, heiress of Gilmilnscroft, assumed the 
surname of Farquhar, and d. in 182.'3, leav- 
ing, inter alios, a son and successor, the pre- 
sent Lieutenant-colonel Gray-Farquhar, 
of Gilmilnscroft. 

Arms — Arg. a lion rampant sa. armed 
and langued or, between three sinister 
hands, two and one, couped paleways gu. 

Crest — A dexter hand, couped as in the 
arms. 

Supporters — Two greyhounds, ppr. 

Motto — Sto, cado, fide et armis. 

Estates — In Ayrshire. 

Seat — Gilmilnscroft, in Kyle Stewart. ' 



26 



HAY NEWTON, OF NEWTON. 

NEWTON-HAY, RICHARD, esq. of NeAvton Hall, in the county of Haddington, 
succeeded his father in February, 1829. 

Mr. Hay Newton is a deputy Ueutenant for Haddingtonshire. 



Hmcacte. 




This is a branch of the noble house of 

TWEEDDALE. 

Lord William Hay, of Newhall, third 
son of John, second marquess of Tweed- 
dale, m. Margaret, only child of John Hay, 
esq. of Limplum, and d. in 172.3, leaving, 

inte)' alios, 

I. John, from whom descend ItEORGE, 
the present Marqi'ess of Tweed- 
dale, and the Hays, of Newhall, 
who have assumed the additional sur- 
name of Mackenzie. 

II. James, who d. in 1779, leaving issue. 
HI. Richard, of whom presently. 

The third son, 

Richard Hay, esq. assumed the surname 
of Newton, on inheriting the estates of 
that family. He vi. Anne, only daughter 
of John Stuart,* esq. of Kincardine, by 
Christiana Macleod, his second wite, and 
by her, who d. in 1777, had issue, 

I. Richard, died unm.^ 

II. William, his father's heir. 

III. John, an officer in the Royal Ma- 
rines, drowned in the Pomona fri- 
gate, which foundered in the West 
Indies in 1789. 



* Sir John Stuart, coimt of Maida, who com- 
manded the British army, when they gained the 
ereat and derisive victory over the French at 
Maida, in Calabria, whs nephew to Anne Stuart, 
who m. Richard Hay-Newton, esq. 



I. Frances, m. to — Anderson, and had 
no issue. 

II. Ann, died unm. 

III. Jane, who m. James Walker, esq. 
of Dairy, and was mother of the pre- 
sent Sir Francis-Walker Drummond, 
bart. of Hawthornden. 

IV. Grace, died unm. 

Mr. Hay-Newton d. 29th June, 1776, and 
was s. by his son, 

William Hay-Newton, esq. of Newton, 
b. in 1747, who wedded Alici;), daughter of 
Anthony Forster, esq. of Jardinefield, in 
the county of Berwick, and had issue, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II. William-Waring, of Blackburn, in 
the county of Berwick, m. Jane- 
Frances, daughter of the late Thomas 
Gregson, esq. 

III. George-Forster. 

IV. John-Stuart, m. 4th August, 1829, 
Margaret-Eliza, daughter of the late 
William Fairlie, esq. of London, and 
has issue, 

1. William-Drummond-Ogilvy, 6. 

in 1832. 

2. Margaret Fairlie, b. in 1830. 

V. Anthony-James. 

Mr. Hay-Newton d. in 1829, and was s. by 
his eldest son, the present Richard Hay- 
Newton, esq. of Newton. 

jFamilB of Jilftoton, of Jletolon. 

It does not appear, from any records now 
extant, at what period this ancient family 
and chief of the name first acquired pro- 
perty in Scotland. They were in posses- 
sionof the estate previous to the year 1.377, 
as shewn by a charter granted by Robert 
n. -of Scotland, at Methven, in favour of 
William de Newton, and his heirs, which 
proceeds on resignation made in his ma- 
jesty's hands as superior by Hobcrt de 
Swinton, a cadet of tlie ancient house of 
Swinton, of Swinton, with consent of Mar- 
garet Newton his spouse, who was heiress 
of Newton. How long William remained 
in possession, or by whom succeeded, is 
not distinctly ascertained. During the re- 



MAY N1<.\VT()N, (JF NEWTON. 



27 



ji^eiicy of Robert, duke of Albany, there is 
an Alexander de Newton named as witness 
to a charter "granted l)y tliat iH)l)leniaii. 

In \AM, on the '21th Sei)tenil)er, William 
do Newton granted a charter of Mortifica- 
tion of the annual rents of Artam, subjects 
l)eloni;iii<j; to him situated within the i)ur};li 
of Haddington, in favour of the (-ollegiate 
church of Bothans, now Yester, " whieJi 
for the salvation of his own soul, and the 
soul of Marian his spouse, his an(;estors 
and successors, and all faithful deceased 
persons, he gave, granted, and confirmed 
to God, and the Blessed Virgin Maiy, and 
to Cuthbert provost of the collegiate church 
of Bothans, and to the j)rebendaries of the 
same, the most celebrated and for ever to 
be celebrated for their divinity." By ac- 
ceptance of this deed, the members of the 
said collegiate church bound themselves to 
say a certain number of masses annually 
for the souls of the said William and Ma- 
rian, according to the tenure of such grants. 
T)ie next pro})rietor of whom the records 
make mention is John de Newton, who wjis 
succeeded by his grandson William, who 
had a brother, Archibald, aiul one sister, 
married to Borthwick of Gamelston, besides 
a sou named John, who predeceased his 
father, and whose widow, Janett Wolf, suc- 
ceeded in life rent to the lands of Kidlaw. 
William, the third proprietor, was succeeded 
by his grandson, 

William Newton, of Newton, a bold and 
faithful adherent of the ill-fated Mafiy 
Stuart. This laird had the misfortune to 
kill, in a duel, his friend Hamilton, of Red- 
house, under the following singular cir- 
cumstances : during the invasion of Scot- 
land by the duke of Somerset, the castle 
of Yester, formerly called Bothans, sus- 
tained a severe siege, and it was only by 
reducing the garrison to extremities that 
the besiegers forced it to surrender. New- 
ton, of Newton, and the then Hamilton, of 
Redhouse,both officers in the garrison, while 
on guard, having openly expressed their 
sentiments on the conduct of the duke, in 
not the most courtly terms, his grace deter- 
mined that on the capture of the castle, the 
blood of one of them should be shed by the 
hand of the other, as an atonement for the 
crime of disrespect they had committed. 
Accordingly both gentlemen, who were inti- 
mate friends, were conveyed by the duke's 
order to Haddington, and in his grace's 
presence compelled to fight a duel at the 
Water Haugh there, when Mr. Hamilton 
was killed. William Newton married, first, 
a daughter of Fcntoun, of that ilk ; and, 
secondly, Marion Home, relict of James 
Lawson. By the latter he appears to have 
had three sons and two daughters, viz. 

I. .fohn, who predeceased his father, 
leaving two daughters. 



Barhara, ) who, for a certain 
I'lizabeth, \ sum of money, re- 
noun(;ed to their uncle, Patrick, 
all right to the estate. 

II. Patiuck, successor to his father. 

III. Thonuis. 

I. Janet. 

II. Margaret. 

In 1559, Newton was employed as a 
deputy for the ambitious James, earl of 
Bothwell, then high admiral of Scotland, 
as appears by an ol)ligation granted by 
Bothwell to liim of this date ; and, in 15G8, 
we find him devotedly attached to the cause 
of Mary Stuart, fighting under her ban- 
ner at Langside. This procedure, incur- 
ring the pain of forfeiture, a gift of es- 
(dieat of his heritable and moveahle estate 
was issued under the privy seal, in favour 
of his youngest son, Thomas. The deed 
runs in the king's name, with consent of 
the regent Murray, and describes the cause 
of forfeiture. Whether he accompanied the 
queen is doubtful, but if not he went imme- 
diately afterwards, as there is a curious 
account of furnishings made to him and his 
household at tin; period in question : his 
active and heroic exploits seem to have re- 
duced the Newton family to great emergen- 
cies. However, under a general act of paci- 
fication, granted by the king's friends in 
favour of those of the queen, Newton was 
restored to his estate, but not without certain 
sureties being taken for his good behaviour. 
Henry Ogle, of Hartramwood, and David 
Livingston, burgess of Edinburgh, became 
bound as pledges to present him before the 
regent and the lords of secret council upon 
ten days warning, and that he should re- 
main a faithful and obedient subject to his 
majesty, under the pain of one thousand 
pounds : the regent and council shortly 
after, either from suspicion or actual proof 
of his interference in behalf of his royal 
mistress, charged Henry Ogle to present 
Newton before them, and neither making 
their appearance, the regent decreed that 
Henry Ogle had incurred the penalty, and 
ordained letters of " horning and poynding 
of his lands and goodes to be decreet for 
uptaking the sazyn ; " but Newton's son, 
Patrick, becoming surety for Ogle, the pe- 
nalty was not exacted ; and finally, James, 
earl of Morton, obtaining the regency, Pa- 
trick was entirely relieved from responsi- 
bility on account of his father, by a dis- 
charge granted to him in 1.'j87, at Holyrood 
House, by Morton. The laird of Newton 
lived to a great age, and, after settling the 
fee of his possessions on his sons, seems 
to have devolved the management of liis 
worldly matters on his son, Patrick, from 
whom he received an annuity. He died 



28 



HAY NEWTON, OF NEWTOX, 



aliout the year 1590, and was succeeded by 
his said son, 

Patrick Newton, of Newton, who in. 
first, Margaret, duii;j!,hter of James Hamil- 
ton ; and, secondly, Christian Wallace ; 
hut had issue only by the former, viz. two 
sons and four daughters ; Archibald, Wil- 
liam, Margaret, Sibella, Jane, and another. 
In I068, a grant was made to Patrick, (pre- 
viously to his succession), executed by 
Queen Mary subsequently to her majesty's 
esca])e from Loclileven Castle, and prior to 
the battle of Langside ; by which certain 
duties whicli had become due and payable to 
the crown on the death of John, Patrick's 
elder brotlier, as well as the casualties due 
for the marriages of Barbara and Elizabeth, 
were conveyed to Patrick in these terms : 
" ordains aine letter to be made, under her 
privy seall in due form, to loved Patrick 
Newton, son to William Newton, of that 
ilk, his aires and assignes." This docu- 
ment is without date, and appears to have 
been executed in great haste. The grant 
seems to have been redeemed by the crown 
shortly after the defeat of the queen's party, 
and conveyed to secretary Maitland, who 
again reconveyed it to Patrick, on account 
of friendship as he expresses himself. Al- 
though Patrick's constitution was ill fitted 
for such exploits as those of his father, he 
nevertheless neglected not his parliamentary 
duties, and we find his own, and his ances- 
tors' services acknowledged by the crown 
in a curious letter addressed to him by 
Adam Newton, advocate and tutor to Prince 
Henry. In this, Adam states, that his own 
and his ancestors' services to the crown of 
Scotland were duly appreciated by Kin</ 
James, is testified by a charter of confirma- 
tion and Novodamus under the great seal, 
dated 26th January, 1598, iu favour of Pa- 
trick, of the barony of Newton, on resigna- 
tion made in his majesty's hands as superior, 
and there is likewise a writ of exemption, 
under the privy seal, from future services. 
Patrick d. in August, 1G02, and was s. by 
his son, 

AitCHiBALD Newton, of Newton, then in 
minority, who at tlie instance of his bro- 
ther-in-law, James, Lord Hay, of Tester, 
and Sir Robert Kerr, seltlcd his estate on 
his wife Christian, third daughter of Wil- 
liam, sixth Lord Hay, in life rent ; but this 
settlement being subsequently renounced, 
another was made reserving the lands of 
Newton to himself iu life rent and to his 
eldest son Patrick in fee, on which the said 
Patrick obtained a charter of confirmation 
and novod;innis from the crown, under re- 
servation of his fatlicr's life rent. Archi- 
bald and his wife lived to a good old age, 
and left two sons and two daughters, viz. 
1'atrick, John, Margaret, and Mary. The 
elder son, 



Patrick Newton, of Newton, executed 
two several bonds of taillie in 1635 and 
1641, which are remarkable on account of 
naming as a substitute one Peter Newton, 
who is there designed as servitor to his 
majesty A'i?((7 Charles L* Patrick wedded 
.Janet, daughter of Sir James Bannatyne, of 
Newhall, and left an only child, 

Thomas Newion, of Newton, who being 
in minority, his uncle, John, then in the 
Dutch service, obtained from the crown a 
gilt of tutory, as guardian to his nephew, 
but as his profession obliged him to reside 
in Holland, he appointed Alexander Hay, 

* That the familv of tlie great Sir Isaac New- 
ton ■ was a branch of this Scottisli house, ap- 
pears more than probable. The proprietor of 
the Newton estate, at the period of King James's 
accession to tlie Eng-lish crown, was (as above 
stated) Patrick Newton, son of ^Villiam, a zea- 
lous supjjorter of the cause of the unfortunate 
Queen ftlar}'. Patrick is supposed to have ac- 
companied the king- to England, for lie was a 
favourite of the ruling power, and a great friend 
of IMaitland. In 1594 he applied to his majesty 
for an exemption in future from all personal 
services, on account of his divers infinuities, 
which request was accordingly granted bv n 
special writ under the privy seal, dated at Holy- 
rood House the ath July, and jiroduced before 
the sheriff of Edinburgh in the September of the 
same year ; if he went to England, he returned 
again, as he died at Newton Hall. 

According to Dr. Reid, there is little doubt 
that one of the family settled in England, either 
at this period or shortly afterwards, as hy a bond 
of taillie executed by Patrick, son of Archibalil, 
in lGo.>, in favour of his brother John and his 
heirs male, the next person called to them is de- 
signed Pfter Nfwton, (servitor to Ids Majesty 
Charles I.), whom failing, to his heirs male. 
There can be no question aliout this person's being 
a cadet of the fimiily, and if what is said of Sir 
Isaac's descent be true, undoubtedly the situation 
wliich this Peter seems to have held, corresjionds 
with the account given of Sir Isaac's ancestor. 
He is also designed in a second bond of taillie, 
executed by Patrick in the same nianner, in 1()41. 
The ]iro]irie.tor contemporary with Sir Isaac was 
Sir Richard : it has been currently said tliat Sir 
Isaac and Sir Richard were not only related but 
corresponded ; and it is easily accounted for how 
no documents to this effect are to be found in the 
charter chest at Newton. Dame Helen Eiving- 
stone survived Sir Richard her luishand, and 
being naturally disapjiointed that she had no son 
to succeed, she carefully destroyed all the corres- 
pondence of her liusband's and her own time, be- 
sides dispersing a library and all the plate. This 
n])pears the more strilcing as the whole corres- 
pondence, for many generations previous to this 
jieriod, had been carefully preserved. Lady New- 
ton repaired to West (Quarter soon after Sir Hich- 
ard's death, carrying every moveable with her, as it 
is said, rather than it should become the property 
of th(f heir, who seems to have incurred her dis- 
pleasure bv uniformly refusing to accompany her 
to (he parish ciiurch. 



TIAY NEWTON, OF NEWTON. 



20 



of Biirra, factor and cliamberlain for tlic 
iiiaiiaiioincnt of tlic cstati', siil)jc(;t to tlw 
control ol Lord Hay, of VcstiT, anil Sir 
James liauiiatync (sec a curious memo- 
randum of tlic 21st September, HM!>, j;iven 
by John on bis leaving;' Scotland). At tliis 
period civil comTuotions distracted Scot- 
land, and the contrilnitions levied ior the 
numerous f>arrisons were severely felt by 
tiie then Newton ; who was subjected to 
the paynu^nt of sums of money for the 
jj-arrisons of Leith and Tamptatton, and ob- 
iii>ed to supply that of tin; castle of IJothans 
with money, bread, drink, and mutton, and 
also hay, corn, and straw, for the horses, 
beside having a number of troops quartered 
on the barony. This laird dyinj;^ without 
issue, was buried by torch-lij;ht witliin the 
old church of Uothans, and succ<'eded by 
his uncle, 

John Nkwton, of Newton, who married 
a Dutch lady nanu'd Cecilia Vandertail, by 
wliom he acquired a considerable fortune, 
and had two sous and two daughters, viz. 
liichard, James, Margaret, and Cornelia. 
After John's succession lie remained in the 
Dutch service, and seldom visited Scotland. 
He did not neglect his interests at home, 
for shortly after his nephew's death, he 
appointed Alexander Ogilvy his factor, with 
the most particular orders, and maintained 
a regular correspondence with Ogilvy in 
his absence, who appears, in all matters of 
importance, to be instructed to obtain the 
counsel and advice of Lord llumbie. In 
this correspondence there is much curious 
matter, shewing the customs of tlie age. 
John Newton built large additions to the 
house and all the garden walls. At this 
time the ward or prison was so crowded with 
culprits, that on an application from Lord 
flay of Tester's tenants for liberty to work 
limestone, Ogilvy thus recommends the 
mode of giving them a supply by a letter to 
the laird of Newton : " I hear great mur- 
niurings amongst the Lord Hay's tenants for 
lymestone, and yor own complaines sare for 
them also, if ye pleas let the prisoiie dor be 
opened, and let them have some of the pri- 
soners for a ransom, ye may do as ye think 
gude." In 1(550, Newton came over to 
Scotland for the purpose of settling divers 
mitters with Ogilvy, and he procured a 
passport, dated 21st August in the same 
year, from the famous General Monk. He 
d. in 1658, and was s. by his son, 

Richard Newton, of Newton, who being 
educated under the eye of his father, inhe- 
rited his feelings and prejudices, particularly 
in regard to a due ol)servance of the rights 
of his barony (see Minutes of the 13aron 
Court, which are truly ridiculous and very 
curious). This court had been held from 
time immemorial within the town of New- 
ton, called Long-Newton, (from the strag- 



gling Icnglh and appearance of the village;, 
on a green mouul u hich lay i" the middle of 
the village, and had a circle cut out at the 
top of it. Its proceedings were conducted 
with the greatest solemnity, under the super- 
intendain;e of three diiferent oflicers, with 
regular salaries, a baron baillie, procurator 
fiscal, and clerk. Centlemen were em- 
powered to hold a court whenever in their 
opinion the refractory state of the barony^ 
recpiired it, and the decrees were generally 
to the discomtiture of the unfortunate cul- 
prits. This laird, who succeeded to a good 
deal of property in Holland, went thither 
with his sister (Cornelia, as appears by a 
passport signed by (3iiARLi;s H. and re- 
nuiined abroad until the year 1667, when 
he returned and was employed to raise the 
troo|)s required in East Lothian for the king's 
service. He in. in 1668, the famous Lady 
Julian Home, sister to Sir Patrick Home 
of Polwarth, created by William HI. earl 
of Marchmont,* but survived his marriage 
littl(! more than a year, when he was *. by 
his only son, 

KiCHAKD Newton, of Newton, whose af- 
fairs were conducted, during his minority. 



* Sir Patrick Home, of Polwurth, first Earl 
OF JMarcumont, early distinguished liimself in 
the cause of liberty. ^\ hen the privy council 
passed an order, compelliiit>' the counties to pay 
the expense of the garrisons arbitrarily placed 
in them, he refused to pay his quota, and by a 
bill of suspension presented to the court of ses- 
sion, endeavoured to procure redress. The coun- 
cil ordered him to be imprisoned for no otiier 
crime, as it would ajipear, than that of haviiio^ 
attemjjted to ])rocure bv a legal process, a legal 
decision on a ])oint of law. After having re- 
mained in close confinement in Stirling- Castle for 
nearly /o«r years, he was set at liberty through 
the favour and interest of the duke of JNIonmoutL. 
Having- af'terw-ards engaged in schemes connected 
with tiiose imputed to Sidney and Mussel, orders 
were issued for seizing him at his house of INlarch- 
mont, but having had timely notice of his danger 
from his relation Home, of Nine Wells, a gentle- 
man attached to the royal cause, but whom party 
spirit. had not rendered insensible to tlie ties of 
friendship. He found means to conceal himself 
for a time, and shortly after to escape biwond sea. 
His concealment was in the family burying place, 
where the means of sustaining- life were brought 
to him by his daughter, a girl of fifteen years of 
age, whose duty and affection furnished her with 
courage to brave the terrors, to which she was 
exposed bv any intercourse with her father. Sir 
Patrick returned with thi> earl of Argyle's expe- 
dition in favour of Monuumtli, but after tlie result 
of that unfortun-ate invasion, he was obliged again 
to seek security by concealing himself some time 
in the house, under the protection of Lady Elea- 
nor Dunbar, sister to the earl of Eglintoun, after 
■which he found nieiuis to escape to Holland, from 
wlieuce he returned and was created, first. Lord 
Home, of Pohvarlli, and then earl of MarcliinoLt. 



30 



PENNANT, OF DOWNING AND BYCHTON. 



with great judgment by his mother, Lady 
Julian Newton, who died in 1692, leaving 
her son in full possession of his paternal 
estate, which had accumulated, under her 
guardianship, to a considerable amount. 
Early instructed in the principles to which 
his uncle was attached. This laird natu- 
rally espoused tlie cause of King William, 
and was created by that monarch a baronet, 
at the same time that Sir Patrick Home 
was raised to the peerage. Sir Richard 
is designed knight baronet in numerous 
documents, and a receipt is extant for the 
fees payable at his creation. He in. a 
daughter of Sir William Livingstone, of 
West Quarter, but having no issue, settled, 
under reservation of Lady Newton's life 
rent, the estate of Newton, by entail dated 
18th June, 1724, on Richard Hay, esq. 
fourth son of Lord William Hay, and grand- 



father of Richard Hay-Newton, esq. pre- 
sent possessor of Newton. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, vert a 
lion rampant or, on a (;hief of the second 
three roses gu. for Newton ; second and 
third, quarterly, first and fourth arg. three 
escutcheons gu. ; second, az. three cinque- 
foils arg. ; third, gu. three bars erm. for 
Hay. 

Crests — A demi lion rampant holding in 
his dexter paw a naked sword, ppr. for 
Newton. A goat's head erased arg. armed 
or, for Hay. 

Mottoes — For Newton, Pro patria : for 
Hay, Spare nought. 

Supporters — Two lions guardant gu, each 
gorged with a collar or. 

Estates — In Haddingtonshire. 

Seat — Newton Hall, North Britain. 



PENNANT, OF DOWNING AND BYCHTON. 



PENNANT, DAVID, esq. of Downing- and Bychton, in the county of Flint, b. 

8th November, 1763; m. 12th December, 1793, Louisa, 
second daug-hter of Sir Henry Peyton, bart. and niece 
of John, earl of Stradbroke, and has one son, 

David, b. 22nd January, 1796, who m. first, the 
Lady Caroline Spencer-Churchill, only daughter 
of George, duke of Marlborough, and by her, 
who died in 1824, had an only child, Caroline, b. 
8th December, 1823, who d. 22nd Jaimary, 1832. 
He wedded, secondly, the Lady Emma Brudenell, 
daughter of Robert, earl of Cardigan, and had by 
her a daughter, Louisa. Mr. Pennant died 15th 
February, 1835. 



Mr. Pennant, who succeeded his father in 1798, served 
the office of high sheriff of Flintshire the following year. 




Hintage. 



This is another branch of the descendants 
of Tudor Trevor, to whom so many of the 
principal families of North Wales and the 
Marches trace their origin (see vol. ii. p. 329). 
Tudur Trevor was father of Lu'DDocca, 
fatlier of Llowarch Gam, father of Edny- 
VED, whose son, R Ys Sais, so called because 
he could speak the Saxon, or English lan- 
guage, possessed great estates in North 
Wales and Sliropshire at the period of the 
Norman conquest, which he divided among 
his sons in the year 1070. The eldest, Tu- 
dur, was fatlier of Bi.eddyn, the father of 
Owen, the father of Thomas, whose son, 

Meilir, was seated at Bryn, in the town- 



ship of Halghton, and parish of Hanmer, 
Flintshire. He was father of 

Madoc ap Meilir, who acquired the estate 
of Bychton, in the parish of Whiteford, 
Flintshire, by marriage with Alice, the 
daugliter and heir of Philip o Ff hychdyn, 
(thiit is, in English, Philip of Bychton), son 
of Philip y Swydden Wyddel, or Philip, 
tlie Irish ofticer, one of the cavaliers who 
accompanied Gruflydd ap Cynan, Prince of 
Wales, from Ireland, to assist him in reco- 
vering his dominions, tlien usurped byTra- 
hacarn ap Caradog. The great and deci- 
sive victory obtained by Gruffydd over the 
usurper, (and in which Trahaiarn was slain), 



PENNANT, OF DOWNING AND liYCMITON. 



31 



on tlio mountains of Carno, in the county 
of Montfiomery, anno 1077, the valour of 
Pliilip mainly a<-lii('ve(l, and firnflydd, thus 
r<'irislatc(i in his priiicipaiily, was not un- 
mindful of Ills Milesian general, for lie he- 
stowed upon him great possessions, of which 
Bychton, in tiie ))arisli of Wliitford, formed 
a part. Tiie arms, home hv his son Pliilip, 
who was seated at Uychton, were " Ar. 
three hars wavy az. the centre bar charged 
witli tiiree sheldrakes of the first." Tiiese 
ensigns, ac(|uired with the Bychton estate, 
the descendants of Madoc and Alice have 
quartered down to the present day. ler- 
werth (or Edward), the son of Madoc and 
Alice, was father of Kenrick, tlie father of 
Ithel, the father of Tudur, wliose son, 

David ai» Tudur, first adopted the cog- 
nomen of Pennant, and from him all of the 
name derive their descent. This surname 
is truly British, derived from Pen, a head, 
and Nant, a dingle, the ancient mansion of 
Bychton being seated at the head of a very 
considerable dingle on the old family estate. 
David wi. first, Janet, danghter of David, of 
Trefcastle, in Tegengl, and had by her a 
son and two daughters, viz. 

Rees, his heir. 

Jane, jm. to John David, of Bachcurig. 
Anne, m. to Griffith ap Lin ap Blethyn, 
of Panty Llongdy. 

David Pennant wedded, secondly, Anne, 
daughter of John Done, of Utkington, in 
Cheshire, by Anne his wife, daughter of 
Richard Heaton, of Heaton, and had 

Thomas, abbot of Basingwerk, Flint- 
shire, celebrated by Guttyn Owain, 
a Welsh bard of the year 1480, who 
records the hospitality of tlie abbot 
in a poem printed in the collection of 
Mr. Rhys Jones. The poet is so 
liberal of his praise as to say, " that 
he gave twice the treasure of a king 
in wine." Guttyn Owaiu and Tudor 
Aled, another noted bard, speak not 
only of the abbot's works of utility ; 
of the water and windmills he erected; 
of his having enlarged and beautified 
the abbey ; but also compliment him 
on his prowess in battle. Thomas 
Pennant, quitting his profession, be- 
came, in the law term, a monk de- 
raiffne, and m. Angharad, daughter 
of Gwilim ap Griffith, of the great 
house of Penrhyn, in Carnarvonshire, 
by whom he had issue, 

1. Edward, of Holywell, who m. 
Catliarine, daughter of John ap 
Davydd ap Ithel Vychan, and 
was ancestor of the Pennants 
of Bagillt. (See the end of tliis 
article). 

2. Thomas, vicar of Holywell. 



.3. Nic-holas, al)bot of Basingwerk, 
wiio married and had a son, 
Edward, of Holywell, whowi. 
Jane, daughter and heiress 
of Tliomas ap Howel, of 
Calived, and was father of 
John, of Holywell, wlio in. 
Margaret, daughter of Hugh 
Mostyn, of the Grange, and 
had, with other issue, a 
daughter, Lucy, wife of Pe- 
ter Ellis, of Cairns, and a 
son and heir, 
John, of Holywell, who in. 
Mary, daughter and heir of 
Thomas ap Thomas, of Mer- 
tyn, in the parish of Whit- 
ford, and had an only daugh- 
ter and heiress, 
Margaret, m. to David 
Pennant, esq. of Bych- 
ton. 

L Agnes, m. to John Griffith, esq. 

of Twna. 
2. Margaret, vt. to Griffith Uoyd 
ap John ap Griffith ap David. 
Roger. 

Hugh, ofTeiriad or priest, a distin- 
guished poet of the reign of Henry 
VIII. In 1575, at an Eisteddfod at 
Caerwis, he was secondary student in 
vocal song. 
David Pennant's eldest son, 

Rees Pennant, of Bychton, espoused 
Margaret, daughter of Rees ap Reinallt, of 
Pentre Hobbyn, and was father of 

Hugh Pennant, of Bychton, who m. Ja- 
net, daughter of Richard ap Howel ap levan 
Vychan, of Mostyn, sister to Thomas Mos- 
tyn, of Mostyn, and Pyers Mostyn, of Tal- 
acre. By this lady he had issue, 

Thomas, his heir. 

Richard. 

William, an eminent goldsmith of Lon- 
don, who lived at the Queen's Head, 
in Smithfifild, and by the sign of his 
shop, and by several bequests he 
made to persons about the court, he 
probably was goldsmith and jeweller 
to the royal family. He purchased 
considerable estates, and at his de- 
mise left a large fortune to his ne- 
phew Hugh, together with a consi- 
derable sum in charity to Whitford 
parish, which still enjoys the same. 

John. 

Pyers, one of the four gentlemen ushers 
to Queen Elizabeth. He obtained 
for himself and other members of his 
family a grant of the crest now borne 
by the Pennants, together with a con- 
firmation of their arms on the 2nd of 



3-2 



PENNANT, OF DOWNING AND BYCHTON, 



May, 1580, from Robert Cooke, cla- 
rcncieux kingj of arms. 
Nicholas, who vi. Catharine, daughter 
of Griffith ap John ap Robert, of 
Whitford, and had a son, 

John Pknnant, esq. who wedded 
Jane, daufthter and heiress of 
John Lloyd ap Llewellyn ap 



widow of Roger Middleton, esq. of Gwae- 
nynog. By her lie had, with two daughters, 
Jane, wife of Thomas ap Thomas, of Meli- 
deu, and Catharine, wife of Richard Sneyd, 
esq. a son and successor, 

Hugh Pennant, esq. of Bychton, who 
m. Lucv, daughter of Henry Conway, esq. 
of Bodshyddan, and by her, who died in 



Rees, of Downing, by whom he February, Kill, bad issue, 



acquired that estate, whereon he 
erected a mansion in 1627. Tlie 
materials were brought from 
Naiit y bi, a dingle opposite to 
the house. There is a tradition 
tliat the stones were rolled along 
a platform from the top of the 
quarry, raised on an inclined 
l)lane', till they reached the build- 
ing, and there were elevated as 
the work increased in height, till 



Pyeks, liis heir. 

II. Thomas. 

III. Hugh, in. a daughter of Edward 
Owen, esq. 

I. Grace, m. to Gronwy Griffith, esq. 

II. Catharine, m. to Edward Meredith, 
esq. of Chester. 

III. Elinor, d. unm. 
The eldest son, 

Pyers Pennant, esq. of Bychton, was 
hiuh sheritV of Flintshire in Kill. He m. 



the whole was completed. The Jane, daughter of INlorris Kyflin, esq. ot 
house is in the form of a Roman j Maenan, by Margaret, daughter of Thomas 
H, a mode of architecture very | Mostyn, esq. of Alostyn, and had issue, 

1. Thomas, his heir. 



common in AVales at that period 
On the front is the pious motto, 
Heb Ddim heb ddim, a Duw a 
diffon : that is, " Without God 
there is nothing, with (iod 
enough." John Pennant had, by 
the heiress of Downing, with two 
daughters, Margaret, m. to Tlio- 
nias Parry, and Catharine, m. 
' to Robert ap Edward, a son and 

successor, 
Hugh Pennant, esq. of Downing, 
who m. Mary, daughter of John 
Humphrey si^ esq. of Plas Belyn, 
and relict of Edward Jones, esq. 
of lal, and was *. by his son, 
Robert Pennant, esq. of Down- 
ing, who m. Mary, daughter and 
co-lieiress of Harry Conway, esq. 
of Nant, and had issue, 

1. Hugh, who d. s. J), in 1G7.5. 

2. John, who d. s. p. in 1(591. 

3. Thomas, who d. issueless 
in 1724, and bequeathed 
Downing to David Pen- 
nant, esq. of Bychton. 

1. Lucy, d. in 1703. 

2. Jane. 

3. Catharine, d. in 1701. 

Catharine, ?w. to Thomas Parry, esq. 

of Morlaud. 
Janet, m. to John ap Rees, of Tiir A1)- 

bot. 
Grace. 
Jane. 
Mary. 
Eleanor. 
Hugh Pennant was s. by his eldest son, 

Thomas Pennant, escj. of Bychton, who 
wedded Catharine, daughter of David Llwyd 
ap David of (Jlanyllyn, near Bala, and 



II. David, successor to his brother. 

III. Hugh, of Bryn Shone, major in 
the service of Chari.es I. who greatly 
distinguished himst-lf in tiie Isle of 
Anglesey against General Mytton, 
m. first, Margaret,* baroness Long- 
ford, daughter of Sir Thomas Cave, 
knt. ; and, secondly, Elizabeth, dan. 
of John Eyton, esq. of Leeswood. 
He died in 16G9. 

I. Elizabeth, in. to Peter Griffith, esq. 
of Caerwys Hall. 

II. Lucy, ?h! to Harry Conway, esq. of 
Nant". 

III. Grace, m. to Thomas Matthews, 
esq. of Denbigh. 

IV. Margaret, m. to John Vaughan, esq. 
of Bronhinlog. 

V. Jane, m. to Jolni Humphreys, esq. 
of the W^ern. 

Pyers Pennant d. in 1G23, ami was s. by 
his eldest son, 

Thomas Pennant, esq. of Bychton, high 
sheriff of Flintshire in 1G33, who in. Mar- 
garet, daughter of Edward Wynne, esq. of 
Ystrad, son of Morris Wynne, esq. of Gwe- 



* This lady had four husbands ; she paid our 
country tlie compliment of beginning and ending 
witli a Uelshmnn : lier first was Sir.lolni \\ yiuie, 
of G wedir, jvniior ; they lived unhappily tof^ether, 
which sent hini on his travels to Italy, wliere he 
died at Lucca. She then took one of the Milesian 
race, for she married Sir Francis Aungier, .Master 
of the Rolls in Ireland, afterwards created Baron 
l.ontrford. 'I'liirdlv, she gave her hand to an 
Knglisliman, Sir 'I'lionias Wenman, of Oxford- 
shire ; and, finally, she resigned lier antiquated 
clianus to our gallant major, who in tlie vear 1().56 
dejiosited her with his ancestors, in the church of 
^\'llitford. — Thomas Pennant. 



PENNANT, OF DOWNING AND BYCIITON. 



(lir, but liaviiis no issue, lio was s. at his 
decease, in 1034, by his brollicr, 

David J'ennant, esq. of Hycliton, slierifl' 
of Flintshiri- in HM'i. This ficiiUcnian, during- 
the eivil wars, adhered to the royal eause, 
and lu'ld a major's coniniission in that ser- 
vice. " lie was," s;iys his descendant, 
Thomas Pennant the historian, " an ofHcer 
in tlie garrison of Denhioh wiien it was be- 
sieged and tali-en by my mat(!rnal great great 
grandfatiier. General Mytton. My loyal 
ancestor suffered there a long iiUprison- 
nient. Bychton was plundered, and the dis- 
tress of tlie family so great, that he was 
kept from starving by force of conjugal 
affection, for his wife often walked with a 
bag of oatmeal from the parish of Whiteford 
to Denbigh to relieve his wants." * fie in. 
Margaret, daughter and heiress of Jolin 
Pennant, esq. of Flolywell, and by her, 
who (I. in 1700, had issue, 
Pyers, his heir. 

John, who m. Sarnh, daughter of — 
Parry, esq. of Merton, and d. in 
1709, aged sixty-nine. lie was buried 
at Chelsea, " where," says Thomas 
Pennant, " he had resided, and where 
my father often visited liim during 
the boyish holydays. My father told 
me he was frequently taken by him 
to the Don Saltero Coffee House, 
where he used to see poor Ricliard 
Cromwell, a little aiul very neat old 
man, with a most placid countenance, 
the effect of his innocent and unam- 
bitious life." 
Mary, in. to John Salusbury, esq. of 
Bachegraig. 

Major Pennant d. in 1666, and was s. bv 
his son, 

Pykks Pennant, esq. of Bychton, vice 
admiral of North Wales, who vi. Catha- 
rine,! daughter of Robert Davies, esq. of 
Gwasaney, by Ann his wife, daughter and 
heiress of Sir Peter Mutton, knt.'of Llan- 



* Notwithstanding the zeal of his house for 
the royal cause, it suffered very little in respect 
to the general composition of delinrmeiits; the 
Bychton estate only paid 42/. 14s. whereas Ro- 
bert Pennant, of Downing, paid not less than 
298/. for his estate, which was very far inferior 
to the otlior. The occasion was this : Robert 
Pennant had the misfortune to have a hot headed 
young fellow in his house, when a small detach- 
ment of the adverse party, with a comet at the 
head aj>proached tlie jtlace. He persuaded the 
lamily to resist ; the doors were barricadoed, a 
musket fired, and the cornet wounded. The house 
was soon forced, and of course plundered ; but 
such was the moderation of the party, no carnaoe 
ensued, and the only revenge seems" to have been 
the disproportionate fine afterwards levied. 

t Was one of the celebrated seven sisters 
of the house of Gwysanev, who were all married 
about the same time, and "all became widows. 

3. 



nerch, chief justice of North "Wales, (see 
vol. ii. jiages 277 arul 521), and had issue, 
Petek, his heir. 

Robert, /j. in 1664, buried | at Pancraa 
in 168L>. He was atteiuled to his 
grave, as was then tin; custom, by a 
most numerous set of friends, among 
whom were two bisho|)S and the first 
gentry of North Wales, who hap- 
pened then to be in town. 

Eliza, died in infancy. 

Mary, m. to Simon Thelwall, escj. of 

Llanbedr. 
Catherine, died in 1740. 

Pyers Pennant d. in 1690, and was *. by his 
elder son, 

Peter Pennant, esq. of Bychton, who 
m. first, Catharine, second daughter of Owen 
Wynne, esq. of Glynn, sheriff of Merio- 
nethshire in 1674, of Flintshire in 1675, 
and of Carnarvonshire in 1676, by Eliza- 
beth his wife, daughter and heiress of Ro- 
bert Mostyn, esq. of Nant, and had issue, 

I. David, his heir. 

II. John, A.M. rector of Hadley, and 

chaplain to the Princess Dowager of 

Wales, d. in 1770, aged seventy. 

MI. Robert, } , ,, ,. , 

IV. Peter, I hoth died s. p. 

I. Elizabeth, b. in 1687, d. in 1775. 

II. Catharine, b. in 1688, d. in 1754. 

III. Margaret, b. in 1690, d. in 1775. 
Mr. Pennant, on the demise of his first wife, 
went into the army temp. Queen Anne, and 
served at the siege of Brussels. Disgusted 
however with his colonel. Sir Thomas Pren- 
dergast, after demanding satisfaction, which 
Sir Henry declined, he resigned, and passed 
the remainder of his days at Bychton. He 
wedded, secondly, the widow of' Robert Da- 
vies, esq. of Gwasaney and Llannerch, and 
daughter of — "Vaughan, esq. of Traws- 
goed, but had no other issue. He d. in 
1736, and was *. by his son, 

David Pennant, esq. of Bychton, who 
inherited Downing from his kinsman, Tho- 
mas Pennant, esq. He m. Arabella, third 
daughter of Richard Mytton, esq. of Hal- 
ston, in Shropshire, by Sarah his wife, 
daughter of Sir John Houblon, knt. lord 
mayor of London, and had issue, 

I \\'illi this inscription : 

Gentilibus suis compositus 

Robertus Pennant 

Filius secundus Pyercei Pennant, de Bychton, 

In com. Hint. arm. 

Et Katherina?, sororis Robert! Davies, 

Hie reconditus. 

Qui cum omnia obiisset munera. 

.Tuvenem (pia; suis charum reddcre poteraut 

Febre Londini correptus, 

Desideratus seque ac notus decessit 

^tatis Ao, 24, 

JIDC. XXXIX. 

D 



34 



PENNANT, OK DOWNING AND BYCHTON. 



1. 



Thomas, liis heir. 

, John, d. youiio- in 1728. 

' twins, born 



in 1729, 

1. Sarah, J l>otli died unmarried ; 

u. Catharine, 1 tlie former in 1780, 

- the latter in 1797. 

Mr. Pennant, who was high sheriff of Flint- 

sliire in 1739, d. in January, 17G3, aged 

seventy-eight, and was s. by his son, 

Thomas Pennant, esq. of Downing and 
Bychton, the celebrated naturalist and tra- 
veller. This distinguished person, who was 
born at Downing 14th ..June, 172G, studied 
at Queen's College, Oxford, and afterwards 
removed to Oriel College, in the same uni- 
versity, where he took the degree of D.C.L. 
in 1771. At twelve years of age he was 
inspired with a passion for natural history 
by a present of Willughby's " Ornithology," 
from Mrs. Piozzi's father ; and for mine- 
rals and fossils by a visit to Doctor Borlase 
in 1747 His first production was an ac- 
count of an earthquake, felt in Flintshire, 
2nd April, 1750, which appeared in the 
Philosophical Transactions in 1756; and the 
following year he was chosen a member of 
tiie Royal Society of Upsal, through the 
influence of tlie great Linna;iis, with whom 
he corresponded. In 17GI, he commenced 
the folio edition of " the British Zoology," 
w Inch was afterwards republished in quarto 
and octavo, and translated into German by 
C. Theop. Murr. This work was followed 
bv his " Indian Zoology," 1769, "Synopsis 
of Quadrupeds." 1771, " Genera of Birds," 
"History of Qaadrupeds," 1781, "Arctic 
Zoology," 1786, and " Index to Butfon's 
Natural History of Birds," 1787 ; which are 
liis principal works relative to the depart- 
ment of science, wliich he chiefly cultivated: 
but he also published a number of detached 
essays and papers in the Philosophical 
Transactions on similar subjects. In 1765. 
Mr. Pennant travelled to the continent and 
visited Buffon, Haller, Pallas, and other 
eminent foreigners. He was admitted into 
the Royal Society in 1767. In 1769 he un- 
dertook a journey into Scotland, of Avhich 
he published an account in 1771; and an- 
other volume appeared in 1776, relating to 
a second tour in the same country, and a 
ivoyage to the Hebrides. In 1778, he pub- 
lished a tour in Wales ; to which was after- 
wards added, in a subsequent volume, a 
journey to Snowdon. He produced, in 1782, 
& narrative of a " Jovirney from Chester to 
i.oiKJon ; " ;i\id, in 1790, his popular " Ac- 
count of London." In 1793, he professedly 
took leave of tiie ))ublic, in a piece of auto- 
biography, which he entitled " The literary 
Life of the late Thomas Pennant ; " but 
tills did not prove to be his latest produc- 
tion, as he afterwards committed to the 
press u " History of the Parishes of W hite- 



ford and Holywell." He died 16th De- 
cember, 1798^ at his seat in Flintshire. 
After his death appeared "Outlines of the 
Globe ; " his " Journey from London to the 
Isle of Wight," 1801 ; his " Tour from 
Downing to Alston Moor ; " and his " Tour 
from Alston Moor to Harrowgate." Mr. 
Pennant married first, in 1759, Elizabeth, 
daughter of James Falconer, esq. of Ches- 
ter, and by her, who (/. in June, 1764, had 
two sons and one daughter, viz. 

Thomas, d. an infant in 1760. 

David, successor to his father. 

Arabella, m. to Edward, son of Sir 
Walden Hanmer, bart. and died in 
1828. 
He wedded, secondly, in 1777, Anne, daugh- 
ter of Sir Thomas Mostyn, bart. of Mostyn, 
by whom, who d. in 1802, he had 

Thomas, rector of Weston Turville, 

Bucks, b. in 1780, who wj. Caroline, 

daughter of Thomas Griffith, esq. of 

Rhual. 

Sarah, b. in 1779, and d. in 1794. 

Pennant, who served the office of high 



Mr. 

sherift' of Flintshire in 1761, d. 16th De- 
cember, 1798, and was s. by his son, the 
present David Pennant, esq. of Downing 
and Bychton. 

^r/«5— First, party per bend sinister, er- 
mine and ermines, a "lion rampt. or, langued 
and armed gu. ; second, arg. three bars 
wavy az. in the centre bar three sheldrakes 
of the first; third, az. three boars in pale 
arg. ; fourth, arg. on a bend az. three fieurs 
de lys of the field. 

Crest— Out of a ducal coronet, an heraldic 
antelope's head arg. horned and maned or. 

Estates— In Flintshire. 

Seats— Bowning and Bychton, both in 
Flintshire. 

jf amtlij of 13rnnant, of Uagillt. 

Edwaud Pennant, eldest son of Thomas 
Pennant, abbot of Basingwerk, second son 
of David ap Tudur Pennant, of Bychton, 
was seated at Holywell, in Flintshire. He 
m. Catharine, daughter of Jolin ap Davydd 
ap Ithel Yychan, and had, with other issue, 
Henry, his heir. 
I David, of Hendre Figillt, who m. Deili, 

I daughter and heir of John ap levan, 

of Hal ton. 
Jane, jh. to Thomas Conway, esq. of 
Nant. 
The elder son, 

Henry Pennant, esq. of Holywell and 
IJagillt, by Margaret his wife, daughter of 
John ap Griliith Vychan, of Pant y Llong- 
dy, had one son and six daughters, viz.^ 
NiciioLAS, his heir. , 



PENNANT, OF DOWNING AND BYCTITON. 



35 



Jane, m. to John Dicas, of Kiiiiurton. 
Alice, m. to Henry ap Hugh, of Holy- 
well. 
Anne, m. to Thomas ap Thomas, of 

Wliitford. 
Margaret, m. to Hugh Thomas, of 

Llanasaph. 
Ellen, died unm. 
Catharine. 
The son and heir, 

Nicholas Pknnant, esq. of Ilolvwell and 
Bagillt, espoused Jane, daughter of William 
Mostyn, es(i. of IJasinwerke, and had, inter 
alios, a daughter, Elizabeth, wife of Robert 
W^oolmer, and a son and successor, 

Edward Pknnant, esq. of Bagillt, who 
m. Eliza, daughter of Edward GilVard, esq. 
of White Ladies, county of Staflord, and 
had issue, 

I. Edward, his heir. 

II. Gilford, a military officer, who went 
to Jamaica in 1G55. He in. 7th Sep- 
tember, 16G9, Elizabeth Aldwinkle, 
and (i. ill 167G, leaving, with a daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, ?m. to — Lewis, esq. 
a son, 

Edward Pennant, esq. h. 1G72, of 
Clarendon, in Jamaica, chief jus- 
tice of the island, who m. Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of Col. John 
Moore, and aunt of Sir Henry 
]\Ioore, bart. Lieut. Governor of 
Jamaica, by whom he had issue, 

1. Edward. 

2. John, who m. Bonella, dan. 
of — Hodg^es, esq. and had 
two sons, one of whom was 
John, who d. s. p. ; the other, 

Richard, of Winnington 
and Penrhyn Castle, 
was created Baron 
Penrhyn, of the king- 
dom of Ireland. His 
lordship m. Anne-Su- 
sannah, daughter and 
heir of General Hugh 
Warburton, but died 
without issue. 

3. Samuel (Sir), knt. lord 
mayor of London in 1749. 
He died the following year. 

4. Gifford. 

5. Henry. 

1. Judith, ni. to John Lewis, 
esq. 

2. Smart, vi. to Rev. William 
May, rector of Kingston, 
kill'ed in the storm of 1722. 

3. Elizabeth, in. to Henry 
Dawkins, esq. of Jamaica, 
and had two sons, 



Henry DAWKiN.s,esq.^vho 
m. the Lady Julia Col- 
yer, daughter of the 
earl of Portmore, and 
liad issue, 

James Dawkius. 
Henry Dawkins. 
Geor(;e- Hay Daw- 
kins, now I*KN- 
NANT, esq. of Pen- 
rhyn Castle. 
Richard Dawkins. 
lulward Dawkins. 
John Dawkius. 
James Dawkins, the ori- 
ental traveller. 

4. Sarah, m. to Col. Thomas 
Rovvden. 

5. Mary, in. to John Morant, 
esq. 

in. George. 

I. Frances, 7r?. to Robert Owen, bishop 
of St. Asaph. 

II. Elizabeth, vi. to Philip Longton, 
esq. 

III. Anne, m. to Edward Parry, esq. 

IV. Jane. 

V. Mary, ?n. 1o John Mostyn, esq. of 
Brynford. 

VI. AVinefred. 

VII. Agnes. 

VIII. Mildred. 
The eldest son, 

Edward Pennant, esq. of Bagillt, wed- 
ded Catharine, daughter of Edward Kynas- 
ton, esq. of Oteley, and by her, who d. in 
1726, had, with three younger sons and two 
daughters, Trevor, the wife of John Lloyd, 
esq. of Pentre Hobbyn, and Catherine, wife 
of John Wynne, esq. of Tower, a son and 
successor, 

Roger Pennant, esq. of Bagillt, who m. 
Elizabeth, daughter of — Mostyn, esq. of 
Rhyd, and had two sons and five daughters, 
viz. Edward, his heir; John; Dorothy; 
Elizabeth ; Anne ; Catharine ; and Marga- 
ret, the vv'ife of Thomas Crichley, e-sq. she d. 
in 17G2. Mr. Pennant d. in 1735, and was 
s. by his elder son, 

Edward Pennant, esq. of Bagillt, who 
espoused Mary, daughter of George Water- 
man, esq. of Barbadoes, and had two sons, 
Edward, his heir, and William, who d. un- 
married in 1753. Mr. Pennant was s. at 
his demise in 1741, by the elder, 

Edward Pennant, esq. of Bagillt, high 
sheriff of Flintshire in 17.53, who d. unni. at 
Marseilles in 1778, having previously (in 
1776) sold Bagillt Hall, and all his estates 
in Holywell township, to Thomas Pennant, 
esq. of Downing. 



36 



EGERTON, OF TATTON PARK. 

EGERTON, WILBRAHAM, esq. of Tatton Park, in the county of Chester, h. 

1st September, 1781 ; m. 11th January, 1806, his first 
cousin, Elizabeth, second daughter of Sir Christopher 
Sykes, hart, of Sledmere House, Yorkshire, and has 
had issue, 

I. William-Tatton, M.P. for Cheshire, J. 30th De- 
ceniher, 1800; m. 18th December, 1830, the Lady 
Charlotte-Elizabeth Loftus, eldest daughter of the 
Marqiiess of Elv, and has had two sons, "Wilbra- 
ham, h. 17th January, ISIJ'i, and Loftus-Edward, h. 
2,'>th July, 1833, (who died an infant,) with a daugh- 
ter, b. in November, 1834. 

II. Wilbraham, captain 43rd light infantry, h. 31st 
ISIav, 1808. 

III. Thomas, h. 16th Novendjer, 1809. 

IV. George, h. in Mav, 1813, and d. in August, 1814. 

V. Mark, b. 27th January, 1815, and d. 28th Decem- 
ber. 1831. 

VI. Edward-Christopher, b. 27th July, 1816. 
VII. Charles-Randle, b. 12th May, 1818. 

I. Elizabeth-Beatrix, died an infant in 1811. 
II. Elizabeth-Mary-Charlotte, died an infant in 1821. 

III. Oiarlotte-Lucy-Beatrix. 

This gentleman, who succeeded his father 17th April, 1806, represented the county 
of Chester for nineteen years in parliament, and served the office of sherift in 1808. 
He is lieutenant-colonel of the Yeomanry Cavalry, lieutenant-colonel of the Local 
Militia, and a magistrate and deputy lieutenant for Cheshire. 




Umcaqe. 



This branch of the Egerton family has 
enjoyed, for a long series of years, extensive 
estates and leading influence in the palati- j 
nate of Chester. 

Sir Thomas Egf.kion, (son of Sir Rich- 
ard Egerton, of Jiidley), the celebrated 
LOUD CHANCELLOK, was bom in Cheshire i 
abont the year 1540, aiul admitted of Bra- 
zennose College, Oxford, in 1556. The 
Athena; Oxonienses give an account of his 
early pursuits, and state his having " ap- j 
l)li(<l his nuisc to severe study in this univer- ! 
sity, where, continuing ahont three years, ' 
he laid a foundation whereon to build ])ro- j 
founder learning. Afterwards, going to ' 
Lincoln's Inn, lie made a most hapjjy pro- 
gress in llie municipal laws, and at length 
was a counsellor of note." In 1681, Mr. 
Egertou's eminent abilities were rewarded 
with the office of solicitor-general, and in 
1592 with the attorney-generalship. In 
1594, he was raised to" the Rolls bench, 



having previously received the honour of 
knighthood ; and, in 1.596, obtained the 
custody of the great seal, as the title 
oC lord keeper. To this high station he 
was elevated by the especial favour of 
his royal mistress, and the universal wish 
of the country, " every one," as Camden 
says, " having conceived mighty hopes and 
expectations of his lordship." Alter re- 
taining this ollii-e during the reign of 
Elizabi:tii, he was created, by her suc- 
cessor, on the 21st July, 1603,'Bakon El- 
i.KSMi.iu:, and constituted LoiU) iiiGii CHAN- 
CF.LLOK of England. To attempt even the 
most abridged epitome of the affairs in which 
Lord Ellesmere a])pears a principal actor, 
during bis eventful and splendid career, 
would far exceed our limits. Among those, 
liowever, may be especially noted the trea- 
ties with the Dutch and the Danes, 40th and 
42n(l lu.i/ABLTH ; his exertions in behalf of 
the ill fated Essex ; the trials of Lords Cob- 



EGERTON, OF TATTON PARK. 



37 



liam and Groy de Wilton in 1(503; the ne- 
gotiations rcs|)(Mtinf;- the proposed union of 
tlie crowns of l-liiiiland and ScotlniKl in 
1604; the struggle witli Ijoril (^liief Justice 
Coivc, in reference to the jurisdiction of tlie 
Court of Ciiancery i" 1615; and tlie trial 
of the earl and countess of Somerset, in 
tlie following year, for the murder of Sir 
Thomas Overbury. The lord chancellor, 
now more than seventy-six years of age, 
feeling both the powers of his mind and 
body shrink, under the pressure of age 
and inlirmity, entreated from the king, in 
two pathetic letters, a discharge from his 
high office which he had held nearly twenty- 
two years. His majesty complied, and 
after advancing the chancellor to the dig- 
nity of Viscount Bracklf.y, received the 
seals in person from his lordship, on his 
death bed, with tears of respect and grati- 
tude, and expressed the intention of add- 
ing the earldom of Bridge water to his 
previous honours. His lordship died l.Oth 
March, 1617, "in a good old age, and full 
of virtuous fame ; " and, in the words of 
Camden, " forte qnanto propius Reipublicas 
mala viderat, iit integer honestum finem 
voluit." Hacket, in his life of Archbishop 
Williams, says he was one " qui nihil in 
vita nisi laudandum aut fecit, aut dixit, aut 
sensit." His apprehension was keen and 
ready ; his judgment deep and sound ; Jiis 
elocution elegant and easy. As a lawyer, 
he was prudent in counsel, extensive in in- 
formation, and just in principle ; so that 
while he lived he was excelled by none ; 
and when he died he was lamented by all. 
In a %vord, as a statesman, lie was faithful 
and patriotic ; and as a judge, impartial 
and incorrupt.* His lordship m. first, Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of Thomas Ravenscroft, 
esq. of Bretton, in Flintshire ; secondly, 
Elizabeth, Lady Wolley,sister of Sir George 
More, knt. of Losely, in Surrey, lieutenant 
of the Tower; and, thirdly, Alice, dowager 
countess of Derby, daughter of Sir John 
Spencer, of Althorp. By the first lady 
only, who d. in 1588, he had issue, viz. two 
sons and one daughter, 

I. Thomas (Sir), knt. who died in Ire- 



* Ben Jouson lias addressed several epig;rams 
to Chancellor Kgerton : one of which we subjoin ; 

To Thomas Lord Chancellor, 
Whilst thv weigh'd judgments, Egerton, I hear, 
And know thee then a judge not of one year; 
Whilst I behold thee live with purest hands, 
Tliat no affection in thy voice commands ; 
That still thou 'rt ])resent in the better cause ; 
And no less wise than skilful in the laws ; 
Whilst thou art certain to thv words once gone, 
As is thy conscience, which is alwavs one: 
The virgin long since fled from earth I see, 
T' our times retum'd, liath made her heaven in 
thee. 



land V. p. 2.1rd August, 1599, aged 
twenty-five, leaving by Elizabeth his 
wife, daugliter of Thomas Venablea, 
baron of Kinderton, three daughters, 

Elizal)eth, ?w. to John Dutton, eldest 
son of Thomas Dutton, estj. of 
Dutton, in Cheshire, and died in 
1611. 

Mary, ni. to Sir Thomas Leigh, 
knt. afterwards Lord Leigh, of 
Stoneleigh. 

Vere, m. to William Booth, esq. 
of Dunham Massey. 
11. John, successor to his father. 

1 . Mary, who m. Sir Francis Leigh, K . B. 
of Newnham Regis, in the county of 
Warwick, father of Francis, earl of 
Chichester. 

Lord Brackley was s. at his decease by his 
only surviving son, 

John Egerton, second viscount, who was 
advanced to the earldom of BiiiDfiEWATER 
on the 27th May, 1617. This nobleman, 
distinguishing himself in Ireland under the 
earl of Essex in 1599, received the honour 
of knighthood, and, at the coronation of 
.James I. was made a knight of the Bath. 
His lordship's appointment, in 1633, to the 
lord presidency of Wales and the Marches, 
gave rise to Milton's immortal Counts, and 
is thus recorded by Warton : "I have been 
informed," says that writer, " from a manu- 
script of Oldys, that Lord Bridgewater, 
being appointed lord president of Wales, 
entered upon his official residence at Lud- 
low Castle with great solemnity. L^pon this 
occasion, he was attended by a large con- 
course of the neighbouring nobility and 
gentry. Among the rest came his children ; 
in particular Lord Brackley, Mr. Thomas 
Egerton, and Lady Alice, 

to attend their father's state 

And new entrusted sceptre. 

They had been on a visit at a house of the 
Egerton family in Herefortlshire ; and in 
passing through Haywood forest were be- 
nighted ; and the Lady Alice was even lost 
for a short time. This accident, which in 
the end was attended with no bad conse- 
quences, furnished the subject for a mask 
for a Michaelmas festivity, and produced 
Conms." The earl wedded the Lady Fran- 
ces Stanley,* second daughter and co-heir 
of Ferdinando, earl of Derby, and by her, 

* Ladv Frances Stanley's grandmother, the 
Lady iNIiirgaret Clifford, was only child of Henry 
earl of Cumberland, and of Kh>;inor his countess, 
younger daughter and co-heir of Charles Bran- 
don, duke of Suffolk, by iNlary his wife, queen 
dowager of France, youngest sister of King Henry 
VIII. 



38 



EGERTOxN, OF TATTON PARK. 



wlio (I. 11th March, 1635, had four sons and 
eleven daughters, namely, 

III. John, his fatlier's heir. 

IV. Thomas, d. unm. 

I. Frances, m. to Sir John Hobart, bart. 
of Blickling, and d. s. p. 

II. Arabella, m. to Oliver, Lord St. 
.John, son of Oliver, earl of Boling- 
broke. 

III. Elizabeth, m. to David Cecil, esq. 
afterwards earl of Exeter. 

IV. Mary, 7n. to Richard, Lord Herbert, 
of Cherbury. 

V. Cecilia, d. unm. 

VI. Alice, d. unm. 

VII. Anne, d. unm. 

VIII. Penelope, ?«. to Sir Robert Na- 
pier, bart. of Luton Hoo, in Bedford- 
shire. 

IX. Catharine, jn. to William Courteen, 
esq, son and heir of Sir William 
Courteen, bart. of London. 

X. Magdalen, ?«. to Sir Gervase Cutler, 
of Stainburgh, in Yorkshire. 

XI. Alice, Hi. to Richard, earl of Car- 
berry. 

Lord Bridgewater d. 4th December, 1649, 
and was s. by his son, 

John Egerton, second earl of Bridge- 
water, who espoused, in tlie nineteenth year 
of his age, the Lady Elizabeth Cavendish, 
daughter of William, duke of Newcastle, 
and had issue, 

I. John, K. B. third earl of Bridge- 
water, ancestor of the earls and 

DUKES of BkIDGEWATER. 

II. William (Sir), K.B. of Worsley, in 
Lancashire, M.P. for Aylesbury, who 
m. Honora, sister of Thomas, Lord 
Leigh, of Stoneleigh, and d. in De- 
cember, 1691, leaving four daugh- 
ters, who all d. unmarried, except 
the youngest, 

Honora, b. in 168.5, m. to Thomas- 
Arden Bagot, esq. of Pipe Hall, 
in Staflbrdshire. 

III. Thomas, of whom presently, as 
progenitor of the Egertons, of Tat- 
to n. 

IV. Charles, of Newborough, in Staf- 
fordshire, M.P. b. in 1654, who rn. 
Elizabeth, widow- of Randolph Eger- 
ton, esq. of Betley, and daugliter 
and heir of Henry Murray, and d. 
in 1717, leaving a son of his own 
name. 

V. Steward, b. in 1660, d. unm. 

I. Frances, died in infancy. 

II. Elizabeth, in. to Robert Sidney, earl 
of Leicester. 

III. Catharine, died an infant. 



The earl d. 26th October, 1686, when the 
manor of Tatton, and the other Cheshire 
estates of the family, passed to his third son. 
The Hon. Thomas Egerton, of Tatton 
Park, b. 16th March, 1651, who m. Hesther, 
only daughter of Sir John Busby,* knt. of 
Addington, in Bucks, by Judith his first 
wife, daughter and co-heir of Sir William 
Manwaring, knt. of West Chester, and by 
her, who died in 1724, had four sons and 
one daughter, viz. 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Thomas, b. in 1680, d. unm. 

III. William, LL.D. chancellor and 
prebendary of Hereford, prebendary 
of Canterbury, rector of Penshurst, 
&c. b. 6th July, 1682 ; m.'Anne, dau. 
of Sir Francis Head, bart. of Ro- 
chester, and d. 26th February, 1737, 
leaving issue, 

John, who d. in November, 1740, 
aged seventeen. 

Charlotte, co-heiress, who wk Wil- 
liam Hammond, esq. of St. Al- 
ban's Court, in Kent, and d. in 
1770, leaving issue (see vol. i. 
p. 132.) 

Jemima, co-heiress, who jh. in 
1747, Edward Brydges, esq. of 
Wootton Court, in Kent, and 
had, with other issue, the pre- 
sent Sir Samuel Egerton 
Brydg es, bart. of Denton Court. 

IV. Mainwaring, b. in 1683, d. in 1686. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to the Rev. Peter 

Leigh, of the West Hall, in High 

Leigh. 

Mr. Egerton d. 29th October, 1685, was 

buried at Little Gaddesden, in Herts, and s. 

by his eldest son, 

John Egerton, esq. of Tatton Park, b. 
12th February, 1679, who wedded Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Samuel Barbour, esq. 
sister and heiress of Samuel Hill, esq. of 
Shenstone Park, in the county of Stafford, 
and by her, who died in 1743, had issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Samuel, successor to his brother. 

I. Hester, eventually sole heiress. 

II. Elizabeth, d. unm. 1763. 

Mr. Egerton d. in 1724, was interred at 
Rosthorne, and s. by his elder son, 

John Egerton, esq. of Tatton Park, b. 
14th October, 1710, who m. in April, 1735, 

* 'J'liis gentleman, who died in 1700, was son 
of Robert Busby, esq. of Addington, by his wife, 
a daughter of Sir John Gore, knt. of New Place, 
in Herts. Sir John Gore had married Bridget, 
daughter of Sir Edward Harington, bart. grand- 
son of Sir James Harington and Lucy his wife, 
sister to Sir Henr\' Sidnev, of Penshurit. 



TATTON, Ol' WlTIir.XSIlAW. 



39 



Cliiistian, (liiuj^litcr of Joliii Ward, e?(|. of 
('apcstliorne, but dyiiicj in I73S, wiflumf 
iiuilo' issue, the estates and reiirescntatioii 
of tliis brancli of tlie family devolved on liis 
brotlier, 

Samuel Egerton, est], of Tattmi I'ark, 
I. 28fli Deeeniber. 1711, wlio \ve(l(l.(l !}ea- 
trix, youn<;est daughter and co-heir of the 
Rev. John Copley, of IJattly, rector of Jvlni- 
ley, in Yorksliire, and by her, wlio d. in 
April, 175;'>, liad an only daughter, IJeatrix, 
Avho ni. ])aniel Wilson, es(|. of Dalhani 
Tower, in Westmoreland, but predeceased 
her father, witliout surviving issue. Mr. 
Egerton died himself 10th February, 1780, 
advanced in years, being one of the repre- 
sentatives in that and the three preceding 
parliaments for the county of Chester. He 
devised his great estates, with divers re- 
mainders, ill tail to his only sister, 

Hesti.k Eoeuton, who luid ?«. in May, 
1747, William Tatton, esq. of Withen- 
shaw. but who, upon inheriting her bro- 
ther's possessions, resumed, by sign manual, 
8th May, 1780, her maiden name. She d. 
the 9tli of the following July, leaving a 
daughter, Elizabeth Tatton, the wife of Sir 
Christopher Sykes, bart. of Sledniere, M.P. 
and a son and successor, 

William-Tatton Egerton, esq. of Tat- 
ton and Withenshaw, h. 9th May, 1749. 
This gentleman, wlio, from his extensive 



landed possessions and great personal influ- 
ence, was esteemed one of tlie leading com- 
moners in the kingdom, represented the 
county of Chester in j)arliament. He m. 
thrice (see famili/ of 7'fiHon, p. 41), and 
dying in 180G, was s. in the Egerton estates 
l)y his eldest surviving son, the present 
N\ ii.BKAiiAM Egerton, esq. of Tatton. 

Ai-nis — Arg. a lion rampant gu. between 
three ph<!ons sa. 

Crest — On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. 
a lion rampant gu. supporting a dart argent. 

Dlottn — Sic donee. 

Estates — Tatton, Rosthern, Ollerton, &e. 
were ])ossessed by Sir Alen de Tatton, an- 
cestor of the present i)roprietor in the ear- 
liest period of authentic history. The elder 
braneli became extinct after a few descents : 
the heiress married William Massey, fourth 
son of Hamon de Massey, baron of Dun- 
ham Massey% whose descendants retained 
possession of the Tatton property without 
intermission until the reign of Edward IV. 
From the Tattons, of Tatton, the family of 
Withenshaw are undoubtedly a brancli : it 
is a curious fact, that the estates should 
again return into the possession of the Tat- 
ton family, after so long an alienation. 

2^oicn Residence — St. James's Square. 

Seat — Tatton Park, near Knutsford. 



TATTON, OF WITHENSHAW. 



TATTON, THOMAS-WILLIAM, esq. of Withenshaw, in the county of Chester, 
i. 2nd June, 1816, 5. his father in 1827. 



Hmcciat. 




\ 



© 





The Tattons, of Kenworthy, from whom 
the family before ns derives, were a branch 
of the ancient house of Tatton, of Tatton, 
which was allied to the barons of Dunham 
Massey. 

Robert Tatton, of Kenworthy, by his 
marriage with Alice, daughter and heiress 
of William de Massey, of Withenshaw, in 
Cheshire, acquired that estate, and was di- 
rect ancestor of 

Robert Tatton, of Withenshaw, who 
m. Alice, sister of William Massie, of Cod- 
dington, living in the .'ird of Edward IV., 
and daughter of Hugh Massie, by Agnes 
his wife, daughter and heiress of Nicholas 
Rold, great great grandson of Sir Richard 
Bold, of Bold. By Alice Massie, Robert 
left four sons, viz. 



40 



TATTON, OF WITHENSHAW 



I. William, who hi. a daughtei- of Wil- 
liam Davenport, of liraniall, but d. 
s. p. 

II. Robert, a priest, who of course died 
uuinarried. 

III. John, of whom presently. 

IV. Bartholomew. 

The third son, 

John Tatton, wedded Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Ralph Davenport, of Chester, a 
•younger son of Ralph Davenport, of Hen- 
bury, and left (with a daughter, Elizabeth, 
7)1. first, to — Bradborne ; and, secondly, 
to Thomas Ashley, of Shepley), a son and 
successor, 

Robert Tatton, of Withenshaw, wlio m. 
Dorotliy, fourth daughter of George Booth, 
esq. of Dunham, and by her, who died in 
1608, had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. John. 

III. Robert, of the Parsonage atNorth- 
enden, died in 1610. 

IV. Edward, of Etchells, m. Margaret 
Corke, and diod in 1632. 

V. Nicholas, vi. in 1596, Dorothy Lin- 
ney. 

I. Elizabeth,??!, in 1570, to John Ward, 
of Capesthorne. 

II. Dorothy, m. in 1582, to James Brad- 
shawe, esq. of the Haugh, in the 
county of Chester. 

Robert Tatton d. in June, 1579, and was s. 
by his eldest son, 

William Tatton, esq. of Withenshaw, 
who m. Mary, daughter of Sir Edward Fit- 
ton, knt. of Gawsworth, and by her, who 
died in 1614, left at his decease, 19th May, 
1611, a son and successor, 

Robert Tatton, esq. of Withenshaw, 
who espoused Eleanor, third daughter of 
John Warren, esq. of Poyntou. and had 
issue, 

I William, liis heir. 

II. Robert, living 1 Ith January, 9th 
James I. 

III. George, died an infant in 1590. 

IV. Philip. 

V. George, b. in 1612. 

I. Elizabeth, b. in 1587; m. first, to 
John Latham, esq. of Wilmslow ; 
and, secondly, to George Mainwaring, 
esq. second son of Sir Randal Main- 
waring, of Peover. 

IT. Margaret, died unra. in 1609. 

III. Mary. 

Robert Tatton d. at Southwark, near Lou- 
don, in 162.3, and was s. by his son, 

William Tapton, esq. of Withenshaw, 
ft. in 158l,who7«. in 1602, Kathorinc, eldest 
daughter of Sir George Leycester, bart. of 
Toft, and by her, who wedded, secondly. 



the Rev. W. Nicolls, D. D and d. in 1665, 

left at his demise in 1616, with three daugh- 
ters, Anne, who d. in infancy, Margaret, 
the wife of Richard Twyford, esq. of Did- 
desbury, and Eleanor, b. in 1612, a son and 
successor, 

Robert Tatton, esq. of WithenshaAv, 
b. 14tli May, 1606, who served the office of 
sheriff for Cheshire in 1645. During the 
civil wars, this gentleman was a staunch 
supporter of the royal cause, and sustained 
a siege at Withenshaw against the parlia- 
mentary forces. It is thus noticed in Burg- 
hall's diary : " February 25, 1643-4, Mr. 
Tatton's house at Withenshaw was taken 
by the parliament, who had laid a long 
siege to it. There were in it only Mr. 
Tatton, some gentlemen, and but a few 
soldiers, who had quarter for life. The 
ammunition was but little." Col. Ducken- 
field conducted the attack, and finally ef- 
fected the reduction of the mansion by 
bringing two pieces of ordnance from Man- 
chester. In the last century, six skeletons 
were found in the garden at Withenshaw 
lying close together, who were supposed to 
be soldiers buried during the siege in the 
house, which was then much larger than it 
is at present. There is a tradition that one 
of the parliament officers exposed himself 
by sitting on a wall, and that a female do- 
mestic begged for a musket to try if " she 
could bring him down," and succeeded. Mr. 
Watson supposes this officer to have been 
" Captayne Adams, slayne at VVithen- 
shawe," on Sunday the 25th, who was 
buried at Stockport 25th February, 1643-4. 
Mr. Tatton compounded for his estate at 
£707. 13*. 4rf. and appears to have been 
oppressed by other vexatious charges, in 
consequence of which he appealed against 
liis portion of subsequent parliament levies. 
These disastrous consequences of loyalty 
must have been severely felt, as Webb, 
writing in 1622, speaks of the Tattons as 
being " much eclipsed," and " by troubles 
and encumbrances, whereunto greatest es- 
tates are oft subject, obscured," and " places 
the chiefest liope of raising the house on 
that grandchild," upon whom these cala- 
mities subsequently fell. Mr. Tatton tn. in 
1628, Anne, third daughter and co-heiress 
of William Brereton, es(j. of Ashley, and 
by her, who died in 1670, had four sons and 
two daughters, viz. 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Robert, of Stockport, b. in 1639, 
who m. Anne, daughter of William 
Davenport, esq. of Bramall, and d. 
in 1685, leaving issue, 

William, successor to his cousin 
Robert. 

Thomas, of Stockport, living in 



TATTON, OF WIT HENS HAW. 



41 



1689, when he was made heir in 
remainder to tlie VVithensliaw 
estate by will of iiis cousin Ho- 
bcrtTatton. He m. Mary, only 
daughter and Iieir of Charles 
Poole, esq. of Marley, in Che- 
shire, and had two sons and cue 
dauohter, 

Kobert, of Stockport, wlio m. 
Frances Shepley, and died 
s. p. in 1743. 

Edward, died nnm. in 1783. 

Mary, died young. 
Anne. 

III. Richard. 

IV. Thomas, of Peel, in the county of 
Chester, 7u. Mary, dau<;hter of Ed- 
ward Petige, esq. of Beauchief, and 
had two daughters, Anne and Elea- 
nor. 

I. Mary, b. in 1G29. 

II. Aniie, b. in 1632, m. in 1664, to Sir 
Amos Meredith, bart. 

Robert Tatton cl. in 1669, was buried at 
Northenden, and s. by his son, 

WiLLr.AM Tatton, esq. of Withenshaw, 
b. in 1636, who espoused Anne, only sur- 
viving child of Rowland Eyre, esq. of Brad- 
way, in the county of Derby, and by her 
(who in. secondly, Robert Radcliffe, esq. 
second son of Sir Alexander Radcliffe, of 
Ordeshall)had a daughter, Anne, ni. to John 
Greenhalgh, esq. of Brandlesorae, and a 
son, 

Robert Tatton, esq. of Withenshaw, b. 
in 1668, who m. Frances, daughter of Peter 
Legh, esq. of Lyme, but by her (who wed- 
ded, secondly. Sir Gilbert Clarke; and, 
thirdly. Dr. Shippen) having no issue, was 
s. at his decease by his cousin, 

William Tatton, esq. of Withenshaw, 
b. at Bramall 5th August, 1674, who m. in 
1698, Hannah, daughter and heiress of Pe- 
ter Wright, esq. of Macclesfield, and had 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Thomas, of Heaton Norris, who m. 
'.rst, Penelope, youngest daughter of 
Matthew, Lord Ducie ; and, secondly, 
Catherine, daughter of Hugh Foulkes, 
esq. of Polesbey, in Denbighshire, 
but d. s. p. in 1775. 

I. Anne, b. in 1702, m. Samuel Kirke, 
esq. of Whitehough, and had a dau. 
Catherine Kirke, the wife of the Rev. 
William Plumbe (see vol. i. page 
292). 

II. Frances, died unm. in 1776, aged 
seventy. 

III. Barbara, of Macclesfield, also died 
unm. in 1776. 

IV. Mary, d. unm. 

V. Lucy, m. to John Stafford, esq. 



VI. Margaret, d. unm. 
vii. Catlierine, d. unm. . 

Mr. Tatton died in 1732, and was s. by his 
son, 

William Tatton, esq. of Withenshaw, b. 
in 1703. This gentleman m. first, (Cathe- 
rine, eldest daughter of Edward Warren, 
esq. of Poynton, who dying without issue 
in 1742, he wedded, secondly, in 1747, Hes- 
ter, daughter of John Egerton, esq. of Tat- 
fon, and eventually heiress of her brother' 
Samuel Egerton, esq. By this lady, who 
d. 9th July, 1780, having previously re- 
sumed the name of E(;kkton, he had one 
son and one daughter, viz. 

William, his heir. 

Elizabeth, ?n. to Sir Christopher Sykes, 
bart. 

Mr. Tatton d. in 1776, and w as s. by liis son, 
William Tatton, esq. of Withenshaw, 
who assumed, upon inheriting the great es- 
tates of his mother's family, the surname 
and arms of Egerton, of Tatton. This 
gentleman, who was born in 1749, and who 
represented the county of Chester in par- 
liament, m. first, in 1773, Frances-Maria,* 
eldest daughter of the Very Rev. Dean 
Fountayne (see vol. ii. p. 269), and by her 
(who d. in 1777) had two sons and a daugh- 
ter, viz. 

William, of Withenshaw, b. in 1774, 
M.P. for Beverley in 1796; d. unm. 
in 1799. 

Thomas, d. in 1778, aged four. 

Frances-Maria, d. young in 1781. 

He wedded, secondly, in 1780, Mary, second 
daughter of Richard - Wilbraham Bootle, 
esq. of Rode and Lathom, and by her, who 
d. in 1784, had issue, 

Wilbraham, of Tatton. See family of 

Egerton, of Tatton. 
Thomas-William, of Withenshaw. 
John, b. in 1784, and d. in 1786. 
Mary-Elizabeth, m. to Sir Mark Mas- 

terman Sykes, bart. of Slcdmere. 

* On this lady's monument, in the church of 
Northenden, are the following lines : 
If e'er on earth true happiness were found, 

'Twas thine, blest shade, thathappiness to prove; 
A father's fondest wish thy duty crown'd, 

Thy softer virtues fix'd a husband's love. 
Ah ! when he led thee to the nuptial fane. 

How smiled tJie mornins: with auspicious rays ! 
How triumphed youtli and beauty in thy train. 

And flattering liealth that promised length of 
days ! 
Heav'n joiu'd your hearts ; three pledges of your 
joy 

Were given in thrice the years revolving round ; 
Here, reader, pause ; and own, with pitying eye, 

That not on earth true happiness is found. 
She died January Pth, 1777, aged twenty-six. 



4-2 



CHUTE, OF CHUTE HALL. 



Mr.Egerton espoused, thirdly, Anna- Maria, 
eldest daughter of Sir George Armytage, 
bart. of Kuklees, by whom he had no sur- 
viving- issue ; and, fourthly, in 1803, Char- 
lotte-Clara, daughter of Tiiomas-Watkin- 
son Payler, esq. of Kent, which lady died 
s. p. in "1804. Mr. Egerton died liimself in 
1806, and was s. in the Egerton estates by 
Ills eldest surviving son,WiLBRAHAM Eger- 
ton, esq. while the Withenshaw property 
passed, under his will, to 

TuoMAs-WiixiAM Egerton, esq. h. 29th 
October, 1783, who assumed in consequence 
the surname and arms of Tattox. He 
m. in 1807, Emma, daughter of the Hon. 
John Grey, third son of Harry, fourth earl 
of Stamford, and had issue, 

I. Thomas-William, his heir. 

I. Emma, m. in February, 1832, to 
Harry Mainwaring, esq. son of Sir 
Thomas Mainwaring, bart. 

II. Mary-Elizabeth, died in 1821. 



III. Henrietta. 

IV. Frances. 

V. Louisa. 

VI. Sophia. 

VII. Susanna-Theodosia. 

VIII. Anna-jNIaria. 

Mr. Tatton, who was sherilV of Cheshire 
in 1809, died in London 2nd March, 1827, 
and a cenotaph is erected to his memory by 
his widow, in the parish church of Northen- 
den, in the form of a simple and elegant 
sarcophagus. His son and successor is the 
present Thomas-William Tatton, esq. of 
Withenshaw. 

Ar7ns — Quarterly, arg. and gu. ; in the 
first and fourth quarter a crescent sa., in 
the second and tliird another of the first. 

Crest — A greyhound sejant arg. collared 
and tied to a tree ppr. 

Estates — Li Cheshire. 

Sent — Withenshaw, in that county. 



CHUTE, OF CHUTE HALL. 





^ife 



U 



-A, 



^' { 



CHUTE, RICHARD, esq. of Chute Hall, in the county of Kerry, b. in October, 

1763; 7)1. first, in 1785, Ag-nes, daughter of Rowland 
Bateman, esq. of Oak Park, and has issue, 

I. Francis, of Spring Hill, captain in the Kerry mili- 
tia, who 7n. first, Mary-Anne, daughter of Trevor 
Bomford, esq. of Dublin, and has three sons and one 
daughter, viz. 

Richard. 

Trevor, lieutenant in his Majesty's Ceylon rifle 

regiment. 
Rowland. 

Mary. 

Capt. Chute wedded, secondly, Arabella, daughter 
of the Rev. Maynard Denny, of Churchill, brother 
of Sir Barry Denny, first bart. of Tralee, M.P. for 
the county of Kerry, and that lady has two sons and 
two daughters. 

II. Rowland, who served many years in the army during 
the late war, and retired a captain in the 58th regi- 
ment. He 7)1. Frances, daughter of James Crosbie, 
esq. of Ballyheig Castle, formerly M.P. and gover- 
nor of the county of Kerry, and present colonel com- 
mandant of its militia. By this lady Capt. Rowland 
Chute has two sons and two daughters. 

I. Lffititia, 711. to William Raymond, esq. of Dromin, 

in the county of Kerry. 
II. Ruth. 

in. Agnes, m. to Richard Mason, esq. of Cappanahanr, 
ill the county of Limerick. 



^ 



l^'^^l^ l> 




CHUTE, OF CHUTE HAUL 



43 



Mr. Chute osponsod, socondly, in 179S, Elizabeth, (laughter of the Rev. Dr. Wil- 
liam MaiinsoU, T).l). of the city of Limerick, and by her has two sons and three 
daughters, 

I. William-Maunsell. 

II. Richard, M.D. member of the college of surgeons, resident in Tralee. 

I. Elizalx'tli. 

11. J)orothea, ?it. to William Neligan, esq. of Tralee. 

111. Margaret. 

Mr. Chute, who succeeded his father in March, 1782, acted for many years as a 
magistrate of the county of Kerry until, from declining health, he was compelled to 
retire from the bench. He served the office of high sheriff, shortly after his attainin"- 
majority, in 1786. 



The Chi'tf.s, of Chute Hall, derive from 
that branch of the ancient family of Chute, 
whicli was seated in the county of Kent. 
The Hampshire and Norfolk lines are now 
represented by William - Lyde- Wiggett 
Chute, esq. of the Vine and of Pickenham 
Hall. (See vol. i. p. 632.) 

The first who settled in Ireland, 

Gkouge Chute, a military officer, went 
into that kingdom during the rebellion of 
Desmond, and obtained grants of land near 
Dingle, and in the county of Limerick, which 
were soon however alienated. He m. an 
Evans, of the county of Cork, and had a 
son, 

Daniel Chute, who acquired, in marriage 
with a daughter of Mc EUigott, the lands 
of Tulligaron or Chute Hall, which were 
afterwards (with others since disposed of) 
confirmed by patent, in 16.30, under which 
they are now held. He left (with a daugh- 
ter, m. to — Crosbie, esq.) a son and suc- 
cessor, 

Richard Chute, esq. of Tulligaron, in 
the county of Kerry, who wedded a daugh- 
ter of Crosbie, of Tubrid, and had issue. 
At the restoration, in 1660, Mr. Crosbie, of 
Tubrid, being high sheriff of Kerry, returned 
Chute to parliament as member for that 
county, in opposition to Blennerhasset, of 
Ballyseedy, who petitioned against the re- 
turn and succeeded. Some curious parti- 
culars connected with this contest are set 
forth in the first volume of the Irish Com- 
mons' Journals, and it was probably owing 
to the expenses then incurred that the alien- 
ation of the grants above alluded to took 
place. Richard Chute was s. by his son, 

EusEBius Chute, esq. of Tulligaron, who 
m. Mary, sister of Mr. Justice Bernard, of 
the court of Common Pleas in Ireland, 
(raised to the bench in 1726,) ancestor of 
the earls of Bandon. By this lady he had 
issue, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II. Francis, who died collector of Tra- 
lee, leaving no issue. 



III. Pierce, ancestor of the Chutes, of 
Tralee. 

IV. Arthur, in holy orders, who died 
unmarried. 

The eldest son, 

Richard Chute, esq. of Tulligaron, wed- 
ded Charity, daughter of Jolin Herbert, esq. 
of Castle Island, in the county of Kerry, and 
had issue, 

I. Francis, his heir. 

II. Richard, of Roxboro, in Kerry, Avho 
m. Jane, daughter of — Austen, esq. 
of Waterfall, in the same county, and 
left one son and two daughters, viz. 

Richard, who m. Miss Morris, of 
Bally beggin, in Kerry, and has 
one son, George, and tliree 
daughters. 

Mary, m. to Hugh Jamison, esq. of 
Cork. 

Charity, m. to Robert Torrens, esq. 
M. P. for Bolton. 

I. Margaret, in. to George Rowan, esq. 
of Rahtarmy, in the county of Kerry, 
and had issue. 

II. Agnes, 7)1. to John Sealy, esq. of 
Maglass, in Kerry, and had issue. 

III. Catherine, m. to Cornelius M'Gilli- 
cuddy, (M'Gillicuddy, of the Reeks), 
and had issue. 

Mr. Chute was s. at his decease by his eldest 
son, 

Francis Chute, esq. of Tulligaron, or 
Chute Hall, whom, in 1761, Ruth, daughter 
of Sir Riggs Falkiner, bart. of Anne Mount, 
in the county of Cork, and bad issue, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II. Falkiner, captain in the 22nd regi- 
ment of light dragoons, wlio »h. Anne, 
daughter of Captain Goddard, of the 
Queen's County, and left at his de- 
cease an only daughter, 

Catherine, w. to William Cooke, 
esq. of Retreat, near Athlone. 

III. Caleb, captain in tl\e 69th foot, who 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of Thcophilus 



44 



MASSIE, OF CODDINGTON. 



Yielding:, esq. of Caher Anne, in the 
county of Kerry. 

IV. Fraiuis - Bernard, who tu. Jane, 
dantihter of Jolin Kowan, esq. of 
Castle Gregory, and has issue, 

1. Francis- iiernard. 

2. Elizabeth. 

V. Arthur, who m. Frances, daughter 
of Jolin Lindsay, esq. of Lindville, 
in the south liberties of the city of 
Cork, and has issue, 

1. Francis, in holy orders. 

2. John, also in orders. 

1. Frances. 

2. Ruth. 

3. Anne. 

I. Margaret, m. to Thomas -William 
Sandes, esq. of Sallowglin, in the 
county of Kerry. 

II. Ruth, m. to the late Thomas Elliott, 
esq. of Garrynthenavally, in Kerry. 



Mr. Chute d. in 1782, and was s. by his 
eldest son, the present Richard Chute, 
esq. of Chute Hall. 

Aims — Gu. semee of mullets or, three 
swords barways, ppr. the middlemost en- 
countering tlie other two ; a canton per 
fesse arg. and vert, thereon a lion passant. 

Crrst — A dexter cubit arm in armour, 
the hand on a gauntlet grasping a broken 
sword, in bend sinister ppr. pommel and 
hilt or. 

Motto — Fortune de guerre. 

Estates — Tulligaron, near Tralee, ac- 
quired by marriage, and one-sixth part of 
the seignorial grant of Mount Eagle Royal, 
(or Castle Island), in the county of Kerry, 
held by fee-farm lease jointly with five other 
gentlemen, under the representatives of 
Herbert, earl of Powis. 

Seat — Chute Hall, situated about two 
miles and a half eastward from Tralee. 



MASSIE, OF CODDINGTON. 



MASSIE, THE REV. RICHARD, of Coddington, in the county of Chester, h. in 

1771 ; m. Hester- Lee, eldest daughter of Edward Towns- 
hend, esq. of Wincham, in the same shire, and has had 
issue, 

I. Richard, vi. 7th January, 1834, Mary-Anne, eldest 
daughter of H. R. Hughes, esq. of Bache Hall, 
Cheshire. 

II. Thomas-Leche. 
HI. Edward. 
IV. \A illiam-Henry. 

V. Townshend. 
VI. John-Bevis. 
VII. Watkin. 
VHI. Charles. 

IX. George, died an infant. 
X. Robert-George. 
XI. Hugh-Hanion. 
XII. Henry, deceased. 

I. Eliza- Anne, m. in 1823, to William T. Buchanan, 
esq. of Ravenscroft. 

II. Hester-Susannah, m. in 1828, to Rev. John Armi- 
stead, vicar of Sand bach. 

III. Frances-Maria, m. in 1827, to Rev. G. B. Blomfield, 
prebendary of Chester and rector of 
Herts, brother to tiie bishop of London. 

IV. Sidney. 

v. Barbara-Henrietta. 
VI. Cornelea-Lee, deceased. 
vn. Harriet-Vyse, m. in 1829, to Laurence Armistead, 

esq. of Cranage Hail, in Cheshire, 
vin. Anna-Maria. 
IX. Charlotte. 
X. Mary-Mackenzie. 

Mr. Massie, who is rector of Eccleston, succeeded his fatlier in 1802. 




Stevenage, 



MASSIK, OF (:(>1)J)INGT0N, 



4,-5 



Hmcagc. 



The early descpiit of the Massif.s, of 
Coddingtou, lias long- bt'oii a inattor of dis- 
pute, some of the pedifjrees deriving them 
from a younger son of Sir John Massie, of 
Tatton, supposed to have been slain at 
Shrewsbury, whose eldest son d. 8th Hkmiy 
V. ; and others from H anion, son of Sir 
John Massey, of Puddington, who also fell 
at the battle of Shrewsbury. "The proba- 
bilities," says Ormerod, " are in favour of 
the Tatton branch, as far as can be argued 
from correspondence of dates, and no stress 
can be laid on a subsequent settlement made 
by John Massie in the sixteenth century, 
whereby he settled Coddington in remain- 
der on the Puddington lariiily, in the event 
of his issue failing, as this settlement over- 
looked acknowledged nearer relations, the 
Massies of Broxton and the Massies of Eg- 
gerley." 

Hugh Massie settled at Coddington in 
consequence of his marriage with Agnes, 
daughter and lieiress of Nicholas Bold, of 
Coddington, great grandson of John, third 
son of Sir John IJold, of Bold, in Lanca- 
shire. Hugh had (with four daughters, 
Anne, m. to David Dod, esq. of Edge ; 
Alice, m. to Robert Tatton, esq. of Withen- 
sliaw ; Maud, the wife of Thomas Cotting- 
liani, esq. of Wirral ; and Margaret, of 
Philip Aldersey, esq. of Middle Aldersey) 
several sons, of whom the third, 

William Massie, esq. purchased, in the 
18th of Henry VI. from Sir Philip Boteler, 
the manors of Coddington, Bechin,Eggerley, 
&c. subject to a rent charge of twenty-five 
marks per annum, which, by a deed, 8th 
Henry VIII. was fixed at forty marks. He 
wedded Alice, daughter and heiress of Adam 
Woton, of Edgerley and Chester, and by 
her, who m. secondly, Hugh Ball, of Cod- 
dington, had two sons, namely, 

I. Morgan, of Eggerley, on whom his 
mothei*'s lands were entailed. He 
in. Margery, daughter of John Da- 
venport, esq. of Daven|)ort, by Maud 
his wife, daughter of Sir Andrew 
Brereton, knt. of Brereton, and had 
au only son and heir, 

Robert, ancestor of the Massies, 
of Eggerley, in whom that ma- 
nor remained vested until the 
time of Charles II., when it was 
purchased from them by Samuel 
Smallwood, whose lineal descen- 
dant, Thomas Smallwood, esq. 
was proprietor in 1759. It was 
shortly after sold to the Rev. 
Thomas luce. 

II. John. 



The second son, 

John Massie, escj. inherited, under liis 
father's deed of partition, 3rd Edward IV. 
the lands of Coddington. He vi. Margaret, 
daughter and heiress of Holme, of Cod- 
dington, and had a son and successor, 

Robert Massie, es([. of Coddington, who 
died before 2;3rd Henry VII. as appears 
i)y an award of the said manor, leaving a 
daughter, Anne, the wife of William Mas- 
sey, of Grafton, and a son, 

William Massie, esq. of Coddington, 
living 2;3rd Henry VII. who m. Alice, dau. 
of Edward de Crew, and had issue, 

I. Robert, his heir. 

II. John, of Broxton, living tent)-). Hen- 
ry VIII. wiio m. Margaret, daughter 
and heiress of Richard Larton, esq. 
of Larton, and had, with a daughter, 
Johanna, m. to John Aldersey, of 
Middle Aldersey, a son, 

Edward Massie, esq. of Larton, 
ancestor of the Massies of Brox- 
ton, who continued there seated 
to the comn)encement of the 
eighteenth century, when the 
estate was sold by Hugh Massie 
to John Dod, esq. a descendant 
of the Dods, of Edge. This 
branch of the Massie family en- 
joyed great respectability and 
extensive possessions, holding 
estates in eleven townships of 
Cheshire, and the manors of 
HalghtonandYale,in the county 
of Denbigh. 

The elder son, 

Robert Massie, esq. of Coddington, 
living temp. Henry VIII. espoused Doro- 
thy, daughter of Sir Hugh Calveley, knt. 
of Lea, by Christiana his wife, daughter of 
Thomas Cottingham, esq. and had, with two 
daughters, Elizabeth, wife of Henry Holme, 
and Jane, of Thomas Salisbury, several sons, 
the eldest of whom, 

Roger Massie, esq. of Coddington, held 
that manor, and lands in Bechin from the 
Lord Dacre as of his manor of ^^ emme, by 
fealty, and the render of a rose yearly. He 
wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Randle 
Brereton, esq. of Eccleston and Wettenhall, 
and had issue, 

John, his heir. 

Jane. 

Elizabeth, who in. William Barnston, 
esq. of Churton, in Cheshire, and d. 
13th January, 1006, leaving issue. 
Roger Massie d. 20th April, 24th Henry 
VIII. and was s. by liis son, 



46 



MASSIE, OF CODDINGTON. 



John Massik, esq. of Coddiii|?toii, who 
made, temp. Edwakd VI. tlie settlement we 
have alluded to in tlio commencement of 
this narrative, by which his estates were en- 
tailed on the male issue of his two sons, witli 
remainder to the Masseys, of Puddinu,ton. 
He m. first, Ellen, daughter of Thomas Da- 
niel, of Tabley, by whom lie had one son, 
Thomas, who died s. p.; secondly, Mar- 
garet, daughter of Randle Bamvile, esq. of 
Chester; thirdly, Grace, daughter of Sir 
Thomas Grosvenor, of Eaton ; and, fourtlily, 
Mary, daughter and heiress of Edward 
Hughes, esq. of Holt, in the county of l)en- 
bigii, receiver to Queen Elizabeth for Che- 
shire and Flintshire. By his second and 
third wives Jolin Massie had no child, but 
by liis third he had issue two sons and four 
daughters, viz. 

John, his heir. 

William, of London. 

Mary, m. to Lawrence Starkey, esq. of 

Wrenbury. 
Jane, m. to Richard Philips, esq. of 

Stockton. 
Margaret. 
Anne, m. to Edward Johnes, esq. of 

Grosvelt. 

The elder son, 

John Massie, esq. of Coddington, wedded 
Anne, eldest daughter of Richard Grosve- 
nor, esq. of Eaton, high sheriff of Cheshire 
in 1602, by Christiana his wife, daughter 
of Sir Richard Brooke, bart. of Norton, 
and had issue, 

I. John, b. in IGOl, d. s. p. 

II. RoGKK, his father's heir. 

III. Richard, died issueless. 

IV. George, also died without issue. 

V. Edward, one of the most distin- 
guished military leaders during the 
civil wars of the reign of Charles I. 
This gallant person, who held a com- 
mission in the royal army in the ex- 
pedition against Scothuul, attended, 
on the commencement of the troubles, 
at York, with the intention of serving 
the king: but " finding himself," 
says Clarendon, " not enough known 
there, and that there would be little 
gotten but in the comfort of a good 
conscience, he went to London, where 
there was more money and fewer of- 
ficers," and on his arrival was made 
lieutenant-colonel to the earl of Stam- 
ford, and appointed governor of the 
city of (Gloucester. The same his- 
torian details, at greater length than 
our limits will permit, the de\ice by 
which Colonel Massie inveigled tlie 
king to undertake in person the siege 
of Gloucester, and commemorates 
also the determined defence of the be- 



sieged, a defence to which, as it gave 
the parliament time to recover their 
broken spirits and forces, may be at- 
tributed " the greatness to which they 
afterwards asjiired." In 1()45, Massie 
obtained the rank of major-general, 
and in the same year his name twice 
occurs in official contemporary pub- 
lications, the first of which is an ac- 
count of his engagement with Prince 
Rupert's forces at Ledbury, where 
Massie uniformly charged in person 
at the head of his troops. " Prince 
Rupert," says Massie, in a letter des- 
criptive of the engagement, " sent 
me word by my trumpeter that I 
sent, that in the fight he sought me, 
but knew me not till after, no more 
than I knew him. But it seems we 
charged each other, and he shot my 
horse under me, and I did as much 
for him. At that charge many com- 
manders of theirs fell." The success 
at Ledbury was followed by the cap- 
ture of Evesham, which was sfornuHl 
with great gallantry in five places at 
once by the parliament forces under 
General Massie. In 1G47, he was 
one of the officers emjjloyed by the 
city to enlist new forces during the 
differences between the army and 
parliament, after the seizure of the 
king's person. In these ^discussions 
he took an active part, and opposing 
the intentions now plainly manifested 
i)y Cromwell, he was, ^vith other of- 
ficers of the i)resbyterian partj, com- 
mitted to prison. Massie, however, 
effected liis escape, lied to Holland, 
and had the boldness to present him- 
self to Prince Charles as a sufferer 
for the king. Massie's abilities and 
bravery were not to be neglected, 
and retaining his rank, he obtained 
the command of a regiment of horse 
under the duke of Buckingham ; and 
in the king's march to Worcester was 
dispatched, on account of liis con- 
nexion with the presbyterians, one 
day's march in ad\ ance of the royal 
army, to give notice of his majesty's 
coming, and to draw the gentry to 
attend upon him. In this new cause 
Massie disphiyi d his wonted activity 
and skill; but, having secured a pass 
in the neigliljourhood of AN'orcester, 
lie attempted to follow up an advan- 
tage of little importance, and re- 
ceived adangerous wound, which pre- 
vented him from exerting liis ser- 
vices in a moment of the greatest 
need to the king. In the flight from 
Worcester, General Massie rode six 
miles with his majesty, but not being 
able to keep pace any longer, the 



MASSIE, OF COODINCTON. 



47 



kino- look lii.s Icavo of liiin, vvitli fears 
trickliii<;- down his clieeks, saying', 
" Fari'Wfil, my dfar and I'aitliCnl 
frit'iid, tlic Lord bU-ss and prcscmc 
us both ; " and so tliey parted. The 
inajor-<;enoral wheeled oil' by ^vay oC 
lJronis<;rove, l)nt beiiii;- unable from 
tlie anguish of his wounds to joiirne\' 
further, lie threw himself on the 
mercy of the countess of Stamford, 
and was received as a prisoner at 
|{roadgate manor. The last effort of 
Massie was an unsuccessful endea- 
vour to seize Gloucester for the kin<»'. 
Clarendon attributes the failure, in 
some degree, to the errors caused by 
a stormy and tempestuous night in 
which the attempt was made, to which 
circumstance however Massie was 
indebted for his personal safety. lie 
had been seized by a troop of horse, 
and was conveyed by them towards 
liis prison, being bouiul on his horse 
before a trooper. In the darkest 
l)art of the night, in a woody and 
hilly defile, he contrived to throw 
the soldier, and disentangling him- 
self from his hold by means of his 
great strength and agility, he secured 
his retreat into the woods.* 

General Massie, of whom a fine 
portrait is still preserved at Pool 
Hall, the seat of his collateral des- 
cendant, died in Ireland, without 
issue, and was interred at Abbey 
Leix. 

VI. William, who m. in London. 

VII. Richard, d. s. p. in Ireland. 

VIII. Robert, citizen of London, 771. Jane 
Massey, of Hoggesdon, in Middle- 
sex, and died in 1()70, leaving a son, 
Edward. 

IX. Hugh, of London, mercliant, who 
d. about the year i(J69, leaving issue, 

* See Clarendon, Onnerod, and several rare 
pamphlets preserved in the British Rluseum. 

The following' abstract of the entire series of 
tlie military services of General JMassie up to 
1646, is taken from ' Ricraft's Survey of Eng- 
land's Champions : ' " Served under the earl of 
Essex at Worcester, Sept. 12, 1642 : at Edge- 
hill, Oct. 22, 1642 : appointed governor of Glou- 
cester ; defeated Lord Herbert's forces, JMarch 
30, 1643 : relieved (after the defence of Glou- 
cester) by I^ssex, Sept. 5, 1643 : defeated Col. 
Vavasor from Tewkesbury, Dec. 6, 1643 : de- 
feated Sir John Winter from Newnliam, and dis- 
mantled the garrison of Wotton, Dec. 4, 1643: 
defeated scattered forces from Gloucester, IVIarcli 
20, 1644: defeated Sir John Winter and took tlie 
town of Little Dean, INlay 7, 16 t4 : stormed 13e- 
verstone Castle, May 27, 1644: took Malmes- 
bury, May 30, 1644: and subsequently Chippen- 
ham: defeated and killed General Myiuie, near 



Hugh, Mab(d, and l']lizab(th, all mi- 
nors in 1G7U. 

X. George. 

XI. Hamon. 

I. Grace. 

II. Christiana, died young. 

III. Grace. 

IV. Margaret, m. to Hugh Williamson, 
esq. of ("howley. 

V. Christiana. 

VI. Anne, m. to Edward Owen, esq. of 
Shrewsbury. 

VII. Mary. 

The eldest surviving sou and heir, 

RocJEil Massik, esq. of f:oddington, aged 
fifty-nine in 100.3, m. in 1049, Mary, daugh- 
ter of Roger Middleton, esq. of Cadwgan, 
in Denbighshire, and had issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Ro(;i;k, ancestor of the Massey s, of 
Pool Hall. (See t/iat fami/i/). 

HI. Edward, of Rosthorne, who died 
in 1730, leaving, inter alios, a son, 
Richard-Middleton Massey, M. D. 
F.R.S. and Sec. S. A. who, by his 
second wife, Sarah, daughter ofJohn 
Marshall, gent, of Wisbech, had five 
sons and one daugliter. The direct 
male line of the Massies, of Ros- 
thorne, terminated in the youngest 
of Dr. Massey 's sons, 

James Massey, esq. who had, by 
his second wife, Martha, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Ravald, of Man- 
chester, one son and three daugh- 
ters, viz. 

John, who predeceased his 
father s. p. 

Elizabeth, 711. to the Rev. Ro- 
bert Wright, D.D. rector of 
Whitechapel. 

Martha-Maria. 



Kidmally, Aug. 12, 1644 : took Monmouth Castle, 
Sept. 26, 1644 : gained a victory at Betsly Sconce, 
in Dean forest, Sept. 30, 1644 : defeated" Sir John 
Winter near Beechly shortly afterwards : secured 
the frontier garrisons in the district under his 
command : again defeated Sir John Winter, Feb. 
26, 1645 : routed Prince Maurice coming from 
Bristol, ftlarch 24, 1645 : stormed Evesham, JNIay 
27,1645: and subsequently 'led brave Fairfax 
the way into the ^\■est ; ' witness the daily skir- 
mishes he was in for five or six weeks together, 
beating the enemy to retreats at least 120 miles,' 
taking and killing many, notwithstanding the 
enemy was four to one." 

To these achievements, Vicars, in ' England's 
Wortliies,' adds the capture of Tewkesbury (1644): 
a second defeat of Bristol royalists : " the first 
conquering blow at that brave light and famous 
victory at Langport : " and " the most furious 
and successful onset at Tivertou, in Cornwall." 



48 



MASSEY, OF POOL HALL. 



Sarah, m. to Domville Poole, 
esq. of Dane Bank, and had 
issue. 
I. Anne, b. in lf)59, m. to Trafford 
Barnston, esq. of Churton, in Che- 
shire. 

Roger Massie was s. by his eldest son, 

John Massie, esq. of Coddington, b. in 
1651, who m. first, in 1674, Elizabeth, dau. 
and heiress of William Wilson, esq. of 
Chester and Terne, registrar of Chester, 
and by her had issue, 

John, d. s. p. 

William, who m. in 1712, Anne, daugh- 
ter of Sir John Williams, bart. of 
Pengethley, but died s. p. in 1729. 

Anne, died unm. in 1727. 
Margaret. 

Elizabeth, m. to Francis Elcock, esq. 
of Pool. 

Mr. Massie married, secondly, in 1693, Do- 
rothy, daughter of Peter Dutton, esq. of 
Hatton, and widow of John Walthall, esq. 
by whom he had no issue ; and, thirdly, in 
1711, Elizabeth, daughter of John Pules- 
ton, esq. of Pickhill, by Anne liis wife, 
daughter of Richard Alport, esq. of Overton. 
By the last lady he left, at his decease in 
1730, a daughter, Mary, m. to Eubule Ro- 
berts, esq. of Llanprydd, in Denbighshire, 
and a son, 

Richard Massie, esq. of Coddington, who 
wedded, 17th April, 1735, Charlotte, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Thomas Lloyd, of Plas 
Power, in Denbighshire, and by her, who 
died in 1783, had issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Thomas, successor to his brother. 



III. William, of Chester, h. in 1740, 
d. s. p. in 1806. 

IV. Richard-Myddelton, h. in 1743, d. 
an infant. 

V. Edward, b. in 1747, j«. and left a 
son, Watkin. 

VI. Robert, b. in 1748, died s. p. 

vii. Charles, b. in 1750, jw. Benedicta, 
daughter of Robert Lloyd, esq. a 
younger brother of the family of 
Maesmynan, and left issue, William, 
Thomas, Maria, and Emma. 

I. Maria-Sobieski, died unm. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to William Lloyd, 
esq. of Plas Power, and d. s. p. 

III. Ann, d. unm. 

IV. Frances, died young. 

Mr. Massie was s. at his decease, in March, 
1770, by his eldest son, 

John Massie, esq. of Coddington, b. in 
1736, at whose decease *. p. in 1773, the 
estates devolved on his brother, 

Thomas Massie, esq. of Coddington, b. in 
1738, Avho VI. Elizabeth, daughter of Na- 
thaniel Marriot, esq. of Cheshunt, Herts, 
and dying in 1802, left an only child, the 
present Rev. Richard Massie, of Codding- 
ton. 

Arms — Quarterly gu. and or ; in first 
and fourth quarters, three fleurs de lys arg. 
for difl'erence a canton arg. 

Crest — A demi pegasus with wings dis- 
played, quarterly or and gu. 

Estates — In Cheshire. 

Residence — Eccleston rectory. The fa- 
mily seat, Coddington Hall, an ancient tim- 
ber edifice, has been entirely taken down. 



MASSEY, OF POOL HALL. 



MASSEY, WILLIAM, esq. of Pool Hall, in the county of Chester, m. in 1817, 
Mary, only daughter of John Goodman, es([. of Porthamel, in Anglesea, and has 
issue, 

I. Francis-Elcock. 

II. William-Glynne. 

1. Margaret-Henrietta-Maria. 
Mr. Massey inherited the estates, upon the demise of his mother, in 1 82.5. 



MASSEY, OF POOL HALL. 



40 



Umcaaf. 




This is a branch of the ancient family of 
Massie, of Coddington. 

Roger Massey, esq. second son of Roger 
Massie, esq. of Coddington, who was born 
in 1604, by Mary his wife, daughter of Ro- 
ger Middleton, esq. of Cadwgan, in the 
county of Denbigh, and nephew of the cele- 
brated General Massey, espoused Mary, 
daughter of — Edwards, esq. of Chester, 
and liad two sons, 

John, father of John (who had a son, 
Robert, vicar of Eccleston) and of 
Roger, who d. s. p. 
Roger, of whom immediately. 

The second son, 

Roger Massey, esq. married and had 
two sons and two daughters, viz. Thomas, 
of Chester ;* William, of whom presently ; 
Grace and Mary, who both d. unm. 
Tlie second son, 

The Rev. William Massey, rector of 
Ditchingham, in Norfolk, wedded Elizabeth, 
second daughter and eventual heiress of 
Francis Elcocke, esq. of White Pool, in the 
county of Chester, and by her had issue, 
Roger, in holy orders, archdeacon of 
Barnstaple and rector of Cheriton 
Bishop, in Devon, and of Lawhitton, 
in Cornwall, m. Miss Anne Arnold, 
and had issue one son, John, and four 
daughters. 
William, who inherited his mother's 
estates. 

Elizabeth. 

Sarah. 
Mrs. Massey, the heiress of Pool, died in 
1825, and was 5. by her son, the present 
William Massey, esq. of Poole Hall. 

• Thomas Massey, of Chester, left three sons, 
William, (father of Thomas and James St. John 
Massey), Cholmondeley, and Henry. 

3. 



.-iFiimiljj of lilrorfec. 



Alexander Elcocke, of Stockport, (son 
of Nicholas Klcocke, and grandsou of Tho- 
mas Elcocke, of the same place, living teinp. 
Henry VH.) wedded Elizabeth, daughter 
and heiress of Thomas Cranage, of Poole, 
and had by her tinee daughters, (Jane, jm. 
to — Kaye, esq. of Yorkshire ; Margaret, 
to Henry Wright, esq. of Nantwich ; and 
Katherine, to William Hyde, esq. of Den- 
ton) and several sons, of whom the eldest 
was Francis. Alexander Elcocke d, 15th 
November, 3rd Edward VI. and appears, 
by incjuisition taken the following year, to 
liave held lands in Whitepoole, Horpoole, 
Worleston, Cranage, and Wich Malbank, 
from Sir Thomas Grosvenor, knt. and Rich- 
ard Leigh, esq. of Baguley, in socage, by 
fealty ; also lands in Wincham, Stockport, 
and Wimbalds Traflord. His son and heir, 

Francis Elcocke, esq. of Poole and 
Stockport, died 24th October, 33rd Eli- 
zabeth, (inquisition post mortem dated the 
same year), leaving, by Dorothy, his first 
wife, daughter of John Waring, esq. of 
Nantwich, a son and successor, 

Alexander Elcocke, esq. of Poole, aged 
fourteen at his father's death. This gen- 
tleman m. first, Margaret, daughter of Wil- 
liam Bromley, esq. of Dorfold, and had, 
with other issue, a son and heir, Francis. 
He wedded, secondly, Elizabeth, daughter 
and co-heiress of Robert Sparke, esq. of 
Nantwich, and had further issue, Alexander, 
who entered his descent at the visitation 
of 1613. He (the elder Alexander) was s. 
at his decease by his son, 

Francis Elcocke, esq. of Poole, b. in 
1596, who m. first, Elizabeth Doleman, of 
Pocklington, in the county of York, and 
by her had one son, Alexander, his heir. 
He espoused, secondly, a daughter of Urian 
Gaskell, of Adlington, and was by her fother 
of Anthony, dean of York and minister of 
Taxal. His elder son, 

Alexander Elcocke, esq. of Poole, left 
at his demise by his wife, a daughter of the 
family of Windsor, of Beam Bridge, a son 
and successor, 

Francis Elcocke, esq. of Poole, who m. 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Massie, esq. of 
Coddington, who died in 1730, by Elizabeth 
his wife, daughter and heiress of William 
Wilson, esq. of Terne, and had issue, 

Francis, his heir. 

Alexander, who m. Miss Hughson, of 

Chester, and had issue. 
John, who m. Miss Wilbraham, daugh- 
E 



50 



HAWKER, OF LONGPARISH HOUSE. 



ter of — Wilbraliam, esq. of Dor- 
fold, and had i^^■ue. 
William, d. s. p. 

Elizabi'tli, 7n. to — Salmon, of Nant- 
wich. 
Mr. Elc'ock was s. at his decease by his 
eldest son, 

Francis Elcocke, esq. of Poole, living 
in 1740, who m. a daughter of — Newton, 
esq. of Carrickfergus, and had two daugh- 
ters, Ann, who died unmarried in 1812, 
aged eighty, and Elizabeth, eventually sole 
heiress, who wedded, as already stated, tlie 



Rev. William Massey, and was mother of 
the present William Massey, esq. of Pool 
Hall. 

Aj-ins — First and fourth, quarterly, gu. 
and or; in first and fourth quarters, three 
fleurs de lys arg. : for diflerence a canton 
arg. for Massey ; second and third, gu. a 
saltier varry between four cocks statant arg. 

Crest — A demi pegasus with wings dis- 
played ; quarterly, or and gu. 
Estates — In Cheshire. 
Seat — Pool Hall, near Nantwich. 



HAWKER, OF LONGPARISH HOUSE. 



HAWKER, PETER, esq. of Longparish House, in the county of Hants, b. 24th 

December, 1786; rn. 19th March, 1811, Julia, only 
child of Hooker Barttelot, esq. late major in the South 
Hants militia, (see vol. ii. page 629), and has issue, 

Peter-William Lanoe, b. 19th January, 1812, lieu- 
tenant in the 74th regiment. 

Mary-Laurie. 
Sophia-Sidney. 

This gentleman, who retired, with a temporary pension, 
from the 14th light dragoons, when senior captain, in 
consequence of a severe wound received in the Penin- 
sula, was appointed, by the earl of Malmsbury, in 1815, 
major, and by the duke of Wellington, in 1821, lieu- 
tenant-colonel, of the North Hants militia, at the special 
desire of his present majesty, then duke of Clarence. 
Colonel Hawker succeeded his father, 6th February, 
1790, and is a deputy-lieutenant for Hants. Col. Haw- 
ker's celebrated Avork on Sporting has become one of the 
standard publications of England. 




Huiractc. 



The representatives of this family have, 
without the omission of a single generation, 
served as officers in the army since the reign 
of Elizabeth, but the early commissions, 
prior to the year 1G94, which are stated to 
have borne date so far back as the year 
1558, having been lost by the neglect of a 
person to whom they were confided, the re- 
gular ])cdigrce can be traced no higher 
than the time of William and Mary. 

Peter Hawker, esq. captain of Queen 
Mary's dragoons in UJ94, was father of 

Peter Hawker, esq. who obtained his 
commission as major in Queen Anne's dra- 
goons in 1703, his lieutenant-colonelcy in 
1707, was appointed general by brevet and 
colonel of a regiment of dragoons in 1712. 



General Hawker was *. at his decease by 
his son, 

Peter Hawker, esq. of Longparish, in 
the county of Hants, made lieutenant-colo- 
nel of dragoons in 1715, and governor of 
Portsmouth in 1717. This gentleman, w^ho 
was interred in the governor's chapel of 
that garrison, left by his wife, Elizabeth 
Hyde, an only son, 

Peter Hawker, esq. of Longparish, en- 
sigii of foot in 1726, cornet of horse guards 
in 1727, lieutenant in 1734, and captain in 
1740. Captain Hawker esj)oused Arethusa, 
only daughter and heiress of George Ryves, 
esq. of Ranston, in the county of Dorset, 
and had issue, 

I. Peter-Ryves, his heir. 



HAWKER, OF LONGPARISH MOUSE 



51 



II. George, in holy orders, rector of 
Wareham, Dorset, who vi. Mary, 
sister of the Rev. William Butler, 
and liad issue, 

1. Peter-Ryves, who died half pay 
major .'KHli foot, leaving George, 
and other eliildren. 

2. [ulnuind, lieutenant of artillery, 
killed at the siege of Baditjos. 

1. Mary-Erie, ) hoth 

2. Arethusa-Ellen, \ deceased. 

III. Edmund, captain royal navy, who 
m. Miss Poles, and had two daugh- 
ters, 

1. Sarah, m. to the Rev. David 
Williams, of Overton, Hants. 

2. Mary-Anne, m. to Parry, esq. 
barrister-at-law. 

IV. Erie, major of the 62nd regiment, 
died unm. 

I. Arethusa, who died unm. 
Captain Hawker died before his wife, who 
wedded, secondly, Thomas Sidney, son of 
the earl of Leicester, and had one daugh- 
ter, Letitia-Ann-Hawker Sidney. Captain 
Hawker was s. by his eldest son, 

Peter-Ryves Hawker, esq. of Long- 
parish, lieutenant-colonel of the 1st regi- 
ment of horse guards in 1777, who inherited 
estates in Middlesex under the will of Major 
Charles Lanoe, of the same regiment. Co- 
lonel Hawker m. at Marylebone church, 
London, about the year 1780, Mary- Wilson 
Yonge, an Irish lady ; he died the 6th of 
February, 1790, and was s. by his only son, 
the present Lieutenant-colonel Hawker, of 
Longparish House. 

Arms — Sa. a hawk arg. beaked and mem- 
bered or, on a perch of the last, quartering 
the ensigns of Ryves. 

Crest — A hawk's head erased or. 

Motto — Accipiter prasdam sequitur, nos, 
gloriara. 

Estates — The chief landed possessions of 
the family were, above a century ago, in 
Wiltshire : but the present estates are in 
Middlesex, inherited from Major Lanoe ; 
and at Longparish, in Hants, enjoyed for 
more than a hundred years. Colonel Haw- 
ker has also a small property and a (dila- 
pidated old) manor house in the parish of 
BuUington, of which place he is lord of the 
manor. 

Town Residence — 3, Bentinck Street, (Col. 
Hawker's ow7i house, now let) ; 2, Dorset 
Place, his present residence. 

Seat — Longparish House, near Andover^ 

jFamili? of Mgbrs, of Uanston. 

The family of Ryves, of Ranston, was a 
junior branch of the ancient and influential 



house seated at Damory Court, in the county 
of Dorset. 

.John Ryves, esq. of Damory Court, 
living in the early part of the sixteenth 
century, m. Amye, daughter of ^- Harvey, 
esq. of Lawnson, in Dorsetshire, and had 
issvie, 

I. John, of Damory Court, who m. Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of John Merven, 
esq. and died in 1587, leaving eight 
sons, namely, 

1. .John (Sir), of Damory Court, 
who m. first, Anne, daughter of 
Sir Robert Naper, of Dorset- 
shire ; and, secondly, Dorothy, 
daughter of Henry Hastings, esq. 
of Woodlands. The latter sur- 
vived her husband, and wed- 
ded, secondly, Thomas Tregon- 
well, esq. 

2. George. 

3. Charles, D.D. member of New 
College, Oxford, in 1602. 

4. Henry, whose grandson, John, 
was the last of the Damory line. 

5. James. 

6. William (Sir), who settled in 
Ireland, where he filled several 
high official appointments and 
purchased extensive estates, in- 
cluding Rathsallow, Crunmore, 
Cayanmoie, in the county of 
Down, Ballyferinott, near Dub- 
lin, and the rectory of Naas. 
He m. first, a daughter of — • 
Latham, esq. of Latham Hall, 
in Lancashire ; and, secondly, a 
daughter of John Waldram ; by 
the former of whom he had (with 
four daughters, one m. to Sir 
John Stanley, another to Sir Ar- 
thur Lee, and a third, Elizabeth, 
to Edward Berkeley, esq. of 
Pylle), four sons, viz. 

William, who m. Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Edward 
Bagshaw, of Finglass, and 
had issue, William, Thomas, 
(m. Jane, dau. of Capt. Bur- 
rows) Bagshaw, and Frank. 
Charles, a master in Chan- 
cery, who m. Jane Ogden, 
and had two sons, viz. 
Sir Richard Ryves, knt. 
a judge and recorder of 
Dublin and Kilkenny, 
who m. Miss Savage, 
and had issue. 
Jeremiah Ryves, who jh. 
Ann Maude, niece of 
the bishop of Ossory. 
George, who tn. Ann, second 
daughter of Sir Edward 
Bagshaw\ 



52 



HAWKER, OF LONGPARISH HOUSE. 



Jolin, who m. Mrs. Plunkett. 

7. Valentine. 

H. Thomas (Sir), an eminent ad- 
vocate, master in Cliancery, 
and judge of the faculty and 
prerogative court in Ireland. 
He was knighted by Charles I. 
and stoutly fought on the royal 
side during the civil wars. Sir 
Thomas d. 2nd January, 1651, 
and was buried in St. Clement 
Danes, London. 

II. Henry, of whom presently. 

III. Valentine. 

IV. Richard. 

V. Thomas. 

I. Mary, m. to William Adeyn, alias 

Barbett, of Dorset. 
n. Margaret, m. to Richard Lawrence, 

esq. of Stepleton, in Dorset. 
in. Jane, m. to Thomas Sydenham, esq. 
of Winfrith. 
The second son of John Ryves, of Da- 
mory Court, 

Henry Ryves, esq. was father of 
John Ryyes, esq. of Ranston, whose son, 
Robert Ryves, esq. died in 1551, leaving 
a son and successor, 

Robert Ryves, esq. of Ranston, wlio left 
five sons, viz. John, his heir ; Robert, of 
Randleston, in Doi'set, who m. Margaret, 
dau. and co-heir of William Gillett, esq. of 
the Isle of Purbeck ; James ; Richard, who 
m. Editha, daughter of John Seymer, esq. of 
Han ford ; and Matthew. The eldest son, 

John Ryves, esq. of Ranston, m. Ann, 
daughter of George Barley, esq. of Long- 
parish, in Dorsetshire, and had issue, 

I. George, his heir. 

II. John, who m. Mary, daugliter of 
Thomas Hussey, esq. of Dorset, and 
had John and Elizabeth. 

III. Richard. 

IV. Robert. 

I. Margaret. 

II. Mellet. 

III. Ann, m. to Ralph Stawel, esq. who, 
in consideration of his eminent ser- 
vices in the royal cause, was elevated 
to the peerage, in 1683, as Baron 
Stawel, of Somerton. (See Burke's 
Ext'mct Peerage.) 

The eldest son and heir, 

George Ryves, esq. of Ranston, es- 
poused, early in the seventeenth century, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Ryves, esq. 
younger brother of Sir John Ryves, of Da- 
mory Court, and had issue, 

I. George, h. in 1627, served the office 
of high sheriff for Dorsetshire, vi. 
Mary, dau. of Thomas Chafin, esq. of 
Chettle, and dying in 1689, left two 
daughters, Elizabeth and Mary. 

II. Charles. 



III. Henry. 

IV. Thomas. 

V. Richard, of whom presently. 

VI. Robert. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to Henry Rose, esq. 
The third son, 

Richard Ryves, esq. wedded a sister of 
Sir Edward Northey, attorney-general, and 
was father of 

Thomas Ryves, esq. comptroller of the 
prize office, who m. Anne, daughter of — 
Cochin, esq. and had two sons and four 
daughters, namely, 

I. George, his heir. 

II. Thomas, who died at Bombay in 
1723, leaving, by Elizabeth his wife, 
relict of W^illiam Kyffin, esq. gover- 
nor of Anjango, (with two daughters, 
Elizabeth, m. to Colonel Skipton, of 
the guards, and Susannah, to Mr. 
Serjeant William Girdler), a son and 
heir, 

Thomas Ryves, esq. who sold the 
last of the Dorset property in 
1781. He m. first, Elizabeth, 
daughter and co-heir of Sir An- 
thony-Thomas Abdy, bart. of 
Felix Hall, Essex, and had by 
her two sons and two daughters, 
viz. 

Thomas, a military officer,'who 

married in America. 
John, lost in the East Indies 

in 1768. 
Elizabeth. 

Charlotte, vi. to James Wil- 
liams, esq. of Spetisbury, 
in Dorsetshire. 
Mr. Ryves wedded, secondly, 
Anna-Maria, daughter of Da- 
niel Graham, esq. and dying in 
1788, left by this lady two sons 
and one daughter, viz. 
George-Frederick, a rear-ad- 
miral in the royal navy, b. 
1758, m. first, 1792, Catha- 
rine-Elizabeth, daughter of 
the Hon. James-Everard 
Arundell, of Ashcombe, in 
Wilts ; and, secondly, in 
1806, Emma, daughter of 
Richard - Robert Graham, 
esq. Admiral Ryves died 
20th May, 1826, leaving 
issue, by his first wife, two 
sons and a daugliter, viz. 
George - Frederick, R. N. 
Henry - W^yndham, R. A. 
and Catherine - Elizabeth ; 
and by his second wife, four 
sons and one daughter, viz. 
Charles -Graham, Walter- 
Robert, Edward-Augustus, 



LYSTER, OF ROWTON CASTLE. 



53 



Herbert-Thomas, and Mary- 
Emma. 
Henry, who m. Sarah, thai "li- 
ter of Thomas Hall, esq. of 
Clol1)iiry, Herts. 
Maria-(ieorp,iana, m. to Wil- 
liam Leigh Symes, esq. of 
Esher, in Surrey. 
!. Elizabetli. 

II. Mary. 

III. Ann, »H. to Edward Berkeley, son 
of William Portman, esq. of Bry- 
anston. 

IV. Dorothy. 

V. Arundell. 



Mr. Ryves d. in 1704, and was s. by his son, 
GKoiUiK Ryvf.s esq. of Ranstoii, who rw. 
Arethusia, daughter of Edmund Pleydell, 
esq. M.P. who d. in 172G, by Anne his wife, 
only daughter and heir of Sir.John Morton, 
of iVTelborne, St. (Jiles, in the county of 
Dorset, and had an only daughter, 

Akfthisa, who m. first, as already 
stated, PinicR Hawker, esq. of Long- 
parish House, in the county of Hants, 
and was by him grandmother of the 
present Lieutenant-colonel Hawkek, 
of Loiigparish. She espoused se- 
condly, Thomas Sidney, son of the 
Earl of Leicester, and had one dau. 
Letitia- Ann-Hawker Sidney. 




LYSTER, OF ROWTON CASTLE. 

LYSTER, HENRY, Esq. of Rowton Castle, in the county of Salop, b. 18th 
October, 1798, m. at St. George's, Hanover Square, 13th October, 1824, the Lady 
Charlotte- Barbara Ashley Cooper, youngest dau. of Cropley, fifth Earl of Shaftesbury. 

Mr. Lyster, who is in the commission of the peace for Shropshire, s. his father 3rd 
May, 1819, and is the fourteenth possessor of Rowton Castle, from his first Shrop- 
shire ancestor, William Lyster. 

Uincage. 

daughter of Edward Leigh ton, of Leighton 
and Church Stretton, and secondly, Jane, 
daughter of Sir Ralph Wotton, knt. by the 
former of whom he had, with a daughter, 
Isabella, the wife of John Forester, esq. of 
Watling Street, ancestor of the Lords For- 
esters, a son and successor, 

Richard Lyster, esq. of Rowton, in the 
county of Salop, b. in 1451, who in. Agnes, 
daughter of Ralph Fitzherbert, esq. of Nor- 
bury, in Derbyshire, (see vol. i. p. 79) and 
was father of 

JohnLyster, esq. of Rowton, who wedded 
first, Christabella, daughter of John Gatt- 
acre, of Gattacre, and had by her two sons, 
Richard, his heir, and William. He es- 
poused secondly, Katherine, daughter of 
Roger Bromley, and had a numerous issue, 
but which (does not appear to have been 
commemorated beyond the second genera- 
tion. John Lyster's eldest son, 

Richard Lyster, esq. of Rowton, m. 
Jane, daughter of Thomas Jennyngs, of 
Walleborne, in Salop, and had three sons 
and one daughter, namely, Michael, his 
heir, John, Gabriel, and Christabella, the 
wife of Thomas Wells. He was s. by the 
eldest son, 

Michael Lyster, esq. of RoMton, who 



TkTkik 



The family of Lyster, of Rowton, is 
considered to have sprung from the same 
stock as the Lysters of Gisborne, in Craven, 
which hoiise has lately been ennobled by the 
title of Ribblesdale. 

William Lyster, of Shrewsbury, the 
first name in the Heraldic Visitation for 
Salop, is found to have purchased Rowton 
Castle, and to have been seated there in 
the year 1451. He m. first, Elizabeth, 



•54 



LYSTER, OF ROWTON CASTLE. 



wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Ricliard Lee, 
esq. of Laiigley, in Shropshire, and had one 
son and two daugliters, viz. 

Richard, his heir. 

Margaret, m. to Richard Acton, esq. of 
Dunwall, second son of Robert Ac- 
ton, esq. of Aldenham. 
Elizabeth, d, unm. 
Michael Lyster d. in 1598, was buried at 
Broughton, Salop, and succeeded by his 
son, 

Richard Lyster, esq. of Rowton, who 
VI. Mary, daughter of Michael Chambers, 
of Shrewsbury, and had issue, 

I. Thomas (Sir), his heir. 

II. Francis, ) , . 
in. Thomas, i *^^"'- 

I. Sarah, m. to'Francis Harries, esq. of 
Bishop's Castle. 

II. Ann, m. first, to Henry Brabason, 
esq. of the county of Hereford, and 
secondly to Charles Kynaston. 

III. Elizabeth, m. to — Lutwyche. 

IV. Maria, d. unm. 

V. Martha, m. to Edward Powell, esq. 

Richard Lyster was s. at his decease, in 
October, 1635, by his eldest son, 

Sir Thomas Lyster, of Rowton, who, 
according to the visitations, was eleven 
years of age in 1623. Tliis gentleman was 
a devoted adherent of Kiny Charles I., 
and on the appearance of tliat monarch at 
Shrewsbury, in the first campaign of the 
civil wars, he waited on the king, then re- 
siding in the council house, the family resi- 
dence of the Lysters, and recruited the 
empty coffers of his majesty by the welcome 
present of five hundred pieces of gold. He 
was kniglited on this occasion, and after- 
wards Jield a high command in the garrison 
established in Shrewsbury ; on the fall of 
the town he was taken prisoner, but his 
lady gallantly held out the castle at Row- 
ton for nearly a fortnight against all the ef- 
forts of the republican officer, Col. Mytton, 
nor did she surrender her post till she had 
obtained good terms from that commander. 
Sir Tliomas espoused, first, Elizabeth, dau. 
of John Adye, of the county of Kent, and 
had by her one son, Richard, his heir, and 
one daughter, Elizabeth, the wife of — 
Draycott, of Ireland. He m. secondly, 
Mary, daughter of Sir John Hanmer, hart, 
of Hanmer, by whom he had a son, Tliomas, 
barnster-at-law, who d. unmarried, and two 
daughters, Dorothy, the wife of William 
Jordan, esq. and Mary, who rf. unmarried. 
Sir Thomas d. in 1655, was buried 17th 
March in that year, at St. Chads, Shrews- 
bury, and was *. by his son, 

Richard Lyster, esq. of Rowton Castle, 
who served the ofiice of liigh sheriff for 



Shropshire in 1684. Hejn. first, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Eyton, of Eyton, 
and by her had one son and one daughter, 
Thomas, his heir. 

Margaret, m. to William Beaw, son of 
the Bishop of Llandaff. 
He wedded secondly, Sarah, only child and 
sole heir of Thomas Hughes, esq. of Moynes 
Court, in the county of Monmouth, and had 
issue, 

Richard, of Moynes Court, who m, Eli- 
zabeth, eldest daughter and co-heir 
of Hugh Derwas, esq. of Penhros, in 
Montgomeryshire, and had a daugh- 
ter and heiress, 

Elizabeth, who wedded the Rev. 
Lewis Owen, D.D. youngest son 
of Sir Robert Owen, of Pork- 
ington, and uncle of Margaret 
Owen, who m. Owen Ormsby, 
esq. and was mother of Mrs. 
Ormsby Gore. By Dr. Owen 
the heiress of Moynes Court left, 
with a daughter, Margaret, who 
d. unmarried, in 1816, a son, 
John Owen, esq. of Penhros, 
in the county of Mont- 
gomery, and of Moynes 
Court, in Monmouthshire, 
who died, at an advanced 
age, unmarried, 18th De- 
cember, 1823, wlien he de- 
vised the Penhros and his 
other Montgomeryshire es- 
tates to Mrs. Ormsby Gore,* 
and the Moynes Court es- 
tates to Lieut. -colonel John 
Lyster, brother of the pre- 
sent Henry Lyster, esq. of 
Rowton Castle. 
John, who d. s. p. 
Sarah. 
Mary. 
Elizabeth. 
Mr. Lyster d. in 1698, and was *. by his 
son, 

Thomas Lyster, esq. of Rowton Castle, 
who m. Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Beaw, 
Bishop of Llandaff, by Cecilia his Avife, 
daughter of Charles, eighth Lord de la War, 
descended from Archbishop Cliichele, foun- 
der of All Souls College, Oxford, and from 
two stocks of tlie royal line of Plantagenet. 
Tliis union produced three sous and three 
daughters, namely, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II. Francis, d. unm. 

III. Thomas, in holy orders, rector of 
the first portion of Westbury, and of 
Neenton, in Salop, who m. Anne, 



• For an account of the Ormsby Gore family 
see vol. i. p. 85. 



LYSTER, OF ROWTON CASTLE. 



55 



dan<;lit('r of the Ri!v. Crorj^o Fislicr, 
and (lied in 1772, aijcd SL'VCMity-tlinc, 
having' liad issue, 

1. RiniAKU, wlio inlicritcd tlic 
Rowton t'statc on tlie di'ccaso of" 
Anne, relit t ol' liis uncle, Rich- 
ard. 

2. Corbet Watkin, d. unin. 

3. Edward, d. unin. 

I. Jane, 7m. to John Powys, esq, of 

Berwick. 
!i. Dorotliea. 
III. Ann. 
Mr. Lystcr d. 7th March, 1701-2, and was 
s. by liis eldest son, 

Richard I^iYsriiu, esq. of Rowton Castle, 
who represented the county of Saloj) for the 
unusual period of tliirty years. The threat 
hospitality and universal popularity of tliis 
gentleman are still very freshly remem- 
bered ; he was a firm supporter of the ex- 
iled royal house, and constantly opposed 
the whig administrations of his day. It is 
related of him, tliat his first return to par- 
liament was for the borough of Shrewsbury, 
for which place, after a strenuous contest, 
he was elected by a considerable majority. 
His opponent, however, disputed the re- 
turn, and endeavoured to destroy the ma- 
jority by disfranchising an extensive su- 
burb, which, till that period, had always 
enjoyed the elective franchise, and as he 
was a supporter of the government, the 
whole whig party joined in the attempt, 
and succeeded in throwing out the suc- 
cessful candidate. Upon tlie decision being 
announced in the commons, Mr. Lyster, 
feeling very keenly the injustice of the pro- 
ceeding, put on his hat, and with his back 
to the speaker, walked down the house ; 
when his manner being remarked, lie was 
called to order, and pointed out to the 
chair. Turning abruptly round he instantly 
said, "When you learn justice I will learn 
manners." This drew down upon him the 
increased wrath of the house, and probably 
he would have been compelled to ask par- 
don on ])is knees, or to visit the Tower, had 
not Sir Robert Walpole, who on all occa- 
sions knew how to throw the grace of good 
temper over his corruptions and tyranny, 
exclaimed, with a smile, " Let him go, we 
have served him bad enough already." 
The indignation which this ill treatment 
occasioned mainly contributed to securing 
the representation of his native county for 
the remainder of his life. In illustration of 
the manners of his day, we may add, that 
on his departure from Rowton to take his 
seat, his tenants annually escorted liim the 
first two stages on his journey, while his 
London tradespeople, duly apprized of his 
approach, with the same punctilio, advancctl 



two stages from town to I)ring him into 
London. 

He wedded Anne, daughter of Robert 
Pigott, es(|. of Chetwynd, and had three 
children, Thomas, iJichard, and Anne, who 
all d. young. Mr. Lyster d. in 17()fi, aged 
seventy-five, and was s. in tiie Rowton es- 
tate by his widow, Anne, at wliose demise, 
in 1781, it passed to her husband's nephew, 
RiciiAitD Lvsi KU, es(|. of Kowton Castle, 
who m. Mary, daughter of Moses Smith, 
esq. and had two sons, viz. 
RiciiAKD, his lieir. 

Thomas - Moses, rector of Oldbury, 
Saloj). 
Mr. Lyster d. 14th April, 1794, and was s. 
by his elder son, 

Richard Lvstkr, esq. of Rowton Castle, 
who espoused Mary, daughter of the Rev. 
John Rodd, of Barton-on-the-Heath, in the 
county of Oxford, and dying 28rd May, 
1807, left a son and successor, 

Richard Lystf.r, esq. of Rowton Castle, 
lieut.-col. of the 22nd Light Dragoons, who 
served the office of high sherifi" for Shrop- 
shire in 1812. Hem. 10th December, 1794, 
Penelope-Anne, daughter of Henry Price, 
esq. of Knighton, in the county of Radnor, 
and by her, who d. in January, 1829, had 
issue, 

Richard, h. 12th December, 1797, and 

d. in March, 1806. 
Hknry, heir to his father. 
John, lieut.-colonel in the Grenadier 
Guards, to whom the late John Owen, 
esq. of Penhros, left the Moynes 
Court estate. 
Thomas-Price, h. 19th July, 1802, in 
the royal navy, died in January. 
1820. 
Mary, m. 1830, to the Rev. Richard 
Webster Huntley, A.M. of Boxwell 
Court, in the county of Gloucester, 
(see vol. ii. p. 468). 
Georgiana. 
Col. Lyster, who represented Shrewsbury 
in three parliaments, and. until his death, 
d. in St. James's Place, London, 3rd May, 
1819, was buried at Alberbury, the 13th of 
that month, and was s. by his eldest surviv- 
ing son, the present Henry Lyster, esq. 
of llowton Castle. 

Arms — Ermine, on a fess sa. three mul- 
lets, arg. 

Crest — A stag's head erased ppr. 
Motto— hoyA\ au niort. 
Estates— liowion Castle, &c.. Written 
Castle, and Kinnerton, in the Stiperstone 
mountains ; Neenton, near Bridgnorth, 
Edenhope, and Aldon, all in the county of 
Salop. 
1 ^'tfl«— Rowton Castle, Salop. 



56 



MURRAY, OF PHILIPHAUGH. 



MURRAY, JAMES, esq. of Philiphaugh, in the county of Selkirk, m. Mary 
Dale, daughter of Henry Hughes, esq. and has issue, 



I, John. 



II. James. 



III. Basil. 



I. Jessy. 







\^W^7 




Mr. Murray s. his brother, in 1830, and is the seventeenth generation of this family, 
in a direct male line. 

ILmtage. 

de Moravia de Falahill, of part of the lands 
of Philiphaugh, dated 20th July, 1461 . His 
son, 

Patrick Murray, of Falahill, acquir- 
ing from Robert Watson several acres 
of land about Philiphaugh, had a charter 
from the said Robert, dated 20th February, 
1477. He subsequently obtained charters 
of lauds in 1480 and 1492. He m. and had 
one son and a daughter, namely, 
John, his heir. 

Margaret, who wedded James, Earl of 
Buchan, and had a son, 

James Stewart, Lord Traquair, an- 
cestor of tlie Earls of Traquair. 
Patrick Murray d. at the close of the fif- 
teenth century, and was succeeded by his 
son, 

John Murray, of Falahill, who upon his 
father's resignation, got a charter under the 
great seal from James IV., " Johanni Mur- 
ray filio et hferedi apparenti Patricii Mur- 
ray de Falahill terrarura dc Gervastoun," 
in 1489 ; afterwards, in 1497, another char- 
ter dated 6th November, in that year, of 
the lands of Cranston, Riddel, &c. and 
eventually, on his own resignation, a char- 
ter, dated 10th October, 1508, of half of the 
lands of Philiphaugh. 

This chieftain, the celebrated " Outlaw 
Murray," who, with five hundred of his 
men, bid defiance to the king of Scot- 
land, James IV., is immortalized by the 
beautiful ballad,* preserved in the Min- 
strelsy of the Scottish Border, and for 
ages a popular song in Selkirkshire. " The 

* " There (i. e. Ettrick Forest) an outlaw keeps 
five hundred men ; 
He keepis a royalle companie ! 
His merrymen are a' in ae liverye clad, 

O' tile T.income greene save gaye to see; 
He and his ladye in purple clad, 
O ! gin they lived not royallie. 

Word is gane to our noble king, 
In Kdinburgh, where that he lay, 



The first of this family on record 

Archibald de Moravia, mentioned in 
the chartulary of Newbottle, in 1280, was 
descended (the author of the critical remarks 
upon Ragman's Roll presumes) from the 
Morays, lords of Bothwel, wlio, by mar- 
riage of a daughter of Sir David Olifard, 
got considerable possessions in the county 
of Selkirk. In 1296, he subscribed the 
oath of fealty to Edward I., and d. in the 
reign of RoBEur Bruce, leaving a son and 
successor, 

Roger de Moravia, who obtained, in 
1321, from James, Lord Douglas, superior 
of liis lands, a charter " tcrrarum de Fala," 
which estate, subsequently designated Fala- 
hill, continued for many years to be the 
chief title of the family. Roger d. at an ad- 
vanced age, in 1380, and was s. by his son, 

Alexander de Moravia, mentioned in a 
charter under the great seal, from Robert 
II. before the year 1380. He was father of 

Patrick [Murray, of Falahill, living in 
1413, who d. temp. James II. and was s. by 
his son, 

John Murray, of Falaliill, who, upon 
the resignation of Thomas Hop Pringle, 
got a charter from King James III. Johanni 



MURRAY, OF PHILIPHAUGII. 



67 



tradition of Ettrick Forest," says Sir Wal- 
ter Scott, " bears, that the "outlaw was 
a man of prodigious strengtii, possessing a 
batton or club, vvitli which he laid Ice (i. e. 
waste) the country for many miles round ; 
and that lie was at length slain by Buc- 
cleugh, or some of his clan, at a little mount, 
covered with fir trees, adjoining to Newark 
Castle, and said to liave been a i)art of the 
garden ; a varying tradition bears the place 
of liis death to have been near to tlie liouse 
of the Duke of Buccleugh's gamekeeper, 
beneath the castle, and that the fatal arrow 
was shot by Scott, of Haining, from [the 
ruins of a cottage on the opposite side of 
the Yarrow. There was extant, within 
these twenty years, some verses of a song 
on his death. The feud between the out- 
law and the Scotts may serve to explain 
the asperity with which the chieftain of that 
clan is handled in the ballad,"* 

The song relates the departure of James 
IV. with " full five thousand men" to sup- 
press the insurrection of the outlaw, and 
subsequently the humiliating necessity to 
which the king of Scotland was reduced to 
compromise with his rebellious subject, by 
grantingt to him the heritable sheriffship of 
the shire of Selkirk. J 

Murray espoused the Lady Margaret 
Hepburn, daughter of Patrick, first Earl of 
Bothwell, and had two sons and three daugh- 
ters, viz. 

I. James, his heir. 

II. William, who m. Janet, daughter 
and heiress of William Romanno, of 
that Ilk, and had a son and succes- 
sor, 

William Murray, of Romanno, 
living in 1531, who m. Margaret, 

That there was an outlaw in Ettricke Foreste 
Counted him nought, nor a' his countrie gay. 

• I make a vowe,' then the gude king said, 

' Unto the man that deir bought me, 
I'se either be ki-^g of Ettricke Foreste, 

Or king of Scotlande that outlaw shall be.' " 
&c. &c. &;c. 

The Sang of the Outlaw Murray. 
* " Then out and spak the nobel king. 
And round him cast a wilie e'e — 
Now ha'd thy tongue, Sir Walter Scott, 

Nor speik of reif nor felonie ; 
For, bad everye boneste man his awin kye, 
A right pure clan thy name wad be." 

t Wha ever heard, in ony times. 

Sicken an outlaw in his degre. 
Sic favor get before a king 

As did the Outlaw Murray of the foreste 
friel" 

Old Ballad, 
t This office continued with bis descendants 
until the government acquired all the Scot's herit- 
able jurisdictions in 1748. 



daughter of Tweedio, of Drum- 
elzier, and dying in the reign of 
Queen Mary, was succeeded by 
bis son, 

John Murray, of Romanno, living 
in 1587, who m. Agnes, daughter 
of Nisbet, of Nisbet, and was 
fathur of 

William Murray, of Romanno, 
in 1G12, who m. first, Susan, 
daughter of John Hamilton, of 
Broomhill, and had by her one 
son, David, his heir. He m. 
secondly, Elizabeth Howieson, a 
daughter of the ancient family of 
Braehead, and had by her three 
sons and one daughter, namely, 
Adam, progenitor of the Mur- 
RAYS, of Cardon ; Gideon, who 
d. in Ireland ; William ; and Mar- 
garet, second vvife of Sir Alex- 
ander Murray, of Blackbarony. 
The laird of Romanno d. temp. 
James VI. and was s. by his 
eldest son, 

Sir David Murray, knt. who ac- 
quired the lands and barony of 
Stanhope, in Peeblesshire. He m. 
the Lady Lilias Fleming, daugh- 
ter of John, Earl of Wigton, 
and had a son and successor, 

Sir William Murray, of Stan- 
hope, created a baronet of Nova 
Scotia in 1664. From this gen- 
tleman lineally derives the pre- 
sent 

Sir John Murray, bart. of Stan- 
hope. (See Burke's Peerage a«rf 
Baronetage.) 

I. Elizabeth, m. to James Douglas, of 
Cavers, heritable sheriff of the county 
of Roxburgh. 

II. Isabel, m. to Robert Scot, of Hop- 
peslie. 

III. Janet, m. to Sir Robert Stewart, of 
Minto, and had issue. 

John Murray, the outlaw, d. in the early 
part of James V.'s reign, and was s. by his 
elder son, 

James Murray, of Falahill, who had one 
charter under the great seal, dated 9th No- 
vember, 1526, " Jacobo Murray de Fala- 
hill terrarum de Kirkurd, Mounthouses," 
&c., in the shire of Peebles, and in two 
years after another, of several lands near 
the burgh of Selkirk, to himself in liferent 
and to Patrick his son and heir apparent in 
fee. He vi. a daughter of Sir John Cranston, 
of that Ilk, and dying about the year 1529, 
was s. by his son, 

Patrick Murray, of Falahill, who ob- 
tained under the great seal a charter, dated 
28th January, 1528, " Patricio Murray filio. 



58 



MURRAY, OF PHILIPHAUGH. 



et hffiredi Jacobi Murray de Falahill, ter- 
rarum de Philiphalgh," and in 1529 a 
charter of the lands and barony of Cranston, 
Riddel, &c. He subsequently, in 1540, had 
the customs of the burgh of Selkirk and the 
heritable sheriflsliip of tliat county, whicli 
liad been granted by King James IV. to his 
o-randfatlier, confirmed, and ratified to him- 
self and his heirs. Patrick Murray wedded 
H daughter of John, Lord Fleming, and d. 
in the reign of Queen Mary, leaving a 
daugliter, m. to Somerville, of Cambus- 
nethan, and a son, his successor, 

Patrick Murray, of Falahill, who ac- 
quired, in 1588, a charter of the lands of 
Hany, Lewinshope, and Hairhead. He m. 
Agnes, daughter of Sir Andrew Murray, of 
Blackbarony, and had issue, 

I, John (Sir), his heir. 

II. Patrick, who got a charter under 
the great seal, dated 10th August, 
1613, of the lands of Winterhope- 
head, &c. in Annandale. 

in. James, who was bred a merchant, 
in Edinburgh. He m. Bethia Maule, 
descended from the Panmure family, 
and had three sons, viz. 

1. James (Sir), of Skirling. 

2. Robert (Sir), of Priestfield or 
Melgrim. 

3. Patrick, of Deuchar. 

I. Isabel, m. to John Abernethy, Bishop 
of Caithness. 

II. . m. to Kerr, of Greenhead. 

III. Elizabeth, m. to Robert Scott, of 
Haining. 

IV. , m. to John Scott, of Tushe- 

law. 
The laird d. in the commencement of the 
reign of James VI. and was succeeded by 
his son. 

Sir John Murray, knt. the first of the 
family, designed " of Philiphaugh." This 
gentleman had four charters under the great 
seal, one dated 22nd August, 1584, " Jo- 
hanni Murray de Falahill, at Pliiliphaugh, 
filio et hceredi Patricii Murray de Falahill, 
octodecim tei-ras husbandrias jacen. infra 
dominium de Selkirk ;" the second, dated 
1st May, 1603, " Domino Johanni Murray 
de Philiphaugh, vicecom. de Selkirk terra- 
rum de Hangingshaw," &c. ; the third, 
dated 20th March, 1604, " Terrarum eccle- 
siasticarum de Traquair in vicecom. de 
Peebles ;" and the fourth, in 1624, " Qua- 
rundem aliarura terrarum Baroniag de Buck- 
cleugh." He espoused first, Janet, daugh- 
ter of Scot, of Ardross, and had by her two 
sons and three daughters, viz. 

I. James (Sir), knighted by Charles 
I., who obtained by charter the lands 
and barony of Balincrief, &c. in the 
shires of Edinburgh and Haddington, 
and the lands of Quhytbum, Davies 



toun, &c. in 1633. He m. Anne, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Craig, of 
Riccartoun, and dying before his 
father, left two sons and four daugh- 
ters, namely, 

1. John (Sir), successor to his 
grandfather. 

2. James, a colonel in the army 
and deputy governor of Edin- 
burgh Castle. 

1. Janet, m. to James Scott, of 
Gallashiels, and had issue. 

2. Elizabeth, wt. to Cranston, of 
Glen. 

3. Margaret, m. first, to Dr. Bur- 
net, and secondly to Colonel 
Douglas. 

4. Isabel, m. to James Naesmytb, 
of Posso. 

11. Gideon, aide-de-camp to King 
Charles I. in whose service he lost 
his life. 

I. , m. to Kerr, of Chatto. 

II. Anne, ni. to John Shaw, of the 

Sauchie family, 
in. Grezel, d. unm. 
He wedded secondly, Helen, daughter of 
Sir James Pringle, of Gallashiels, and had 
further issue, 

I. John, of Ashiesteel. 

II. William, t who both fell fighting 

III. David, ) under the royal ban- 
ner. They died issueless. 

I. Helen, married to Scot, of Bread- 
meadows. 

II. Elizabeth, 7n. to Mr. Knox. 

III. Isabel. 

Sir John Murray was a person of much 
ability, and distinguished in his generation. 
He sate in parliament in 1621, and survived 
till about the year 1640, when he died, at a 
very advanced age, and was succeeded by 
his grandson, 

Sir John Murray, knt. of Philiphaugh, 
who was appointed by parliament one of 
the judges for trying those of the counties 
of Roxburgh and Selkirk, who had joined 
the gallant Graham's standard in 1646. He 
subsequently, in 1649, claimed £12,014. 
for the damages he had sustained from Mon- 
trose. Sir John wedded first, Anne, daugh- 
ter of Sir Archibald Douglas, of Cavers, 
heritable sherifl" of the county of Roxburgh, 
and had six sons and four daughters, viz. 

I. James (Sir), his heir. 

II. John, of Bowhill, one of the sena- 
tors of the college of justice. 

III. William, a colonel in the army. 



IV. Archibald,"] 

V. Thomas, j- all d. 

VI. Lewis, J 



young. 



I. Anne, m. first, to Alexander Pringle, 
of Whitebank ; and, secondly, to Ro- 
bert Rutherford, of Bowland. 



CROMPTON-STANSFIELD, OF ESIIOLT HALL. 



59 



both d. unra. 



!i. Janet. 

III. Racliel. 

IV. Elizabctli. 

Sir John Mnriay vi. secondly, Maroaret, 
danghter of Sir Joliii Scott, of Scotstarvet, 
and widow of Jolin Trotter, of Charterhall, 
and liad by lier an only daughter, Jean, 
who died young. He (/. in l()7(j, and was *. 
by liis eldest son. 

Sir Jamks Murray, of Pliiliphaugh, h. 
in 1655, who was appointed one of the sena- 
tors of the college of justice in UJ8y, and 
lord register in 1705. This learned person 
m. first, Anne, daughter of Hepburn, of 
Blackcastle, who d. issueless ; and, se- 
condly, Margaret, daughter of Sir Alex- 
ander Don, of Newton, by whom he had 
three sons and five daughters, viz. 

I. John, his heir. 

II. James, 

III. Alexander, 

I. Rachel, d, unm. 

II. Anne, m. to Pringle, of Haining. 

III. Elizabeth. 

IV. Jane. 

V. Margaret. 

Sir James d. in 1708, and was s. by his 
eldest son, 

John Murray, esq. of Philiphaugh, heri- 
table sheriff of the county of Selkirk, (which 
office had been more than two hundred and 
fifty years in the family,) and a member of 
the British parliament from 1725 until his 
death. He wedded Eleanora, daughter of 
Lord Basil Hamilton, son of William, duke 
of Hamilton, and had by her four sons and 
two daughters, viz. 

I. Basil, a youth of great promise, who 
d. in the flower of his age unm. 

II. John, heir to his father. 

III. David. 

IV. Charles. 

I. Mary, wi. to Sir Alexander Don, 
bart. of Newton, and had issue. 



II. Margaret. 
The laird of Philiphaugh d. in 1753, and 
was s. by his eldest son, 

John Murray esq. of Philiphaugh, who 
espoused Miss Tiiomson, and hud three sons 
and four daughters, viz, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Charles, d. unm. 

III. James, successor to his brother. 

I. Janet, m. to — Dennis, esq. of the 
island of Jamaica. 

II. Eleanora, m. toSir James Nasmyth, 
bart. of Posso. 

III. Mary, m. to John Macqueen, esq. 
of Jamaica. 

IV. Margaret, m. to Capt. Baugh, of 
the 58th regiment. 

Mr. Murray d. in 1800, and was s. by his 
eldest son, 

John Murray, esq. of Philiphaugh, at 
whose decease unmarried, in 1830, the es- 
tates and representation of this great and 
ancient family devolved on his only sur- 
viving brother, the present James Murray, 
esq. of Philiphaugh. 

ylrw*— Arg. a hunting horn sa, stringed 
and garnished gu. ; on a chief az. three 
stars of the first. 

Crest — A demi naked man winding his 
horn, ppr. 

Motto — Hinc usque superna venabor. 

Estates — In Selkirkshire. 

Seat — Philiphaugh, in that county. At 
Philiphaugh the gallant marquess of Mon- 
trose was defeated by General Leslie : the 
remains of the entrenchments are still vi- 
sible on the field where the battle was 
fought, and a few years since several im- 
plements of war and a small culverin were 
dug up. 



CROxMPTON-STANSFIELD, OF ESHOLT HALL. 



STANSFIELD-CROMPTON, WILLIAM-ROOKES, esq. of Esholt Hall, in 
the West Riding of Yorkshire, b. 3rd August, 1790 ; m. 17th June, 1824, Emma, 
eldest daughter of William Markham, esq. of Becca Hall, son of Archbishop Mark- 
ham. (See vol. ii. p. 207.) 

This gentleman, whose patronymic is Crompton, inheriting, 13th Februaiy, 1832, 
upon the demise of his father, Joshua Crompton, esq., his mother's estates, assumed' 
in compliance with her testamentary injunction, the additional surname and arms of 
Stansfield. 

Mr. Crompton Stansfield is a master of arts of Jesus College, Cambridge, and a 
magistrate and deputy-lieutenant for the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire. 



60 



CROIMPTON-STANSFIELD, OF ESHOLT HALL. 



Hfncncie. 




The family of Stausfield, or Stansfeld as 
anciently written, trace their descent from 
one of the companions-in-arras of William 
THE Conqueror, who obtained the grant of 
the lordship of Stansfeld. His descendants 
have remained ever since enjoying high 
respectability in the county of York, and 
their ancient residence, Stansfield Hall, is 
still to be seen in the once beautiful valley 
of Todmorden. 

Jordan de Stansfeld, son of Wyons 
Maryons, lord of Stansfeld at the Conquest, 
m. a daughter of Sir John Tovvneley, of 
Towneley, and had, with three younger 
sons, (Thomas, Robert, and Oliver, con- 
stable of Pontefract Castle), a successor, 

John Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, father, by 
Elizabeth liis wife, daughter of Thomas En- 
twistle, of a daughter, Jane, the wife of 
Rafe Copley, of Copley, and of a son, 

Richard Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, living 
temp. Henry I. who espoused Alice, daugh- 
ter of Sir Thomas Toustal, knt. of Thur- 
land Castle, and had four sons, Edmund, 
Robert, Hugh, and Roger, The eldest, 

Edmi'nd Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, vi. 
Agnes, daughter of Thomas de Midgley, 
and was father of 

Ralph Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, who m. 
Jane, daughter of Thomas Copley, of Cop- 
ley, and liad three sons, Henry, Ralph, 
and William, and a daughter, Joan. The 
eldest son and heir, 

Henry Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, wedded 
Dionis, daughter of Bryan Thornhill, of 
Thornhill, in Yorkshire, and was *. by his 
son, 

William Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, who 
ni. Joane, daughter of Sir John Burton, knt. 
of Kinslow, in Yorkshire, and was father of 

Thomas Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, living 
at the close of the fourteenth century, who 
is supposed, from the circurastaiu:e of tlie 



arms over the mantelpiece being placed 
along with those of Lascells, to have built 
the old mansion of Stansfeld Hall, situated 
in a very beautiful part of the valley of 
Todmorden : it is within tlie parish of Ha- 
lifax and townsliip of Stansfeld, or, as it is 
now spelt, Stansfield. He m. Barbara, 
daughter of John Lascells, of Lascells Hall, 
in the county of York, and had a son and 
successor, 

John Stansfeld, esq. of Stansfeld Hall, 
wlio 7)1. in 1410, Mary, daughter of John 
Fleming, esq. of Wathe, lineally descended 
from Sir Michael le Fleming, (kinsman to 
William the Conqueror, and one of his 
commanders,) and had issue, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Henry. 

I. Ann, m. Thomas Savile, second son 
of Henry Savile, by Ellen his wife, 
daughter of Thomas Copley, of Cop- 
ley, and had four sons, viz. 

John Savile, of HuUenedge. 

Thomas Savile, who m. Elizabeth, 
Lady Waterton, of Walton. 

Henry Savile. 

Nicholas Savile, of Newhall, an- 
cestor of the Savilles, earls of 
Mexborough. 

II. Isabel. 

III. Jane. 

IV. Elizabeth. 

V. Mary. 
The elder son, 

Thomas Stansfeld, esq. of Stansfeld 
Hall, by Alice his wife, daughter of John 
Savile, was father of 

William Stansfeld, esq. of Stansfeld 
Hall, who m. Elizabeth, daugliter of John 
Duckenfield, esq. of Duckenfield, in the 
county of Chester, and had two sons, 

James, of Stansfeld Hall, living in 1536, 
in which year he removed to Hurts- 
head. 
Thomas, whose line we have to detail. 
Tlie second son, 

Thomas Stansfeld, of Heptonstall, in 
Stansfeld, whose will was proved in 1508, 
married a lady named Blanche, but of what 
family is not recorded, and had two sons, 
Lawrence, his heir, and Thomas, of Sower- 
by, who died about the year 1537, leaving 
a silver chalice to Crosstone Chapel. The 
elder, 

Lawrence Stansfeld, of Stansfeld, wed- 
ded Isabell Horsfall, and dying about 1534, 
(liis will was proved in that year), was buried 
in Heptonstall Church, and s. by his son, 

Thomas Stansfeld, of Sowerby, who m. 
Alice, daughter of — Mitchell, of Hoptiui- 
stall, and had three sons, Thomas, who ap- 



CROMPTON-STANSFIELD, OF ESIIOLT HALL. 



61 



pears to have died uiimaiTi<'d, Lawkknci:, 
successor to liis fatlier, and Nicholas, of 
Wadsworth Hoyd, wliose will was proved 
in 16H7. Tiiouias Staiislcld died possessed 
of lands in Stansfeld and Langfield in loOl, 
and was s. hy his son, 

Lawkknci- Stanspkld, of Sowerhy, who 
died about the year 1591, leavin<^- by Eliza- 
beth, whose maiden surname is unknown, 
a son and heir, 

Nicholas Stansfeld, esq. of Norland, 
who m. at Halifax, in 1591, Susan Hopkin- 
son, and left at his decease, in 1599, a son, 

John Stansfeld, esq. of Sowerhy, b. in 
1592, who m. at Halifax in 1612, Martha, 
daughter of — JJentley, and had four sons 
and one daughter, of whom the second son, 
Joshua, commanded a company of militia 
during tlie civil wars, and fought in 1G42 at 
Atherton Moor, wliere Lord Fairfax was 
defeated by the marquis of Newcastle. The 
eldest son, 

JosiAS Stansfeld, esq. of Breck, in 
Sowerby, b. in 1619, d. in 1702, having had 
issue seven sons, viz. 

I. Timothy, of Pond, (a house which 
tradition affirms the Stansfields to 
have possessed since the Conquest), 
who was ancestor of Timothy Stans- 
feld, esq. of Newcross, Surrey, and 
of Robert Stansfeld, esq. of Field 
House, near Sowerby. 

II. Joshua, of Horton, near Bradford, 
died in 1732, leaving issue. 

III. Samuel, of whom hereafter. 

IV. James, of Bowood, in Sowerby, 
who died in 1730. His daughter, 
Martha, m. Joshua Tillotson, esq. 
nephew to the archbishop. 

V. Ely, M. A. vicar of Newark, who d. 
in 1719, leaving one son, who d. s. p. 

VI. Josias, of Haugh End, in which 
house Archbishop Tillotson was born. 
Josias had one son, John, who d. s.p. 
and one daughter, Sarah, mj. to Mar- 
tin Hotliam, esq. of York. 

VII. John, of Sowerby, b. in 1657, who 
m. in 1681, Elizabeth, daughter of — 
Hirst, esq. of Adswood Hall, in Che- 
shire, and d. in 1737, leaving a son, 

Ely Stansfeld, esq. of Sowerbv, 
b. in 1683, m. in 1713, Mary, 
daughter of John Farrar, esq. of 
Cliff Hill, and had one son, Da- 
vid, and two daughters, Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Joseph Moore, 
of Halifax, (and mother of an 
only daughter, Mary, m. to Wil- 
liam Threlkeld, esq.), and Mary, 
who d. unmarried in 1778. Mr. 
Stansfeld d. in 1734, and was s. 
by his son, 

David Stansfeld, esq. of Hope 
House, Halifax, b. in 1720, who 
m. in 1748,_, Ellen, daugliter of 



tlie Rev. Timothy Aired, of Mor- 
ley, and d. in 1769, leaving a 
daughter, Nelly, vi. to Jolin 
Kawson, esq. of Stony Koyd, 
near Halifax, and a son and suc- 
cessor, 
David Stansfeld, esq. of Leeds, 
b. 13th February, 1755, who m. 
in 1776, Sarah, daughter and 
heiress of Thomas Wolrich, esq. 
of Armley House, in Yorkshire, 
and had issue, 

1. Thomas -Wolrich, b. in 
1779. 

2. George, b. in 1784, m. in 

1814, Anna, daughter of 
Richard Micklethwaite, esq. 
of New Laiths Grange, and 
has issue. 

3. William, b. in 1785, m. in 

1815, Margaret, daughter 
and co-heirof JamesMilnes, 
esq. of Manor House, Flock- 
ton, in Yorkshire, and has 
issue. 

4. David, b. in 1788, lost on 
his passage from South Ame- 
rica in 1810. 

5. Josias, b. in 1790. 

6. James, b. in 1792. 

7. Hatton-Hamer, b. in 1793. 

8. Henry, b. in 1795. 

9. Hamer, b. in 1797. 

1. Peggy,m. in 1802, to James 
Bischoff, esq. and has issue. 

2. Eleanor. 

3. Mary. 

4. Sarah. 
The third son, 

Samuel Stansfield, esq. of Bradford, 
wedded, 12th April, 1675, Mary Clarkson, 
of Bradford, and d. in September, 1727, 
aged seventy-nine, leaving a son and suc- 
cessor, 

Robert Stansfield, esq. of Bradford, b. 
in 1676, who m. first, in 1703, Elizabeth, 
daughter of the Rev. Thomas Sharp, M. A. 
of Little Horton, and by her, who died in 
1722, had to survive youth an only daughter. 
Faith, 711. to Richard - Gilpin Savvry, 
esq. 
Mr. Stansfield wedded, secondly, in 1723, 
Anne, daughter of William Busfield, esq. 
of Rishworth, and had, with other issue who 
died unmarried, one son and one daughter, 
viz. 

Robert, his heir. 
Ann, successor to her brother. 
The only son and heir, 

Robert Stansfield, esq. of Bradford, b. 
in 1727, who purchased, in 1755, Esholt 
Hall or Priory, in Yorkshire, espoused 
Jane, eldest daughter of Richard Ferrand, 
esq. of Harden Hall, by Mary his wife, 
daughter of William Busfield, esq. of Rish- 



6-2 



CROMPTON-STANSFIELD, OF ESHOLT HALL. 



worth, but dying without issue, 14th Sep- 
tember, 1772, was s. by liis sister, 

Ann Stansfield, of Esholt Hall, b. 27th 
August, 1729, who m. 27th August, 1756, 
William Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, 
senior bencher of Gray's Inn, and dying 
12th February, 1798, was s. by her daughter, 

Anna-Maria Rookes, of Esholt Hall, 
who wedded, 28th February, 1786, Joshua 
Crompton, esq. of York, third son of Sa- 
muel Crompton,* esq. of Derby and of Beal, 
in Yorkshire, and had issue, 

I. William - Rookes Crompton, her 
heir. 

II. Joshua-Samuel Crompton, of Sion 
Hill, b. 17th September, 1799, M. A. 
of Jesus College, Cambridge, a ma- 
gistrate of the North and West Ri- 
dings of Yorkshire, and late M.P. for 
Ripon. This gentleman inherited, 
by will, his father's property in the 
North Riding. 

III. Robert-Edward Crompton, of Azer- 
ley Hall, b. 8th August, 1804, B. A. 
of Trinity College, Cambridge, sub- 
sequently an officer in the 15th Hus- 
sars. He succeeded, by his father's 
will, to the estates of Azerley and 
Sutton, near Ripon, in Yorkshire. 

I. Maria- Anne Crompton, m. 4th July, 
1814, to Henry Preston, esq. of More- 
by Hall, high sheriff" of Yorkshire in 
1834, and has one son and one daugh- 
ter, Thomas - Henry Preston and 
Anna-Maria Preston. 

II. Mary - Frances Crompton, m. 4th 
December, 1828, to Lieut.-col. Sir 
William - Lewis Herries, K.G. H. 
bi'other to the Rt. Hon. John Charles 
Herries, and has two sons, Herbert- 

* This gentleman, Samuel Crompton, esq. wbo 
was eldest son of Samuel Crompton, esq. of Derby, 
and Ann bis wife, (baptized in 1688), daughter 
of William Rodes, esq. of Great Houghton, wed- 
ded Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Fox, esq. of 
Derby, and had four sons and one daughter, viz. 

I. Samuel Ckomi'ton, esq. of Wood End and 
Beal, in Yorkshire, h. in 1750, m. Sarah, 
daughter of Samuel Fox, esq. and d. in 
1810, leaving one son and one daughter. 

II. John Crompton, esq. of The Lilies, b. in 
1753, mayor of the town and high slieriff 
for the county of Derby in 1810. He m. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Archibald Bell, esq. 
and (/. in 1834, leaving two sons and two 
daughters. 

III. Joshua Crompton, esq. of York, wliow. 
as in the text, the heiress of Esholt Hall. 

IV. Gilbert (Crompton, esq. of York, b. in 
1755, m. Eliza, daughter of the Rev. George 
Johnson, rector of Loftus, in the North 
Riding of Yorkshire, and vicar of Norton, 
in the county of Durham, and has issue. 

I. Elizabeth Crompton, b, in 1745, residing 
in Derby. 



Crompton Herries and Frederick- 
StansHeld Herries. 

III. Elizabeth-Jane Crompton. 

IV. Henrietta-Matilda Crompton. 

V. Margaret-Sarah Crompton. 

VI. Caroline-Rachel Crompton. 

The heiress of Esholt died 5th June, 1819, 
and devised by will to her eldest son, the 
present William-Rookes Crompton-Stans- 
FiELD, esq. of Esholt Hall, (on the death of 
his father), the property bequeathed to her 
by her mother. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, sa. 
three goats passant arg. for Stansfield ; 
second, vert, on a bend arg. double cotised 
erm. a lion passant gu. between two covered 
cups or, on a chief az. three pheons gold, 
for Crompton ; third, arg. a fess sa. be- 
tween three rooks ppr. for Rookes. 

Crests — First, for Stansfield, a lion's 
head erased, encircled by a wreath ; second, 
for Crompton, a demi horse sa. vulned in 
the chest with an arrow ppr. 

Motto — Nosce teipsum, for Stansfield ; 
love and loyalty, for Crompton. 

Estates — In Yorkshire. 

Seat — Esholt Hall, or Priory, in the' West 
Riding of Yorkshire. The priory of Esshe- 
holt was founded by Simon de Ward, in the 
middle of the twelfth century, and dedicated 
to God, St. Mary, and St. Leonard ; a proof 
of the sincere and profuse devotion of that 
period, for while Simon freely bestowed the 
fairest and most fruitful portion of his es- 
tates on strangers, he was content to reserve 
for himself and his posterity a mansion and 
domain atGuiseley, which no modern land- 
holder, who had been possessed of both, 
would have been content to inhabit for 
twelve months. Esholt Priory fell of course 
with the smaller foundations, and remained 
vested in the /crown until granted, nine 
years after his dissolution to Henry Thomp- 
son, one of the king's gens-d'armes at Bou- 
logne. Ill this family it continued sorae- 
wliat more than a century, when it was 
transferred to the neighbouring and more 
distinguished house of Calverley by the 
marriage of Frances, daughter and heiress 
of Henry Thompson, esq. with Sir Walter 
Calverley. His son, Sir Walter Calverley, 
hart, built on the site of the priory, in the 
earliest part of the last century, a magnifi- 
cent house, and planted a fine avenue of 
elms from Apperley Bridge, which, not- 
withstanding the change of taste, from the 
noble growth to which they have attained, 
reconcile the most fastidious eye to their 
rectilinear disposition. Along this approach 
the house is seen to great advantage, with 
two fronts of handsome white stone, beauti- 
fully backed by native oak woods, with the 
more distant hills of Upper Aresale beyond. 
It is not improbable that till the great de- 



CROMPTON-STANSFIELD, OF ESIIOLT HALL. 



g: 



molltion of tlie buildiiii^js by Sir Walter 
('iilvcrlcy, mucli of tlit! priory (lontiiuicd in 
its orii;inal state ; now a few pointed arches 
in some of the oliices alone remain to attest 
that a reli}i,ious house once occupied the 
site. Tlie i)uikler of tlie present mansion 
died in 174i>, and his son, of the same name, 
sold tlic manor liouse of Esholt to Robert 
Stansdeld, esq. of Bradford, great uncle of 
the present proprietor. 

jFamilf of KooSes. 

Richard RooKES,esq. living in the reign 
of Henry VII. son of William Rookes, of 
Roydes Flail, in the West Riding of York- 
shire, espoused Mary, daughter of John 
Rawden, esq. of Rawden, and was s. by 
his son, 

Richard Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hal!, 
te})ip. Henry VHI. father, by Elizabeth his 
wife, daughter of Robert Waterhouse, esq. 
of Halifax, of 

John Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, who 
»j. Jennet, daughter and co-heir of Richard 
Watson, of Lofthouse, near Wakefield, and 
by her, who wedded, secondly, Stephen 
Lutton, gent, left a son and successor, 

William Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, 
who 7)1, Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Wil- 
kinson, of Bradford, and had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. James, fellow and bursar of Univer- 
sity College, Oxfoi-d. 

III. Richard, ? i »i i /v • 

T, , . ' >• both left issue. 

IV. Robert, S 

V. Tempest. 

VI. Maximilian, left issue. 

VII. John. 

I. Bridget, m. to Mark Hoppey, of 
Esholt. 

II. Barb.ara, 771. to Richard Pearson. 

III. Grace, m. to Richard Rawlinson. 

IV. Susan, >«. to Michael Holdsworth, 

V. Prudence, m. to John Ramsden. 
The eldest son, 

William Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, 
living 20th Charles 1. 7n. first, Jane, daugh- 
ter of John Thornhill, esq. of Fixby, in the 
county of York, by whom he had a son, 
William, his heir; and, secondly, Susan, 
daughter of Mr. Rosethorn, and widow of 
Mr. Radcliffe, of Lancashire, by whom he 
had another son. He was s. by the elder, 
William Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, 
who espoused Mary, daughter of George 
Hopkinson, esq. of Lofthouse, and sister of 
the well known anticjuary, and had issue, 
William, who died while a student at 

University College, Oxford. 
George, heir. 

John, successor to his brother. 
Jane, who 771. Robert Parker, esq. se- 
cond sou of Edward Parker, esq. of 



Browsholme, and d. s. p. in 1712. 
Mr. Parker was a great anticpiary 
and collector of MSS., coins, 8tc. 
Mary, died young. 
The eldest surviving son, 

CEORciE Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, 
living in 1G77, ?h. Jane, daughter of ('apt. 
Henry Crossland, of Helmsley, in the North 
Riding of Yorkshire, but dying without sur- 
viving issue, (his only daugiiter, Katharine, 
having predeceased him in Hj82, aged four 
years), he was s. by his brother, 

John Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, who 
espoused, first, Anne, daughter and heir of 
George Hopkinson, esq. of Lofthouse, and 
had two sons, William and George. He 
711. secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. 
Marmaduke Cooke, D.D. vicar of Leeds 
and prebendary of York, by whom (who 
died 17th December, 1G95), he had issue, 

I. John, d. in 1700, and was buried at 
Bradford. 

II. Marmaduke, who died 27th April, 
1 724, leaving by Jane his wife, daugh- 
ter of William Turner, esq. of Wake- 
field, an only daughter and heiress, 

Elizabeth, who in. Christopher 
Hodgson, M. D. of Wakefield, 
but dying s. p. 15th March, 1789, 
aged seventy-three, left her es- 
tate at Barrowby to her cousin, 
AVilliam Rookes, esq. of Esholt. 

I. Elizabeth. 

II. Mary. 

III. Jane. 

IV. Anne. 

Mr. Rookes d. 30th May, 1713, and was s. 
by his son, 

William Rookes, esq. of Roydes Hall, 
(of Jesus College, Cambridge,) who 7/1, 
Mary, daughter of William Rodes, esq. 
of Great Houghton, by Mary his wife, dau. 
of Richard Wilson, esq. of Leeds, and had 
issue, 

I. Edward, of Roydes Hall, b. in 1713, 
in. first, in 1740, Mary, daughter and 
heir of Robert Leeds, esq. of Mil- 
ford, and assumed in consequence 
the surname of Leeds. He wedded, 
secondly, Henrietta, daughter of 
Sandford Hardcastle, esq. of Wake- 
field, and sister of Thomas Arthing- 
ton, esq. of Arthington. This lady 
died s. p. in 1803. By his first wife, 
Mr. Rookes Leeds, who d. in 1788, 
had four daughters, viz. 

Mary Leeds, who ;«. George Wal- 
ker, esq. of Middlewood Hall, 
and d. s. p. in 1803. 
Jane Leeds, who 711. William Ser- 
jeantson, esq. of Wakefield, and 
had a son, 

William-Rookes-Leeds Ser- 
jeantson, esq. of Camphill, 



64 



LAWRENCE, OF SEVENHAMPTON. 



b. in 1766, nt. 2nd June, 
1795, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Henry Dawkins, esq. of 
Standlinch, by the Lady 
Juliana Colyeare bis wife, 
dau. of the Earlof Portmore. 

Elizabeth Leeds, d. unmarried, in 
1763. 

Anne Leeds, »«. to the Rev. Jere- 
miah Smith, of Woodside, iu 
Sussex. 
II. William, b. 27th August, 1719, at 



Roydes Hall, m. at Otley, on his 
own and his wife's birthday, 27th 
August, 1758, Ann, sister andheiress 
of Robert Stansfield, esq. of Es- 
holt Hall, and was grandfather of the 
present 

William - Rookes Crompton - 
Stansfield, esq. of Esholt Hall. 
III. John, d. young. 

I. Mary, d. unm. 1793. 

II. Ann, d. iu infancy. 

III. Elizabeth, d. unra. in 1770. 



LAWRENCE, OF SEVENHAMPTON. 

LAWRENCE, WALTER-LAWRENCE, esq. of Sandywell Park, in the county of 

Gloucester, b. 21st May, 1799, m. 24th July, 1824, 
Mary, only daughter of Christian Speldt, esq. of Strat- 
ford, in Essex, and has three daughters, viz. 

Mary-Elizabeth. 

Alice. 

Agatha. 

This g'ontleman, whose patronymic is Morris, assumed 
in its stead the surname and arms of Lawrence, by the 
desire of his maternal grandfather, Walter Lawrence, 
esq. He succeeded to the Sandiwell estate in 1823, 
under the will of Mr. Lightbourn, and is a magistrate 
and deputy lieutenant for the county of Gloucester. 



HLmcagt. 




The family of Lawrence was originally 
seated in the county of Lancaster. 

Sir Robert Lawrence, of Ashton Hall, 
in that shire, accompanied the lion-hearted 
Richard to Palestine, and distinguishing 
himself at the siege of Acre, in 1191, was 
made a knight-banneret, and obtained for 
his arms " Arg. a cross raguly gu." He 
was father of 

Sir Robert Lawrence, who wedded] a 
daugliter of James Traiford, esq. of Traf- 
ford, in Lancashire, and had a son and suc- 
cessor, 

James Lawrence, living in the 37th of 
IIenky hi. whom, in 1252, Matilda, only dau. 
and heiress of John Washington, of Wash- 
ington, in Lancashire, and acquired by his 
marriage the manors of Washington, Sedg- 
wick, &c. in that county. His son and suc- 
cessor, 

John Lawrence, levied a fine of Wash- 
ington and Sedgwick, in 1283. He m. Mar- 
garet, daughter of Walter Chesford, and 
was father of 



John Lawrence, who presented to the 
clmrch of Washington, in 1326, and died 
about the year 1360, leaving, by Elizabeth 
his wife, daughter of — Holt, of Stably, in 
Lancashire, a son and heir. 

Sir Robert Lawrence, knt. who m. Mar- 
garet Holden, of Lancashire, and had four 
sons, namely, 

I. Robert (Sir), his heir. 

II. Thomas, whose son, Arthur, seated 
at Prior's Court, in the county of 
Gloucester, was ancestor of Sir John 
Lawrence, of Chelsea, who was cre- 
ated a baronet in 1628. This branch 
of the family is now extinct. 

III. William, b. in 1395, who served 
in France, and subsequently joining 
Lionel, Lord Welles, fought under 
the Lancastrian banner at St. Albans, 
in 1455, where he was slain, and 
buried in the abbey church. 

IV. Edmund. 
The eldest son, 



LAVVllENCK, OF SK VENMAMPTON. 



G.l 



Sir Robekt Lawrknce, living- in 1454, 
espoused Ainphilbis, daughter of Edward 
Longford, esq. of Longford, in tlio county of 
Lancaster, and had three sons, namely, 

1. James (Sir), knt. styled " of Stand- 
ish," to distinguisli him from another 
Sir Janus Lawrence tiu-n living. He 
»i. Cecily, daugiiter and heiress of — 
Boteler, esq. of Lancashire, and had 
two sons and one daughter, 

1. Thomas (Sir), knt. whom. Elea- 
nor, dau. of Lion(d, Lord Welles, 
K.G., by Joan, his wife, dau. and 
heir of Sir Robtn-tWaterton, knt. 
(See Burke's Extinct Peerage.) 
By this alliance Sir Thomas ac- 
quired several manors in the 
counties of Lincoln, Notting- 
ham, and York, as appears by 
a deed of partition, dated 6tli 
April, 2nd Henry YH. and had 
two sons, viz. 

Sir John Lawrence, the se- 
venth knight in a direct 
Iine,who enjoyed thirty-four 
manors, amounting, in 1591, 
to £6,000. per annum, hut 
being outlawed, for having 
killed a gentleman usher of 
King Henry VH. he died 
an exile in France, issueless, 
when Ashton Hall, and his 
other estates passed, by 
royal permission, to his re- 
latives, Lords Monteagle 
and Gerard. Many of the 
Lawrences were at this time 
seated at Withington, Can- 
bury, and Priors Court, in 
the county of Gloucester ; 
at Fisbury, in Wilts, at 
Crich Grange, in the Isle 
of Purbeck,* and at St. 
James's Park, in Suffolk. 
Thomas Lawrence, died s. p. 
2. Robert, d. without issue. 

1. Cecily, m. to William Gerard, 
esq. ancestor of the Lords Ge- 
rard, of Bromley. 

* Sir Ouvlu Lauhenck, living temp. Henry 
VIII. , founder of the Crich Grange hranch, was 
seventh son of Nicholas Lawrence, esq. of Ager- 
croft, third son of Sir Giles Laurence, of Stand- 
ish. He HI. the Lady Anne Wriothesley, dau. of 
Thomas, the first and celebrated Earl of South- 
ampton, and had a son and successor, 

Edward Lalrence, esq. who died 28th Au- 
gust, 1601, leaving by Alice his wife, daughter 
of Thomas Trenchard, esq. of Lichet, a son, 

Sir Edward Laurence, of Crich Grange, in 
Dorset, who was knighted in 1619. He died in 
1629, and was s. by his son, 

Sir Edward Laurence, of Crich Grange, 



II. Robert, of wiiom presently. 

III. Nicholas, from whom descended 

Littleton Lawrence, esq. of 
Cricklade, who inherited the 
mansion aiul estates of Shurd- 
ington, under the will of Wil- 
liam J^awrence, esq. and his 
descendants still possess them. 
The second son, 

Robert Lawrence, esq. m. Margaret, 
daughter of John Lawrence, e.sq. of Rixton, 
in Lancashire, by Mary his wife, daughter 
of Eudo, eldest son of Richard, Lord Welles, 
and had issue, 

I. Robert (Sir), who m. the daughter 
of Thomas Stanley, esq. and d. s. p. 
in 1511. 

II. John, who, with Sir Edmund How- 
ard, commanded a wing of the En- 
glish army at Flodden. He d. without 
issue, aged thirty-eight. 

Ml. William. 
The third son, 

William Lawrence, esq. living in 1509, 
purchased landed properly to the amount of 
£2,000. per annum, including Sevenhamp- 
TON, &c. in the county of Gloucester, the 
manor of Sea House, in Somerset, Blackley 
Park and Norton,in Worcestershire, Staple 
Farm and Newhouse, subsequently pos- 
sessed by Dr. Robert Fielding, in right of 
his wife, Upcot Farm, and many other es- 
tates. He wedded Isabel, daughter and co- 
heir of John Molyneux, esq. of Chorley, in 
Lancashire, and had issue, 

I. John, LL.D. archdeacon of Wor- 
cester, parson of Withington, who d. 
s. p. 

II. Robert, of whom presently. 

III. William. 

IV. Edmund, of Withington. 

V. Thomas, of Compton, in the parish 
of Withington. 

The second son, 

Robert Lawrence, esq. b. at Withing- 
ton, in 1521, had by his first wife three 
daughters, the wives of Truman, Hodg- 
kins, and Rogers; and by his second. 



knighted at Oxford in 1643, who m. in 1623, 
Gra'ce, daughter of Henry Bruen, esq. and dying 
in 1647, left, with two daughters, Elizabeth, m. 
to Robert Culliford, esq. of Encombe, and Mar- 
garet, to William Floyer, esq. of Hayes, (see vol. 
i. p. 606.) a son, 

Sir Robert Laurence, knt. of Crich Grange, 
who wedded Jane, daughter and heir of John 
Williams, esq. of Tynham, and was s. in 1666, by 
his son, 

John Laurence, esq. of Crich Grange, who d. 
s. p. having sold all bis estates to Nathaniel 
Bond, esq. 



61 



LAWRENCE, OF SEVENHAiMPTON. 



Eleanor, daughter of Jolin Stratford, of 
Fariicot, tliree sons, viz. 

I. WiiLi.AM, to whom his father g-ave 
the Slmrdington estates, &c. This 
"William was father of 

Anthony, of Shurdington, whose 
son and heir, 

William, died without issue, 
leaving his estates at Shur- 
dington to liis widow, Dul- 
cibella, for life, remainder 
to divers distant relations, 
excluding, through some 
pique, the descendants of 
Anthony, of Seveuhanii)ton, 
his heirs at law. Littleton 
Lawrence,of Cricklade,des- 
cendantof ayoungerbranch, 
took the Shurdington es- 
tates under this will, and his 
heirs still enjoy them. 

II. Robert, who had the manor of Se- 
venhampton, but dying issueless, he 
devised Oldeswell to William, the 
son of his elder brother, and the 
manor of Sevenhampton, Andovers- 
ford, &;c. to the grandsons of his 
younger brother, Anthony. 

in. Anthony. 
Robert Lawrence died in 1585. His third 
son, 

Anthony Lawrence, esq. in whose des- 
cendants the representation of the senior 
branch of this ancient family is now vested, 
wedded a daughter of William Gradwell, 
esq. of Gray's Inn, and had issue, 

I. Anthony, his heir. 

II. Francis. 

III. William, d. s. p. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to William Rogers, 
esq. of Sandiwell. 

Anthony was s. at his decease by his eldest 
son, 

Anthony Lawrence, esq. who m. Mary, 
daughter of Giles Broadway, esq. of Port- 
lip, and had two sons and three daughters, 
namely, Robert, his heir, Anthony, of 
Dowdeswell, Ann, m. to Giles Roberts, esq. 
of Oudswell, Mary, vi. to John Dowle, esq. 
of Badginton, and Elizabeth, m. to John 
Freme, esq. The elder son, 

Robert Lawrence, esq. of Sevenhamp- 
ton, wedded Mary, daughter of John Ro- 
gers, esq. of Hasleton, and had issue, 

1. Anthony, M.D. whose line ended 



in his three daughters and co-heirs 
viz. 

Elizabeth, m. to — Moore, esq. 
Culpepper, m. to — Pembruge, 

esq. 
Mary, d. unm. 

II. Robert, d. aged twenty. 

III. Walter, of whom presently. 

I. Elizabeth, 7m, to William Norden, 
esq. 

II. Mary, m. to Carew Williams, esq. 
of Corndale. 

III. Ann, m. to Thomas Ludlow, esq. 

Tiie tliird son, 

Walter Lawrence, esq. of Painswick, 
espoused Anne, daughter of Edmund Webb, 
esq. and had, with several other children, 
who all d. unmarried, a daughter, Joanna, 
wife of Ethell Perks, esq. and a son his 
successor, 

Walter Lawrence, esq. of Sevenhamp- 
ton, who m. Mary, daugliter of John Cocks, 
esq, of Woodniancote, in the county of 
Gloucester, a branch of the family of Cocks, 
of Dumbleton, progenitors of the ennobled 
liouse of Somers, and had issue, 

Robert, in holy orders, d. unmarried. 

Walter, heir to his father. 

John, in holy orders, rector of Seven- 
hampton, living unmarried in 1806, 
aged seventy-three. 
Mr. Lawrence was s. at his decease by his 
elder surviving son, 

Walter Lawrence, esq. of Sevenhamp- 
ton, who wedded Mary, only surviving 
child of Thomas Hayward, esq. by Dorothy 
his wife, another daughter of the said John 
Cocks, esq. of Woodmancote, and left at 
his decease an only surviving child, 

Mary Lawrence, of Sevenhampton, re- 
presentative, through her two grandmothers, 
of the family of Cocks, of Woodmancote, 
whose estate she holds, and whose arms she 
quarters. The heiress of Sevenhampton m. 
in 1797, William Morris, esq. brother of 
Robert Morris, esq. M. P. for Gloucester, 
and has an only surviving child, the present 
Walter-Lawrence Lawrence, esq. of San- 
dywell Park, 

A7-ms — Arg. a cross raguly gu. 
Crest — The tail and lower part of a fish, 
erect and couped ppr. 

Estates — In Gloucestershire. 
Seat — Sandywell Park. 



G7 



MURRAY, OF TOUCIIADAM AND POLMAISE. 



MURRAY, WILLIAM, esq. of Touchadam and Polmaise, both in the county of 
Stirling-, b. 6th July, 1773; m. 11th Juno, 1799, Anne, daughter of Sir William 
Maxwell, hart, of Monreith. 

This gentleman, who is vice-lieutenant of the county of Stirling, and lieutenant- 
colonel of the Yeomanry of that shire, succeeded his father in 1814. 



ILmcaae. 





This family lias been seated for centuries 
ill the county of Stirling, and is supposed to 
derive from the noble house of Bothwel. 
Its patriarch. 

Sir William de Moravia, designed of 
Saiiford, joined Robert Bruce in defence 
of the liberties of his country, but, being 
taken prisoner by the Englisli, was sent fo 
London in 1306, and remained in captivity 
there until exchanged after the battle of 
Bannockburn. Sir William's son and suc- 
cessor. 

Sir Andrew de Moravia, obtained from 
King David Bruce two charters; the first, 
granting the lands of Kepmad, dated in 
1365; and the second, bestowing Tulcha- 
dam, Tulchmallar, &c. in 1369. Sir Wil- 
liam died temp. Robert IL and was *. by 
his son, 

W^iLLiAM DE Moravia, of Touchadam, 
living in 1392, in which year he had a char- 
ter from King Robert III. He wedded 
Christian Cunninghame, and was father of 

Alexander de Moravia, of Touchadam, 
who, in 1455, upon the resignation of his 
father, got a charter, from James II. of the 
lands of W^eigateschaw, in the county of 
Lanark ; and Toucliadam, Newark, &c. in 
the shire of Stirling; all erected into a 



barony. He m. — Sutherland, and had a 
son and successor, 

William Murray, of Touchadam, con- 
stable of the castle of Stirling in the reign 
of James III. This laird acquired, in 1459, 
the lands of Bucliadrock, in Stirlingshire, 
and in 1462, in a baron court held at 
Dunipace concerning part of the lands of 
Herbertshire, of which W^illiam, earl of 
Orkney, was superior, W^illiam Murray, of 
Touchadam was, by his lordship, appointed 
judge. 

Touchadam married a lady named Chris- 
tian, and had four sons, 

I. David, liis heir. 

II. John, father of John, of Gawamore, 
successor to his uncle. 

III. Herbert. 

IV. Patrick. 
The eldest son, 

David Murray, of Touchadam, having 
no issue, made a resignation of his whole 
estate to his nephew, 

John Murray, of Gaw^amore, captain of 
the king's guards and lord provost of Edin- 
burgh, who, upon the demise of his uncle 
about the year 1474, became " of Toucha- 
dam," and got a confirmation thereof under 
the "great seal. This John Murray was a 
firm and devoted adherent of King James 
III. After the battle of Stirling, he was 
deprived of a considerable portion of his 
estate, and a great number of the old family 
writs were embezzled and lost. He es- 
poused a daughter of — Seaton, of W^in- 
ton, and had a son and heir, 

William Murray, of Touchadam, living 
in 1507, who m. Agnes, daughter of John 
Cockburn, of Ormiston, and was s. at his 
decease, in 1514, by his son, 

John Murray, of Touchadam, who had 
a charter under the great seal, dated 9th 
June, 1541, of the lands of Sandieholmes, 
in Lanarkshire. He wedded the Lady Ja- 
net Erskine, daughter of Robert, fourth 
earl of Marr, and had two sons, William 
and James, by the elder of whom, 



■6S 



MURRAY, OF TOUCHADAM AND POLMAISE. 



William Mirray, of Touchadam, lie was 
siicceeded. Tliis laird married Agnes, dan. 
and co-lieir of James Cunningliame, of Pol- 
mais, in the county of Stirling, and dying 
an 15<i9, left, with a daughter, Agnes, a son 
and successor. 

Sir John Murray, of Toucliadam and 
Polmais, who got a charter, dated ^Gth De- 
^•eniber, 1()0"2, to himself and Jaen Cock- 
burn his wife, of several lands in Stirling- 
shire, containing a new erection, in consi- 
deration of the many good services he liad 
himself rendered to the king, as well as of 
the loyalty so frequently disjjlayed by liis 
great-great-grandfather, John Murray, of 
Touchadam. Sir John w*. Jean, daugliter 
of John Cockburn, of Ormiston, and was s. 
by his son. 

Sir William Murray, of Touchadam and 
Polmais, who obtained from Charlks I. a 
cliarter of the lands of Cowie in 16'."3(). 
During the conflicts wliich harassed the reign 
of that ill-fated prince, Sir \Mlliam strained 
every nerve in defence of the royal cause, 
and, in consequence, sutl'ered severely from 
the enactments of the adverse party. He 
was in the engagement of the duke of 
Hamilton, and in 1G54, was emerced by 
Cromwell in the sum of fifteen hundred 
pounds. He died shortly after, and left, by 
Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Sir Alex- 
ander Gibson, of Durie, a son and succes- 
sor, 

John Murray, of Polmais and Toucha- 
dam, served heir to his father in January, 
1655. He VI. Janet, daughter of Sir John 
Nisbet, of Dean, lord provost of Edinburgh, 
and was s. by his son, 

John Murray, of Touchadam and Pol- 
mais, who wedded Anne, daughter of Sir 
Alexander Gibson, of Durie, one of the 
senators of tlie college of justice, and had 
five sons, viz. 

I. John, his heir. 

II. William, eventual inheritor. 

III. George, who married and liad issue. 

IV. Adam, M. D. d. s. p. 

V. Mungo, who married and had issue. 

The eldest son, 

John Murray, of Touchadam and Pol- 
mais, infeft in his fatlier's lifetime, married 
Lilias, daughter of Stirling, of Keir, and 
dying in 1716, was *-. by the elder of two 
sons, 

John Murray, of Touchadam and Pol- 
mais, who dying unm. was s. by his brother, 

William Murray, of Touchadam and 
Polmais, at whose decease likewise unm. 
the estates reverted to his uncle, 



William Murray, of Touchadam and 
Polmais, who was served heir to the whole 
estate in 1729. He w/. first, Cecilia, dau. 
of Gibson, of Durie, by whom lie had a son 
and daughter, who both d. in infancy. He 
wedded secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
Alexander Gibson, bart. of Pentland, and 
had three sons and one daughter, viz. 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Alexander, who d. unm. 

III. John, who m. Isabella, daughter of 
Professor Hercules Lindsay, and 
had issue, 

1. John, mercliaut, of Liverpool, 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of James 
Bryce, esq. and has two sons 
and one daughter. 

2. Cecilia, m. to John Russell, esq. 

I. INFargaret, m. to the Marchese Ac- 
crambonie. 
William Murray d. in 1758, and was s. by 
liis son, 

William Murray, of Touchadam and 
Polmais, who tm. first, Margaret, daugliter 
of John Callander, esq. of Craigforth, and 
by her had a son. William, his heir. He 
wedded, secondly, Anne, daughter of Law- 
rence Campbell, esq. of Clathick and Kil- 
lerraont, by whom he had, 

John, capt. R. N. deceased. 

Archibald, East India company's ser- 
vice, deceased. 

Alexander, an advocate, who m. Miss 
Johnina Wilkinson, of the county of 
Denbigh. 

Anne, ?«. to Robert Bruce, esq. of Ken- 
net. (See vol. ii. page 485). 

Mr. Murray espoused, thirdly, Grace, daugh- 
ter of Alexander Speirs, esq. of Elderslie, 
and by tliis lady had one son and three 
daughters, viz. 

Peter, died in infancy. 

Mary, m. to Alexander Speirs, esq. of 
Culvrench, in Stirlingshire. 

Grace. 

Elizabeth, died an infant. 
Polmaise d. in 1814, and was s. by his 
eldest son, tlie present William Murray, 
esq. of Polmaise and Touchadam. 

AiTtis — Az. three stars within a double 
tressure, flory counterflory or. 

Cj-est — A mermaid, holding in her dexter 
hand a mirror, in her sinister a comb. 

Motto — Tout prest. 

Estates — In Stirlingshire, acquired in the 
fourteenth century. 

Seat — Polmaise, 



69 



GRIMSTON, OF GRIMSTON GARTH. 



\ 




7 



GRIMSTON, CHARLES, esq. of Grimston Garth and Kilnwick, both in the East 

Ridin;^ of tho county of York, h. 2nd July, 1791 ; m. 
10th November, 1823, Jane, third survivinp^ daughter 
of the Very Rev. Thomas Trench, dean of Kildare, and 
niece of Frederick, present Lord Ashtown, by whom he 
has issue, 

MAKMADtiKF.-jKRARD, h. 27tli November, 182C. 

Walter-.John, b. 9th February, 1H2H. 

William-IIenry, h. 1st November, 18:50. 

Daniei-Tbomas, b. 8th July, 1832. 

Roger, b. 5th March, 1834. 

Maria- Emma. 

Frances-Dorothy. 

Jane. 

Catherine. 

This j^entleman, who succeeded his father in 1821, is 
colonel of the East York militia, and a magistrate and 
deputy-lieutenant for the same Riding. 

Uinrage. 



^ik^< 



Svi.vESTF.R DE GilYMFSTONF, camc Over 
from Normandy as standard-bearer in the 
army of William, the Com/ueroj-, to whom 
lie did liomaj;e for Grymestone and Holmp- 
ton, and bis lands elsewhere, to bold of the 
Lord Rosse as of liis seigiiiorie and manor 
of Rosse in Holdernesse, which Lord Kosse 
was lord chamberlain of the king's bouse- 
liold in 1066. Sylvester married, it is sup- 
l)osed, in Normandy, and bad a son and 
successor, 

Damel de Grymestone, avIio wedded tlie 
daughter of Sir Adam Surmvall, or Somcr- 
ville, of Brent Hall, near Pattrington, and 
bad three srons, 

I. Thomas (Sir), his heir. 

II. Daniel, who m. the daughter of 
Rolland Slierwarde, and bad a son, 
Rolland, who died young. 

III. Oswald, who in. tbo dauglitor of 
John Mussard, of Leawde Burton, 
and bad a son, John. 

Tlie eldest son. 

Sir Thomas de Grymestone, knt. of 
Grymestone, living temp. Stephen, wedded 
tbo daugliter of Sir John Bosville, of Awdes- 
ley, and bad a son and successor, 

Sir .John de Grymestone, of Gryme- 
stone, who received the lionour of knigbt- 
hood from Henry H. He m. the daughter 
and heiress of Sir John Goodmatiliam, knt. 
of Goodnianliam, in whose right lie became 
lord of the manor of Goodmanham, bolden 



under Henry Piercy, earl of Northumber- 
land, and left by her, at bis decease, 12th 
October, 1165, (buried at Goodmanham,) a 
son. 

Sir Martin de Grymestone, of Gryme- 
stone, knt. living temp. Henry IH. who 
espoused the daughter and co-heiress of 
Sir John Collam, knt. of Collam, and had 
two sons, viz. 

Roger, bis heir. 

Alexander, m. the daughter of Sir .John 
Frowiske, of the county of Middle- 
sex, and bad a son, Martin, lord of 
Edmonton. 

Sir Martin was s. by his elder son, 

Sir Roger de Grymestone, knt. of 
Grymestone, lord of the manors of Gryme- 
stone, Tiinstall, Holmpton, Goodmanham, 
and Collam, who m. the daughter of Sir 
Fowke Constable, lord of Frisbmarshe, and 
was s. by his elder son, 

Sir Jerard de Grymestone, knt. of 
Grymestone, who sold, in 1353, fifty-three 
oxgangs of land in the manor and lordship 
of Risby, some land in Cottingbam, half 
the moietie of Holmpton in H(ddernesse, 
ami certain lands in Bewlake and Mos- 
crofte. Sir Jerard wedded the daughter of 
Sir John Baskerville, knt. but having no 
issue, was *. by his brother, 

Walter de Grymestone, of Grymestone, 
who 7/j. the daughter and co-heir of Har- 



'0 



GRlxMSTON, OF GRIMSTON GARTH. 



barde Fliiiton, of Flinton, and had three 
sons, 

William, his heir. 

Jerard, m. the daughter of AVilliani 
Asheton, and was lather of Anthony 
Grimston, of Nidd, in Nitherdaile. 
John, who was made dean of Dorches- 
ter in the l-2th year of Richard II. 
and in tlie loth of the same reign 
Abbot of Selby. He d. in 1398, and 
was solemnly interred in the monas- 
tery of Selby. 
Walter de Grymestone enjoyed, in right of 
his wife, the lordships of Flinton, in Hol- 
der iiess, and Laresby, in the county of Lin- 
coln, which lands were formerly possessed 
by Sir John de la Lyne. The manor of 
Flinton was holden upon the manor of Hum - 
bleton, lately belonging to the dissolved 
monastery of Thornton CunlifTe, in Lincoln- 
shire. Laresby was holden under Ralph 
Neville, earl of Westmoreland, upon his 
manor of Grimsby, paying a pair of white 
gloves and one penny for all service. 
AValter's eldest son and successor, 
William de Grymesvone, of Gryme- 
stone, wedded Armatrude, daughter of Sir 
John Rysam, knt. of Rysam, in Holder- 
ness, and had three sons, viz. 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Robert, who, marrying the daughter 
of Sir Anthony Spelman, removed 
to the estates obtained through his 
wife in Suflolk, and was s. by his 
son, 

Edward de Grymestone, from 
whom descended the Grimstons 
of Suffolk, who were raised to 
the rank of baronet in 1612. 
The male line of this branch, of 
which Sir Harbottle Grim- 
ston was a distinguished mem- 
ber, expired in 1700, when the 
estates were inherited by the 
last baronet's grand-nephew, 
William Luckyn, esq. M. P. 
for St. Albans, (grandson of 
Sir Capel Luckyn by Mary 
Grimston), who assumed 
the surname of Grimston, 
and was elevated to the 
peerage of Ireland by the 
titles of Baron Dunboyne 
and Viscount Grimston in 
1719. His lordship's great 
grandson is the • present 
Earl of Verulam. (See 
Bi'RKe's Peerage). 
lit. John, made second dean of Wind' 
sor in 1416. 
The eldest son, 

Thomas Grimston, of Grimston, living in 
the reign of Henry V. wedded Dioness, 
daughter of de Sutton, lord of Sutton. 



Southcotes, and Stone Ferry, and was s. at 
his decease by his eldest son. 

Sir Roger Grimston, knt. of Grimston, 
who left no issue by his wife, tlie daughter 
of Sir John Antwisle, of Lancashire, and 
was accordingly s. by his brother, 

Thomas Grimston, of Grimston, living in 
1436, who wedded the daughter of Sir Wil- 
liam Fitzwilliam, knt. of Aldwark, near 
Rotherham, and had issue, 

I. William, who d. s. p. 

II. Walter, successor to his father. 

I. Margaret, m. to Robert Stowthing- 
ham, of Sentriforthing, in Holder- 
nesse, and had issue. 

II. Ann, VI. to William Vavasour, esq. 
(See vol. i. p. 52.) 

The only surviving son and his father's 
successor, 

Walter Grimston, esq. of Grimston, es- 
poused the daughter and co-heiress of Sir 
John Portington, knt. appointed judge of 
the court of Common Pleas in 1444, and 
was father of 

Thomas Grimston, esq. of Grimston, who 
was living temp. Henry VII. He m. an 
heiress named Newark, and had, with two 
daughters, (the elder m. to George Brigham, 
of Brigham, and the younger d. unm.) six 
sons, viz. AVilliam, who died young ; Wal- 
ter, successor to his father ; John, who 
wedded the daughter and heiress of — 
Ewry ; Henry, rector of Collam, Goodman- 
ham, and Laresbie ; with tAvo other sons, 
who died without issue. The eldest son and 
heir, 

Walter Grimston, esq. of Grimston, m. 
the daughter of John Dakins, of Brandes- 
burton, and had, with a daughter, (Eliza- 
beth, the wife of Marmaduke Constable, son 
and heir of Sir William Constable, knt. of 
Hatfield), an only son, 

Thomas Grimston, esq. of Grimston, who 
wedded the daughter of Nicholas Girling- 
ton, of Harkfurth, and_ had seventeen chil- 
dren, of whom 

Thomas, succeeded his father. 
Francis, m. Susannah, daughter of Wil- 
liam Wenslej , esq. of Brandesbur- 
ton. 
John, m. Grace, daughter of William 
Strickland, esq. of Boynton, and had 
three sons, viz. 
Marmaduke. 
Francis. 

Henry, of Fraisthorpe, who m. the 

daughter of William Strickland, 

esq. of Eston, and had a son, 

John Grimston, of Dring or 

Dringhoe, in Holdernessc, 

ancestor of the Grimstons, 

of Neswick. 

Marmaduke, m. the daughter of John 



GRIMSTON, OF GRIMSTON GARTH. 



71 



Starley, p;oni. atid liad issue, Jolin, 
Roln-rt, Tlioiuas, ami Dorothy. 
Edward, ni. tlic daiij^liter of Halpli l*ol- 
lard, of IJioinptoii, and had a daugli- 
ter, Cathrriiic. 
Ann, in. to Robert Wri<;lit, ('S(|. of 

Plowland, in the county of York. 
Maud, in. to .John Thwenge, esq. of 
Upper Ilelinesley, and liad a son, 
Marniaduke Thvvenge, es(|. of Upper 
Helmesley, b. in 1560, whose only 
dauo-hter, Margery, espoused George 
Wilnier, esq. (See vol. ii. p. 148). 
Thomas Griniston was *. by his eldest son, 

Thomas Grimston, esq. of Griniston, 
living in l.')40, who m. the daughter and 
heiress of Marnuuluke Thwaites, esq. ol' 
Little Smeaton, and had issue, 

Marmadukr (Sir), liis heir. 

Tlioiuas, who m. the daughter of John 
Strelly, esq. of Laniblery, Notts, but 
d. s. p. 

John, who in. a lady named Owen, of 
the county of Oxford, and had (with 
two daughters, Frances and Doro- 
thy) one son, 

Maiimaduke (Sir), eventual inhe- 
ritor of the estates and repre- 
sentation of the family. 

Thwaites, who in. a daughter of Henry 
Mainwaring, esq. of Cheshire. 

Walter, who rn. the daughter and co- 
heir of Marmaduke Thurkell, esq. 

Christopher, who in. a daughter of 
Francis Barnye, esq. of Gunton, in 
Norfolk. 

-, m. to William Thornton, esq. 



Catherine, in. to John Eastoft, esq. of 
Eastoft. 

Joan, m. to John Hopton, esq. 

Dorothy, in. to Henry Holme, esq. of 
Paul Holme. 

Cicell, m. to Robert Saltmarshe, esq. 
of Saltmarshe. 
Thomas Grimston, who, in right of his wife, 
became lord of the manors of Little Smea- 
ton, Berkby, Southmoors, and Little Danbv, 
was s. by his son, 

Sir MarmadukeGrimston, knt. of Grim- 
ston, temp. Queen Elizabeth, who m. tlie 
daughter of George Gill, esq. of the county 
of Hertford, and had by her one son, Tho- 
mas, who d. s. p. It appears by some mar- 
riage articles of later date, made between 
William Grimston, esq. of Grimston Garth, 
and Dorothy, daughter of Sir Thomas Nor- 
clifte, bart. of Langton, that Sir Marniii- 
duke married Dame Elizabeth Brown, who 
survived him, but this was most probably a 
second marriage, as notliing has arisen to 
contradict the tirst. Sir Marmaduke's ne- 
phew (the only son of his brother Jolin) 
another 



Sir Marmadi'Ke Grimston, of Grimston, 
knighted by Khtr/ James I. in ICAi'S, even- 
tually inherited the estates and continued 
the line of the iamily. This gentleman 
served the office of high sheritF for York- 
shire in 1598, and Drake, in his Kljoracum, 
mentions his being one of tJie learned coun- 
cil at Y'^ork to James I. in the first year of 
his reign. He in. the daughter of Sir Wil- 
liam l)alton, of Hawkeswell, in Y'orksliire, 
(see vol. i. |). Cyli)) and had one son and one 
daught(;r, viz. 

William, his heir. 

Theophania, in. to Leonard Beckwith, 
esq. of Handale Abbey, in Cleve- 
land. 

Sir Marmaduke Grimston was s. by his only 

son, 

William Grimston, esq. of Grimston, 
who adiiered, during the civil wars, with 
unshaken loyalty to Charles I. suffered 
much by sequestration, and for redemption 
of an estate for support sold Flinton, Wan- 
holme, and part of Grimston. He also 
settled the lordships of Goodmanham and 
Little Smeaton on John, his son, who gave 
them, after the death of his own son, to his 
sisters, Tvho sold Goodmanham to the earl 
of Burlington. William Grimston m, first, 
a daughter of Christopher Byerley, esq. of 
Midridge Grange, in the county of Durham, 
and had by her three sons and one daugh- 
ter, viz. 

William, his heir. 

Marmaduke, ) , 

Henry, \ '^' ^^""S- 

Dorothy, d. young. 

He wedded, secondly, a daughter of Sir 
Robert Strickland, of Thornton Briggs, in 
Y'orkshire, and had to survive youth, 

John, m. Miss Lockwood, of Sewerhj'^, 
and had a son, Thomas, who died 
young. 
Charles, who had one son and one 
daughter, Peter and Frances. 

Margaret, m. to — Maskall, esq. of 

London. 
Mary, ni. to Thoma;s Mosley, esq. of 

Y^ork. 
Elizabeth, m. to Philip Langdale, esq. 

of Houghton. 
Dorothy, m. to Robert Medley, esq. 
civilian of York. 
Mr. Grimston espoused, thirdly, the widow 
of Mr. Laiton, and daughter of Lord Evers, 
but by this lady had no issue. He was s. 
by his eldest son, 

William Grimston, esq. of Grimston, b. 
16th August, 1G40, who sold ])art of Gartoii 
and the advowson of Goodmanham. During 
the life of this proprietor, the old family 
mansion at Grimston Garth was burnt down. 



GRIMSTON, OF GRIMSTON GARTH. 



He espoused Dorotliv, daiisiliter of Sir Tho- 1 
masNorcline, knt. o'f Langton. by Dorothy 



his wife, daus'iter of Tiiomas, Viscount 
Fairfax, of Emely, and liad three sons and 
three daughters, viz. 

"William, Avho died before his fatlier, 

aged nineteen. 
Thomas, heir. 

Marmaduke, died an ensign in Colonel 
Wharton's regiment in the fatal camp 
at Dundalk. 
Dorothy, m. to Nathaniel Gooche, gent. 

of Hull. 
Ann, m. to Thomas Rider, esq. and had 

a son, Grimston Rider. 
Alathea, tn. to Benjamin Laughton, esq. 
of Newhill, Yorkshire. 

Mr. Grimston d. 5th August, 1711, and Avas 
s. by his son, 

Thomas Grimston, esq. of Grimston 
Garth, b. 8th October, 1664, who m. Doro- 
thy, daughter of Sir John Legard, bart. of 
Ganton, by Frances, his second wife, eldest 
daughter and co-heir of Sir Thomas Wid- 
drington,* sergeant at law, and left at his 
decease, 13th April, 1729, an only surviving 
son and successor, 

Thomas Grimston, esq. of Grimston 
Garth, b. 26th September, 1702, who m. 
16th October, 1722, Jane, daughter and co- 
heir of John Close, esq. of Richmond, in 
Yorkshire, by Jane his wife, sister and heir 
of Charles Estouteville, esq. of Hunmanby, 
and had, to survive youth, an only son, 
John, his heir. Mr. Grimston inherited, in 
right of his wife, from the Estouteville fa- 
mily, lands in Hunmanby, Fordon, and Erg- 
ham, together with the right of presenta- 
tion to the rectory of Ergham. He also 
acquired under the will of his distant rela- 
tive Admiral Medley, the estate of Kiln- 
wick, purchased by the admiral from Col. 
Condon, as well as the property of Little 
Smeaton, which had formerly belonged to 
his own ancestors. Mr. Grimston d. 22nd 
October, 1751, was buried at Kilnwick, and 
t. by his son, 

John Grimston, esq. of Grimston Garth 
and Kilnwick, b. 17th February, 1724, who 
wedded, 12th March, 1753, Jane, youngest 
daughter of Sir Thomas Legard, bart. of 
Ganton, by Frances his wife, sister and co- 
heir of John Digby, esq. of Mansfield 
Woodhouse, and by her, who d. 11th No- 
vember, 1758, had issue. 



* By Frances his wife, daughter of Ferdi- 
nando, T.ord Fairfiix. and of Mary, daughter of 
Edmund Sheffield, first earl of Mulgrave, K. G. 



I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. John, died young. 

III. Henry, died unm. 23rd October, 
1820, and was buried at Kensington. 

I. Jane, m. to Lieut. Col. George Le- 
gard, of the 69th regiment, third son 
of Sir Digby Legard, bart. of Gan- 
ton. 

II. Frances, died unm. 10th October, 
1833, and buried at Kilnwick. 

Mr. Grimston d. 21st June, 1780, was buried 
at Kilnwick, and s. by his son, 

Thomas Grimston, esq. of Grimston 
Garth and Kilnwick, b. 29th December, 
1753, who espoused, 19th February, 1780, 
Frances, second daughter of Sir Digby Le- 
gard, bart. of Ganton, and by her, who d. 
in 1827, had issue, 

I. Medley-Sylvester, b. 14th May, 1781, 
d. v.p. 30th August, 1801, unmarried, 
and was buried at Bowness, in West- 
moreland. 

II. Walter, b. 7th July, 1782, and died 
unm. 6th September, 1801, at Ro- 
setta, in Egypt, where he was then 
serving as ensign in the 58th regi- 
ment. 

III. William-John, b. 24th June, 1783, 
and died 16th April, 1784. 

IV. Charles, heir to his father. 

V. Edward, b. 13th August, 1793, died 
an infant. 

VI. Oswald, b. 22nd October, 1794, who 
m. 16th September, 1830, Ernie- 
Mary, eldest daughter of the Rev. 
Mr. Money, of Marcle, in Hereford- 
shire, and has one son and two daugh- 
ters. 

VII. Henry-Estouteville. 

I. Emma. 
Mr. Grimston died 2nd May, 1821, was 
buried at Kilnwick, and succeeded by his 
son, the present Charles Grimston, esq. 
of Grimston Garth and Kilnwick. 

Ai-iris — Arg. on a fess sa. three mullets 
of six points or, pierced gu. Mr. Grimston 
bears forty quarterings : the principal are 
Goodmanham, Collam, Flinton, De Laland, 
Portington, Thwaites, Acklom, Danby, Mid- 
dleton, Conyers, Close, Estouteville, Fitz- 
william, Lacy, Cromwell, Dabignie, Hugh 
Lupus, &c. 

Crest — A stag's head, with a ring round 
the neck, arg. 

Motto — Faitz proverount. 

Estates — In the county of York. 

Seats— Grimston Garth and Kilnwick, 
near Beverley. 



73 



PLUMPTRE, OF FREDVILLE. 



PLUMPTRE, JOIIN-PEMBERTON, esq. of Fredville, in the county of Kent, 

/;. 3rd May, 1791 ; 7n. 2nd April, 1818, Catharine-Ma- 
tilda, fourth daughter of the late Paul-Cobb Methuen, 
esq. of Corsham House, Wilts, (see vol. i. p. 394), and 
has three daughters, viz. 

Catharine-Emma. 

Cecilia-Matilda. 

Matilda-Charlotte-Louisa. 

Mr. Plumptre, who is a magistrate and deputy-lieutenant 
for Kent, represents the Eastern Division of that county 
in parliament. He succeeded his father 7 th November, 
1827. 



Itincage. 




The family of Plumptre, settled for cen- 
turies in the town of Nottingham, repre- 
sented that borough in parliament from the 
time of the Plantagenets. In the 15th of 
Edward I. Paul de Plumptre, surnamed 
the Clerk, son of William, son of Thomas 
de Plumptre, living tempore Kinff John, 
claimed from Thomas, son of William de 
Plumptre, a yearly rent of ten merks ster- 
ling in Plumptre, with divers portions of 
lands, but failed in the attempt. He was 
father of 
Henry de Plumptre, whose son, 
William de Plumptre, living in the 3rd 
and 18th of Edward III. married and had 
issue, 

I. Henry, his heir. 

II. John, M.P. for Nottingham, in the 
last parliament of Richard II. He 
m. a lady named Emma, and dying 
in 1415, was buried at St. Peter's, 
Nottingham. " This John," says 
Thoroton, " had licence 16th Rich- 
ard II. to found a certain hospital 
or house of God, for two chaplains, 
whereof one should be master ; and 
for thirteen widows broken with old 
age and depressed with poverty, in a 
certain messuage in Nottingham, and 
to give the said messuage and ten 
other messuages, and two tofts, with 
the appurtenances to the said master 
or warden, and his successors, viz. 
the one messuage for the habitation 
of the said chaplains and widows, 



and the rest for their sustentation, to 
pray for the wholesome estate of the 
said John, and Emma his wife, whilst 
they should live, and for their souls 
afterwards. In the year 1400, July 
12, seeing that God had vouchsafed 
him to build a certain hospital at the 
Bridge End of Nottingham, in honour 
of God, and the annuntiation of his 
mother, the blessed Virgin, for the 
sustenance of thirteen poor women, 
he proposed to ordain a chantry, and 
willed that it should be at the altar 
of the annuntiation of the blessed 
Virgin Mary, in the chapel built be- 
neath the said hospital, and should 
be of two chaplains perpetually to 
pray for the state of the king, of him 
the said John de Plumptre, and 
Emma, his wife, and of the whole 
community of Nottingham, who, with 
the prior of Lenton, after the death 
of John, the founder, were to present 
to it, and each of the two chaplains 
were, for their stipends, to have one 
hundred shillings yearly, paid in 
money, out of the said ten tenements 
and two tofts in Nottingham." 
III. John, mentioned in the wills of his 

two elder brothers. 
1. Elisota, also named in her brother's 
wills. 

The eldest son, 

Henry de Plumptre, of Nottingham,who 

flourished in the reign of Richard II. wed- 



74 



PLUMPTRE, OF FREDVILLE. 



ded a lady named Margaret, but of wliat 
family is "not recorded, and by her, who 
died in 1421, had a son, John, his heir. 
Henry de Plumptre died in 1408, (having 
in that year made liis will, in which he gave 
a legacy to his sister, Elisota, and another 
to John, his younger brother, beside very 
many other) and was s, by his son, 

John de Plimpthr, of Nottingham, who 
m. Helen Strelley, of Woodborough, and 
died in April, 1471, being buried at St. 
Peter's, Nottingham, and leaving, with a 
younger son, Thomas, a priest, his suc- 
cessor, 

Henry de Pu'mptre, of Nottingham, 
who espoused Matilda, daughter and heir of 
Robert Medocroft, by Joan, his wife, daugh- 
ter and heir of John Knaresborough, of 
Kyme, in the county of Lincoln, and had 
two sons and two daughters ; Henry, his 
heir ; and John, living 2nd Henry VH. 
who died *. p. Margaret, wife of George 
Baxter, and Joan, wife of John Burton. 
To the elder son, 

Henry Plumptre, esq. of Nottingham, 
" Thomas Poge, of Mislerton, gent, conveyed 
in 23rd of Henry VII. one messuage and 
thirteen cottages, whereof the messuage and 
nine cottages laj' together on the north side 
of the church-yard of St. Mary, in Notting- 
ham, where now (Thoroton, from whom this 
conveyance is extracted, wrote in 1677) is 
situated the chief mansion-house of Henry 
Plumptre, esq." This Henry wedded, 18th 
Henry VIII. Elizabeth, daughter of Mau- 
rice Orrell, and dying in June, 1.508, was 
interred at St. Nicholas, and succeeded by 
his son, 

John Pli'mptre, esq. of Nottingham, 
born 5th January, 1504. This gentleman 
m. first, Katherine, daughter of John Kyme, 
of Styckford, in Lincolnshire, and by her 
had two sons, Nicholas, his heir, and Wil- 
liam, and one daughter, Beatrix, the wife of 
Adley Clay, esq. He espoused secondly, 
a lady named Agnes, by whom he liad two 
more sons, and one daughter, namely, 

George, who m. Cassandra, relict of 
William Reason, and had two daugh- 
ters, Anne, m. to Roger Smith, and 
Catharine, the wife of the Rev. Isaac 
Sharpe, of Thorpe, near Newark. 

Leonellus. 

Agnes. 

John Plumptre died in July, 1552. and was 
buried in the north choir of St. Mary's, 
Nottingham. His eldest son and succes- 
sor, 

Nicholas Plumptre, esq. of Nottingham, 
represented tliat town in parliament, 13tli 
Elizabeth. He m. first, 15th December. 
1572, .\nne, eldest daughter of John Sharpe, 



esq. of Wickham, and subsequently of 
Frisby, in the county of Leicester, by Mary, 
his wife, daughter of William Saunders, 
esq. of Welford, Northamptonshire. By 
her, who died in April, 1580, he had one 
son and one daughter, namely, Henry, his 
heir; and Mary, bapt. 9th May, 1577. Mr. 
Plumptre married secondly a lady named 
Eleanor, who survived until 1602. He d. 
in September, 1579, was buried at St. 
Mary's, Nottingham, and succeeded by his 
son, 

Henry Plumptre, esq. of Nottingham, 
bapt. 19th September, 1579, who m. 25th 
August, 1597, Ann, second daughter of 
Richard Parky ns, esq. of Boney, Notts, 
(an ancient and influential family,* raised 
to the Irish peerage in 1795, as Baron 
Rancliffe), and by her, who died 22nd 
April, 1639, had four sons and four daugh- 
ters, viz. 

I. Nicholas, bapt. 21st November, 
1598, his heir. 

II. Richard, bapt. 30th October, 1599, 
died *. p. in America. 

III. John, slain near Ashby-de-la- 
Zouch, in 1644, fighting under the 
royal banner. 

IV. Huntingdon, successor to his 
brother. 

I. Elizabeth, bapt. 1st January, 1600, 
and d. 23rd January, 1603. 

II. Anne, bapt. 4th April, 1603, ?«. to 
the Rev. Ralph Hansby, vicar of St. 
Mary's, Nottingham, and of Barton, 
in Fabis, in the same shire. 

III. Catharine, bapt. 28th February, 
1607, died unm. 15th April, 1629. 

IV. Elizabeth, bapt. 31st May, 1611, m. 
to William West, esq. of Beston, 
Notts. 

This Henry Plumptre, and Nicholas and 
Huntingdon, his sons, obtained in 1632, a 
confirmaiiou from Richard, archbishop of 
York, of a certain chapel or oratory, with 
a choir adjoining it, in the north side of St. 
Mary's church, called the chapel of All 
Saints, *' to hear divine service, pray, and 
bury in." He died 26th July, 1642, was 



* The family of Parkj'ns came originally from 
Upton and INIattisfield, in the county of Berks. 
Ricliard Parkyns, esq. (great grandson of Thomas 
Parkyns, esq. of Upton), in the commission of 
the peace and recorder of the towns of Notting- 
ham and Leicester, died in 1603, leaving, by 
fjlizabeth, his wife, daughter of Aden Beresford, 
esq. of Fenny Bentley, in Derbysliire, and relict 
of Hum])hrey Barlow, esq. of Stoke, inter alios, a 
son and heir, Sir George Parkvns, of Eunnev, 
direct ancestor of the present Lord Rancliffe, and 
a daughter. Ann, w?. as in the text, to Henry 
Plumptre, escj. of ISottingham. 



PLUMPTRE, OF FREDVILLE. 



there interred, and succeeded by his chU-st 
son, 

Nicholas Pi.hmi'tuk, esq. of Nottiii);haiii, 
at whose drccase, lunuarried, 3rd April, 
1644, the estates and representation of the 
family vested in his brother, 

Huntingdon Plvmitki;, M.D. of Not- 
tingham, bapt. 5th February, IGOl, a gen- 
tleman of great professional reputation, who 
is recorded in Gervase Ilolles's Memoirs of 
the Earls of Clare, as attending tlie fust 
earl in his last illness, being " accounted 
the best physician at Nottingham." He 
was likewise noted for his wit and learning, 
and when a young master of arts at Cam- 
bridge, published " Epigrammatum Opus- 
culum, duobis libellis distinctum, Lond. 
1629, 8vo." and subsequently " Homeri 
IJatrachomyomachia Latino carmine red- 
dita, variisque in locis aucta et illustrata." 
In 1650 he pulled down the hospital erected 
by his ancestor, rebuilt it as it now appears, 
and so advanced the rents that the monthly 
allowance to the poor became double what 
it was previous. Of the decay and eventual 
renewal of the Plumptre Hospital, Thoro- 
ton gives the following account : " After the 
dissolution of the monasteries in the '2nd 
Edward VI. Sir Gervase Clifton, Sir John 
Hersey, Sir Anthony Neville, knights, and 
William Holies, esq. commissioners for the 
survey of colleges, chapels, &c. certified 
that no poor were then to be found in this 
hospital, and that the lands were then 
wholly employed to the benefit of one Sir 
Piers Bursdale, priest, master thereof. 
Afterwards both the hospital and chapel 
became ruinous and demolished, and the 
very materials embezelled, till after divers 
patents of the said mastership, Nicholas 
Plumptre, of Nottingham, 24th Elizabeth, 
obtained one, and with the tines he received 
made some reparations, and brought in some 
poor, but, after his decease, during the 
mastership of Richard Parkyns, of Boney, 
and Sir George, his son, who, it seems, were 
trusted successively, for Henry Plumptre, 
son and heir of the said Nicholas, in his 
nonage, both the hospital and tenements 
belonging to it grew into great decay, until 
after Sir George's death, that Nicholas 
Plumptre, son and heir of Henry, last 
named, became master by a patent, 5th 
Charles I. and made some repairs and 
amendments, which yet were not judged 
sufficient by his brother and heir, Hunting- 
don Plumptre, doctor of physick, who suc- 
ceeded him in the mastership, which he ob- 
tained in 1645." 

Dr. Plumptre 7n. first, 18th .July, 1638, 
Jane, youngest daughter of Richard Scott, 
esq. of Byshopdicke Hall, in the county of 
York, but that lady dying s. p. 5th June, 

1641, he espoused secondly, 14th August, 

1642, Christian, third daughter of Sir Ri- 



chard Brooke, of Norton, in Cheshire, by 
(Catherine,* his wife, daughter of Sir Henry 
Neville, M.P. of Billingbere, in Berks, 
and had issue, 

I. Henry, his heir. 

II. John, h. 20th November, 1649. 
Ml. Richard, who married twice, but 

died without surviving issue, 24lh 
February, 1699. 

I. Amanda, h. 1647, died young. 

II. Faustina, m. to the Rev. Drue Cres- 
sener, D. D. rector of Soham, in 
Cambridgeshire. 

III. Arabella,rf.unm. 1.5th August, 16.93. 

IV. Amanda, m. to William Orde, esq. 
of Beale. 

Dr. Plumptre died in June, 1660, and was 
s. by his eldest son, 

Henry Phimptre, esq. of Nottingham, 
h. 19th September, 1644, who wedded first, 
Mary, daughter of Thomas Blayney, esq. 
of Herefordshire, and by her, who died in 
1673, had one daughter, Christina, who died 
unm. in 1693. He m. secondly, Joyce, 
daughter of Henry Sacheverell, esq. of Bar- 
ton, and widow of John Milward, esq. of 
Snitterton, in Derbyshire, by whom, who 
died in 1708, he had three sons, viz. 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Henry, b. 15th February, 1680, ni. 
Dorothy, daughter of — Wigsall, 
esq. of Derbyshire, and relict of Mr. 
Stanley, a younger son of the Hamp- 
shire family of that name, and by 
her, who died in 1760, aged seventy- 
nine, he left at his decease, in No- 
vember, 1746, one son and one 
daughter, viz. 

Russell, b. 4th January, 1709, 

* Descent of Catherine Neville from 

Edward III. Kinsr of England. 

I 
Edmund, duke of \ ork. 

I 

Constance, of \ork, m. Thomas, Earl of 
Gloucester. 

1 
Isabella le Despencer, m. Richard Beau- 
champ, earl of Worcester. 

I 
Elizabeth BeaucLamp, m. Sir Edward 

Neville. 

George, Lord Abergavenny. 

I 

1 

Sir Edward Neville, beheaded. 

I 
Sir Henry Neville, of Billinobere- 

J. 
Sir Henry Neville, of Billingbere, m. Anno, 

daughter of Sir Henry Killigrewe. 

Catharine Neville, who to. Sir Richard 
Brooke, and vras mother of Christi.ai, 
wife of Dr. Plumptree, 



76 



PLUMPTRE, OF FREDVILLE. 



D.M. regius professor of physic 
in the University of Cambridge, 
and for several years fiither of 
tlie university. He was of 
Queen's College, where he pro- 
ceeded M.B. 1733, M.D. 1738, 
and was appointed regius pro- 
fessor of physic in 1741. He m. 
and had one daughter, who m. 
— Ward, esq. of Wilbraham, 
in the county of Cambridge. 
Dr. Plumptre died in October, 
1793. 
Amanda, b. 29th November, 1711, 
and d. 26th June, 1766. 

ni. Fitzwilliam, b. 24th October, 1686, 

VI. Jane, widow of Commodore Owen, 

and d. 3rd December, 1749. 

Mr. Plumptre died 29th December, 1693, 

was interred at St. Mary's,* and succeeded 

by his son, 

John Plumptre, esq. of Nottingham, 
born 1679, who m. Annabella, eldest daugh- 
ter of Sir Francis Molyneux,t hart, of 

» At the west end of Plumptre Chapel is a 
beautiful monument of marble, -with the following 
eleo-ant epitaph over this gentleman : 

Hie infra requescit pars terrena 

Henrici Plumptre Armig. 

Mortui 29 Decembris 1693 aetatis 49 

Qualis vir fuerit scire aves. 

Ab antiqua stripe in oppido Nottinghamise ortus 

Omnioenam eruditionem Lonestismoribus adjunxit 

Eruditionis finem duxit esse regimen vitae 

Hinc facta sibi morum suprema lege 

Benevolentia universali 

Pietatis baud fucatae evasit exemplar singulare 

Amicus, civis, maritus, Pater, miserorum Patronus 

Qualem jam exoptare licet vix reperire. 

Viduam reliquit ejus amantissimam 

Jocosam Henrici Sacheverel Armigeri 

De Morley in iigro Derbiensi filiam natu secundam 

Qute cum tres filios vivo peperisset 

Johannem, Henricum et Fitzwilliams, 

Optimi Patris monumenta 

Hunc etiam lapidem in perpetuam memoriam 

Mortuo cum lachrymis poni curavit. 

Hie quoq. demum letho 

Consortionem redintegravit interrumptam 

Ilia Jocosa 

Verbo omnes complectar Laudes 

Conjux illo digna viro 

Functa fato 8 die Novembris 

1708 ffitatis 69. 

t The Molyneuxs of Teversall were a branch of 
the family seated at Sefton, in Lancashire, founded 
in England, by William de Moulines, one of the 
Norman nobles in the train of the Conqueror, 
whose name stands in the eighteenth order upon 
the Roll of Battel Abbey. 

Sm RicJiAUD MoLYNEUx, of Sefton, one of 
the heroes of Agincourt, married Joan, daugh- 
ter and heir of Sir Gilbert Haydock, and relict 
of Sir Peter Legh, of Lyme, and had, with other 
issue, two sons, Sir Richard Molvneux, ances- 



Teversall, M.P. for Nottinghamshire, by 
Diana, his wife, sister of Seroop, Lord Vis- 
count How, and by her, who died 27th June, 
1745, had issue, 

I. Henry, b. in 1708, and d. in 1718. 

II. John, heir. 

III. Charles, b. 16th July, 1712, D.D. 
archdeacon of Ely, and rector of St. 
Mary Woolnoth, London, and of 
Orpington, Kent. Dr. Plumptre d. 
14th September, 1779. 

IV. Francis, who married on the 7th 
April, 1755. 

V. Polydore, b, 1st November, 1714, 
m. 11th December, 1760, Elizabeth 
Eyre, and d. 15th April, 1777. 

VI. Septimus, m. Miss Catherine 
Younge. 

VII. Robert, D.D. master of Queen's 
College, Cambridge, 1760, casuistical 
professor of that university on the 
resignation of Bishop Law, 1769, 
vice chancellor 1761, 1777, preben- 
dary of Norwich, rector of Wimple, 
and vicar of Whadden, in Cambridge. 
He d. 29tli October, 1788, having 
married 7th September, 1756, Anne 
Newconie. 

I. Maria, m. 1752, to Dr. Thomas Wil- 
braham. 

II. Annabella. 

Mr. Plumptre d. 29th September, 1751, 
and was s. by his son, 

John Plumptre, esq. of Nottingham, b. 
10th February, 1710, who represented the 
town of Nottingham for many years in par- 
liament. He m. first, in 1750, Margaretta, 
daughter of Sir Brook Bridges, hart, of 
Goodnestone, but had no issue. He wed- 
ded secondly, in 1758, Mary, daughter of 
Philips Glover, esq. of Wispington, in Lin- 
colnshire, cousin to the author of Leonidas, 
by whom (who died in 1782) he left at his 
decease, a daughter, Mary, who m. in 178.5, 
Sir Richard-Carr Glynn, bart. of Gaunts, 
and a son and successor, 

John Plumptre, esq. of Fredville, in 
Kent, and of Nottingham, who served the 
office of sheriff for the former in 1798, when 
Arthur O'Connor and others were tried 
under a special commission, at Maidstone, 
for high treason. Mr. Plumptre m. in 1788, 
Charlotte, daughter of the Rev. Jeremy 
Pemberton, of Trumpington, near Cam- 
bridge, and had issue, 

John-Pemberton, his heir. 

tor of tlie ennobled house of Sffton ; and Sir 
'I'noMAS MoLYNEUx, knight banneret, progenitor 
of the MoLYNEiix's of 'reversal, — a family which 
maintained for a lengthened series of years the 
first rank among the landed proprietors of Notting- 
hamshire, and allied with the most distinguished 
houses in England. 



BADCOCK, OF LINCOLNSHIRE AND BUCKS. 



77 



Charlps-Tlionias, rector of Claypole, in 
LiiK'olnsliire, m. in 1825, Caroline, 

, second dauglitcr of Jolin Calcraft, 
esq. of Ancastcr, in the same county, 
and l)y her {who d. 12tli June, ]mli) 
has one daughter, Fanny-Sophia. 

Henry-Western, rector of Eastwood, 
Notts, VI. in Ajjril, 1828, Eleanor, 
only daiij;hler of" the late Sir IJrook- 
Williani Bridges, hart, of Goodne- 
stone Park, Kent, and has one son 
and three daughters. 

Charlotte-Sophia, d. unni. 22nd August, 
1809. 

Emma-Maria, 7«. to Henry Gipps, esq. 
who afterwards took holy orders. 

Mary-Louisa, m. to John Smyth, esq. 
captain royal engineers, and died in 
Demerara 21st January, 1833, 

Frances-Matilda, m. to Robert Rams- 
den, esq. of Carlton Hall, Notts. 



Annahella-Helen. 
Augusta-Catherine. 
Eniilia-Septima. 
Oetavia- Anne. 

Mr. Plumptre died 7th November, 1827, 
and was s. by his eldest son, the present 
John-Pkmbkkton Plumitkk, esq. M.P. of 
Fredville. 

Anus — Arg. a chev. between two mullets 
pierced in chief and an annulet in base sa. 

Crest — A phoenix or, out of flames ppr. 

Motto— SufWcit meruisse. 

Estates — Principally in Kent and in the 
town and county of Nottingham. There is 
also some property in London. 

Toion Residence — No. 3, Great George 
Street, Westminster. 

Seat — Fredville, Kent. 



BADCOCK, OF LINCOLNSHIRE AND BUCKS. 

l^eprcscnting iLobfll of ?^aiIcston. 

BADCOCK, LOVELL-BENJAMIN, esq. lieutenant-colonel commanding the 15th, 
or King's hussars. 

Colonel Badcock served, with distinction, in the 14th dragoons, in France, Spain, 
and Portugal. He succeeded his father 13th April, 1821. 



Hmeage. 




The Rev. Benjamin Lovell, who ap- 
pears, from strong presumptive evidence, 
to have been descended from the baronial 
house of Tichmersh,* was born about the 
year 1600, and appointed in 1639, Parson 

* For an account of the Lovells, Barons Lovell, 
of Tichmersh, see Burki's Eiiinrt Feera^n. 



of Preston Bagot, in the county of Warwick. 
He married and had three sons, viz. 

I. Salathiel, named after the puritans 
of those days. 

II. Robert, buried"] Jhese two were evi- 
at Coventry. i^''\ "«'"^^, \^\^\ 

III. John,buiiedat r'^^ ^^^^f'^'lf.}})''^ 
Preston Bagot. f''^ ^^ Wilham 

* J Lord Lovell. 
In 1658, the Rev. Benjamin Lovell buried 
his wife at Leckhampsted, Bucks, from 
which rectory he was driven, as a Round- 
head, during the troubled times in which he 
lived : — what subsequently became of him 
has not been ascertained, but his eldest 
son. 

Sir Salathiel LovELL,who en teredGray's 
Inn, in 1649, became eminent at the bar, 
and was made a sergeant at law in 1692, 
receiving at the same time the honor of 
knighthood. He was afterwards appointed 
recorder of London, deputy recorder of 
Northampton, and eventually in 1708, one 
of the barons of the Exchequer. Sir Sala- 
thiel, who purchased the manor of Harleston, 
in Northamptonshire, where himself, his 



BADCOCK, OF LINCOLNSHIRE AND BUCKS. 



w ife, and most of his children are buried, 
wedded about the year 1660, a lady named 
Marj-, and by her, who died 9th December, 
1719, had, with other issue, 

Samuel, his heir. 

Henry, who m. Mary, daughter and co- 
heir of Tliomas Cole, esq. of London, 
and left, at his decease in 1724, an 
only daughter, 

Mary, who ??j. first, the Hon. 
Samuel Grimston ; and secondly, 
in 1740, William -Wildman, 
second Viscount Barrington. 

Maria, m. to Joseph Townshend, esq. of 
London, and died in London, 8th 
August, 1743, aged eighty -three, 
being at her own request buried at 
Harleston. By her will she bequeaths 
the reversion of £2000, together with 
all her diamonds, pearls, plate, &c. 
to her " dear niece, Mary Badcock, 
the daughter of my nephew. Captain 
Samuel Lovell, and the wife of my 
nephew, Richard Lovell Badcock, 
esq. of Twickenham. 

Penelope, bapt. in September, 1667, 
m. to the Rev. Michael Stanhope, 
D.D. canon of Windsor, and died 
8th July, 1738, leaving, with other 
issue, a son, Arthur Charles Stan- 
hope, esq. father of Philip Stanhope, 
who succeeding to the honors of his 
family in 1773, became fifth Earl of 
Chesterfield. 

Jane, bapt. 5th June, 1687, who m. 
about the year 1713, Richard Bad- 
cock, of London, merchant, and by 
him, who died 12th August, 1722, 
left a son, 

Richard Lovell Badcock, esq. 
of Twickenham, of whom pre- 
sently. 

Sir Salathiel lived to an advanced age, and 
so long survived his memory, that he was 
called the Obliviscor of London. He died 
3rd May, 1713, aged eighty-one, and was s. 
by his son, 

Samuel Lovell, esq. a Welsh judge, bapt. 
18th September, 1665, whom, in 1692, Miss 
Sergeant, and by her, who died in London, 
April, 1736, had one son and one daughter, 
namely, 

Samuel, his heir. 

Rachel-Jane, m. in 1732, to Richard 
Edgeworth, esq. of Edgeworthstown, 
in the county of Longford, aud d. in 
1764, leaving issue. 

Mr. Lovell was s. at his decease by his only 
son, 

Samuel Lovell, esq. of Kensington, h. 
in 1690, a captain in the Guards, who died 
24th April, 1761, leaving an only daughter 
and heiress, 



Mary Lovell, who wedded in 1742, her 
cousin, Richard Lovell Badcock, esq. of 
Twickenham, in Middlesex, and of Maple- 
tliorpe Hall, in the county of Lincoln, son 
of Richard Badcock, of London, by Mary, 
ills wife, daughter of Sir Salathiel Lovel. 
Of this marriage there were, 

Lovell Badcock, the heir. 
Thomas-Stanhope Badcock, succes- 
sor to his brother. 
Mary Badcock, m. to the Rev. Richard 
Gardner. 
]\Ir. Badcock died at the Hotwells, Bristol, 
7th September, 1749, was buried in the 
cathedral there, and succeeded by his elder 
son, 

Lovell Badcock, esq. of Little Missenden 
Abbey, in the county of Bucks, and of 
Maplethorpe Hall, in Lincolnshire, h. in 
1744, who was lieutenant-colonel of the 
iiuckinghamshire militia, and a magistrate 
and deputy-lieutenant for that county. He 
likewise served the office of sheriff. He 
died unm. in 1797, aged fifty-three, and was 
buried in the church of Little Missenden. 
His estates devolved on his brother, 

Thomas Stanhope Badcock, esq. of 
Little Missenden Abbey, and Maplethorpe 
Hall, a magistrate and deputy-lieutenant 
for the county of Buckingham, who was 
high-sheriff thereof in 1808. He m. at 
Tewkesbury, 17tli February, 1782, Anne, 
daughter of William Buckle, esq. of the 
Mythe House, and Chasely, in Gloucester- 
shire, by Anne, his wife, daughter of George 
Turberville, esq. and had issue, 

I. Lovell-Benjamin, his heir. 

II. William-Stanhope, capt. R.N. who 
served under Lord Nelson, at Tra- 
falgar, in 1805, and was present at 
tlie capture of Washington in 1814. 
He m. 2nd January, 1822, Selina, 
youngest daughter of the late Sir 
Henry Harpur- Crewe, bart. of Calke 
Abbey, and sister of the present 
baronet, by whom he has issue, 

Lovell -Stanhope- Richard, b. at 
Terret House, Bucks, 4th De- 
cember, 1826. 

Selina-Frances. 

Georgiana-Jane. 

Matilda-Sophia. 

I. Anne, m. 21st September, 1809, to 
Major-General Sir Jasper Nicolls, 
K.C.B. and has one son, Francis- 
Hastings-Gustavus Nicolls, and eight 
daughters. 

II. Sophia,JH.9th June, 1814, to the Rev. 
James Duke Coleridge, eldest son of 
Colonel Coleridge, of Heaths Court, 
Ottery St. Mary's, Devon, and has 
two daughters, Sophia Coleridge, and 
Frances Anne Lovell Coleridge. 



WILSON PATTEN, OF BANK HALL 



79 



Mr. Radcock died 13th April, 1821, was 
burifd ill th(> Ahhoy C'Inircli, Until, fm<l snc- 
cccdcd Ijy Lis elder son, the present i^ieii- 
teiiaiit- Colonel Lovell Ui^njamin Bad- 
cock. 

Arms — Barry nehuly of six or, and gules. 
Crest — A talhot passant arg. 



Motto — Tempus omnia nionstrat. 

Estates — In Lincolnshire. Little Mes- 
seiiden Abbey, the family seat and projierty 
in IJiieks, has been sold to f'aptain \riiold. 
Mapletliorp Hall, in FJiieolnsliire, has also 
passed from the family, having been pur- 
chased by Colonel Sibthorpe. 



WILSON PATTEN, OF BANK HALL. 

PATTEN-WILSON, JOHN, esq. of Bank Hall, in the county of Lancaster, b. 26th 
April, 1802 ; m. in April, 1828, his cousin, Anna-Maria, daughter and co-heiress of the 
late Peter Patten- Bold, esq. of Bold, in the same shire, and has two daughters, viz. 

Anna-Mauia. 
Ellinor. 

This o-entleman, who succeeded his father in 1827, is a deputy-lieutenant for Lanca- 
shire, and major in the militia. He formerly represented that whole county in parlia- 
ment, and now sits for the Northern Division. 



Hmcage. 



^1 f?i 




The family of Patten claims an ancestry 
coeval with the Conquest, but was not set- 
tled in Lancashire until the reign of Henry 
VIIL 

Richard Patten, living in 1119, son and 
heir of Richard Patten, or Patine, of Patten 
House, near Chelmsford, in the county of 
Essex, m. a daughter of the ancient Der- 
byshire family of Eyre, and had a son 
and successor, 

Richard Patten, Lord of Dagenham 
Court and Patten House, both in the county 
of Essex, who espoused Mary, daughter and 
co-iieir of Ralph Dagenham of Dagenham 
Court, and had three sons, Richard, Robert, 
and John, of whom the eldest, 

Richard Patten, living in the 5th Henry 
in, was father of - 



John Patten, who ?«. a Derbyshire lady, 
named Revyle, and had, with a daughter, 
Agnes, the wife of John Segar, a son and 
successor, 

John Patten, who wedded — Poole, of 
tlie county of Derby, and had two sons, 
John, liis heir, and William of Wheldryk, 
in Yorkshire, who »?i. Emma Everingham, 
and had a son, Thomas, of Wheldryk, living 
in 1429, who left two daughters and co'^ 
heirs, named Agnes and Idonea. John Pat- 
ten's elder son and successor, 

John Patten, of Dagenham Court, in 
Essex, and of Waynflete, in Lincolnshire, 
flourished in the reign of Edward HI. 
and was alive in 1376. He espoused the 
daughter and heiress of Sir Oswald West- 
ingcroft, of Westingcroft, in Lancashire, 
and had a son, 

Nicholas Patten, of Waynflete, in the 
county of Lincoln, who had three sons, 
namely, 

I. John, of Waynflete, who left an il- 
legitimate daughter, Joan, wife of 
— Valence, of Kent. 

II. Nicholas, Lord of Dagenham, who 
left a daughter, Margaret, m. to — 
Bostock, of Cheshire, and a son, 

Robert, of Dagenham, living temp. 
Henry IV. who married and had 
daughters only. Juliana, one of 
these co-heirs, marrying Richard 
Churchstyle, of Essex, conveyed 
to him the manor of Dagenham. 

III. Richard. 



80 



WILSON PATTEN, OF BANK HALL. 



The third son, 

RicHAKD Patten, alias Waynflete, of 
"Waynflete, sometime in the reigns of the fifth 
or sixth Henries, wedded Margery, daugh- 
ter of Sir William Brereton, knt. of Brere- 
ton, in Cheshire, (who d. 4th Henry VI., 
by Anylhi, liis wife, daughter of Hugh 
Yenables), and had issue, 

I. William Patten, «??«* Waynflete, 
the illustrious founder of Magdalen 
College, Oxford, who was born at 
Waynflete, (whence, as was the cus- 
tom of those times, he derived his sur- 
name,)but the exact periodof his birth 
has never yet been ascertained. He 
was educated at Winchester school, 
and studied afterwards at Oxford, but 
in what college is uncertain. The 
historian of Winchester is inclined 
to prefer New College, which is most 
consistent with the progress of edu- 
cation at Wykeham's school. Wood 
acknowledges that although his name 
does not occur among the fellows of 
New College, nor among those of 
Merton, where Holinshed places him, 
unless he was a chaplain or post- 
master, yet " the general vogue is 
for the college of William of Wyke- 
ham." Wherever he studied, his 
proficiency in the literature of the 
times, and in philosophy and di- 
vinity, in which last he took the de- 
gree of bachelor, is said to have been 
great, and the fame he acquired as 
schoolmaster, at Winchester, with 
the classical library he formed, is 
a proof that he surpassed in such 
learning as was then attainable. 

Of his preferments in the church 
we have no account that can be 
relied upon. Wood says he was 
rector of Wraxall in 1433, which is 
barely possible, and that he was 
rector of Chedsey in 1469, which is 
highly improbable, for he had then 
been twenty years Bishop of Win- 
chester. It is, however, more clearly 
ascertained that, about 1429, he was 
appointed head master of Winches- 
ter school. In 1438 he was master 
of St. Mary Magdalen Hospital, near 
Winchester, which is supposed to 
have suggested to him the name and 
patroness of his foundation at Ox- 
ford. In 1440, when Henry VI. 
visited Winchester, for the purpose 
of inspecting the discipline, constitu- 
tion, and progress of Wykeham's 
school, on the model of which he 
liad begun to found one at Eton, he 
procured the consent of Waynflete to 
remove thither with thirty-five of his 
scholars and five fellows, whose edu- 
cation Waynflete superintended until 



1442, when he was appointed pro- 
vost of that celebrated seminary. 
On the demise of Cardinal Beaufort, 
in 1447, he was advanced to the see 
of Winchester, which he held for the 
long space of thirty-nine years, dur- 
ing which he amply justified the re- 
commendation of the king, being 
distinguished for " piety, learning, 
and prudence." His acknowledged 
talents and political sagacity pro- 
cured him the unreserved confidence 
of his royal master, who appears to 
have treated him with condescending 
familiarity, employed him in afl'airs 
of critical importance, and received 
throughout the whole of his turbulent 
reign abundant proofs of his inva- 
riable loyalty and attachment. In 
October, 1456, he was constituted 
Lord High Chancellor in the room 
of Bourchier, Archbishop of Can- 
terbury, and held the seals of office 
nearly four years, resigning in the 
month of July, 1460, about which 
time he accompanied the king to 
Northampton, and was with him a 
few days before the fatal battle near 
that place, in which the Lancastrians 
were defeated. Waynflete's attach- 
ment to Henry's cause had been 
uniform and decided, yet his high 
character appears to have protected 
him. Edward IV. treated him not 
only with respect, but with some de- 
gree of magnanimity, as he twice 
issued a special pardon in his favour, 
and condescended to visit his newly 
founded college at Oxford. The 
evening of the bishop's life was 
passed free from political strife and 
danger, and he lived to witness the 
quiet union of the rival roses, in the 
nuptials of Henry of Richmond and 
Elizabeth of York. This learned 
prelate, celebrated by historians for 
piety, temper, and humanity, died 
nth August, 1486, and was interred, 
with great funeral pomp, in Win- 
chester cathedral, in a magnificent 
sepulchral chapel, which is kept in 
the finest preservation by the society 
of Magdalen College. (See C/ial- 
fners, Chandler, &c. &c.) 

II. John Patten, «/?«* Waynflete, dean 
of Chichester, there buried. 

III. Richard Patten, founder of the 
Lancastrian family before us. 

The third son of Richard Patten, and bro- 
ther of Bishop Waynflete, 

Richard Patten, of Boslow, in the 
county of Derby, living in the reign of 
Henry VI. m. and had two sons and one 
daughter, viz. 



WILSON PATTEN. OF BANK HALL. 



81 



I. Richard, of London, who m. Crace, 
daughter of John IJaskiTville, by the 
daughter and heiress of — Godard, of 
Herefordshire, and dyings in 1536, 
left one son and four daughters, viz. 

1. William, sometime hird of the 
manor of Stoke Newington, m. 
Anne, daugliter and co-heiress 
of Hichard .lohiison, of JJoston, 
in ]jincolnsliir(>, and had issue, 
Mi;i{Ci'KY, living yth October, 
1003, who was Bluemantle 
pursuivant in the college of 
arms from 1527 to 1611. 
Richard. 
Thomas. 

Gratian, of St. Andrews, Hol- 
born, d. in October, 1603, 
leaving by his wife, Eliza- 
beth Collis, who married 
secondly, Mr. Trussel, of 
Winchester, a son, W^il- 
liam. 
Elizabeth, m. to Sir Thomas 
Cony, knight, of Basing 
Thorpe, in the county of 
Lincoln, 
Pallas. 
Anne. 

1 . Joan, 711. first to William Streete, 
of Islington, living in 1536, and 
secondly, to Thomas Percy, of 
Stanwell, Middlesex. 

2. Lettice, m. to Richard Staver- 
ton, of Bray, in Berks. 

3. Mary, m. to Christopher INLar- 
ton, of Ashton. 

4. Alice, m. first to Thomas Searle, 
of Essex, living in 1536, and 
secondly, to Armigel Wade, of 
Hampstead. 

II. Humphrey, of whom presently. 

1. Helen, m. to John Robynson, named 
in the will of her brother, Richard, 
which bears date 29th April, 1536. 
The younger son, 

Humphrey Patten, who became seated 
at Warrington, in the county of Lancas- 
ter, temp. Henry VHL, wedded Jane, 
daughter of Thomas Rixtone, gent, of Great 
Sankey, in the same shire, and was s. at his 
decease (being buried at Warrington) by 
his son, 

Thomas Patten, of Warrington, who es- 
poused, in 1560, Julian, daughter of John 
Marshall, gent, of the same place, and had, 
with five daughters, Ellen, Alice, Elizabeth, 
Dorcas, and Margaret, two sons, Thomas, 
his heir, and John, b. in 1565, who died and 
was buried at Lancaster. The elder son, 

Thomas Patten, of Patten Lane, War- 
rington, b. in 1561, m. Ellen, daughter of 
George Diggles, and by her, who Avas in- 
terred at Warrington, had issue, 

3. 



I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Joiin, b. in J59.S, who m. first, Mar- 
garet, daughter of Richard Mather, 
and had a daughter, Ellen, and 
secondly, Anne, daughter of Ni- 
cholas Croft, of Sutton, in Lanca- 
shire, by whom he had a son, Tho- 
mas, who wedded Ellen, daughter of 
John Middleton, and had three sons. 
John Patten d. in 1676. 

III. Anthony, of the Isle of Man, b. in 
1601, and d. in 1611, leaving a son, 
Carsar. 

IV. William, of Preston, b. 4th Sep- 
tember, 1604, alderman and register 
of the Court of Chancery, at Lancas- 
ter, who m. first, Margery, dau. of 
Thomas Banyster, of Preston, and 
by her had tliree daughters, Ellen, 
m. to John Anderson, citizen of Lon- 
don, Jennet, m. to Thomas Cooper, 
of Preston, and Elizabeth, m. to John 
Ryley, of the same town. Mr. Alder- 
man Patten wedded secondly, Mary, 
daughter of James Archer, of Pres- 
ton, and dying in 1660, left by her 
several children, of whom all d. un- 
married excepting three, that follow: 

1. William, of Preston, baptized 
10th May, 1646, who w. a daugh- 
ter of — Bellingham, of Bel- 
lingham, in Northumberland, 
and had three sons and four 
daughters. 

2. Thomas, of Preston, lord of 
Thornley, barrister-at-law, and 
M.P. for Preston in 1688, who 
d. in 1697, leaving by his wife, 
the daughter and heiress of — 
Doughty, esq. of Coin Hall, in 
Lancashire, an only child, 

Elizabeth, who m. Sir Thomas 
Stanley, bart. of Bicker- 
staff, and was mother of Sir 
Edward Stanley, bart. af- 
terwards eleventh Earl of 
Derby. 

3. Henry, of Elrerton, Hants, in 
holy orders, m. and had issue, 

Thomas Patten d. in 1639, was buried at 
Warrington, and s. by his eldest son, 

Thomas Patten, esq. of Patten Lane, b. 
in l.'J95, who wedded first, Alice, daughter 
of Thomas Taylor, esq. of Preston-on-the- 
Hill, in the county of Chester, and by her 
had an only child, Thomas, who appears to 
have died unmarried. He espoused se- 
condly, Susan, daughter and heir of Robert 
Drinkwater, esq. and by her, w ho d. in 1688, 
had (with other issue, all of whom d. s. p.) 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

H. William, of Warrington, merchant, 
b. in 1640, m. in 1668, Rachel, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Hugh Barrow, A.M. 



82 



WILSON PATTEN, OF BANK HALL. 



vicar of Lancaster, and d. in 1698, 
leaving issue to survive youth, 

L Thomas, b. in I6G2, who m. 
Sarah, dau. of Thomas Sliaw, 
gent, of Manchester, and dying 
in 1733, left issue, 

AViLLiAM, of London, b. 9th 
June, 1700, m. Mary, daugh- 
ter of Edward Farnworth, 
esq. of Runshaw, and liad 
one son, Thomas, a Roman 
Catholic clergyman, with two 
daughters, Margaret and 
Elizabeth. 
Robert, of Warrington, b. in 
1707, who m. in 1734, Brid- 
get, daughter of Thomas 
Patten, esq. of Patten Lane, 
and d. in 1772, leaving an 
only surviving child, 

Robert Patten, esq. who 
wedded, in 1765, Han- 
nah, daughter of George 
Leigh, esq. of Ouh- 
trington, sheriff' of Che- 
shire in 1749, and d. in 
1779, leaving one son, 
Thomas-Leigh, born in 
1766, who d. s. p. and 
two daughters, Mar- 
garet, the wife of — 
Bower, esq. and Sarah, 
the wife of Owen Jones, 
esq. of Liverpool. 
Thomas, D.D. rector of Child- 
rey, in Berkshire, b. in 1714, 
m. in 1765, Elizabeth, dau. 
of Peter Brooke, esq. of 
Mere, high sheriff" of Che- 
shire in 1728, by Frances 
his wife, only daughter and 
heiress of Francis HoUins- 
head, esq. of Wheelock, in 
the palatinate. Dr. Patten, 
the respected author of se- 
veral religious works, died 
28th February, 1790. 
Sarah, b. in 1691, m. to Tho- 
mas Newton, esq. of Man- 
chester. 
Rachel, d. in 1755, unm. 
Mary, m. to John Nichols, of 

Liverpool, merchant. 
Lydia, m. to Walter Noble, 
esq. of Chorlev Hall, Staf- 
fordshire, and d. in 1752. 
Dorothy, d. unm. 
Elizabeth, d. unmarried, in 
1772. 
2. Hugh, of Liverpool, b. in 1675, 
rn. Sarah Tarleton, widow of — 
Dudley, esq. and d. in 1736. 

1. Marv, I , 

2. Rachel, \ '^- ""*"• 



3. Susannah, b. in 1662, j/i. to 
John Murray, esq. of the Isle of 
Man, and was mother of John 
Murray, esq. ambassador to Con- 
stantinople in 1768. 

4. Dorcas, vi, to the Rev. John 
Worsley, A.M. minister of Tri- 
nity Chapel, Warrington, and d. 
in 1753, aged sixty-nine. 

III. Peter, A.M. Fellow of New Col- 
lege, Oxford, b. in 1644, d. in 1673. 

IV. John, b. in 1647. 

V. Robert, b. in 1648, m. Dorcas, dau. 
of the Rev. Dr. Byfield, and d. in 
1720. 

I. Susan, m. to John Barrow, esq. of 
Sankej', in Lancashire. 

II. Ellen, m. to John Cottam, esq. of 
Preston. 

Thomas Patten d. in 1663, and was s. by 
his eldest son, 

Thomas Patten, esq. of Patten Lane, b. 
in 1638, who wedded, 4th December, 1660, 
Mary, daughter of John Leigh, esq. of 
Ouhtrington, in Cheshire, son of John Leigh, 
esq. of the same place, by Alice his wife, 
daughter of William Massey, esq. of Mas- 
sey Green, and by her, who d. 19th April, 
1720, had issue, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. John, b. in 1664, d. in 1688. 

III. William, of London, b. in 1668, m. 
in 1692, Miss Elizabeth Jackson, and 
d. in 1740, leaving an only daughter 
and heiress, 

Mary, who m. her cousin, the 
Rev. Thomas Wilson, D.D. pre- 
bendary of Westminster. 

IV. George, b. in 1672, vi. Miss Sutton, 
of Gropenhall, Cheshire, and d. in 
1729, without surviving issue. 

I. Elizabeth, b. in 1666, m. to John 
Golbourne, esq. of Warrington. 

II. Mary, who jh. in 1698, the Right 
Rev. Thomas Wilson, D. D. bishop 
of Sodor and Man,* and had one son, 

* Thomas Wilson, the pious and venerable 
bishop of Sodor and JMan, was born at Burton, in 
Cheshire, anno 1663, and was fifth son of Na- 
thaniel Wilson, of Burton, by Alice his wife, 
sister of Dr. Sherlock. His education was com- 
pleted at Trinity College, Dublin, on leaving- 
which, in 1686, he was licensed to the curacy of 
New Church, in Winwiok parish, of which his 
uncle, Dr. Sherlock, was rector. To this circum- 
stance he was indebted for his introduction to the 
Stanley family, from whom, in 1697, he received 
the bishopric of Sodor and Man. The annual re- 
ceipts of his new preferment did not exceed 
£300. in money, out of which small stipend and 
the produce of his demesnes he contrived to 
maintain his house, to relieve distressed mai'iners, 
and feed and clothe the poor of the island. His 
life was, in fact, one uniform display of the most 
genuine and active benevolence, considering hiiu- 



WILSON PATTEN, OF BANK HALL. 



b3 



The ReT. Tho.nhs Wilson. D I). 
prelx'iidary of VVcstmiiistcr, 
cliai)laiii and sub-almoiiL'i- to 
Kinij Gkokoic 11., b. '24tli Au- 
{^ust, I70;J. married at VVIiitoliall 
cliaiH'l, 4tli Ft'bniary, I7.'i;3, his 
coiisiii-;4iTiiian, Mary, only dau. 

self as the steward, not tlie proprietor, of tlio 
revenues of the bishopric, he devoted his iuconie 
to what he esteemed its proper use. The poor 
who could spin or weave found the best market at 
Bisiiop's Court, where tiiev bartered tiie produce 
of ilieir labour for cum. Tailors and shoeniaJiers 
were kept in tlie house constantly employed, to 
make into <;^Mrnients or shoes the cloth or leather 
which his corn had purchased ; and the aged and 
infirm were supi)lied accordino^ to their several 
wants. At the same time he ke])t an open, hos- 
pitable table, covered with the produce of his 
own demesnes, and to which all sects and parties 
were alike welcome. To the duties of his sacred 
function he applied himself with the utmost 
zeal, and endeavoured by his exhortations and 
example to animate the clergy of the island to 
a regular and faithful discharge of their pastoral 
otfice. So great indeed was his perseverance, and 
so successful his endeavours, that Lord Chan- 
cellor King used to declare that, " if the ancient 
discipline of tjje church were elsewhere lost, 
it might still be found in all its purity in the Isle 
of i\lan." In 1707, the degree of D.D. was 
conferred upon him by the universities of Oxford 
and Cambridge ; and in the same year he ])rinted 
the church catechism in Manks and English, for 
the use of the schools which he had established 
in various parts of his diocese, and which he 
superintended with the greatest care. About the 
year 1722, the orthodoxv of his spirit seems to 
have involved him in altercations and difficulties. 
Mrs. Home, the wife of the governor of the 
island, had defamed Mrs. Puller and Sir Robert 
Pool, and in consequence being contumacious, 
and refusing to ask pardon of the persons injured, 
was interdicted by the bishop from the holv 
communion. But his archdeacon, Mr. Horribin, 
who was chaplain to Ca|)tain Home, received the 
ladv.and incurred suspension in consequence at the 
hands of his lordship. The governor conceiving 
this to be a stretch of power beyond the law fined 
the bishop in the sum of £30. and his two vicars- 
general in that of £20. each ; and on their re- 
fusing to discharge those arbitrary penalties, com- 
mitted them all to Castle Rushin, a damp and 
gloomv prison, where Dr. Wilson was treated 
with the utmost rigour. The bishop appealed to 
the lords justices, when the proceedings of the go- 
vernor were declared extrajudicial and irregular, 
and the fines were ordered to be restored. His 
lordship survived until his ninety-third year, 
when he expired on the 7th March, 1755, univer- 
sally esteemed and lamented. His attachment to 
his flock had been so sincere, that no temptation 
(he had been offered the valuable see of Exeter) 
could seduce him from the services of his little 
diocese. 

His works, consisting of religious tracts and 
sermons, were collected by his son, and published 
iu 1780. 



and lii;iiess ol William Patt«n. 
esq. of London, but having no 
issue, lie devised tlie Wilson es- 
tates to Ills maternal lainily, thu 
Pattkns, with the injunction 
tiiat the inheritor .sliould assunic 
tlie additional surname and arms 
of Wilson, lie died at Alfred 
House, Jialh, 16tli April, ITb-l, 
aged eigiity. 
Mr. Patten d. in U)H4, was buried at War- 
ririi^ton, and a-, by his son, 

Thomas Paitkn, esq. of Patten Lane, 
l)a|)tized 2nd August, ICfJ'i, who m. 20th 
July, 1666, Margaret, eldest daughter of 
Jonatlian Blackburne, esq. of (Jii'ord, in 
tlie comity of Lancaster, and d. in 172G, 
leaving 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Jonathan, of Manchester, b. 1.3th 
April, ]6i)o, who w. first, 3rd Jul), 
l/lfi, Catharine, daughter of Randal 
Feilden, esq. of Blackburne, (see vol. 
ii. ]). 44.')) and liatl by her, wlio d. in 
17:J1, with two daughters, both of 
whom d. unmarried, a son and heir, 

Jonathan, of Manchester, born in 
1734, m. in 17(52, Anne, daugh- 
ter of K'obert Feilden, esq. and 
d. in 1792, leaving two sons and 
a daughter, viz. Jonathan, Tho- 
mas, and Elizabeth. 
He wedded secondly, in 1732, Jane, 
daughter of John Sydall, esq. and 
relict of Jolin Green, esq. of Hoi- 
come, in Lancashire, by wliom, who 
d. in 1743, he had three daughters, 
Jane and Anne, who d. young, and 
Lettice, wife of Joseph Rose, of Lon- 
don, merchant. Mr. Patten married 
tliirdly, in 1746, Sarah, daughter of 
John Cheshire, of Manchester, mer- 
chant. 
I. Bridget, m. in 17.34, to Robert Pat- 
ten, esq. of Warrington. 
The elder son, 

Thomas Patten, esq. lord of W-'inmar- 
leigb, in the county of Lancaster, a deputy 
1 lieutenant of that shire, b. in 1690, erected, 
from a design of the architect Gibbs, the 
! mansion of Bank Hall, near W arrington. 
He m. 16th June, 1728, Lettice. second dau. 
and co-heir of the Rev. James Peake, M. A. 
1 and by her, who d. in 1735, left at his 
1 decease, 2lst February, 1772, a daughter, 
Frances, b. in 1730, w*. in 1752, to Sir Rich- 
ard Brooke, bart. and a son and successor, 
Thomas Patten, esq. of Bank Hall, a 
magistrate and deputy lieutenant for tlie 
county of Lancaster, and lientenant-colouel 
of the royal Lancashire militia, who served 
the office of high sherilV for that shire iu 
1773, and for Cheshire in 1775. He in. 
17fh January, 1757, Dorothea, second dau. 
of Peter Bold, esq. of Bold, M.P. for Lan- 



81 



WILSON PATTEN, OF BANK HALL. 



cashire, and liad six daughters, Anna- 
Maria, Lettice, Doroihea, Frances, Mary, 
and Everilda, and four sons, viz. 

I. Thomas, who d. young. 

II. Petkk, liis heir. 

III. Thomas, s. to his brother. 

IV. Richard, d. young, in 1774. 

Col. Patten was *. at his decease, 19th 
March, 1806, aged eighty-six, by his son, 

Peter Patten, esq. of Bank Hall, M.P. 
for Newton from 1797 to ISOG, and for 
Malmesbury from 1813 to 1818, colonel of 
the royal Lancashire militia, &c. who as- 
sumed, upon inheriting the Bold estates, at 
the decease of his aunt, Anna-Maria Bold, 
of Bold, the additional surname and arms of 
Bold. He in. Mary, youngest daughter of 
the Rev. John Parker, of Astle, in Cliieshire, 
and of Brightmet, in the county of Lancas- 
ter, by whom he had four daughters, viz. 
1. Mary, who s. her father at Bold 
Hall, and married Prince Sapieha, a 
Polish nobleman, but (/. s. p. in 1824, 
when the estates passed to her next 
sister, 
II Dorothea, inheritrix of Bold Hall, 
w. 23rd May, 1820, Henry Hoghton, 
esq. (only son of Sir Henry Philip 
Hoghton, bart. of Hoghton Tower) 
who has assumed the surname of 
Bold, and has issue. 

III. Frances. 

IV. Anna-Maria, VI. to her cousin, 
John Wilson Patten, esq. of Bank 
Hall, M.P. 

Col. Patten Bold, d. 17th October, 1819,* 
aged fifty-five, and was s. in the represen- 
tation of the family by his brother, 

Thomas Wilson-Patten, esq. M.P. of 
Bank Hall, lieutenant-colonel of the 5th 
royal Lancashire militia, b. 22nd February, 
1770, who had assumed the additional sur- 
name of Wilson, at the request of the 
Bishop of Sodor and Man, and by the tes- 
tamentary injunction of his lordship's son, 
from whom the Patten family inherited the 

* In the cbapel at Bold there is a monument 
by Chantry, erected to Peter Patten-Bold, esq. 
witli this inscription: — 

" In memory of Peter Patten-Bold, esq. colonel 
of the 1st regiment of royal Lancashire militia, 
and during twentv-one years a member of the 
British parliament ; animated by a steady loyalty, 
and consistent love of freedom, his public life was 
distinguished by an impartial adherence to the 
dictates of his conscience and to the principles of 
the British constitution." 

He died 17th October, 1819, aged fifty-five, 
■leaving a widow and four daughters. 

Arms of Bold — Arg. a griffin segreant sa. 

Crest — Out of a ducal coronet gu. a demi- 
griffin issuant sa. with wings expanded or, beaked 
aud taloned gu. 



Cheshire, and a portion of their Lancashire 
estates. Col. Wilson-Patten wedded, in 
1800, Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Nathan 
Hyde, esq. of Ardwick, and left at his de- 
cease, in 1826, a daughter, Elizabeth, 7«. to 
Sir John BuUer Yarde Buller, bart. of 
Lupton House, Devonshire, and a son his 
successor, the present John Wilson-Pat- 
ten, esq. of Bank Hall, M.P. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, fusilly 
erm. and sa. a canton gu. for Patten ; 
second and third, sa. a wolf rampt. or, in 
chief three estoiles of the second, for Wil- 
son, 

Crests — First, a griffin's head erased, for 
Patten ; second, a demi-wolf rampt. for 
Wilson. 

Mottoes — For Patten, Nulla pallescere 
culpa. For Wilson, Virtus ad sidera tol- 
lit. 

Estates — In Lancashire, Cheshire, and 
Staflbrdshire. 

Seats — Bank Hall, near W^arrington, and 
Light Oaks, near Cheadle. 

jFamilB of 13oI&. 

The BoLDS were seated, it is affirmed, be- 
fore the Conquest at Bold, in the county 
of Lancaster; and in the reign of Henry 
III. we find in Testa de Nevil that Mat- 
thew DE BoLDE, the grandson of Wil- 
liam DE BoLDE, of Bolde, was employed on 
an inquisition to make a return of the 
" Nomina villarum, serjeantes and knights 
fees," in the hundred of West Derby. They 
have ever since maintained the highest place 
among the great landed proprietors of the 
north of England, have constantly received 
the honour of knighthood, have repre- 
sented flieir native shire in parliament, and 
have allied with its inost distinguished 
families. 

Sir Richard Bold, knt. of Bold, living 
in the time of Richard II. (great-great 
grandson of the said Matthew) had three 
sons, John, his heir; Baldwin, who became 
seated at Upton, in Cheshire; and John, 
whose great grand-daughter, Agnes, mar- 
ried Hugh Massey, son of Hugh Massey, of 
Tatton. From Sir Richard's eldest son, 

John Bold, of Bold, who had a grant 
from Henry IV. of free warren, in Pres- 
cot, under the forest of Symondswood, 
lineally descended, (his great-great grand- 
son) 

Sir Richard Bold, knt. of Bold, temp. 
Henry VIII. who wi. Margaret, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Butler, knt. of Bewsey, and 
had issue, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

n. Francis, of Craushaw, who married 



D'AETII, OF KNOWLTON CX)URT. 



8.5- 



Catherine IJarnes, sister of the JJishop 
of Durham. 
111. John, wlio ni. Anne, diiuuilitcr of 
Sir Tliomas Laiij^litoii, of Walton, 
and had a son, Henry, wliose dauf^h- 
ter, Klizalx'th, married to — Mussel, 
of London. Jolin IJold wedded se- 
condly, the dati. of Uicliard Ather- 
ton, of Nortli Moels, and had by her 
a son, John, father of Anne, wife of 
Sir Alexander Holland, of Sutton. 

I. Margaret, m. to Thomas Ireland, of 
the llutt. 

II. Klizaheth, ni. to Henry Byrom, of 
Byrom. 

III. Anne, »«. to Richard Butler, of 
RawclilVe. 

IV. Dorothy, ju. to Sir John Holcroft, 
of Holcroft. 

V. Maud, m. to Sir Richard Sherburne, 
of Stonyhurst. 

The eldest son, 

Richard Bold, esq, of Bold, m. first, 
Elizabetli, daughter of Sir Thomas Gerard, 
of Bryn, and had one son, Richard, whose 
line failed, and a daughter, Anne, m. to 
Francis Tunstall, esq. of Thurland. Rich- 
ard Bold wedded secondly, Margaret, dau. 
of William Wooful, and by her was father 
of 

William Bold, esq. whose son, by Pru- 
dence his wife, daughter of William Brooke, 
of Norton, 

Richard Bold, esq. of Bold, living in 
1613, espoused Ann, daughter of Sir Peter 
Leigh, knt. of Lyme, and had issue. He 
d. in \6of>, and was direct ancestor* of 

* Of the intermediate line, Richard Bold, 
esq. 7)1. Elizabeth, daugfhter of Thomas Norton, 
esq. of Barkisland, and died M.P. for Lancashire 
in 1704. His father was Peter Bold, esq. of 
Bold. 



I»i:ti:k Bold, esq. of Bold Hall, M.P. 
for Lancasliire in I7;)(>, IT.OO, and 17;>4, 
who m. Anna-Maria, daughter of Godfrey 
Wentworth, esq. of Woolley, (see page 
9.3) and liad six daughters, viz. 

Anna-Maria, his sole heiress. 

DoKOTHKA, 7M. to Thomas Patten, esq. 
of Bank Hall, and was mother of 
Pf.tkk Paptkn, es(j. who succeeded 
liis aunt at Bold. 

Frances, rn. 13th September, 1759, to 
Fleetwood Hesketh, esq. of Rossall, 
and was grandmother of the present 
Pktkk HKSKi:Tii-FLi-.KTW()(»D,esq. of 
Rossall, M.P. for Preston. 

Mary, m. to Thomas Hunt, esq. of 
Mollington. 

goverilda. 

Elenor. 

He d. 12th September, 1762, aged fifty- 
nine, and was succeeded by his eldest 
daughter, 

Anna-Maria Bold, of Bold, at whose 
decease, unmarried, 25th November, 1813, 
aged eighty-one, the estates of the Bold 
family passed to her nephew, Peter Pat- 
ten, esq. as already stated. 

%* Among tlie Bradshaw papers, at 
Marple, is a letter, dated December, 1649, 
addressed to Peter Bold, esq. of Bold. It 
is from Henry Bradshawe, the elder brother 
of the president, congratulating the Com- 
monw^ealth on the acquisition of Mr. Bold 
for a friend, and Mr. Bold on the comfort 
and honour which he and his family would 
reap thereby, though tlie daily trouble 
thereof might be more than his tender 
years might admit of. 



D'AETH, OF KNOWLTON COURT. 

D'AETH-HUGHES, GEORGE-WILLIAM, esq. of Knowlton Court, in Kent, 
a captain in the royal navy, m. 20th July, 1816, Harriet, daughter of the late Sir 
Edward Knatchbull, bart. of Mersham Hatch, and has issue. 



I. Narborough. 
II. Edward-Henry. 

III. George-Wyndham. 

IV. Charles. 



I. Harriet. 

II. Frances, 
ni. Elizabeth. 



This gentleman, whose patronymic is Hughes, assumed by sign manual, 30th May, 
1808, the additional surname and arms of D'A ' 



estates of his grand-uncle, Sir Narborough D'Aeth, bart 



Aetii, in consequence of inheriting the 



86 



D'AKTH, OF KIVOWLTON COURT. 



l-fncaae. 







Tliis lamilv, whidi derives its surname 
from Aeth, in Flanders, is of ancient stand- 
ing in the county of Kent. 

William D'Aeth, of Dartford, espoused 
temp. Edward VI. Anne, daughter .and heir 
of — Vaughan, esq. of Erith, and by her 
had nine children, as appears recorded on 
his tombstone still remaining in Dartford 
church. His eldest son, 

Thomas D'Aeth, living in 1615, married 
Joan, daughter of William Head, and had a 
son and successor, 

Thomas D'Aeth, esq. who wedded Mary, 
daughter of Mr. Serjeant Barton, and had, 
with two elder sons, Adrian and Abel, wlio 
both died without issue, 

Thomas D'Aeth, esq. an eminent mer- 
chant of the city of London. This gentle- 
man wedded Elhanna, daughter of Sir John 
Rolt, lent, of Milton Earnest, in the county 
of Bedford, and left at his decease, an only 
surviving son. 

Sin Thomas D'Aeth, created a Baronet, 
I6th July, 1716, who married first, Eli- 
zabeth, daughter of Admiral Sir John 
Narborongli, knt. one of the commissioneis 
of the navy to King Charles II. and 
sole heiress of lier brother. Sir John Nar- 
borough, of Knowlton Court, hart. Sir 
John Narborough, and liis only brotI]Jer, 
James Narborough, esq. were unfortunately 
cast away, with their father-in-law. Sir 
Cloudesley Shovel, on the rocks of Scilly, 
2'2nd October, 1707. By the heiress of 
Knowlton, Sir Thomas D'Aeth had 
T. Narborough, his heir. 
II. Thomas. 

1. Elizabeth, who m. in 1740, the Hon. 
and Rev. Godfrey Dawney, one of 
the prebendaries of Canterbury, son 
of Henry, second Viscount Downe, 
and d. s. p.' 



II. Ellvanna, m. to Captain Fitzgerald, 
of the French service, and d. s. p. 

til. Sophia, wi. in l749,AVilliamChamp- 
neys, esq. of Vintners, in Kent, but 
died without issue, in 1772. Mr. 
Champneys left by a former wife an 
only surviving daughter ami heiress, 
Harriet Champneys, m. to John 
Byrte, or Burt, esq. of Boley Hill. 

IV. Bethia, m. first, to Herbert Palmer, 
esq. of Wingham, in Kent, and 
.secondly, to John Cosnan, esq. She 
d. s. p. 

V. Harriet, under age in 1735, m. 
Josiah Hardy, esq. consul at Cadiz, 
and had five daughters, namely, 

1. Harriet Hardy, who became 
the second wife of William 
Hughes, esq. of Betshanger, in 
Kent, and by him, who died in 
April, 1786, had one son and 
three daughters, viz. 

George - William Highes, 
who succeeded to Knowl- 
ton on the demise of Sir 
Narborough D'Aeth, in 
1808, and is the present 
proprietor. 

Harriet Hughes, m. to George 
Leonard Austen, esq. of 
Sevenoaks, in Kent. 

Louisa Hughes. 

Charlotte Hughes, died un- 
married. 

2. Elizabeth- Sophia Hardj', m. 
to Edward Markland, esq. of 
Leeds. 

3. Priscella Hardy, m. to John 
Godby, esq. of Greenwich. 

4. Louisa Hardy, tn. to John 
Cooke, esq. captain of the Bel- 
lerophon, killed at Trafalgar. 

5. Charlotte Hardy, w/. to Lieu- 
tenant Colonel George John 
Hamilton, R.A. 

Sir Thomas D'Aeth married secondly, Jane, 
daughter of Walter Williams, esq. of Din- 
geston, in the county of Monmouth, and had 
by her one son, 

Francis, in holy orders, rector of 
Knowlton, who died num. in 1784. 

Sir Thomas was cho.sen member of parlia- 
ment for Canterbury in 1708. and for Sand- 
wich ill 1714. He died 4th January, 1745, 
and was succeeded by liis son. 

Sir Narboroi'gh D'Aeth, second bart. 
of Knowlton Court, who m. Anne, daughter 
and heir of John Clarke, esq. of Blake Hall, 
ill Essex, and dying in 1773 (his will, dated 
l.'itli February, 1771, was proved 24th Ja- 



DYMOCK, OF PENLRY F4ALL AND ELLESMKRE. 



87 



nuarv, 1774), was succeeded by his only. 
cJii'd, 

Sir Nakbokoi'(;h D'Artii, tliird hart. o( 
Kiiowltoii Court, wlio died mini, in April, 
ISOK, was hiiricd at Knowlton, and suc- 
ceeded ill his estates by (tlie grandson of 
his aunt. Hmuuft) his cousin, the present 
GF.oiuiK William lIuGUiis-D'Ahrii, esq. of 
Knowlton Court. 

jfamtly of a)ugf)r3. 

John Hughes, esq. of Newbery, in Berk- 
shire, son of Thomas Iluolies, es(j. of the 
same place, by Klizabeth Hodges, his wife, 
died about the year 1710, leavino- a dauf^h- 
ter, Hannah, ?m. to Thomas Cowslad, esq. 
and a son, 

Thomas Huches, M.D. of Oxford, who 
espoused in 1743, Mary, only surviving 
child and heiress of William Smith, esq, of 
Eltham, one of the six clerks in Chancery, 
by Sarah, his wife, daughter of Sir Jotin 
Shaw, bart. and had one son and one daugh- 
ter, viz. 

William, his heir. 

Mary, who m. Lieut.-oolonel Timnis, 

and was mother of John Timnis, esq. 

wlio assumed the surname and arms 

of Elwes, (see vol. ii. p. 466). 

Dr. Hughes, whose will bears date in 1750, 

was s. by bis son, 

William Hughes, esq. of Eetshanger, 
in Kent, who wedded first, Mary, eldest 
daughter of John Hallett, esq. son of James 
Hallett, esq. of Dunmow Priory, in Essex, 
by Mary, his wife, daughter of Sir Ambrose 
Crowley, knt. of Greenwich, and grandson of 
Sir James Hallett, knt. and Mary, his wife, 
dau. of Thomas Buncombe, esq. of Brough- 
ton, in Bucks. By this lady, who died in 
1780, and was buried at Little Dunmow, Mr. 
Hughes had four sons and three daughters, 
viz. 

I. William, } , i *, j- , • . ^ 

II. Thomas,i^^'«^^^''^'^^'"^"f«"^y- 



HI. Charles, in holy orders, rector of 
Gestingthorpe, in Essex, and of 
Wixoe, in Suflolk, and vicar of 
Patrixburn, in Kent, who assumed 
by sign manual in May, 1823, the 
additional surname and arms of 
Hallett. He m. in May, 1806, 
Frances-=Anne, daughter of the late 
Sir Edward Knatclibull, hart, of 
Mensham Hatch, and lias issue, 

1. James, b. in 1807. 

2. Edward Knatclibull, h. in 1808. 

3. Charles, b. in XHiYJ. 

4. William, b. in 1812. 

5. Henry, b. in 1814. 

6. John-Henry, b. in 1818. 

7. George-Wyndham, b. in 1819. 

8. Abraham-Vernon, b. in 1821, 

9. Frederick, h. in 1826. 

1. Frances. 

2. Mary. 

3. Anna-Maria. 

IV. Henry, of Albany Chambers, Lon- 
don. 

r. Mary, m. to William Wells, esq. of 
Redleafe, in Kent, and dying in 
June, 1818, was buried at Penshurst. 

II. Elizabeth. 

HI. Anne. 
Mr. Hughes married secondly, Harriet, 
eldest daughter and co-heir of Josiab Hardy, 
esq. by Harriet, his wife, daughter of Sir 
Thomas D'Aeth, bart. and bv her had 
three daughters, as already stated, with one 
son, the present George William Hughes- 
D'Aeth, esq. "of Knowlton Court. 

^r>H5— Quarterly ; first and fourth, sa. a 
griffin passant or, between three crescents 
arg. ; second and third, sa. a chev. between 
three fleur delys arg. 

Crest— k griffin's head erased or, in the 
mouth a trefoil slipped vert. 
Estates — In Kent. 
iSeff^— Knowlton Court, in that county. 



DYMOCK, OF PENLEY HALL AND ELLESMERE. 

DYMOCK, EDWARD, esq. of Penley Hall, in the county of Flint, and of Elles- 
mere, in Shropshire, b. 16th December, 1774; m. in 1804, Mar}-, daughter of John 
Jones, esq. of Coed-y-Glynn, in the county of Denbigh, and has issue, 

Edward-Hi'mphrey, in holy orders, b. in 1809. 
John, b. in 1816. 
Robert-Myddelton, b. in 1817. 
Thomas-Biddulph, b. in 1823. 

Mary-Anne, m. in 1825, to Robert-Darwin Vaughton, esq. of Whitchurch in the 
county of Salop. ' 

This gentleman, a magistrate and deputy-lieutenant for the county of Flint, and 
formerly major in the West Shropshire local militia, succeeded his father in 1784. 



88 



DYMOCK, OF PENLEY HALL AND ELLESMERE. 



Hincaac. 




Here we have another branch of the nu- 
merous descendants of TuDUR Trevor, (see 
family of Vaughan, of Burlton Hall, p. 
239), to whom so many of the principal fa- 
milies of North Wales, and the marches 
thereof, trace their origin. 

Rys Sais, so called because he could speak, 
the Saxon or English language, possessed 
great estates in North Wales and Shrop- 
shire at the period of the Norman con- 
quest, which he divided among his sons in 
the year 1070. His eldest son, Tudur, was 
father of Bleddyn, the father of Owen, 
who had several children : one of these, 
Thomas, was father of Meilir, who resided 
at Bryn, in Halghton, in the parish of Han- 
mer, and was ancestor of the Pennants, of 
Downing, Bichton, &c. Another son of 
Owen ap Bleddyn was Owen Vychan, fa- 
ther of CADWYAN,thefatherofRiRiD, whose 
son, 

Madoc ap Ririd, espoused Margaret, 
daughter of Ithel Anwyl, a chieftain of 
Tegengl, (as most of Flintshire was at that 
period called by the Welsh), and had a son 
and successor, 

David ap Madoc, who, according to the 
mode of address then used in Wales, was 
called " Dai Madoc ; " for David ap Madoc 
would thus be spoken, Dai being the dimi- 
nutive of David. He m. Margaret, daugh- 
ter and heir of Tudur ap Ririd, of Penley, 
by whom he acquired that estate, and had 
a son and heir, 

David ap Dai Madoc, whose name, by 
mutation of address, was David Dai Marine, 
that is David, the son of Dai (David) Ma- 
doc, and from the mode of expression then 
customary David Dai Madoc became David 
Damoc, or Dymock, for it is written both 
ways in ancient manuscripts. Hencefor- 
ward Damoc or Dymock became the adopted 
surname of the family. David Dai Madoc, 



who lived at Willington, in the county of 
Flint, wedded Margaret, daughter of David 
Voel, of Hanmer, (son of David, one of the 
sons of Sir John Hopton, or Upton, of Bet- 
tisfield, in Hanmer, lineal male ancestor of 
the Hanmers, of Hanmer, now represented 
by Sir John Hanmer, hart.), and had a son, 
I EUAN Dymock, of Penley and Willing- 
ton, in the county of Flint, father, by Lucy 
his wife, daughter of Richard ap Madoc ap 
Llewelyn, of Halghton, in the same shire, of 
Thomas Dymock, hen* esq. of Penley 
and Willington. This gentleman m. Mar- 
garet, daughter and heir of Griffith ap Mor- 
gan Goch, of Willington Hall, by whom he 
acquired that estate, and had issue. He d. 
6th December, 1487, and was s. by his son, 
Thomas Dymock, esq. of Willington Hall 
and Penley, who m. Margaret, daughter of 
Sir Randle Brereton, knt. of Malpas, in 
the county of Chester, and dying ten days 
after his father, 16th December, 1487, was 
s. by his eldest son, 

Randle Dymock, esq. of Willington and 
Penley, who wedded Elizabeth, daughter 
of Griffith Hanmer, esq. of Fens, and had 
two sons, viz. 

Humphrey, m. to Elen, daughter of 
William Davies, esq. and had one 
son, Randle, who d. s. p. and four 
daughters. 
Edward. 
The second son, 

Edward Dymock, esq. married four times, 

and by three of his wives had issue. By 

tlie first, Catherine, daughter of Richard 

Conway, esq. he had two sons, Humphrey 

and Randle, who both died s. p. and five 

daughters. By the second, Magdalen, dau. 

of Roger Puleston, esq. as appears by a 

deed dated in 1622, he had another son, 

William, who succeeded to the estates, 

[ The third wife, Catherine, daughter of Wil- 

l liam Mostyn, esq. died without issue; and 

; the fourth, Margaret, daughter of Thomas 

i Kynaston, esq. left one son, Thomas, and 

a daughter, Anne. He was s. by his elder 

surviving son, 

William Dymock, esq. of Willington 
Hall and Penley, living in the reign of 
Elizabeth, who m. Margaret, daughter of 
William Hanmer, esq. of Fens, and had 
two sons and four daughters, viz. 

I. Humphrey, of Willington, who m. 
Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Han- 
mer, knt. and by her (who died in 

* The term hen in Welsh is applied to persons 
who attain a very great age. 



WENTWORTIT, OF WOOIXEY. 



89 



lfi67) left at his decease in 1650, four 
sons and five daiip;hters, viz. 



1. Thomas, 

2. William, 

3. C/liarles, 

4. Hiinii)liroy, 



The eldest son, 
.Thomas Dyniock, 
esq. of Williiij;- 
ton, inherited. He 
and iiis brother Humplirey were 
the last survivors, and after their 
decease the Willington estate 
was sold to Sir John Trevor, 
of IJrynkinalt, Speaker of tlie 
House of Commons, who died in 
1696. The four brothers died 
s.p. 

1. Mary. 

2. Margaret. 

3. Dorothy. 

4. Catherine. 

5. Ursula. 

II. Edvvakd, of whom presently. 

I. Ellen. 

II. Mary. 

III. Magdalen, 

IV. Elizabeth. 

The younger son, 

Edward Dymock, esq. of Penley, wed- 
ded Mary, daughter of John Davenport, 
esq. and was father of 

Edward Dymock, esq. of Penley, who 
espoused Mary, daughter of David Jones, 
esq. of Oakenholt, and had three sons and 
one daughter, viz. 

I. Edward, his heir. 

II. John, who d. s. p. 

III. William, who married and had a 
son, 

John, of Whitchurch, in Salop, fa- 
ther, by Elizabeth his wife, of 
EdwardDymock, esq. of whom 
hereafter as successor to his 
great uncle, in the Penley 
estate. 



I. Elizabeth, m. to Edward Morrall, 
esq. of Plas Yolyn. (See vol. ii. 
page 596). 

Mr. Dymock died in 1705. was buried at 
Hannier, and ,?. by his eldest son, 

EnwAun Dymock, esq. of Penley, who 
died unmarried, and left the Penley estate 
to his grand-nephew, 

Edward Dymock, esq. b. in 1730, who 
wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Humphrey 
Brown, esq. and had three sons, (Edward, 
John, and William), by the eldest of whom, 

Edward Dymock, esq. of Penley, I. in 
1752, he was succeeded in 1760. This gen- 
tleman espoused, Hth January, 1774, Mary, 
daughter of Edward Edwards, esq. of Pen- 
tre Heylin, in the county of Salop, and had 
issue, 

Edward, his heir. 
John, ") 

William, > who all died s.p. 
Thomas, ) 
Mary, d. \inm. 
Christian, 

Elizabeth, I now resident at Whit- 
Frances, church, in Salop. 
Anne, 

Mr. Dymock d. in 1784, and was s. by his 
eldest son, the present Edward Dymock, 
esq. of Penley Hall. 

Arms — Per bend sinister ermine and er- 
mines, a lion rampant langued and armed 
gu. 

Ciest — An arm in armour, ppr. holding 
in the hand a spear sa. 

Motto — Pro rege et lege dimico. 

Estate — Penley, in that part of the parish 
of EUesmere which is situated in Flintshire. 

Seat — Penley Hall. 



WENTWORTH, OF WOOLLEY. 



WENTWORTH, GODFREY, esq. of Woolley Park, in the county of York, b. 
14th September, 1797; m. 20th June, 1822, Anne, fourth daughter of Walter 
Fawkes, esq. of Farnley Hall, in the same shire, and has issue, 

Godfrey-Hawksworth. 
George-Edward. 

Anne. 

Rosamond-Frances. 

Catharine-Mary. 

Mr. Wentworth, who succeeded his father in 1826, is a magistrate and deputy-lieu- 
tenant for Yorkshire. 



90 



WENTWORTH, OF WOOLLEY. 



Hinracie. 




Erlif 




Tliis is a distinguished and powerful 
branch of the ancient stock of Went- 
worth Woodhouse, in the county of York, 
a family which has been rooted there 
from the earliest period to which the ge- 
nealogist can usually ascend in his in- 
vestigations. Of the orthography of the 
lands, whence originated the name, Domes- 
day Book, and all the old charters have it 
Winteicorth, and such is still the pronun- 
ciation of the common people, who do not 
easily fall into new modes of speech. As 
to its derivation, Mr. Hunter, " in his His- 
tory of Doncaster," makes the following 
remarks : " The latter half of the name 
(worth), is one of the most frequent local 
terminals, and appears to denote some de- 
gree of cultivation. The former half affords 
room for conjecture. It has been suggested 
that it may be the word c/ivint, preserved in 
the Breton language, wliich is a dialect of 
the Celtic, where it denotes elevation. This 
sense would undoubtedly apply well to 
Wentworth, which stands high, as does also 
another place of the same name, in the isle 
of Ely, relatively to the fens around it. 
Celtic etymologies are, however, to be ad- 
mitted w-ith great caution in investigating 
the names of places cultivated or populated ; 
and perhaps the scribe of Domesday, who, 
in one of the five instances in which the 
word occurs, has written it thus, Wintrer- 
uorde, may have presented us with an 
ancient and expiring orthography from 
whence we may conclude that the name of 
Wentworth is to be classed with Wintrer- 
ton, Winterburn, Winteredge, and other 
places which have obtained those names 
from their high exposed or cold situations." 

While the lands of Wentworth Wood- 
house continued to be the seat of the chiefs, 
and descended from sire to son, in an im- 
broken series, till the succession of male 



heirs failed with William, the second earl 
of Strafl'ord, the junior scions of the family 
founded, in several instances, houses of 
rank and influence, the Wentworths of 
WooLLEY, of North and South Elmsal,* 
of Bretton,t of \Yentworth Castle,^ of Net- 
tlested,^ Ike. 

Thomas Wentworth, of Wentworth 
Woodhouse, son of William Wentworth, by 
Isabel, his wife, daughter of Sir Richard 
Fitzwilliam, of Aldwark, succeeded to the 
estates and representation of the family, in 
the 23rd of Henry VII. He wedded Bea- 
trix, daughter of Sir Richard Woodruffe, 
knt. of Woolley, whose house was then 
in the plenitude of its prosperity, and had 
issue, 

I. WiLLiAM,of Wentworth Woodhouse, 
who enjoyed the estates only a few 
months, dying 4th July, 1549. He 
m. Catherine, daughter of Ralph 
Beeston, of Beeston, and was s. by 
his son, 

Thomas Wentworth, esq. of 
Wentworth Woodhouse, high 



* The Wentworths of North Elmsal acquired 
that estate temp. Edward III. in marriage with 
Alice, daughter and heiress of John Bissett, and 
continued tliere for several centuries, until the 
year 1741, when their male line expired with Sir 
Butler Cavendish Wentworth, hart, the estates 
devolving on that gentleman's half sister, Cathe- 
rine Wentworth, who wedded Hugh Cholmley, 
esq. of Whitby, in the countv of York, M.P. for 
Hedon, and sheriff of that shire in 1724. The 
Wentworths of SorTH Elmsal sprung from a 
younger son of Thomas Wentworth, of North 
Elmsal, are also now extinct. 

t The Wentworths of Bretton, deriving from 
Richard Wentworth, of Everton, in the countv 
of Nottingham, third son of John Wentworth, of 
Elmsal, by Agnes, his wife, sister and co-heir of 
Sir William Dronsfield, of Bretton, became ex- 
tinct in the male line upon the demise of Sir 
Thomas Wentworth Blackett, hart. 9th July, 
1792. The estates of Bretton, &c. are now en- 
joyed bv the Beaumont family, (see vol. ii. p. 523). 

i The Wentworths of Wentworth Castle 
were founded by Sir William Wentworth, of 
Ashby, in Lincolnshire, slain at Marston ]\Ioor, 
who was a younger son of Sir A\'illiam Went- 
worth, hart, of Wentworth Woodhouse, and 
brother to Thomas, first earl of Straftbrd. They 
became extinct in the male line in 1799. The 
estates are now possessed bv Frederic Thomas 
William Vernon Wentworth, esq. of Wentworth 
Castle, (see vol. ii. p. 81). 

§ For an account of the Wentworths of Net- 
tlested, earls of Cleveland, and barons Went- 
worth, now represented bv Anna Isabella, Dow- 
ager Lady Byron, and the Hon. Nathaniel Curzon, 
between whom the barony of Wentworth is in 
abeyance, refer to Burke's Extinct and Dormant 
Peerage. 



WRNTWORTII, OF WOOLLEY. 



91 



slierifT for Yorkshire in tho 2-ltIi 
Elizabeth. Tliisgeutlrman aui;- 
Tiieiitcd ill a great decree liis 
iiilieritance by liis inarriai;e with 
Margaret, daiigliter of VViiliani 
(Jascoitiiie, es(|. of (Jawthorpe, 
loiij^ one of the jjriiicipal fami- 
lies of tlie West Ridiiit;', and 
whose ))edi<;ree l)oasted of the 
name of chief justice (Jascoigne. 
My tliis lady, Mr. Wentworth 
left at his decease, in 15H7, one 
son and four dausjiiters, namely, 
1. William (Sir), of Wont- 
worth Woodhouse, created 
a Baronet in '1(511, father 
of Thomas Wentworth, the 
ill-fated Earl of Straf- 
ford, and grandfather of 
the Lady Anne Went- 
worth, who wedded Ed- 
ward Watson, second Lord 
Rockingham. The great 
grand-daughter and even- 
tual heiress of tliis mai*- 
riage, 

Lady Anne Wentworth, 
espoused in 1744, Wil- 
liam, third Earl Fitz- 
wiLLiAM,andwas grand- 
mother of Charles- 
Wh^liam, present Earl 
FiTzwiLLiAM. See 

Burke's Peerage. 

1. Elizabeth, m. in 1577, to 
Thomas Danby, esq. of 
Farnley. 

2. Barbara, died unmarried. 

3. Margaret, w. first, to Mi- 
chael, son and heir of .Tohn 
Lord D'Arcy ; and secondly, 
to Jasper Blitheman, esq. of 
New Latres. 

4. Catherine, m. in lo9G, to 
the unfortunate Thomas 
Gargrave,* esq. of Nostcl. 

* Few names are of move frequent occurrence 
in the affairs of the West Riding of Yorkshire, 
than that of Gargrave, derived, it is presumed, 
from a village so called, in Craven. The first 
recorded ancestor of the family of Sir John Gar- 
grave, who was tutor to Richard, duke of York, 
and a warrior as well as scholar, served under 
Hknry V. as master of the ordnance in France. 
He was direct progenitor of Sir Thomas Gar- 
grave, speaker of the house of Commons, who 
purchasing in the 9th F^lizaeeth, Nostel, with 
other estates in the county of York, established 
his family there. His son and heir, 

Sir Cotton Gargrave, knt. of Nostel, wedded 
first, Bridget, daughter of Sir William Fairfax, of 
Steeton, and by her had to survive himself, an 
only son, Thomas, of Nostel, who married, as in 
the test, Catherine, daughter of Thomas Went- 
worth, and was executed for murder at \'ork. 



II. Michael, of whom presently. 

III. Thomas, who m. Grace, daughter 
of .Joim Gascoigne, esq. of Lasing- 
croft, in Yorksiiire, and had, with 
three daughters, Mary, Grace, and 
Elizabeth, an only son, Thomas, 

IV. Bryan. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to Ral|)h Denam. 

II. Isabella, )//. to Nicholas Wombwell, 
esq. of Greesbrook, in Yorkshire. 

HI. Beatrix, ??^. toTiiomasWorrall,esq. 
of Loversall, in Yorkshire. 
Thomas Wentworth d. 6th December, 1548, 
and was buried at Wentworth. His second 
son, 

Michael Wentworth, esq. of Mendam 
Priory, in the county of Suftblk, living in 
the 'S[)i\\ of Henry VIIL was cofferer to 
the king and comptroller to the queen. He 
m. Isabel, daughter and heir of Ptrcival 
Whitley, esq. of Whitley, in Yorkshire, 
and had by her, who died in 1560, three 
sons and three daughters. He died 13tU 
October, 1558, and in the inquisition taken 
the 30th of the following April, it is found 
tiiat his son and heir, 

Thomas Wentworth, esq. of Mendara 
Priory, in Suffolk, and of Whitley, in the 
county of York, was then aged seventeen 
years and two months. This gentleman es- 
poused Susan, dau. of Christopher Hopton, 
esq. of Armley Hall, in the latter shire, and 
had (with two daughters, Beatrix, m. to 
John Green, esq. of Dean Grange, in Hors- 
forth, and Mary, the wife of Robert Con- 
Sir Cotton espoused secondly, Agnes, dauuliter 
of Tliomas Waterton, esq. of Walton, and bad 
(with other issue, of whom one daughter, Eliza- 
beth, m. William Fenwick, esq. of Stanton, and 
another, Frances, m. Stephen Tempest, esq. of 
Broughton), a son, 

Sir Richard Gargrave, knt. of Kinsley and 
Nostel, sheriff' of Yorkshire, ord James I. wlio, 
by a course of extravagant and wanton expendi- 
ture, was forced to sell his estates, and became so 
reduced in circumstances, that Dodsworth, writing 
in 1634, speaking of him says, " that he now Iveth 
in the Temple for Sanctuary, having consumed his 
whole estate, to the value of £3J00 per annum, 
at the least, and hath not a penny to maintain 
himself, but what the purchasers of some part of 
his lands, in reversion after his mother's death, 
allow him, in hope he will survive his mother, 
who hatli not consented to the sale." 

Bevond this (says Mr. Hunter) I have not 
been able to trace him. The memory of his ex- 
travagance and his vices 3'et lingers about Kins- 
ley. The rustic moralist still ])oints his counsel 
with the story of Sir Richard Gargrave, who 
could once ride on his own land from Wakelield 
to Doncaster, and had horses innumerable at his 
command, but was at last reduced to travel with 
the pack-horses to London, and was found dead 
in an old ostelry with his head upon a pack- 
saddle. 



92 



WENTWORTH, OF WOOLLEY.- 



ingby, esq. of Herefordsliire) a son and 
successor, 

Mich A ELWENT\voRTH,esq.who purchased 
WooLLEY, and other lands in the county of 
York, anno 1599, from Francis Woodruft'e, 
esq. He wedded Frances, daughter and 
sole heir of George Downes, esq. of Paun- 
ton, in Herefordshire, and had issue, 

I. Thomas, b. in 1595, who predeceased 
him, unmarried. 

II. Michael, heir to his father. 

III. George (Sir), successor to his 
brother. 

IV. Matthew, capt. of a troop of horse, 
died; s. p. will dated 1646, proved 
1651. 

V. John, successor to his brother, Sir 
George. 

I. Dorothy, 7n. to John Wood, esq. of 
Copmanthorpe. 

II. Elizabeth, m. first, to Thomas Old- 
field, esq. of Wadlands; and secondly, 
to Richard Beaumont, esq. of Mir- 
field. 

III. Alice, d. unm. 

IV. Mary, in. to Richard Langley, esq. 
of Millington, in Yorkshire. 

V. Rosamond, m. first, to Bertram 
Reveley, esq. of Throple ; and se- 
condly, to Robert Widdrington, esq. 
of Carlington, both in Northumber- 
land. 

VI. Margaret, m. 11th February, 1628, 
to William Wombwell, esq. of 
Wombwell. 

Michael Wentworth, who enjoyed his pur- 
chase of Woolley more than forty years, 
died just at the commencement of the civil 
wars, and by the inquisition taken 9th Sep- 
tember, 1642, it was found that he had died 
seized of the manors of Woolley, Notton, 
Kirshell, Pool, and Brackenholm, the manor 
or grange of Owston, alias Wolston, in the 
county of the city of York, and half the 
tithe of garbs in Notton and Chevet. He 
was s. by his eldest son, 

Michael Wentworth, esq. of Woolley, 
aged forty-five in 1642, who died unm. and 
was succeeded by his next brother. 

Sir George Wentworth, knt. of Wool- 
ley, who, on the breaking out of the civil 
w-ar, zealously followed the example of the 
whole race of Wentworth, espoused the 
cause of the king. Amongst other acts of 
devotion he raised for his majesty a regi- 
ment of foot, at his own expense, and 
as colonel, commanded it himself. He m. 
first, Anne, daughter of Thomas, Lord Fair- 
fax, of Denton, by whom he had two sons, 
namely, 

Michael, b. in 1622, who mi. Catherine, 
daughter of Sir William St. Quintin, 
hart, but predeceased his father with- 
out issue in 1658. His widow wed- 



ded secondly. Sir John Kaye, bart. 
of Woodsom ; thirdly, Henry Sandys, 
esq. of Down, in Kent ; and fourthly, 
Alexander, earl of Eglintoun. 
William, b. 1624, and d. in 1625. 
Sir Godfrey espoused secondly, Everild, 
second daughter and co-heir of thristopher 
Maltby, esq. of Maltby, and by her had 
issue, 

nu • » ' 1 i both died young, 
Christopher, ) j & 

Everild, to. to John Thornhill, esq. of 

Fixby. 
Frances, TO. r2th January, 1657, Thomas 

Grantham, esq. 
Anne, to. to William Osbaldeston, esq. 
of Hunmanby. 
Sir Godfrey Wentworth died 18th October, 
1660, aged sixty, and was *. by his brother, 
John Wentworth, esq. of Woolley, b. 
in 1607, who wedded Elizabeth, daughter of 
Arthur Aldburgh, esq. of Aldburgh, in York- 
shire, and by her (who died in 1675), left at 
his decease, 22nd February, 1682, a son 
and successor. 

Sir Michael Wentworth, of Woolley, 
b. in 1654, knighted at Windsor, 5th July, 
1681, who TO. 18th November, 1673, Doro- 
thy, daughter of Sir Godfrey Copley, bart. 
of Sprotborough, by Elizabeth, his second 
wife, daughter of William Stanhope, esq. 
of Linley, Notts, and had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. John, d. unm. 1700, aged twenty- 
three. 

III. Godfrey, b. in 1678, to. Anna- 
Maria, daughter of Giles Clarke, esq. 
of the Temple, and had, with other 
issue, who died unmarried, 

Godfrey, successor to his uncle. 

Anna-Maria, to. first, 21st Novem- 
ber, 1726, to the Rev. Edward 
Sylvester, and secondly, to Peter 
Bold, esq. of Bold Hall. 

IV. Michael, d. unm. in 1724. 

V. Thomas, of Horbury, who to. Mar- 
garet, daughter of — Webster, and 
relict first, of Francis Nevile, esq. 
of Chevet ; and secondly, of George 
Empson, of Gowle, and had an only 
son, 

William, of Horbury, who to. 
Catherine, daughter of Sir Lyon 
Pilkington, bart. and widow of 
the Rev. Cavendish Nevile, of 
Chevet, and died without sur- 
viving issue, in 1785. 

VI. George, ) i- , 

vil. James, I'^^'^^y''""^- 

VIII. Matthew, of Wakefield, b. 13th 
April, 1689, TO. in 1721, Anne, daugh- 
ter of James Sill, of Wakefield, and 
relict of John Nevile, esq. of Chevet, 
and died in 1749, leaving issue, 



WENT WORTH, OF WOOLLEY. 



93 



1. Peresjrine, of Tolston Loilgo, 
Hramham INloor, rrf;istr.ir of tlie 
West Riding-, b. 17'2'i, m. first, 
Mary, dan. of Bcilby Thompson, 
<'S(i. of Kscrirk, and secondly, 
Mary, eldist dant^litcr of Kalpli 
Aslitoii, esq. of Cuerdale, in 
Lancashire, widow of the Rev. 
John V\ itton, of Lupset Hall, 
hnt died x. p. in 180!>. 

2. Miciiael, of Little Harbour, near 
Portsmouth, m. Miss Went- 
worth, and d. in 1792, leaving 
issue. 

1. Dorothy, m. Peter Serle, esq. 
of Testwood, in Hants, and had 
issue. 

I. Elizabeth, b. in 1G77, m. in 1696, to 
William W ombuell, esq. of Womb- 
well. 

II. Dorothy. 

III. Frances, m. in 1716. to Thomas 
Hinchlitte, esq. of London. 

IV. Anne, m. first, in 1705, to Sir Lion 
Pilkington,bart. of Chevet; secondly, 
to Sir Charles Dalston, bart. of 
Heath Hall, and thirdly, in 17.J0, to 
John Maude, esq. of Alverthorpe 
Hall, (see vol. ii. p. 86) all in the 
county of York. 

V. Rosamond, died young-. 

VI. Catherine. 

VII. Margaret. 

Sir Michael died in 1696, and was s. by his 
eldest son, 

William Wentworth. esq. of Woolley, 
b. in 1675, who wedded Catherine, daughter 
of Charles Turner, esq. of Kirk Leatham, 
in Yorkshire, but dying s. p. at Bath, 3rd 
June, 1729, was s, by his nephew, 

Godfrey Wentworth, esq. of Woolley 
and Hickleton, who represented the city of 
York in parliament. He m. in 1727, his 
cousin, Dorothy, eldest surviving daughter 
of Sir Lion Pilkington, bart. and had issue, 

I. William, died unm. in 1746. 

II. Godfrey, died unm. in 1757. 

III. John, died in infancy. 

I. Anna-Maria, b. 9th June, 1736, m. 
in 1760, Sir George Armytage, bart. 
of Kirklees, M.P. and dying in 1788, 
left issue, 

George Armytage, who succeeded 
his father, and is the present 
baronet of Kirkless. 

John Armytage, who m. Anne, 
daughter of John Harvey Thurs- 



by, esq. of Abington Abbey, 
(see vol. i. p. 320). 
Godfrey - Wentworth Army- 
tage, successor to his maternal 

grandfather. 

Anna-Maria Armytage, m. to W"il- 

liam I'lgc-rton, esq. of Tatton. 
Henrietta Armytage, m. first, to 
James Grady, esq. of Harley- 
street, and secondly, to Jacob 
Bosanquet, esq. 
Charlotte Armytage, m. to tlio 
Venerable John Kyre, archdea- 
con of York. 
H. Dorothy, died in infancy. 
III. Catherine, d. unm. in 1821. 
Mr. Wentworth died I8th January, 1789, 
aged eighty-four, and was s. by (the third 
son of his eldest daughter), his grandson, 

Godfrey Wentworth ARMYTA(iE, esq. 
b. 9th May, 1778, who then became " of 
Woolley," and assumed the surname and 
arms of Wentworth. He m. in 1794, 
Amelia, daughter of Walter Ramsden 
Hawksworth, esq. of Hawksworth Hall, 
near Otley, who afterwards took the name 
of Fawkes, and had issue, 

I. Godfrey, his heir. 

II. John, b. in 1789, who m. Henrietta, 
daughter of Jacob Bosanquet, esq. 

III. William, b. in 1807. 

I. Amelia. 

II. Anna-Maria, d. young. 

III. Catluerine, 

IV. Frances, m. to — Clements, esq. 

V. Charlotte, m. 15th November, 1834, 
to William Arch Campbell, esq. of 
Wilton-place, Middlesex. 

VI. Dorothea. 

VII. Mary-Elizabeth. 

Mr. Wentworth represented Tregoney in 
parliament, was a magistrate and deputy- 
lieutenant for the West Riding of York- 
shire, and served the office of high-sheriff 
in 1796. He died in 1826, and was suc- 
ceeded by his eldest son, the present God- 
frey Wentworth, esq. of Woolley. 

Arms — Sa. a chev. between three leo- 
pards' heads or. 

Crest — A griffin passant. 

Estates — In the West Riding of the 
county of York, in the parish of Royston, 
comprising the separate townsliips of Wool- 
ley, which came info the family in 1559; 
and of Notion, Staircross, Cold Hiendley,' 
acquired subsequently. 

^S'frtf— Woolley Park, near W^akefield. 



94 



CURRER, OF CLIFTON HOUSE. 




CURRER, The Rev. DANSON - RICHARDSON, of Clifton House, in the 

county of York, b. 3rd April, 1784; m. 28th Novem- 
ber, 1815, Hannah, elder daughter of the late Sir 
William Foulis, bart. of Ingleby Manor, in Cleveland, 
and has issue, 

1. William. 
II. Richard-Roundell. 

III. John Richardson. 

IV. Henry-George. 
V. Charles-Savile. 

1. Mary- Anne. 
II. Eleanor-Hannah Richardson. 

This gentleman, whose patronymic is Roundell, as- 
sumed by sign manual, in 1801, upon the demise of his 
brother, the surname of Currer only, in pursuance of 
the testamentary injunction of his maternal grand-uncle, 
John Currer, esq. of Kildwick Hall. Mr. Currer is a 
master of arts, of Christchurch, Oxford, a magistrate 
for the three Ridings of the county of York, as well as 
for the liberty of St. Peter's, York, a deputy lieutenant 
for the W^est and East Ridings, and a commissioner of 
assessed taxes for the West and North Ridings. 



Hinraac. 



The CuRRERS liave been seated at Kild- 
vviek, in Y'orkshire, for nearly three cen- 
turies. 

Hugh Curkek, of KiUhvick, in Craven, 
in. Anne, dnugliter of — Knowles, of Riding, 
and had two sons, William Currer, of INIar- 
ley, who wedded Isabel, daugliter of Cliris- 
to'pher Maude, esq. of HoUing Hall, (see 
Yol. ii. page 85), and 

Henry Cirreu, of Kildwick, Avho m. 
Ann, daughter of Christoplier Wade, of 
Pluuitree Banks, and by her (who espoused, 
secondly, the Rev. Edward Horrocks), left 
at his decease, 19th August, 1568, four sons 
and nine daughters, viz. 

I. William, who removed to Stainton 
Cotes, in the parish of Gargrave, and 
died 22nd June, 20tii James I. 

II. High, of whom presently. 

III. Henry, who resided at Middleton, 
in the parish of Ilkley. 

IV. Christopher, who died young. 

I. Margaret, m. in 1576, to Hugh Bawd- 
wine. 

II. Agnes, m. in 1576, to William 
Bawd wine. 

III. Anne, m. in 1582, to Rev. Alexan- 
der Horrocks. 



IV. Isabel, m. in 1.583, to Jolui Enimot. 

V. Jane, m. in 1584, to Steplien Dixon. 

VI. Lucy, m. in 1584, to Miles Gill. 

VII. Sybella, m. in 1592, to Edmund 
Hirde. 

VII!. Mary, m. in 1593, to Edmund 

Bawdvvine. 
IX. Aenetta, m. in 1580, to Rowland 
Watson. 
The second son, 

HtUiH CruKER, esq. who purchased the 
manor of Kildwick, in Craven, wedded He- 
lena, daugliter of John Halstead, esq. of 
Rowley, in Lancashire, and had issue, 

I. Henry, his lieir. 

II. Hugh, who lived at Steeton, died iu 
1636, aged forty-eight. 

III. Christopher, h. in 1590, d. in 1611. 

IV. William,) twins, h. in 1592. The 

V. Samuel, ^ younger died an infant; 
the elder resided at Kildwick Grange, 
Craven. 

Hugh Currer d. in 1617, was buried at Kild- 
wick on 27th February, and succeeded by 
his son, 

Hknuy Ci'URER, esq. of Kildwick, bapt. 
4th June, 1587, who m. first, Athk-, daugh- 
(rr and sole heir of John llariioon, esq. of 



CURRER, OF CLIFTON HOUSE. 



93 



riasby, and had by lif r four sons and six 
dtiugliters, viz. 

I. Hugh, his heir. 

II. Henry, d. uiim. in London in lGo4. 

III. Jolin, of JJradley. 

IV. William, died yotiiip,- in \U24. 

I. Helena, m. to Roger Whaley, of 
Winterburn. 

II. Marv, m. to Tiioinas Hammond, of 
Thres'hfield Hall. 

III. Ann, ni. to William Watson, of 
Silsden Moor. 

IV. Sarah, ) . . i ., 7 

V. Susan, \ *"'"^' ^"^'' ''• >"""«• 

VI. Martha, wi. to Edmund Bawdwen, 
of Stone Gap, in the parish of Kiln- 
wick. 

Mr. Currer wedded, secondly, Eleanor, dau. 
of William Lowther, esq. of Ingleton, and 
widow of William Newhy, of Baruick., but 
had no issue. He d. 1st April, 1G53, and 
was s. by his son, 

Hugh Cukrf.r, esq. of Kildwick, b. in 
1608, who m. first, Blanch, daughter of Tho- 
mas Ferraiid, esq. of Carleton, by Blanch 
liis wife, daughter of Edmund Towneley, 
esq. of Royle, and had one son, Henry, 
%vho died an infant. He espoused, se- 
condly, Anne, daughter of Peter Haworth, 
esq. of Thurcroft, in the county of Lancas- 
ter, and widow of Robert Winckley, esq. 
of Winckley. By this lady, who d. in 1656", 
he had one son and five daughters, viz. 
I. Henry, his heir. 

I. Ann, m. first, to William Busfield, 
merchant, of Leeds ; and, secondly, 
to Robert Ferrand, esq. of Harden 
Grange. 

II. Eleanor, m. in 1685, to Richard En- 
twistle, esq. of Foxholes, in Lanca- 
shire. 

III. Grace, m. in 1674, to John Leche, 
esq. of Garden, in the county of Ches- 
ter (see vol. ii. p. 367). 

IV. Mary, m. in 1677, to the Rev. Ro- 
bert Pickering, rector of Eccleston, 
son of Robert Pickering, esq. of 
Thehvall. 

v. Elizabeth, m. in 1676, to Ellis Mere- 
dith, esq. of Pentrybychan, in Den- 
bighshire. 

Mr. Currer d. in 1690, and was s. by his son, 
Henry Currer, esq. of Kildwick, 6.25th 
July, 1651, who rn. first, Margaret, daughter 
of Abraham Fothergill, esq. of London, and 
by her, who d. in 1697, had issue, 
1. Haworth, his heir. 

I. Ann, VI. Benjamin Ferrand, esq. of 
St. Ives, and died s.p. 

II. Dorothy, b. in 1687, who m. Rich- 
ard Richardson, M.D. of Bierle\ . 



(see family of Richardson), and d. 
in 1763, leaving issue, 

1. Richard Richardson, esq. of 
Bierley, lord of the manor of 
Okenshaw and Cleck Heatoii, 
a magistrate and deputy lieu- 
tenant for the West Riding, h. 
in 1708, who married in 1750, 
Dorothy, only daughter and heir 
of William Smallshaw, esq. of 
JJolton in tlie Moors, by Mary 
his wife, daughter of John Star- 
kie, esq. of Huntro3de, but died 
s. p. in 1781. 

2. William Richardson, M. D. of 
]{ipon, b. in 1709, and d. unm. 
in 1783. 

3. Henry Ricliardson, A. M. rec- 
tor of Thornton, in Craven, b. 
in 1710, m. in 1747, Mary, dau. 
of Benjamin Dawson, esq. of 
Oldham, merchant, and died in 
1778, leaving two sons and two 
daughters, viz. 

Richard Richardson, esq. b. 
19th January, 1755, a cap- 
tain in Sir Thomas Egt-r- 
ton's regiment of royal Lan- 
cashire volunteers, d. unm. 
at Lisbon 24th May, 1782, 
whither he had gone for the 
recovery of his liealth, and 
was buried there. 
Henry Richardson, in holy 
orders, of whom liereafter 
as successor to liis uncle, 
John, in the Currer es- 
tates. 
Dorothy Richardson, of Gar- 
grave, 
Mary Richardson, b. in 1752, 
who »«. in 1775, the Rev. 
William Roundell, of Gled- 
stone, a magistrate and de- 
puty-lieutenant for the West 
Riding, and had issue, 
RicHARD- Henry Roun- 
dell, esq. novvof Gled- 
stone. (For an account 
of the Roundell family 
see vol. i. p. 342). 
William-Hartley Roun- 
dell, of whom pre- 
sently as successor to 
his grand-uncle. 
Danson - Richardson 
Roundell, in holy or- 
ders, successor to his 
brother William, and 
present proprietor. 
Henry-Dawson Roundell, 
b. in 1785, M.A. rector 
of Fringford, Oxoii. 
Sa vile-Richardson Roun- 
dell. 



96 



CURRER, OF CLIFTON HOUSE. 



Septimus -Warde Roun- 
dell. 

Eleanor Roundell. 

Mary-Anne Roundell. 

Dorothea - Richardson 
Roundell, m. to Rev. 
William J. Palmer, 
M. A. rector of Mix- 
bury, Oxon. 

4. John Richardson, of whom 
presently as successor to his cou- 
sin, Sarah Currer. 

5. Thomas Richardson, h. in 1724, 
d. unm. in 1763. 

1. Dorothy Richardson, h. in 1712, 
m. in 1730, Sir John-Lister Kaye, 
bart. of Denby Grange, in the 
county of York, and d. in 1772, 
leaving issue. 

2. Margaret Richardson, d. unm. 
in 17f)4. 

HI. Elizabeth, d. unm. in 1704. 

IV. Margaret, d. unm. at York. 

V. Henrietta-Maria, also d. unm. 

Henry Currer, of Kildwick, wedded, se- 
condly, Mary, daughter of Edmund Watson, 
esq. of East Hage, in the county of York, 
and widow of Thomas Yarborough, esq. of 
Campsall, but had no issue. He died 
19th January, 1723, and lies interred at 
Kildwick. " He was," says his monumen- 
tal inscription, " a great proficient in the 
study of the law ; but, allured by the charms 
of a private life, retired to the place of his 
birth, where he chose rather to employ the 
skill he had acquired therein to the benefit 
of his country, in the dispensation of justice 
on the bench, than to the improvement of 
his own fortune, in attendance at the bar. 
He excelled in all the relations of life, in 
discharging the several obligations of a 
loving husband and aS'ectionate father, of a 
sincere friend and obliging neighbour, ten- 
derly, discreetljf, faithfully, and conscien- 
tiously." He was s. by his only son, 

Haworth Currer, esq. of Kildwick, h. 
26th January, 1690, who m. .5th July, 1722, 
Sarah, fourth daughter of Tobias Harvey, 
esq. of Womersley, and by her, who died 
in 1766, had one son and one daughter, 
Henry and Sarah. He d. 13th April, 1744, 
and was s. by his son, 

Henry Currer, esq. of Kildwick, h. in 
1728, who espoused, in 1756, Mary, daugh- 
ter and co-heir of Richardson Ferrand, esq. 
of Harden, hni d. s.p. on the 10th March, 
in tlie same year, and was buried at Kild- 
wick, where a monument is erected to his 
memor5\ His widow vi. secondly, Peter 
Rell, esq. second son of Ralph Bell, esq. of 



Thirsk. Mr. Currer was succeeded in his 
estates by his sister, 

Sakah Currer, of Kildwick, h. in 1729, 
who d. unm. at Widcombe, near Bath, in ' 
17,o9, and was interred in the abbey church 
in that city, where her monument still re- 
mains. She was succeeded by (the fourth 
son of her aunt, Dorothy Currer, by her hus- 
band, Richard Richardson, esq. of Bierley), 
her first cousin, 

John Richardson, esq. a magistrate and 
deputy-lieutenant for the West Riding, who 
tiien became " of Kildwick," and assumed 
the surname and arms of Currer. He d. 
unmarried, 22nd June, 1784, and was s. by 
his nephew. 

The Rev. Henry Richardson, A.M. b. 
9th December, 1758, rector of Thornton, in 
Craven, who assumed a short time before his 
death, on inheriting the Kildwick estates, 
the surname and arms of Currer. He m, 
at Gargrave, in 1783, Margaret-Clive, only 
daughter of Matthew Wilson, esq. of Esh- 
ton, by Frances his wife, daughter of Richard 
Clive, esq. of Stych, in Shropshire, and by 
her (who wedded, secondly , her cousin, Mat- 
thew Wilson, esq. second son of the Rev. 
Henry Wilson), had an only daughter and 
heiress, 

Frances-Mary. 
Mr. Richardson Currer d. 10th November, 
1784, when the acquired estates of his uncle 
and predecessor, John Currer, esq. passed 
under the will of that gentleman to (the son 
of his the Rev. Mr. Richardson Currer's 
sister Mary) his nephew, 

William-Hartley Roundell, esq. h. in 
1780, who assumed in consequence the sur- 
name and arms of Currer. This gentleman 
died unmarried, 12th February, 1801, and 
was s. by his brother, the Rev. Danson- 
Richardson Roundell, who, having changed 
his name for tliat of Currer, is the present 
Rev. Danson-Richardson Currer, of Clif- 
ton House. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, erm. 
three bars gemelles sa. on a chief az. a lion 
passant guardant arg. for Currer ; second 
and third, or, a fesse gu. between three 
laurel branches ppr. for Roundell. 

Crests — First, a lion's head erased arg. 
collared sa. pierced arg. for Currer ; se- 
cond, a short sword in pale arg. hilt and 
pommel or, gripe gu. 

Motto — Merere. 

Estates — In the parish of Kildwick, Gis- 
burn, and Kirkby Malzeard, in the West 
Riding, and Pickering, in the North Riding 
of Yorkshire. 

Seat — Clifton House, North Riding of 
Yorkshire. 



97 



LUCY, OF CHARLECOTE. 



LUCY, GEORGE, esq. of Charlecote, in the county of Warwick, h. 8th June, 

1789, m. 2n(l Decomhor, 1823, Mary-Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Sir John Williams, hart, of Bodelwydden, in 
Flintshire, and has issue, 

WiLLiAM-FuLK, b. 10th September, 1824. 
Henry-Spenser, b. 28th November, 1830. 

Mary-Emily, b. 2nd February, 1826. 
Caroline, b. 13th January, 1828. 

Mr. Lucy succeeded his father on the 12th January, 
1823. He was M.P. for the borough of Fowey, Corn- 
wall, from 1820 to 1830, and sheriff of the county of 
Warwick in 1831. 



Umeage. 




Thurstane de Charlecote, supposed to 
have been a younger son of Thurstane de 
Montfort,* of Beldesert, in the county of 
Warwick, tetnp. Richard I. was father of 

Sir Walter de Charlecote, upon whom 
Henry de Montfort conferred the villap^e of 
Charlecote, and the grant was confirmed by 
Richard I. who added divers immunities 
and privileges, which were all ratified by 
Kinff John in the fifth year of that monarch's 
reign (1203). Sir Walter left a son, 

Sir William de Lucy, the first of the 
Charlecotes who bore that surname, and 
Sir William Dugdale surmises that he did 
so because his mother mi(/ht have been the 
heir of some branch of the great baronial 
family of Lucy, which had derived its de- 
siguation from a place in Normandy. Of 
tliis house was Henry de Lucy, governor 
of Palais, so distinguished during the con- 
flict between A"m</ Stephen and the Empress 
Maud, who was afterwards, in the time of 
Henry II. justiciary of England; and at 
one period, in the temporary absence of 
the king beyond sea, lieutenant of the king- 
dom. 

Sir William de Lucy had a confirmation 
of the lordship of Charlecote from Thurston 
de Montfort, son and successor of the Thur- 
stane de Montfort above specified. He took 
up arms with the barons against Kinr/ John, 



* For the Momforts see Burke's Extinct and 
Dormant Peerage. 



when his lands were all seized by the 
crown ; but returning to his allegiance, he 
had a full restoration in the first year of the 
ensuing monarch. In the 20th of Henry 
III. Sir William had the custody of the 
counties of Warwick and Leicester, with 
the castle of Kenilworth. He married, 
first, Isabel, daughter of Absalom de Alder- 
monstone ; and secondly, Maud, sister and 
one of the co-heirs of John Cotele. He 
founded the monastery of Thelesford, and 
dying about the 32nd Henry III. (1247) 
was succeeded by the son of his second 
marriage. 

Sir William Lucy, knt. of Charlecote, 
who wedded Amicia, daughter and heiress 
ofW^illiam de Furches, and heiress like- 
wise of William Fitz-Warine, bywhom he 
had a son and heir, 

FouK DE Lucy, of Charlecote (in the im- 
mediate retinue of the celebrated Peter de 
Montfort), who, after the battle of Lewes, 
temp. Henry III. was constituted one of the 
nine governors of the kingdom. De Lucy 
acquired so much reputation by his gallan- 
try in the Baron's war, that being indebted 
to one Elyas de Blund, a Jew, of London, 
in a large amount, he obtained a special 
mandate,dated49thHENRY 111.(1264) and di- 
rected to the commissioners in whose hands 
the estates of the Jews then seized upon 
were entrusted, to deliver up to him all his 
bonds, and to cancel the debt. Subse- 
quently, however, the royal cause having 
attained the ascendancy by the victorious 
arms of Prince Edward, De Lucy and his 
H 



98 



LUCY, OF CHARLECOTE. 



associates wore glad to coniproniise for their 
estates under the Dicluni de KenUnorlli. 
" This Fouk," says Dundale, " was a spe- 
cial lover of good iiorscs, as it would seem, 
for in the lllh of Edwaud I. he gave forty 
marks to two Londoners tliat were merchants 
of horses, for a black cliarger, about which 
time a fat o\ Was sold for sixteen shillings." 
He died in the 31st of Edwaud L (1302) and 
was s. by his son. 

Sir William Lucy, of Charlecote, a 
person of celelirity in his generation, and re- 
presentative in several ])arlianients for tlu; 
county of Warwick. He was succeeded by 
his son, 

Sir William Lt'CY, of Charlecote, who 
received a military summons in the IJith of 
Edward IH. to attend the king into France, 
but being then joined in commission with 
the sheriff to array one hundred and sixty 
archers in Warwickshire for the king's ser- 
vice, his attendance was dispensed with, 
and he was thereby deprived of sharing in 
the glory of Cressy. He died in three 
years afterwards (22nd Edward III. 1348) 
and was *. by his son, 

Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, who was s. 
at his decease by his son, 

Sir William Lucy, of Charlecote, who 
being a knight was retained in the 5th 
Richard II. (1381) to serve John of Gaunt, 
Duke of Lancaster and King of Castile, 
for life, with one esquire, in times of war 
and peace. In the first year of the next 
king he represented the county of Warwick 
in parliament. His son and successor. 

Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, was 
also in the retinue of John of Gaunt. In 
the 7th of Henry IV. (1405) he was mem- 
ber of parliament for Warwickshire, and 
the next year sheriff for the counties of 
Warwick and Leicester. He wedded Alice, 
daughter, and eventually heiress, of Sir 
William Hugford, and acquired by that lady 
a fair inheritance in tlie counties of Jiedford 
and Salop. He died 28th July, 3rd Henry 
V. (1415), leaving by the siiid Alice (who 
married, in eight weeks after his decease, 
Richard Archer, of Tamworth) a son and 
successor, 

William Lucy, of Charlecote, who dur- 
ing his minority was in ward to John Bo- 
teler, of Warrington. Upon the decease of 
Elizabeth Lady Clinton, in the 2nd of 
Henry VI. (1423) lie was found to be her 
cousin and next heir. In the war of the 
Roses, William Lucy arrayed liimself under 
the banner of the house of York. He 
wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Reginald, 
Lord Grey de Rtithyn, and dying in tlic 
6tli Edward IV. (1466) was succeeded by 
liis son, 



Sir William Lucy, of Charlecote, cre- 
ated a knight of the Bath at the coronation 
of Henry the Seventh's queen. He es- 
poused, first, Margaret, daughter of John 
Brecknock, treasurer to Kinc/ Henry VI. ; 
and secondly, Alice, daughter of William 
Hanbury. He died in 1492, and was suc- 
ceeded by his eldest son by his first wife, 

Edmund Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, born 
in 14G4, who appears to have been a soldier 
of high repute in the reign of Henry VII. 
for we find him in command of a division 
of the royal army at the battle of Stoke, 
and afterwards retained to serve the king 
in his French wars, with two men at arms. 
He was summoned, 10th Henry VII. (1494), 
with other persons of rank, to attend at 
the creation of the king's son, the Duke 
of York, to be made a knight of the Bath ; 
but it seems he did not appear, for in the 
April following (1495) 11th Henry VII. 
his testament bears date, and in that he 
is styled esquire. He Avedded Elizabeth, 
daughter and heiress of Walter Tramsing- 
ton, by whom he had no issue ; and se- 
condly, Jane, daughter of Richard Ludlow, 
and was succeeded at his decease (the pro- 
bate of his testament being 19th May, 1498, 
14th Henry VII.) by his eldest son. 

Sir Thomas Lucy, knt. of Charlecote, 
one of the servers to King Henry VIII. 
who wedded Elizabeth, relict of George 
Catesby, esq. of Ashby-Legers, in the 
county of Northampton, and daughter of 
Sir Richard Empson, knt. by whom he 
had issue, 

William, his heir. 

Thomas, upon whom his father settled 
the manor of Cleybrooke, in Lei- 
cestershire. 

Edmund, who inherited the manors of 
Beckering and Sharpenho. 

Anne, m. to Thomas Herbert, esq. 
Radignnd, »«. to — Betts, esq. 
Barbara, m. to Richard Tracy, esq. of 
Stanwa}% in Gloucestershire. 

Sir Thomas Lucy died in 1525, and was s. 
by his eldest son, 

William Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, who m. 
Anne, daughter of Richard Fermer, esq. of 
East Neston, in Northamptonshire, and was 
succeeded, in the 5th of Edward VI. 1551, 
by his eldest son, 

Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, who, 
in the 1st of Queen Elizabeth, rebuilt the 
manor-house with brick, as it now stands. 
He was knighted a few years afterwards, 
and he subsequently represented the county 
of Warwick in parliament. His remark- 
able prosecution of Shakspeare, for deer- 
stealing, in Fulbroke-park, has attached. 



LUCY, OF CHARLECOTE. 



99 



however, more celebrity to liis name flian 
any of the honours whieli he liad enjoyed. 
Tliis prosecution was conducted with mucii 
bitterness, in coiiseciueiiee of a lampoon, 
written by the ])oet on Sir Tiionias, wlio 
at len<;th compelled him, about the year 
l.'iH.'i-O, to (ly from bis native place, Tiie 
great dramatist subsequently avenged liim- 
self, by delineating liis prosecutor under 
the character of .JisriCK Si.f.ndf.k. Sir 
Thomas Lucy wedded .loice, daughter and 
heiress of TJiomas Acton, esq. of Sutton, 
in Worcestershire, and had a daughter, 
Anne, married to Sir Edward Aston, knt. of 
Tixhall, and dying in 1600, was s. by his 
only son, 

SiK Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, who 
wedded, first, Dorothy, daughter of Nicho- 
las Arnold, esq. by whom he liad a son, 
Thomas, who died young ; and a daughter, 
Joyce, the wife of Sir William Cook, knt. 
of Highnam. Sir Thomas m. secondly, Con- 
stance, daughter and heir of Sir Richard 
Kingsmill, of High Clere, Hants, and had 
by that lady six sons and several daughters, 
viz. 

I. Thomas, his heir. 
n. Richard, who received the honour 
of knighthood 8th January, 1617, and 
was created a baronet 11th March 
following. He m. first, Elizabeth, 
daughter and co-heiress of Sir Henry 
Cock, of Broxburn, in Herts, and 
relict of the Hon. Robert West, by 
whom he had (with a daughter, Con- 
stantia, jn. to Henry, Lord Colerain) 
an only son and successor, 

Sir Kingsmill Lucy, second ba- 
ronet of Facombe, in Hamp- 
shire, who JH. Lady Theopliila 
Berkeley, and left a son and two 
daughters, viz. 

1. Berkeley (Sir), third ba- 
ronet, who wedded Cathe- 
rine, daughter of Charles 
Cotton, esq. of Beresford, 
and left at his decease an 
only daughter and heiress, 

Mary, m. to the Hon. 
Charles Compton. 
Sir Berkeley, dying with- 
out male issue, the ba- 
ronetcy EXPIRED at his 
decease. 

2. Theophila, married to Sir 
William Ingoldsby, bart. 

3. Mary, d. unm. 

III. George, slain in France. 

IV. William, in holy orders, D. D. 
rector of Burgh-Clere and High- 
Clere, in Hampshire, m. Martha, 
daughter of William Angell, of Lon- 
don, esq. Dr. Lucy was an eminent 
divine, and a staunch supporter of 



the royal cause. Having suffered 
great persecution, he survived to 
witness the restoration of the mo- 
narchy, and was consecrated bishop 
of St. David's in 1660, wherein he 
continued until his decease. " He 
was a person," says Wood, in the 
At/ience Oxoinenscs, "of signal can- 
dour and virtues requisite in a cler- 
gyman, which in the very worst of 
times gained him great esteem from 
the very enemies of his cause and 
faction." His lordsliip d. 4th Oc- 
tober, 1677, and was buried in the 
collegiate cburch of Brecknock, in 
Wales, He was grandfather of 
William Lucy, esq. of Castle Carey, 
in Somersetshire, and of George 
Lucy, esq. of Pembroke. 

V. Robert, died in France, 1615, s. p. 

VI. Francis, of the city of Westminster, 
living 1682, married and had a son, 

Richard, who m. Rebecca, daugh- 
ter and heiress of Thomas Chap- 
man, esq. of Wormley, and re- 
lict of Sir Thomas Playters. 

I. Elizabeth, first wife of Sir An- 
thony Hungerford, of Down-Amp- 
ney, county of Gloucester. 

II. Anne. 
Ml. Bridget. 

Sir Thomas Lucy died in 1605, and lies 
buried in a chapel on the north side of the 
church of Charlecote, where a splendid mo- 
nument has been erected to his memory by- 
Dame Constance, his widow. He was s. 
by his eldest son, 

Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, mem- 
ber for Warwickshire in six successive 
parliaments, who espoused Alice, daughter 
and heiress of Thomas Spencer, esq. of Cla- 
verden, in Warwickshire, and had issue, 

Spencer, ') 

Robert, > successively of Charlecote. 

Richard, J 

Thomas. 

William. 

FouLK (Sir), m. Isabella, daughter and 

sole heiress of John Davenport, esq. 

of Henbury, in Cheshire, and had 

with other issue, 

Davenport, who eventually inhe- 
rited Charlecote. 

George, ) who both became of 

William, S Charlecote. 

Fulke, m. to Elizabeth Mason, of 
London, and was father of Tho- 
mas Lucy, who succeeded his 
uncle, the Rev. William Lucy, 
D.D. at Charlecote in February, 
172.3-4, and of George Lucy, 
who inherited from his brother. 



100 



LUCY, OF CHARLECOTE. 



Lucy. m. to the T\ev. John Hani- 

iwond. Tlie grandson of tliis 

lady. 

The Rev. Jon\ Hammond, 

occurs in the sequel as 

eventual inheritor of Ch a r- 

LF.coTE and the estates of 

the Luc}' family. 

Constance, m. first, to Sir William 
Spencer, bart. ; and secondly, to Sir 
Edward Smith. 

Margaret, d. unm. 

Bridget, m. to Sir Bryan Brougli- 

ton. 
Alice, m. to Sir William Undcrhill. 
Mary, m. to Sir Matthew Herbert. 
Elizabeth, m. to Sir John Walcot. 

Sir Thomas Lucy d. in December, 1640, and 
his virtues are set forth in a Latin inscrip- 
tion upon a noble and curious monument at 
r.harlecote. Of Sir Tliomas it was said, 
that " liis tables were ever open to the 
learned, and his gates never fast to the poor." 
He was s. by his eldest son, 

Spencer Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, a co- 
lonel in the royal army. This gentleman 
took the degree of doctor of physic at Ox- 
ford in 1643. He married Mary, daughter 
of Henry Brett, of Down Hatherley, in the 
county of Gloucester, but dying without 
issue in 1648, the estates devolved upon his 
brother, 

Robert Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, who 
wedded Margaret, daughter of Thomas 
S))encer, esq. of Upton, by whom (w^ho m. 
after his decease, Thomas, Lord Arundel, of 
Wardour) he had an only daughter, Brid- 
get, m. to William, Viscount Molyneux. 
He died in 1658, without male issue, and 
was *. by his next brother, 

Richard Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, who 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Urry, 
esq. of Thorley, in the Isle of Wight, by 
whom he had Thomas, his son and heir, and 
Richard, who died young; with a daughter, 
Constance, the wife of Sir John Burgoyne, 
bart. of Sutton. He died in 1677, and was 
succeeded by 

Thomas Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, who 
wedded Catherine, daughter of Robert 
Wheatley, esq. of Brcckuol, in Bucks, by 
whom (who m. after his decease, George, 
Duke of Northumberland) he had an only- 
daughter, Elizabeth, vi. to Clement Throg- 
raorton, esq. of Haseley. This Thomas d. 
in lGd4, leaving no male issue, and was s. 
by (the eldest sou of Sir Fulk Lucy, sixth 



son of the last Sir Thomas Lucy aforesaid 
and Isabella Davenport) his first cousin, 

Davenport Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, at 
whose decease, unm. in 1690, the estates de- 
volved upon his brother, 

Georcr Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, who 
wedded, first, Mary, daughter and heiress of 
John Broun, esq. of Finham, and secondly, 
Jane, daughter and co-heir of George 
Broun, esq. of Coundon. He d. s. p. in 
1721, and was *. by his brother, 

The Rev. William Lucy, D. D. of 
Charlecote, who ?n. Frances, eldest daugli- 
ter of Henry Balguy, esq. of Hope, in the 
county of Derby, but had no issue. He 
was rector of Hampton Lucy, and a pre- 
bendary of the cathedral church of Wells, 
and dying in February, 1723-4, was s. by 
(the elder son of his brother Fulke, by his 
wife, Elizabeth Mason, of London,) his 
nephew, 

Thomas Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, who 
died unmarried 26th December, 1744, and 
was s. by his only brother, 

George Lucy, esq. of Charlecote, who 
was sheriff of the county of Warwick in 
1769. This gentleman died unmarried 1st 
December, 1786, and was s. by his kinsman. 

The Rev. John Hammond, being de- 
scribed, in his predecessor's will, as the 
next person in remainder, to whom stood 
limited after his decease, without issue male, 
the family estates, and grandson of the Rev. 
John Hammond and Alice Lucy, second 
daughter of Sir Fulke Lucy and Isabella 
Davenport. He assumed the surname 
and arms of Lucy only, by sign manual, 
dated 9th February, 1787. He m. in May, 
1788, Maria, daughter of John Lane, esq. 
of Bentley Hall, in the county of Stafford, 
and d. 12th January, 1823, leaving issue two 
sons, namely, John (the younger), in holy 
orders, b. 19th August, 1790, and his heir, 
the present George Lucy, esq. of Charle- 
cote. 

Arms — Gules, three luces or pikes, hau- 
riant, between nine cross crosslets, arg. 

Crest — In a ducal coronet gules a boar's 
head couped ermine between two wings 
displayed, tusked and crined or, tongue of 
the first. 

Motto — With truth and diligence. 

Estates — In Warwickshire, held since the 
Conquest ; in the counties of Gloucester and 
Cornwall, acquired by purchase. 

Seat — Charlecote, in Warwickshire. 



101 




IRWIN, OF TAN HAGUE. 

IRWIN, JOHN, esq. of Taniagoe, in the county of Sligo, colonel of the Sligo 
militia, b. Ivth April, 1770. 

Colonel Irwin is in the commission of the peace since 1793, was formerly a gover- 
nor of the county, and served the office of hijjh sheriff in 1822. 

ber, of the 4th Horse, and had one 
soil and a dauj;litcr. 
Margaret, who ///. IJobcrt Browne, esq. 
of Portland, in the county of Sligo. 
Col. Irwin died in 1752, and was s. by his 
son, 

Liiwis-FuANCis Ikwin, esq. of Tanragoe, 
b. in 1728, who m. in 176(5, Elizabeth, only 
sister of the late John Harrison, esq. of 
Norton Place, in the county of Lincoln, and 
by her, who died in lbl5, aged eighty-two, 
had issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Crinus, in holy orders, archdeacon 
of Ossory, who m. in 1807, Amy, 
eldest daughter of the late Mr. 
Justice Chamberlain, judge of the 
King's Bench, in Ireland, and has, 
with four daughters, two sons, 

1. John-Lewis. 

2. Lewis-Chamberlain. 

I. Elizabeth, w. to Robert Jones, esq. of 
Portland, in the county of Sligo, and 
died in 1822, leaving two sons, Ro- 
bert Jones, and Lewis George Jones, 
and seven daughters. 

II. Margaret, m. the late Rev. Shuck- 
burgh Upton, of the Templeton 
family, and has two sons and one 
daughter, namely, 

1. Lewis Upton. 

2. Arthur Upton. 
1. Elizabeth Upton, vi. to The- 

ophilus Lucas Clements, esq. of 
Rakenny, in the county of 
Cavan. 

III. Beatrice -Susanna, m. to Benjamin 
Agar, esq. of Brockfield, in the county 
of York, and has issue, 

1. John Agar. 

2. Benjamin Agar. 
1. Elizabeth Agar. 

. Irwin died in 1785. and was s. bv his 



The Irwins of Tanragoe have maintained 
a position of great respectability amongst the 
gentry of the county of Sligo, since their 
settlement in Ireland^ but from which branch 
of the Scottish Irvines or Trvings, they de- 
scend has not been ascertained. The pe(;u- 
liar name ofCritius, borne by members of the 
family, is traditionally derived from Krynin 
Abi'thna?, the second husband of the mother 
of Duncan, king of Scotland, to whom and 
his descendants that monarch granted the 
privilege of bearing the thistle as a crest. 

John Irwin, esq. who wedded a daughter 
of Colonel Lewis Jones, of Arduaglass, held 
a command in the parliamentary army, in 
which his father-in-law also served, and ac- 
companying Cromwell into Ireland, settled 
in the county of Sligo. He was father of 

Alexander Irwin, esq. of the county of 
Sligo, who married the sister of — Grilfith, 
esq. of Ballincar, and aunt of Colonel 
Griffith, father of Anne, countess of Har- 
rington, and of Lady Rich. By this lady 
Mr. Irwin had six sons, who all died with- 
out issue, excepting the eldest, 

John Irwin, esq. of Tanragoe, born in 
1680, a colonel in the army. He m. first, 
Lady Mary Dilkes, widow of — Dilkes, 
esq. of the county of Cork, but had no issue ; 
and secondly, SusannaCadden, of an ancient 
Cavan family, by whom he had one son and 
two daughters, viz. 

Lewis-Francis, his heir. 

Letitia, m. to Captain Thomas Web- 



Mr 

elder son, the present Col. Irwin, of Tan- 
ragoe. 

Arms — Arg. three holly leaves ppr. 
Crest — A hand issuing out of a cloud, 
grasping a branch of thistle, ppr. 
3iotto — Nemo me impune lacessit. 
Estates — In the county of Sligo. 
Seat — Tanragoe, Collooney. 



102 



MOORE, OF CORSWALL. 



MOORE-CARRICK, JAMES, esq. of Corswall, in the county of Wigton, h. at 

Glasgow 20th December, 1762; m. 31st December, 
1798, Harriet, only daughter of John Henderson, esq. 
and has issue, 

Johx-Carrick, h. 13th February, 1805; m. in 1835. 
GraJiam Francis, b. 18th September, 1807. 

Harriet-Jane. 

Louisa. 

Julia. 

This gentleman, who succeeded to the representation 
of his family, upon the demise of his brother, the gal- 
lant and lamented Sir John Moore, assumed the addi- 
tional surname of Carrick, in compliance with the 
testamentary injunction of his relative, Robert Car- 
rick, late a banker at Glasgow, who bequeathed to him 
estates in the counties of Wigton, Kirkcudbright, and 
Ayr. 




Hmeagf. 



This family claims to be descended from 
the Moores, or Mures, of Rowallan, but 
traditionalone confirms the assumption. 

Charles Moore, esq. a captain in the 
array, who served in the wars of William 
III. espoused Miss Hay, of the family of 
the earls of Kinnoul, and was father of 

The Rev. Charles Moore, minister of 
Stirling, who m. Marion, daughter of John 
Anderson, esq. of Dovehill, an old and res- 
pected family, and was s. by his only sur- 
viving son, 

John Moore, M.D. of Dovehill, who 
was born at Stirling in 1730. This eminent 
person maintained for many years a distin- 
guished place in the literary world, and his 
works have been universally read and ad- 
mired. The principal are " Zelcco," " Ed- 
ward," and " Mordaunt." Dr. Moore wed- 
ded Jane, youngest daughter of the Rev. 
John Simson,* professor of divinity in the 
university of Glasgow, and had issue, 
I. John (Sir), his heir. 



* Professor Simson's half sister, (the daughter 
of his father by a former marriage), Agnes Sim- 
eon, m. John Simson, of Kirktownhall, and had 
seventeen sons, six of whom only attained man- 
hood, viz. 

I. Robert Simson, M.D. the celebrated pro- 
fessor of mathematics in the university of 
Glasgow, who died in 1768 unmarried. 

II. Patrick Simson, in holy orders, minister 



II. James, present representative of the 
family. 

III. Graham (Sir), K.C.B. vice admiral 
in the royal navy. 

IV. Charles, of Lincoln's Inn, barrister- 
at-law, died unm. 

V. Francis, formerly under secretary of 
war. 

1. Jane. 

Dr. Moore was s. at his decease by his eldest 
son, the celebrated 

Sir John Moore, born at Glasgow, 13tb 
November, 1761. This gallant officer em- 
braced from his youth the profession of 
arms, with the feelings and sentiments of 
a soldier ; he felt that a perfect knowledge 
and an exact performance of the humble 
but important duties of a subaltern are the 
best foundations for subsequent military 
fame, and his ardent mind, while it looked 
forward to those brilliant achievements, for 
which it was formed, applied itself with 



of the gospel at Coventry, who left a 
daughter, Anne, m. to her cousin, Dr. 
Robert Simson. 
III. Thomas Simson, M. D. professor of me- 
dicine in the college of St. Andrews, who 
m. the daughter of Sir John Preston, of 
Preston Hall, and had four sons and two 
daughters, viz. 

1. John, who d. unm. 



MOORE, OF COIISWALL. 



103 



energy and exemplary assiduity to the duties 
of tliat station. Ilavinp,' risen to eoniniinul, 
he early si;;iiali/.('d liis name in the W Cst 
Indies, in Holland, and in l<'<;\|)t. Tlic 
nnrernittinp,' attention, with which lie devoted 
himself to the duties of every branch of his 
l)rofession, obtained him the confidence, and 
lie beeanie the eompanion in arms of that 
illustrious oilicer, Sir lialph Aberciomby, 
who fell at the head of his victorious troojis 
in an action which maintained our national 
superiority over the arms of France. In that 
engagement General Moore was wounded, 
when leading- on the reserve with his usual 
gallantry ; and on his return his majesty 
conferred upon him the honour of knight- 
hood, and the order of the IJatli. flis sub- 
sequent career, the battle of C'orunna, and 
the death of the gallant commander, in the 
arms of victory, are too well known to re- 
quire more than the bare mention here." 
" Like the immortal Wolfe," says Sir John 
Hope, in his dispatch to government, " he 
was snatched from hia country at an early 
period of a life spent in her service ; like 
Wolfe, his last moments were gilded by the 
prospect of success, and cheered by the 
acclamations of victory ; like Wolfe, also 
his memory will for ever remain sacred in 
that country which he sincerely loved, and 
which he had so fiiithfully served." The 
interment of Sir John Moore took place 
early on the morning succeeding his death. 
A grave only three feet deep was dug by 
his officers on the bastion of Corunna, and 
there were deposited, uncoffined, the mortal 



2. Robert, a physician at Coventry, -who 
m. liis cousin, Anne, daughter of tlie 
Rev. Patrick Simson, and had three 
sons : Robert, in holy orders ; Tho- 
mas, of Coventry ; Patrick, of Fil- 
longley ; and two daug;hters, Agnes, 
m. to the Rev. Rlr. Hewet, rector of 
Fillongley, and Preston, d. unm. 

3. Patrick, a clergyman in the church 
of Scotland, d. unm. 

4. James, I\I.D. professor of medicine 
at St. Andrews, d, unm. 

1. Agnes, VI. to Professor Wilson, and 
has, with other issue, a daughter, m. 
to the Right Hon. Francis JeH'ery, 
one of the lords of session, under the 
title of Lord Jeifery. 

2. Preston, m, to Professor Craigie, of 
St. Andrews. 

IV. John Simson, who m. Agnes, second 
daughter of John Prentice, merchant in 
Glasgow, and was father of John Simson, 
esq. of Hill, in Dumbartonshire. 

V. Matthew Simson, a merchant in Glasgow, 
whose line is »xtinct. 

Ti. William Simson, d. unm. 



remains of the lamented hero.* In the 
cathedral church of St. I'aul, however, a 
grateful nation has reared a monument to 
his memory- Sir .[idiii, who at the jir-riod 
ol hie decease in IbOii, was commander in 
chief of the British forces in Spain, a lieu- 
tenant-general in the army, and colonel of 
the iViiid regiment of foot, being unmarried, 
was succeeded in the representation of the 
family by his next brother, the present 
Jamks Cakrick-Mooke, esq. of Corswall. 

Ai-ms — Arg. on a fesse az. three mullets 
pierced of the field, within a bordure, in- 
vected gu. 

Crest — A moor's head in profile, couped 
at the shoulders, ppr. 

3Iutto — Duris non pangor. 

Estates — In the counties of Wigton, Kirk- 
cudbright, and Ayr. 

Seat — Corswall, Wigtonshire, North Bri- 
tain. 

* Epitaph on Sir John Moore, by the Rev. Dr. 
Parr, inscribed on a marble monument erected at 
Corunna. 

H. S. E. 

Johannes Moore, 

Allectus in ecjuestrem ordinem Balnei 

A Georgio tertio Britanniarum rege j 

Ortu Scotus, 

Impei-ator foitis idemque innocens, 

Et rei militaris peritissimus 

Scientia et usu : 

Qui 

In Batavia, Corsica, JT-gypto, India Occidentali, 

Hostes fugatos vidit ; 

Hispanorum tetra et detestabili tyranide oppres- 

sorum 

Jura leges aras et focos, 

Summo quo potuit studio tutatus est ; 

¥a post varies belli casus 
Cum ad Corunnam ivgre accessisset 

]\Iilites sues, 

Longo itinere, fame, frigore enectos, 

Ad subeundam priplii dimicationem 

Hortando erexit, 

Audeiido confirmavit ; 

Et Gallis numero copiarum fretis 

Et felicitate duels prene perpetua superbientibus 

Victoriam e manibus eripuit, 

Legioni (luadragesimse secundaj, 

Societate periculorum diu secum conjunctissas 

Et memori rerum in /Egypto prospere gestarum, 

De virtute digna commilitionibus suis 

Gratulatus est ; 

Et vulnere pro patria sociisque ejus accepto 

Vitam, uti multum et sxpe optaverat. 

Bene consummavit 
XVII Kal. Februar. Anno Sacro mdcccix. 



Georgios, Georgii Tertii filius, 

Brittaniarum regnum unitum regens, 

Etqui Regis Majestati a sanctoribus consiliis sunt. 

Hoc monumentum 

Ponemdura curaverunt. 

Anno Sacro 

WDCCCXllU. 



i04 



MASSINGBERD, OF GUNBY. 

MASSINGBERD, PEREGRINE, esq. of Gunby, in the county of Lincoln, b. 29th 

January, 1780; vi. 18th Aug-ust, 1802, Elizabeth-Mary- 
Anne, daughter and heiress of Henry Massingberd, esq. 
and has had issue, 

Henry-Langton, h. 29th May, 1803 ; d. in 1810. 

Algernon Langton, b. 23rd May, 1804; m. Caroline- 
Georgina, daughter of W illiam Pearce, esq. residing 
at Weasenham, in Norfolk, and has one child, 
Algernon, b. in September, 1828. 

Sarauel-Langton, b. in 1805; d. in 1814, 

Bennet-Langton, b. in 1813 ; d. in 1814. 

Charles-Langton, b. 23rd April, 1815. 

Elizabeth-Langton, d. in 1818. 

Mary-Langton, m. first, January, 1813, to William- 
Hastings Neville, esq. youngest son of General Ne- 
ville, and has issue, Staphanie-Langton Neville, b. 
in 1831, and Rothes-Hastings Neville, h. in 1832. 

Margaret-Clarissa. 

This gentleman, who is second son of Bennet Langton,* esq. of Langton, by his wife, 
the Lady Mary Leslie, dowager countess of Rothes, assumed the surname and arms of 
Massingberd, on inheriting, in right of his wife, the Gunby estates. 




' The ancient and eminent family of Mas- 
singberd has been seated in the county of 
Lincoln for many centuries. (For the early 
descents refer to the account of the Mas- 
singberds of Ormsby, vol. i. p. 663.) 

Sir Thomas Massingberd, knt. represen- 
tative of the family in the sixteenth century, 
wedded Joan, younger daughter and heir 
(her elder sister, Agnes, was prioress of 
the nunnery of Crabhouse, in Norfolk) of 



John Braytoft, of Braytoft Hall, and, re- 
ceiving with her a considerable estate, made 
that seat his chief place of residence. Sur- 
viving his wife. Sir Thomas became, in the 
reign of Henry VIII. a knight of St. John 
of Jerusalem, and added the second es- 
cutcheon to the family'arms. He had issue, 
I. Augustine, who purchased, in 1538, 
the manors belonging to Sir John 
Markham, in Bratoft and elsewhere. 



* George La>'gtov, esq. eldest son and heir of George Langton, by his wife IMiss Fern, wedded 
Diana, daughter of Edmund Tumor, esq. of Stoke Rochfort, in the county of Lincoln, and had issue, 
I. Bennet, who m. in 1770, Mary, dowager countess of Rothes, daughter of Gresham Lloyd, 
esq. by Mary Holt, his wife, great niece of the Lord Chief Justice Holt, and had issue, 

1. George Langton, esq. of Langton, in the county of Lincoln. 

2. Peregrine Langton, esq. now Massingberd, of Gunby. 

3. Alt^ernon Langton, h. in 1781, originally a military officer, but subsequently in holy or 
ders, m. Mary-Anne, sister of Edward Drewe, esq. of " ' " " 
and d. in 18!29, leaving one child, Bennet. 

Charles Langton, a naval officer, d. in 1810. 

Mary, 

Diana, 
3. Jane. 
4 

d. unm 



Grange, in the county of Devon, 



4. 

1. 
2. 



both d. unm. 



. Elizabeth, "| 
. Isabella, V 
. INIargaret, J 



II. 

I. 

ij. 



Fern, died young. 

Diana, m. to the Rev. Dr. Uvedale. 
Juliet, «. to the Rev. William Brackenbury. 



MASSlNGBF.llD, OF GUN BY. 



He m. lVf;ir<;;uTt, dau^litcr of Itohcrt 
Elriiij^ton, esq. ollloxtim, in Middle- 
sex, and dyiii^ in tlic lilV'tiiiic of liis 
fatlier, 7tli" Ft'l)ruarv, 1 ')!!>, left four 
sons and five daugiiti is, nanuly, 

1. Thomas, successor to liis grand- 
father. 

2. William, who was interred at 
Saltfleetby, St. Peters, in 1572. 
He m. a dau<;hter of Richard 
Clayton, of London, and Jiad a 
son and heir, 

Oswald, a goldsniitli, in Lon- 
don, who resided at Farn- 
liam, in Surrey, lie wedded 
Mary Sli<;hwright, daughter 
of a barrister of Gray's Inn, 
and had a son, 

John, an eminent mer- 
chant of London, and 
treasurer of the East 
India Company, who »h. 
Cecilia, daughter of 
Thomas Pellit, mer- 
chant, of London, and 
dying in 1653, left is- 
sue, 

Elizabeth, married 
to George, first 
Lord Berkeley. 
Mary, tn. to Robert, 
third Earl of Lind- 
sey. 

3. Christopher, who was appointed, 
1st August, 1548, clerk of the 
council within the town of Ca- 

, lais, for life. 

4. John, who m, Dorothy, relict of 
Ralph Quadring, esq. and eldest 
daughter of Sir Robert Hussey, 
knt. of Linwood, by Margaret 
his wife, daughter and co-heir of 
Sir Thomas Say, knt. of Liston, 
in Essex, andrf. in 1580, leaving," 
with two daughters, Edith, j«. 
first, to Mr. Baker, and secondly, 
to Mr. Nicholls, and Ann, the 
wife of John Booth, of Kyme, a 
son, Augustin, who resided at 
Sutterton, and d. s. p. in 1614. 

1. Grace, wi. to Stephen Spack- 
man. 

2. Anne, m. first, to Christopher 
Forcet, of Billesby, and secondly, 
to Christopher Somercotes, of 
Somercotes. 

3. Ursula, ?«. to John Davy. 

4. Edith, w. to Augustin Caundish, 
and (/. in 1590. 

5. Elizabeth, buried at Braytoft, 
18th October, 1588. 

11. Oswald, confrere of St. John's, %vho 
had a yearly pension of ten pounds 
assigned to him on the first suppres- | 



sion of the order, in 15-10. In five 
years after, he obtained license, un- 
der the king's sign manual, to travel 
ix'yond sea, with one servant and 
two horses, by the ap])ellation of Sir 
Oswald Massingberd, knight of the 
f)rder of St. John of Jernsaieni. At 
the final dissohidon of the order, in 
I55!>, he was prior of Kilniainham, 
in Ireland. 

III. Alan, who d. nnni. 

IV. Martin, wiio wi. Ursula Elritigton, 
and had three sons, and one daughter! 

I. Edith, married to Richard Lvtler of 
Tathwell. ^ 

II. Cecily, m. to Thomas Moore. 

III. Dorothy, ~1 

IV. Grace, }■ all ^/. unmarried. 

V. Christian, J 

Sir Thomas Massingberd died 25tli ]Mav 
1552, and was interred at (Jiinby, under'a 
large marble tombstone, with his portraiture; 
in complete armour, (a lion at his feet) and 
his lady's inlaid in brass thereon, having a 
large shield, a little above, between their 
heads, and four small shields on each side. 
The following mutilated inscription still re- 
mains : *' S"^ Thomas Massyngberde, knt. 
and dame Joban his wyfe, specyale desyers 
all resnabull creatures of your charyte to 

gyfe lawde and prays unto queen of 

everlasting life with ." Sir Thomas 

was s. by his grandson, 

Thomas Massingberd, esq. of Braytoft 
Hall, M.P, for Calais in 1552, who ni. first, 
Alice, daughter and heir of Richard Bever- 
coats, esq. of Newark, and had issue, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. George, who m. Alice Milles, of 
Abingdon, in tlie county of Berks, 
and left at his decease an only sur- 
viving child, Edward, baptized in 
June, 1589, who wedded Judith, dau. 
of Armigill Sharpies, of Louth, in 
Lincolnshire, and had two sons, Abra- 
ham, of the same place, who died be- 
fore the year 1649, leaving issue, and 
Charles. 

III. Augustin, died at Gunby, in 1580, 
unmarried, 

I. Katharine, m. to Thomas Cole. 

II. Margaret, d. unmarried. 

III. Grace, m. to Alan Raithy. 

He wedded secondly, Dorothy, daughter and 
heir of Richard Ballard, gent, of Orby, and 
had further issue, 

I. William, of Bratoft, who m. Helen 
Quadring, of Burgh, and had issue. 

I. Frances, m. to Samuel Newcomen, 
of Low Toynton. 

II. Jane, married to Robert Dighton, of 
Braniston. 

ui. Dorothy. 
Thomas Massingberd d. in 1684, and was 
s. by his eldest son, 



106 



MASSINGBERD, OF GUNBY. 



Thomas Massingberd, esq. who resided, 
during bis father's lifetime, at Saltfleetby 
St. Peter's. He m. Frances, daughter of 
Sir George Fitz Williams, knt. of Maple- 
thorpe, and had, with other children, who 
all died unmarried, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Henry, who wi. Alice Busshey, and 
had, inter alios, a son, Nathaniel, 
upon whom his grandfather settled 
tiie estate at Croft, which he pur- 
chased from Mr. John Brown, and 
likewise the lands in Thorpe, formerly 
in the possession of Robert Hill and 
John Greene, 

I. Frances, m. to Francis Cave, esq. 
of Ingerby, in Leicestershire. 

II. Jane,7n. to Francis Gyrnwick. 

III. Mary, m, to Edward Pigot, gent. 

IV. Susanna, m. to Robert Hastings, 
of Bilsby. 

V. Bridget, m. to William Thory, of 
Winthorpe, 

VI. Alice, m. first to Robert Stevenson, 
and secondly to — Lowndes, esq. 

Mr, Massingberd died at Gunby, 11th Sep- 
tember, 1620, and was succeeded by liis 
eldest son, 

Thomas Massingberd, esq. of Gunby, 
barrister-at-law, who resided for some time 
at Louth, He espoused Frances, daughter 
of Robert Halton, esq, of Clee, serjeant- 
at-law, by Joan his wife, daughter of John 
Draner, or Drayner, esq, of Hoxton, and 
had (with other children, who d. s. p.), 

I, Henry, his heir. 

II. Drayner (Sir), b. Uth December, 
16!,j, and ancestor of the Massing- 
BtKDS, of South Ormsby, (see vol. 
i. p. 661). 

I. Frances, m. first, to John Day, of 
Sausethorp, and secondly, to Thomas 
Pitcher, esq, of Trumpington, in the 
county of Cambridge. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to John Booth, esq. 

III. Susanna, married first, in 1625, to 
Richard Cater, esq. who was killed 
by a fall from his horse, 10th July, 
1631, and secondly, in 1635, to Rich- 
ard Godney, esq. of Swaby. 

IV. Alice, m. to Thomas Day, esq. of 
Sausethorp, 

V. Margaret, m. to Leonard Purley, 
gent, of Farlsthorp. 

Mr. Massingberd, who d. suddenly on his 
way to church, 5th November, 1636, was 
buried at Gunby, and s. by his son, 

Henry Massingberd, esq. of Gunby, 
admitted of Christ College, Cambridge, 18th 
April, 1627, as fellow commoner, whence 
he removed to the Inner Temple, of which he 
was entered a student 7th June, 1629, and 
remained there to the following April only. 
During the civil war of the reign of Chari.es 
I. he took an active part, and raised a troop 



of horse for the service of the parliament. 
In the constable's accounts for the parish of 
Friskney, one shilling is charged as given 
to Captain Massingberd's cornet, towards 
his colours. Another item is, " spent by 
two soldiers, sent to the town by Mr. 
Mashcnberd and Mr, Misserdine, two shil- 
lings," Another, '* for a horse from John 
Cotes, of Boston, being sent to Captain 
Massingberd from the committee at Bos- 
ton, one shilling."* So warmly did he 
espouse the parliamentary cause that both 
his brother, Sir Drayner, and himself were 
indicted at Grantham for high treason. In 
1658, the protector, Cromwell, created him 
a BARONET, and the preamble in the patent 
states the honour to be conferred " as well 
for his faithfulness and good aftection to 
us and his countrey, as for his descent, pa- 
trimony, ample estate, and ingenious educa- 
tion, every way answerable, who out of a 
liberal mind hath undertaken to maintain 
thirty foot souldiers in our dominion of Ire- 
land, for three whole years." The original 
patent, which was renewed at the restora- 
tion, the family still preserve. It bears 
the initials of Oliver's Christian name, 
encircling a good likeness of him, in a robe 
of ermine. 

Sir Henry wedded first, Elizabeth, young- 
est daughter of William Lyster, esq. of 
Rippingale and Colby, and had to survive 
infancy, 

Henry, who died unmarried, at his 
chambers in the Inner Temple, in 
1666, aged twenty-five. > 

John, who died unmarried, at Barnet, 
in 1671. 

Finances, m. first, to George Saunder- 
son, esq. of Thoresby, and secondly, 
to Timothy Hildyard, esq. 

Elizabeth, m. to Sir Nicholas Stough- 
ton, bart. of Stoke, in Surrey, 
The baronet espoused secondly, Anne, relict 
of Nicholas Stoughton, esq. of Stoke, and 
daughter and sole heir of William Evans, 
esq. of London. By her he had one son to 
survive, William, his heir. He m. thirdly, 
27th November, 1679, Elizabeth, dau. of — 
Rayner, esq. of Yorkshire, but by that lady 
had no child. He died in September, 1680, 
aged seventy-one, and was s. by his son. 

Sir William Massingberd, second bart. 
of Gunby, who m. 11th July, 1673, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Richard Wynn, esq, of 
London, and had one sou and one daughter, 
viz. 

William, his heir. 

Elizabeth, successor to her brother. 
Sir William was s. by his son, 

Sir William Massingberd, third bart. 
of Gunby, M.P. for Lincolnshire, b. in 1677, 
at whose decease, unmarried, the baronetcy 

• Oldfield's History of VVamlieet. 



TAYLOR, OF BIFRONS. 



107 



expired, while the estates devolved on his 
sister, 

Elizabeth Massingberd, of Gunby, who 
wedded Thomas Meux, esq. and liad a son, 
William Meux, esq. of Gunby, who as- 
sumed the surname and arn\s of Massing- 
berd only. lie m. first, MissThornborough, 
by whom he had, 

Thomas, who in. Miss Elizabeth Emer- 
son, sister to Sir Walter Amcotts, 
bart. and predeceasing his father, in 
1777, left issue, 

Henry, successor to his grand- 
father. 
Thomas, capt. R.N. of Candlesby 
House, in the county ot Lincoln, 
and of Beckingham House, near 
Bawtry, Yorkshire, b. in 1763, 
m. 12th February, 17.94, Eliza- 
beth Hawksmore Waterhouse, 
and had two sons, Thomas Mas- 
singberd, esq. and the Rev. 
H. Massingberd, besides three 
daughters, Christiana, Louisa, 
Ellen, and Mary-Jane. 
Charles. 
Emily. 

Mr. (Meux) Massingberd wedded secondly, 
Miss Drake, and had, 

William, m. Miss Pastern. 
Samuel, died unm. 
George, living in America. 
Francis, d. unm. 

Caroline, 
Margaret, 



both (/. unm. 



Ann, m. to John Pyke, esq. 
Katlicrine, m. to the Rev. Francis 

Wilson. 
Mary-Joice, vi. to the Rev. Edward 

Brackenbury. 
Sarah Elizabetli, m. to Radcliffe Pearl 
Todd, ('S(j. 
He died in 1780, and was *. by his grandson, 
Henry Massingbkri), esq. of Gunby, 
who espoused Miss Elizabeth Hoare, and 
died about the year 17H7, leaving an only 
daughter and heiress, Elizabeth Mary- 
Anne Massingberd, who wedded, as al- 
ready stated. Peregrine Langton, esq. who 
assumed in consequence the surname and 
arms of Massingberd, and is tlie present 
Peregrine Massingberd, of Gunby. 

^rm*— Quarterly, first and fourth, az, 
three quatrefoils, (two and one,) and in 
chief a boar passant or, charged on the 
shoulder with a cross patce gu. ; second and 
tliird, quarterly, or and arg. on a cross hu- 
mettee gu. between four lions rampant sa. 
two escallops of the first. 

Crests — First, a dragon's head erased, 
quarterly, or and gu. between two wings 
az. Second, a lion's head erased, charged 
with two broad arrows in saltire, arg. 
barbed or, between four gouttes d'eau. 

Motto — Est meruisse satis. 

Estates — In the county of Lincoln, in- 
cluding the manors of Gunby, Bratoft, and 
Markby. 

^crt^— Gunby Hall, built in 1700, by Sir 
William Massingberd, bart. 



TAYLOR, OF BIFRONS. 



TAYLOR, EDWARD, esq. of Bifrons, in Kent, b. 24th June, 1774; m. 6th Sep- 
tember, 1802, Louisa, only child of the Rev. J. C. 
Beckingham, of Bourn House, in the same county, the 
last representative of the ancient family of Aucher, and 
has issue. 







^g^ 




Herbert-Edward, captain 85th regiment. 

Brook-John, lieutenant 81st regiment. 

Aucher-Beckingham. 

Bridges, in the office for foreign affairs. 

Wilbraham. 

Mary-Louisa, m. in 1824, to the Hon. James Knox, 
M.P. for Dungannon, and has a daughter. 

Louisa-Charlotte, »«. in 1828, to George-Cornwall 
Legh, esq. of High Legh, in Cheshire. 

Emily-Octavia, m. in 1833, to William Deedes, esq. 
of Sandling, in Kent, and has one son. 

Mr. Taylor represented the city of Canterbury in par- 
liament' from 1807 to 1812. 



108 



TAYLOR, 0? BIFRONS. 



Hincaaf. 



- all died young, and were 
buried at Patrixbourn. 



This family, originally from Whitcliurch, 
in Shropshire, spelt their name, in 1500, 
Taylour. 

Nathaniel Taylouk, esq. represented 
the county of Bedford in parliament, and 
was also "recorder of Colchester, in Essex, 
during the usurpation of (Cromwell. He 
7)1. the daughter of Colonel Bridges, of Wal- 
lingford, in Essex, ancestor of Sir Brook 
Bridges, bart. of Goodnestone, Kent, and 
had eigiiteen children, most of whom were 
born in Brook House, Holborn, and several 
died young. His son, 

John Taylor, esq. born 7th December, 
1655, purchased Bifrons, and other estates, 
situated in Kent, A.D. 1694. He wedded 
Olivia, daughter of Sir Nicholas Tempest, 
bart. of Durham, and by her, wlio died in 
1716, and was buried at Patrixbourn, had 
issue, 

Brook, his heir. 

Hekbekt, successor to his brother. 
Upton, 
James, 
Nathaniel, 
John, 
Hannah, 

John Taylor died 4th April, 1729, was 
buried at Patrixbourn, and succeeded by 
his eldest son, 

Brook Taylor, esq. of Bifrons, D.C.L. 
born at Edmonton, 18th August, 1685. This 
gentleman, distinguished as a mathemati- 
cian, and as the author of a learned treatise 
on Linear Perspective, was chosen fellow of 
the Royal Society in 1712, and elected 
secretary in 1714, in which year he took 
his degree, at Cambridge, of doctor of civil 
law. He espoused Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Sawbridge, esq. of Olantigh, in Kent, 
and by her, who died in 1729, and was 
buried at Patrixbourn, had an only daughter, 
Elizabeth, baptized 25th March, 1730, 
m. to Sir William Young, bart. 
Brook Taylor died in London, in 1731, was 
interred at St. Anne's, and succeeded by his 
brother, 

The Rev. Herbert Taylor, of Bifrons, 
rector of Hunton, and vicar of Patrixbourn, 
baptized 15th May, 1698. This gentleman 
7«. Mary,daughterof Dr. Wake, prebendary 
of Canterbury, and nephew of Archbishop 
A\ ake, ancestor of Sir William Wake, bart. 
of Courteen, and had issue, 
Herbert, his heir. 
Edward, successor to his brother. 
The Rev. Herbert Taylor died 29th Sep- 
tember, 1763, was buried in the family 
vault at Patrixbourn, and succeeded by his 
elder son, 



Herbert Taylor, esq. of Bifrons, at 
whose decease, unmarried, in London, 19th 
November, 1767, aged thirty-six, the estates 
devolved on his brother, 

The Rev. Edward Taylor, born 26th 
August, 1734, who m. in 1769, Margaret, 
sister of Thomas Watkinson Payler,* esq. 
of the county of Kent, (whose family first 
bore the name of Turner, and descended 
from William Turner, esq. of Sutton Va- 
lence, an officer of Ki)iff Henry VHI.'s 
household,) and by her, who died at Brus- 
sels, 27th April, 1780, aged thirty-six, had 
five sons and three daugiiters, viz. 
Edward, his heir. 

Herbert (Sir), born 29th September, 
1779, a lieut. -general in the army, 
colonel of the 85th Regiment, first 
aid-de-camp to the king, and his ma- 
jesty's private secretary, also master 
of St. Katherine's, and knight grand 
cross of the orders of the Bath and 
Guelph. Sir Herbert wedded Char- 
lotte Albinia, daughter of Edward 
Desbrowe, esq. (vice chamberlain to 
Queen Charlotte) by Charlotte his 
wife, daughter of George, third Earl 
of Buckinghamshire, and has one 
dan. Charlotte. He sat in parlia- 
ment for Windsor from 1820 to 1823, 
when he resigned his seat. 
Brook (Sir), b. 30th December, 1776, 
knight grand cross of the Hanove- 
rian Guelphic order, one of his ma- 
jesty's most honourable privy coun- 
cil, and, at various times, envoy- 
extraordinary and minister pleni- 
potentiary to the courts of Hesse 

* This gentleman, who died about the year 
1816, married three wives, first, Charlotte, second 
daughter of William Hammond, esq. of St. Alban's 
Court ; secondly, Wiss Wynn, sister of Sir Ed- 
mund Wynn, bart. ; and thirdly, Rlrs. O'Callaghan, 
of Limerick. By the first only he had issue, viz. 
Thomas, major of dragoons, William, in holy 
orders, James, lieutenant-colonel in the army, 
John, Henry, Anthony, in holy orders, another 
son, and Charlotte, the wife of William Egerton, 
esq. of Tatton. Mrs. O'Callaghan (his last wife) 
was the widow of Edmund O'Callaghan, esq. of 
Kilgory, in the county of Limerick, who fell in a 
duel with Mr. INI'Namara, and by whom she had 
four daughters, the co-heirs of their father, 

1. Bridged, married to the late Thomas 
O'Reilly, esq. 

2. Catherine, married to the Hon. Thomas 
Browne, brotlier and heir presumptive to 
tlie Earl of Kenmare. 

3. Ellen, married to James Bagot, esq. of 
Castle Bagot, in the county of Dublin. 

4. Elizabeth, married to tierald Dease, esq. 
of I'urbotstown, nephew \o i_uid Eingal. 



O'BRIEN. OF BLATIIEIIWYCKE. 



lOf) 



Casscl, Wirtemburg, Bavaria, and 



1 



russia. 



William, twin Ijrotlicr witli Brook, for- 
merly in tlie oflici! for (bri'if^n afl'airs, 
who was unl'ortunatily drowned in 
the Thames, IGth July, 17'J7, buried 
at Patrixbourn. 

Brid^TS-\\'atk.inson, b. in 1778, cajjtain 
in the royal navy, who was accident- 
ally drowned in the Adriatic, oir 
Brindisi, 24tli February, 1814, when 
in conuuand of his majesty's frigate, 
Apollo. He had served with great 
zeal and distinction during tlie whole 
of the war, participated in the actions 
of the 1st of June with Earl Howe, 
and at the Nile under Lord Nelson, 
w ith whom he was at the attack upon 
Tenerift'e, and was wounded in the 
Leander when she fought the Gene- 
reux. Monuments were erected to 
his memory at Brindisi by the in- 
habitants, at Portsmouth by the of- 
ficers of the Apollo, and at Patrix- 
bourn by his own family. It is re- 
markable that he saved the lives of 
three individuals, at different times, 
iv/ien droivniny, at the risk of his 
own . 

Mary-Elizabeth, m. 19th April, 1796, 

■ Edward Wilbraham Bontle, esq. of 
Lathom House, Lancashire, since 
created Lord Skelmersdale, and has 
issue, 

Hon. Richard Bootle Wilbraham, 
who m. Jessy, third daughter of 



Sir Richard Brooke, hart, of 
Norton Priory, and has one 
daughter. 
Hon. Edward Bootle- Wilbraliam, 

in tlie guaids. 
Hon. Mary Bootle-Wilbraham. 
Hon. Emma-Caroline Bootle-Wil- 
braham, married to Edward Lord 
Stanley. 
Cliarlotte, vi. 3rd March, 1794, the 
Hev. Edward Northey, canon of 
Windsor, and by him (who d. in Fe- 
bruary, IH'28), has issue, 

1. Edward Northey, who marri(;d 
Charlotte, daughter of Lieut'ii- 
ant-general Sir George Anson, 
G.(MJ. uncle to the Earl of Lich- 
field. 

2. William Northey, in the army, 
who married Agnes, daughter of 
General Bouel, and niece of 
Baron Fagel, in Holland. 

1. Charlotte Northey. 

2. Lucy Northey. 

3. Mary Northey. 

Margaret, died unmarried, at Lathom 
House, 24th October, 1809, and is 
buried at Melling, in Lancashire. 

Arms — Gu. three roses arg. barbed vert; 
a chief vair. 

Crest — A lion's head erased arg. collared 
gu. charged with three roses of the first. 
Estates — In Kent. 
Seat — Bifrons. 



O'BRIEN, OF BLATHERWYCKE. 



O'BRIEN, STAFFORD, esq. of Bbthenvycke Park, in the county of Northamp- 
ton, b. 29th October, 1783; m. 7th June, 1808, the 
Honourable Emma Noel, daug-hter of Sir Gerard- Noel 
Noel, hart. M.P. by Diana his wife. Baroness Barham, 
and has issue, 

I. ArrjusTus. 
II. Henry. 
III. Algernon. 

I. Emma, died unmarried. 

ii. Angelina, m. to the Hon. A. Fitzroy. 

III. Fanny, died unmarried. 

IV. Lilly. 

Mr. O'Brien, who succeeded his father, Henry O'Brien, 
esq. is in the commission of the peace, and was high 
sheriff of the county of Rutland in 1809. 




110 



O'BRIEN, OF BLATHERWYCKE. 



Ilincage. 



This is a branch of the ancient stem of 
DromolanU. (See Bikke's Peerage and 
Baronetage.) 

Sir Donatus O'Brien, of Dromoland 
(son of Cornelius O'Brien, esq. of Leama- 
iiagli, and lineally descended from the kings 
of 'Thomond), was born in 1642, and edu- 
cated in London, as appears by a decree in 
Chancery, dated 1st February, 1680. He 
liad two grants of land under the acts of set- 
tlement ; and, by privy seal, dated at White- 
hall 16th October, and by patent at Dublin, 
yth November, 1686, was created a baronet. 
He m. first, Lucia, second daughter of Sir 
George Hamilton, and had by her a son, 
Lucius, ancestor of the present Sir 
Edward O'Brien, bart. of Dromo- 
land, in the county of Clare. 
Sir Donatus espoused, secondly, in July, 
1677, Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Deane, 
esq. of Cromlin (see vol. ii. p. 690), and 
widow of Henry Grey, esq. of Dublin, by 
wlioni, who d. in 1683, lie had, with two 
daughters, Honora and Elizabeth, one son, 

Henry O'Brien, esq. who became seated 
at Stonehall, in the county of Clare. This 
gentleman wedded, in 1699, Susanna, dau. 
and co-heiress of William Stafford, esq. 
of Blatherwycke,* iu Northamptonshire, 
and had issue, 

I. Stafford, who d. young. 

II. Henry, his heir. 

III. Donatus, of whom presently. 

IV. William, in holy orders, died unm. 
1751. 

I. Elizabeth, in. to John Rice, esq. of 
the county of Kildare. 

II. Anne, m. to Edward Butler, esq. 

III. Susannah, j/(. first, in 1722, to James 
Rice, esq. of Mount Rice, in the 
county of Kildare ; and secondly, 
Augustine Levers, esq. 

IV. Catherine, in. in 1727, to Patrick 
French, esq. barrister-at-law. 

V. Margaret, who d. unm. 

VI. Frances, m. to Hyacinth D'Arcy. 
esq. of Ballycursane, iu the county 
of Galway. 

* The manor of Blathervrycke was acquired bv 
Sir Humphrey Stafford, sprung from the old 
baronial house of Stafford, in the time of Henry 
VI. by marriage with Alianore, daughter and co- 
heir of Sir Thomas Aylesbury, and continued with 
his descendants, who allied with the ancient 
families of Fray, Tame, Cave, Clopton, Fermor, 
Seymour, &c. until conveyed by the sisters and 
co-heirs of the last male heir, William Stafford, 
esq. to their husbands ; the elder, Susanna, mar- 
rying Henry O'Brien, esq. as in the text ; and 
the younger, Anne, becoming the wife of George, 
Lord Carbery. 



Mr. O'Brien d. 15th January, 1723 (his 
widow married, in 1728, Arthur Geoghegan, 
esq. of Castletown, in Westmeath, who as- 
sumed the surname of Stafford), and was 
s. by his son, 

Henry O'Brien, esq. of Stonehall, in the 
county of Clare, and of Blatherwycke Park, 
Northamptonshire, b. 1st March, 1708, who 
m. in November, 1730, Margaret, daughter 
of William Stammer, esq. of Carnelly, in 
the county of Galway, and had an only sur- 
viving daughter, Susannah, m. to Edward 
O'Brien, esq. of Inistimon, in Clare. Mr. 
O'Brien d. 17th March, 1757 (his widow 
surviving, m. secondly, Alexander Shearer, 
esq. of Limerick), and was s. by his brother, 

Donatus O'Brien, esq. who settled in the 
county of York, where he married Miss 
Mary Becket, of Barnesley, aunt to the late 
Sir John Becket, bart. and had six sous 
and three daughters, viz, 

I. Donatus, who d. unm. 

II. Henry, eventual heir. 

III. Lucius. 

IV. Stafford. 

V. William, j 

VI. Spersto, 






who both died unm. 



I. Susanna, m. to the Rev. Bacon Bed- 
ingfeld, of Ditchingham Hall, Nor- 
folk, and had one son and five daugh- 
ters, viz. 

John-James Bedingfeld, esq. now 
of Ditchingham. ( See family of 
Bedingfeld.) 

Susanna-Harriet Bedingfeld, mar- 
ried, first, to John Talbot, esq. 
only brother of the late Earl of 
Shrewsbury : and secondly, to 
the Hon. Henry Roper Curzon, 
eldest son of Lord Teynham. 

Lucy-Eleanor Bedingfeld. 

Caroline Bedingfeld, m. to Joseph 
Mortimer, esq. 

Matilda- Stafford -Sophia Beding- 
feld, ?H. to her cousin, Donatus 
O'Brien, esq. of Tixover. 

II. Mary, m. to Smith Kirkham, esq. 
of Luffenham, in Rutlandshire, and 
had one daughter, m. the late Rev. 
Charles Burton. 

III. Eleanor, m. Colonel James Tufton 
Phelp, of Coston House, in the 
county of Leicester, and has issue, 

Edward-Tufton Phelp, esq. now 
of Coston House, who m. Ellen, 
only sister of W^illiam-Edward 
Powell, esq. of Nanteos, M. P. 
and lord lieutenant for the county 
of Cardigan (see vol. i. p. 230). 

Cecil-Tufton Phelp, who in. Miss 
Knight. 



RICHARDSON, OF FIN DEN PLACE. 



Ill 



Laura-Edwyna Plielp, in. to ^^'il- 
liam Edward Powell, esq. of 
Nantcos, M.P. 
Jiiiia-Phcli). 
l'aimy-l*li<'l|'. 

Ottavia-l*li«l|», m. to Major Arclii- 
buld Crawi'iird, ol" tlic Hon. East 
India Company's Artillery, hro- 
tlur to the })resent Iiol)('rtCraw- 
furd, esq. of Newfield (see vol. 
i. p. f)'>i). 
Eleanor- Plielp, »i. to Capt. Cherry, 
late of the Royal Horse Guards. 
Mr. O'Brien's eldest surviving son, 

Henky 0']JKiEN,osq. of Stone Hall and 
Blatherwycke Park, who inherited the es- 
tates of his paternal family in Ireland, as 
well as the Stafford possessions in England, 
^/. in 1811, leaving, by Margaret Plenary, 
two sons and five daughters, namely, 

I. Stafford, his heir, and present 

PROPRIETOR. 

II. Donatus, who tn. his first cousin, 
Matilda Stafford Sophia, daughter of 
the Rev. Bacon Bedingfeld, of Ditch- 
ingham, and has issue. 



I. Mary-Anne, m. Thomas Hotchkin, 
esq. of South Lulfenham, and has 
issue. 

II. Margaret, in. to John Slater Wil- 
kinson, esq. of Hilcot House, in the 
county of I)erhy, and has issue. 

III. Letitia, m. to the Hon. Thomas 
Orde I*a\vlett, second son of the late 

Lord Holtun, and has issue. 

IV. Frances, wi. to Rohert Crawfurd, 
esq. of Newfield, in Ayrshire, and 
has issue (see vol. i. p. .^fA). 

V. Eleanor, ;«. to Arthur Annesley, 
esq. of Bletchingdon Park, in the 
county of Oxford, (see vol. i. p. 7), 
and has issue. 

Anns — Quarterly ; 1st and 4th, per pale 
gu. and or, three lions counterchauged. 2n(l, 
arg. three piles gu. .3rd, arg. a pheon. 

Orest — Issuing out of clouds a naked arm 
embowed, the hand grasping a sword, all ppr. 

Motto — Vigeur de dessus. 

Estates — In Ireland, acquired in IGOO; 
and in Northamptonshire, England, in 1708. 

Seat — Blatherwycke Park, near Wans- 
ford. 



RICHARDSON, OF FINDEN PLACE. 

RICHARDSON, WILLIAM-WESTBROOK, esq. of Finden Place, in Sussex, 
h. 18th August, 1788, a mag-istrate and deputy lieutenant for that county, succeeded 
his cousin, William Richardson, esq. in 18U1. 



Ufncngt. 




This is a branch of the Northern House 
of Richardson, of Bierley. 

Nicholas Richardson, of the county of 
Durham, came into A'orkshire in ISfil, and 
purchased estates at Tong, North Bierley, 
and Woodhall, all in the West Riding. 



He married, first, Margaret, daughter of 
John Midgley, of Clayton, in Bradford- 
dale, and by her had one son and two 
daughters, viz. Richard, his heir; Helena, 
b. in 1573, m. to Richard Cordingley, of 
Holm ; and Margaret, b. in 1574, the'wife 
of Michael Jenkinson, of Pudsey. Nicholas 
Richardson wedded secondly, Ann, daugh- 
ter of Lionel Goodall, and had several otiier 
sons, who all died young, and one daughter, 
Ann, m. in 1605, to Christopher Cave, of 
Otley. He died in 1616, and was s. by his 
son, 

Richard Richardson, esq. of North 
Bierley, b. in 1576, who married first, in 
1599, Ann, daughter and heiress of Wil- 
liam Pollard, and had, 

I. AViLLiAM, his heir. 

II. Richard, successor to his brother. 
HI. Thomas, a merchant, i. in 1609. 
IV. Nicholas, d. in infancy. 

I. Ann, jH. to Thomas Langley, of Hor- 
bury. 



11 



RICHARDSON, OF FIXDEN PLACE. 



II. Alice, b. in 1()14, m. to Thomas 
Senior, of Hopton, uitliin Mcrfield. 

III. Sarah, h. in \(',](i, m. first, to 
Richard Jenkinson, of Pudsey ; and 
secondly, to Robert Milner, esq. of 
the same place. 

IV. Beatrice, 6. in 1622, wi. James Sayle, 
of Pudsey, esq. and had two daugh- 
ters, viz. 

Beatrice Sayle, m. to Richard Hut- 
ton, esq. of Pudsey, great grand- 
son of Archbishop Hutton. 
Faith Sayle, ni. to Thomas Sharpe, 
of Horton, (eldest brother of 
Mr. Abraham Sharpe, the ma- 
thematician), and liad an only 
daughter and heiress, 

Elizabeth Sharpe, m. to Ro- 
bert Stausfielcl,esq. of Brad- 
ford. 
Richard Richardson, who m. secondly, Mrs. 
Susannah Swaine, but had no other issue, 
died in 1634, and was s. by his eldest son, 

William Richardson, esq. of Bierley, 
b. in 1602, who m. Elizabeth, eldest daugh- 
ter of George Hopkinson, esq. of Loft House, 
and sister to the learned antiquary, John 
Hopkinson, whose MS. collections relating 
to the antiquities of the county of York, in 
forty volumes, are preserved in the family 
library of the Richardsons. Mr. Richard- 
son died issueless, in 1648, was buried at 
Bradford, 22nd February, in that year, and 
succeeded by his brother, 

Richard Richardson, esq. of Bradford, 
who became " of Bierley." This gentle- 
man {b. in 1604), paid a fine of £40. for 
declining the honor of knighthood from 
Charles L as apj.'ea:s bv the receipt dat(Hl 
5th October, 16.30, signed " Wentworth," 
and still in the possession of the family. 
He wedded Jane, second daughter of George 
Hopkinson, esq. of Loft House, and by her, 
who died in 1662, had issue, 

I. William, of Bierley, b. in 1629, m. 
in 1659, Susannah, daughter of Gil- 
bert Savile, esq. of Greetland, in 
Yorkshire, and had two sons and 
one daughter, viz. 

1. Richard, of Bierley, M.D. in 
tlie commission of the peace for 
the West Riding, born in 1663, 
who married, first, in 1699, Sa- 
rah, only daughter and heiress 
of John Crossley, esq. of Kirk- 
shaw House, Halifax, by whom 
he had an only child, Richard, 
who died young. He wedded 
secondly, Dorothy, daughter 
of Henry CrRRER,esq. of Kild- 
wick, and had issue, (see family 
of CuRRER, of Kildwick). 

2. William, of High Fearnlcy, in 
Yorkshire, 6. in 1666, who m. 



Mary daughter and heir of John 
Kirshaw, of Hoyle House, Hali- 
fax, merchant, and had, with 
other issue, who died unm. a 
daughter, 

Martha, 7W. to Edward Iveson, 

esq. son of Henry Iveson, 

esq. of Black Bank, high 

sheriff of Yorkshire in 1708. 

1. Jane, m. to Edward Ferrand, 

esq. of Harden. 

II. Richard, of Newall, b. in 1635, who 
died in 1699, leaving an only son, 
William, who d. s. p. in 1711. 

III. John, of Birks, one of the lords of 
the manor of Bradford, b. in 16.36, 
precentor and canon residentiary of 
York, and archdeacon of Cleveland. 
His first wife, Ann Kent, died s. p. 
He f7i. secondly, in 1672, Hannah, 
sister of Dr. John Sharp, archbishop 
of York, and had issue. 

IV. George, of Woodhall, b. in 1644, m. 
Sarah, daughter of Richard Langley, 
esq. of Priestly Green, Halifax. This 
gentleman's male line ceased with his 
grandson, George, who died in 1748. 

V. Samuel, in holy orders, rector of 
Burnham Sutton, Norfolk, b. in 1647, 
who Hi. Frances, daughter of the Rev. 
Philip Cornwallis. His male line 
ceased with his grandson, Joseph, 
who died in 1763, leaving two daugh- 
ters, his co-heirs. 

VI. Joseph, of whom presently. 

I. Elizabeth, ni. to William Pollard, 
gent, of Bierley. 

II. Ann, m. to William Brook, gent, of 
Lum. 

III. Judith, w. to John Thornton, of 
Tyersall, in the parish of Calverley, 
and from this marriage the Smyths 
of Heath derive. 

Richard Richardson died in 1656, and by 
his will, which bears date 14th February, 
1655, it appears that he was seized of the 
manor of Okenshaw and Heaton, and one 
fourth part of the manor of Bradford, with 
considerable estates in the county of York. 
His youngest son. 

The Rev. Joseph Richardson, rector of 
Dunsfold and Hambledon, in Surrey, b. in 
1648, wedded in 1683, Elizabeth, daughter 
and co-heir of John Peebles, esq. of Dews- 
bury, by whom, who died in 1726, he ac- 
quired that manor, and had issue, 

I. Joseph, his heir. 

I. Jane, »?. to the Rev. Edward Eliot, 
rector of Buttermere, in Wilts, only 
son of Sir William Eliot, knt. of 
Busbridge. 

II. Elizabeth, who m. the Rev. Thomas 
Warton, B.D. vicar of Basingstoke, 



DUN DAS, or BARTON COURT. 



;j 



liiiiits, and of Cobliaiii, in Surrey, 
sometime fellow of Magdalen College, 
Oxford, and professor of poetry in 
that university, and had two sons, 
Joseph VVarton, li.l). late master 

of Winchester School. 
Thomas Wah roN, li.D. late fellow 
of Trinity ('ollegc, and professor 
of poetry at Oxford, Poet Lau- 
reate, and author of the History 
of English Poetry. 

III. Mary, m. to John Churchar, gent, 
of Midhurst, and d. aged ninety-five, 
without issue. 

IV. Ann, m. to Jolin Payne, esq. of 
i\[elford, in Surrey, and d. aged 
ninety, *■. />. 

Mr. Richardson died 18th June, 1742, and 
was *. by his only son, 

JosKi'H RicHAUDSON, esq. of Gray's Inn, 
barrister-at-law, b. 14th July, 1689, who m. 
in 1723, Elizabeth, second daughter and co- 
heir of John Minshull, esq. of Portslade, in 
Sussex, by Barbara, his wife, daughter, and 
eventual heiress of William Westbrooke, 
esq. of East Ferring. By this lady, who d. 
in i7.V2, he acquired considerable estates in 
the county of Sussex, aud had issue, 

I. William-Westbrooke, his heir. 

II. John, fellow of King's College, 
Cambridge, rector of Winterbourne, 
Strickland, and Witherston, and vicar 
of Hermitage, in Dorset, b. in 1727, 
died unm. 28th November, 1795. 

III. Laurence, of London, b. in 1729, 
died unm. in 1772. 

IV. Thomas, of Warminghurst Park, 
b. in 1732, who m. 26th March, 1787, 
Frances, second daughter of John 
Margesson, esq. of Offington, in Sus- 
sex, and dying in 1797, left issue, 

William-Westbrooke, successor 
to his cousin. 



John, b. lOth March, 1790, d. 2(Uh 

July, l82o, unm. 
Thomas, b. 27th December, 1791, 
a captain of Dragoons, and 
deputy lieutenant for Sussex, 
Mr. Richardson died 2nd January, 1734, 
and was s. by his eldest son, 

William WestbrookeRiciiakdson, esq. 
lord of the manors of Coring and East Fer- 
ring, in Sussex, and of Dewsbury, in York- 
shire, b. 16th November, 1725, who m. in 
1758, Barbara, daughter and co-heir of 
Richard Johnson, esq. of London, merchant, 
and had issue, 

William, his heir. 

Joseph, a cornet of dragoons, b. in 
1757, died unm. in 1797. 

Richard, b. in 1758, died 28th Decem- 
ber, 1759. 

Barbara Elizabeth, died unm. in 1770. 
Mr. Richardson, who served the office of 
slieriff for Sussex in 1770, died in 1771, 
and was*, by his son, 

William Richardson, esq. of Finden 
Place, in the county of Sussex, b. in 1754, 
wedded in 1779, Mary, eldest daughter of 
John Margesson, esq. of Offington, (see vol. 
i. p. 296), but by her, who died 10th April, 
1828, leaving no issue, he was *. at his de- 
cease, 16fh June, 1801, by his cousin, the 
present William Westbrooke Richard- 
son, esq. of Finden Place. 

Ai-ms — Sa. on a chief arg. three lions' 
heads erased of the field. 

Crest — Out of a mural crown or, a dexter 
arm in armour couped at the elbow, brand- 
ishing a falchion arg. the gripe vert, pomel 
and hilt or. 

Estates — In Sussex. 

Seat — Finden Place, Sussex. 



DUNDAS, OF BARTON COURT. 



DUNDAS-DEANS-WHITLEY, JAMES, esq. of Barton Court, in the county 
of Berks, a post captain in the royal navy, and naval aid-de-camp to the king, b. 
4th December, 1785 ; jn, 28th April, 1808, his first cousin, Janet, only daughter of 
the late Charles Dundas, Lord Aniesbury, by Ann his wife, daughter and sole heiress 
of Ralph Whitley, esq. of Aston Hall, Flintshire, and has issue, 

Charles, of the Coldstream guards. 

James, M.A. of Magdalen College, Cambridge. 

Ann, m. to John-Archer Houblou, esq. of Great Hallingbury, Essex. 

Janet. 

Sophia. 

This g-entleman, whose patronymic is Deans, assuming by sign manual the surnames 
of Whitley and Dundas, is now Captain Whitley-Deans-Dundas. He is a magistrate 
and deputy lieutenant for Berkshire, and represented Greenwich in the last parliament. 
3. I 



114 



DUN DAS, OF BART(3N COURT. 



lii'ncacic. 




DnxDAs, of FiNG ASK, old( st soil of James 
Duiidas, of J)aMdas, by Christian, liis spcoiul 
wife, daii^liter of John, Lord Imicrmeath, 
and Lorn, was returned heir to his father 
in divers lands anno 1431 (see vol. i. p. 642). 
He W2. Enphani, dauii'litiM- (if Sir Alexander 
Livingston, of ('allender, and had one son 
and two daughters, viz. 
Al.KXANDEll, his heir. 
Elizabeth, m, to Sir David Guthrie. 
Margaret, m. to Alexander Cockburn, 
of Langton. 
Fingask died in 1451, during his confine- 
ment in Dumbarton Castle, wherein he had 
been imprisoned, through the hostility of 
VV illiam, earl of Douglas, and was *. by his 
son, 

Alexander Dundas, of Fingask, who 
married Isabel, daugiiter of Lawrence, Lord 
Oliphant, and had several sons, with one 
daughter, the wife of Law, of Lawbridge. He 
fell at Flodden, in 1513, together with four 
of liis sons, and was s. by his eldest son, 

Alexander Dindas, of Fingask, who 
procured from James V. a charter of con- 
tirniation of the lands of Coates, in the lord- 
ship of Elcho. He wi. Elizabeth, daugiiter 
of Sir David Bruce, of Clackmannan, and 
had issue, 

I. Archibald, his heir. 

II. Robert. 

III. Tlionias, of Findhorn. 

I. Margaret, vi. first, to William Kerr, 
of Ancrani, ancestor of the Marquises 
of Lothian ; and secondly, to Sir 
George Douglas, of Mordington. 

II. Nicholas, m. to Alexander Corville, 
coniniendator of Culross. Their 
eldest (laughter, Grizcl Colville, be- 
came the ^\ife of Sir John Preston, 
of Valley(i( Id ; and their second 
daughter, Jean Colville, of Robert 
Bruce, of Blair Hall. 



Vlexander Dundas was slain at Pinkie, and 
succeeded by his eldest son, 

Archibald Dundas, of Fingask, served 
heir to his father in 1548, William Lord 
Fiuthven being then sherilf. This Archibald 
was a man of much influence in the time of 
James VL as appears by a letter of that 
monarch, dated in l.')79, to Alexander Blair, 
of Baltliyock, relative to the affairs of the 
county of Perth, he recommending him to 
consult with Archibald Dundas, of Fingask, 
as a person in whom lie (the king) placed the 
greatest confidence. He was succeeded at 
his decease by his son, 

William Dundas, of Fingask, who wed- 
ded, in 1582, Margaret, eldest daughter and 
heir of Sir David Carnegie, of Clouthie, 
but having no issue, was succeeded by his 
brother, 

Archibald Dundas, who, upon his own 
resignation, got a charter of confirmation of 
the lands and barony of Fingask, in favour 
of himself and his heirs male, anno 1609. 
He married first, Jane, daughter of Sir 
David Carnegie, by Eupham, his second 
wife, daughter of Sir David Wemyss, of 
Wcmyss, and had a son, John, his heir; 
and a daughter, Nicholas, m. to Fairlie, of 
Braid. Archibald wedded secondly, Giles, 
daughter of Lawrence Mercer, of Aldie, and 
had a son, Lawrence, professor of humanity 
at Edinburgh. The eldest son. 

Sir John Dundas, of Fingask, returned 
heir to his father in 1624, received the 
honour of knighthood from Charles L at 
Dunfermline in 1633. Enthusiastically at- 
tached to the unfortunate monarch, and 
nearly related by his mother to the great 
and gallant marquis of Montrose, he de- 
voted his energies and fortune to the royal 
cause, and ruined his estate, — the transmit- 
ted inheritance of so long a line of ancestry. 
He espoused first, Anne, daughter of Sir 
William Moncrief, of that Ilk, but had no 
issue ; and secondly, Margaret, daughter of 
(ieorge Dundas, of Dundas, by whom he had 
an only son, his successor in 1670, 

John Dundas, of Fingask, who in. Mag- 
dalen, daughter of Thomas Allardyce, son of 
Allardyce, of that Ilk, and was succeeded 
in 1724, by his son, 

Thomas Dundas, of Fingask, who ac- 
quired a considerable estate in the county 
Stirling, and got a cliartcr under the great 
seal anno 1739, for erecting his lands into a 
barony, under the designation of the ba- 
rony of Fingask. He m. Berthea, daugh- 
ter of John Baillie, of Castlecarry, and 
had two sons, namely, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Lawrence, of Kerse, M.P. for Edin- 
burgh 1768, created a baronet of 



DIINDAS, OI- BARTON COURT. 



11. 



Great Britain, «itli rcmainiler to liis 
brotlicr, Thomas. He in. Maroarct, 
dauglitiT ol" Alexander liruce, of 
Kennet, and dyinfjj in 1781, was suc- 
reeiied hy liis son, 

SiK Thomas Di'NDAs, second hart, 
of Kerso, who was elevated to 
tlie peerae;e as Bakon Dl'NDAS, 
of Aske, in Yorkshire. 
The elder son, 

Thomas Di'ndas, esq. of Fini^ask, was 
M.P. for the stewarlry of Orkney and Sli<t- 
land. Tiiis >;('ntlenian in. first, Anne, danfili- 
ter of James (Jrahain, of Airth, .JimI<;(' of 
the liifjh court of Admiralty for Scotland, 
hnt had no issne ; and secondly, in 1744, 
Ladj' .Janet INlaitland, daui;hler of (Charles, 
sixth earl of Landerdale, by whom he had, 
witli fonr danp^htors, 

I. Thomas, a jijeneral oflicer of distinc- 
tion, who m. Eleanor I-llizaheth, 
daugliter of Alexander, earl of Home, 
and died at Guadaloupe, 3rd June, 
1794, leavin<>- issue. 

II. Chaklks, of uliom presently. 

I. Margaret, m. to A. Gibson, esq. 

II. Berthia, m. to George Haldane, 
esq. 

III. Mary, jti. to James Bruce, esq. of 
Kiiinaird. 

IV. Jankt, m. James Deans, esq. M.D. 
of Calcutta, by whom she had James 
Deans, esq. who assumed the sur- 
name of Dundas, and is the present 
Captain Dundas, of Barton Place, 

Mr. Dundas died in 1786. His second son, 
Charles Dundas, esq. of Barton Court, 
in the county of Berks, for many years 
representative in parliament for tiiat shire, 
was elevated to the peerage lOtli May, 1832, 
as Bakon Amesbi'RY, of Kentbury Ames- 
bury, but enjoyed the honour for two monflis 
only, dying 30tli June, 1832. He esi)oused 
first, Ann, daughter and sole heiress of 
Balph Whitley, esq. of Aston Hall, in Flint- 
shire, and had by her an only daughter, 
Janet, who wedded her cousin, Capt. 
James Deans, which gentleman 
having taken the surname and in- 
herited the estates of the family of 
Dundas, is the present James Whit- 
ley-Deans-Dundas, esq. of Barton 
Court. 

Lord Aniesbury wedded secondly, his cousin, 
Margaret, third daughter of the late Hon. 
Charles Barclay, and widow first, of Charles 
Ogih y, esq. and secondly, of Major Archi- 
bald Erskine. 

.-fFamils of SiJtltlttlrp. 

Adam de Aston possessed, tnnp. Ed- 
ward IH. the Aston estate, in the parish of 
Hawarden, and the county of Flint, which 



' was conveyed by the lieiress of his son, 
Bichard, to Henry de Messam. William, 
great grandson of Henry de Messam, had 
j an only daughter and heir, Margaret, wJio 
i uedded Bh iiAKD Wil tm:y, and from this 
marriage the estate has descended to its 
j)resent proprietor. I'ilth in descent from 
Itichard \\ hitiey, and Margaret, his wife, 
was 

Thomas A\ ihii.ey, esc]. who served the 
oflice of sherill lor Flintshire in IG;38. He 
was one of the most devoted adherents of 
fCin(/ Charms I. and was fined £125. liy 
the parliament for his exertions in the royal 
cause. He was twice married, by his 
first wife, Dorothy, daughter Qf Thomas 
Ravenscroft, esq. he had one son, Bobert 
Whitley, e.sq. afterwards of Aston, and two 
daughters. By the second wife, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Roger Brereton, of Stoke, he 
had five sons and five daughters. Roger 
Whitley, the eldest son of the second 
marriage, was a colonel in the service of 
Charles I. and governor of Aberystwith 
Castle ; Thomas VVhitley, the second son, 
was slain in the defence of Hawarden 
Castle, for the same monarch ; Jolm \\ hit- 
ley, the third son, was a colonel of Foot in 
the royal army, and fell in defending 
Conway against the ])arliamentary forces ; 
Bali)h Whitley, the fourth son, survived 
the disastrous period of the Commonwealth, 
and was made receiver of North Wales, by 
/v7m</ Charles H. ; and Peter ^\ bitley, the 
fifth son, was also an active royalist, and an 
attendant upon Prince Rupert. 

The descendant of Thomas Whitlev, 
high sherift' in 1(538, another 

Thomas Whitley, esq. of Aston Hall, 
wedded Anne, daughter of Thomas Loder, 
esq. of Balsdon Park, (by Elizabeth, his 
wife, daughter of Sir Jonathan Raymond, 
of Barton Court, lierks, who had obtained 
that estate in marriage with the daughter of 
l*hilip Jenimet, es(|. alderman of London), 
and had a son and successor, 

Ralph Whitley, esq. of Aston Hall, in 
Flintshire, and of Barton Court, in the 
county of Berks, whose only daughter and 
heiress, by Margaret, his wife, 

Jamt Whitley, of Aston Hall, espoused 
Charles Dundas, esq. M.P. for Berkshire, 
and left, at her decease, an only daughter, 
Janet Whitley - Dundas, who »h. 28th 
April, 1808, as already stated, James Deans, 
esq. the present Cajjfain Whitley-Deans 
Dundas, of Barton Court. 

Arjns — Quarterly ; first and fourth, arg. 
a lion rampant gu. within a bordure flory 
counterfiory ; second, arg. on a chief gu. 
three garbs or, for AA hitley ; third, az. a 
cross moline arg. for Deans. 

Crests — First, for Dundas, a lion's head 



116 



WHIELDON, OF SPRINGFIELD HOUSE. 



li.ll faced, lookiii<i- tln!)iii?h a bush of oak, 
ppr. ; second, for ^^ umlky. a stajj's head, 
arg. attired or, lioUliiu: in its mouth the end 

of a scroll bearing tlje motto, " Live to 

I>* 
ive. 

Mottoes — Essaypz, for DuNDAS. Arte 

vel marte, for Di ans. 



Estates — In Berksliire, Flintshire, &c. 

Town jResiderice. — Baker-street, Port- 
man-square. 

Seats — Barton Court, near Hungerford, 
Berks ; and Aston Hall, Flintshire. 



WHIELDON, OF SPRINGFIELD HOUSE. 



WHIELDON, GEORGE, 





]% 




\ 


m 


/ 









esq. of Sprin;j,field House, in the county of Warwick, and 
of Welton Place, Northamptonshire, b. 27th March, 
1786, m. first, 9th November, 1809, Saba, second dau, 
of the late Josiah Spode, esq. of The Mount, in Stafford- 
shire, but by that lady had no issue. He wedded, se- 
condly, 19th February, 1817, Mary, third daughter of 
the late Richard Brettell, esq. of Finstall House, and 
of Stourbridge, in the county of Worcester, and has 

I. George, b. 1818. 
II. Arthur-Edward. 
III. Harry-Thomas-Turner. 

\. Georgina-Elizabeth. 
II. Katlierine-Mary. 

Mr. Whieldon, who is in the commission of the peace 
and deputy lieutenancy of the county of Stafford, had 
the gratification of receiving from his friends and 
neighbours, in 1826, an elegant silver candelabrum, 
value one hundred guineas, " as a small tribute ex- 
pressive of their sense of his able and upright discharge 
of the responsible duties of the magistracy." 



Uincacic. 



Thomas Whieldon, esq. of Fenton Hall, 
in the county of Stafford, who was \n^\\ 
sheriff of that shire in 1787, espoused I3th 
September, 1776, Sarah, daughter of John 
Turner, esq. of Cumberland Place, London, 
and left at his decease, in 1794, three sur- 
viving sons, Geokge Whieldon, esq. now 
of Springfield House; Thomas Whieldon, 
esq. resident at Rome; and the Rev. 
Edward Whieldon, of Wood House, in Staf- 
fordshire, rector of Burslem, and perpetual 
curate of Bradley, with a dau. Charlotte, 
wife of Daniel Bird Baddeley, esq. of Ivy 
House. 

Arms — Gu. on a ch' v. arg. between three 
pears stalked and leaved or, as many crosses 
sa. a ciiief ermine tliereon a lion passant 
of the fourth. 



Crest — Upon a mount vert between two 
branches of oak ppr. a fer de moline fess 
ways sa. thereon perched a parrot vert 
collared gu. holding in the dexter claw a 
pear stalked and leaved. 

fliotfo — Virtus praestantior auro. 

Estates — At Fenton, in the parish of 
Stoke - upon - Trent, Staffordshire; and 
Springfield, &c. in the parishes of Bedworth, 
Exhall, and Foleshill, in Warwickshire ; 
whereon there is a valuable mine of coal, 
and an extensive colliery established, called 
the Hawkesbury Colliery, giving employ- 
ment to upwards of two hundred work- 
men. 

Seats — Welton Place, Northamptonshire ; 
and Springfield House, Warwickshire. 



il7 



WESTBY, OF THORN II ILL, 



VVESTBY, WILLIAM, esq. of Tlionii.ill, in the county of Dublin, b. 18th June, 
1753; m. first, in Tottenham church, Middlesex, itith April, 1781, Mary, daughter 
of George Fletcher, esq. of Tottenham, and had issue (Mrs. Westby died on the 17th 
May, 1797), 

I. William, who died young. 

n. Nicholas, b. 28th October, 1787; m. 26th Au- 
gust, 1815, the Hon. Emily-Susiinnah-Laura W'al- 
degravp, eldest daughter of Wiliiaui, late Lord 
Radstock, and has had, 

1. William-Waldegrave,) , 

2. Nicholas-Granville, \ '^' y°""«- 

3. Edward-Perceval, h. 11 th July, 1828. 

1. Emily-Elizabeth. 

2. Eriiia-Laura, d. 1st March, 1834. 

3. Caroline-Mary. 

4. Louisa-Isabella. 

5. Horatia-Caroline. 

III. George, lieutenant in the 95th, or rifle rei>inienf, 
b. 2nd June, 1790; killed 5th May, 1811, at 
Fuentes D'Onore, in Spain ; d. unm. 

IV. Edward, cornet in the 2nd North British dra- 
goons, b. 25th August, 1794 ; killed at Waterloo, 
18th June, 1815; d. unm. 

I. Mary. 

II. Louisa. 

III. Wilhelmina, m. to Richard Moore, esq. of the 
county of Tipperary, barrister-at-law, and has 
issue. 




\ 



^"x^y^/AM 



■u-p" 'v-vtJ* *in|^ ^ 




Mr. Westby wedded, secondly, 28th August, 1809, Elizabeth, daughter of George- 
Boleyn Whitney, esq. of Newpass, in the county of Westmeath, but has not increased 
his family by other issue. He is the eldest son and representative of the late William 
Westby, esq. of High Park, in the county of Wicklow. 



Uiueac^e. 



Owing, it is stated, to the destruction of 
the parish registry of Ennis, in the county 
of Clare, there is no possibility of now as- 
certaining the actual founder of this family 
in Ireland. He is presumed to have been a 
Thomas WiiSTBY, son of Major Westby, 
of RavvcliflV, in the county of Lancaster, 
wlio settled at Clonmel. (See vol. i. page 
699.) Of this Thomas little is known, nei- 
ther the name of his wife nor the time of 
his death : he is supposed, however, to have 
left the following issue, 

Nicholas, of Ennis, in the county of 

Clare. 
James, who had a son and daughter, 
namely, 

Nicholas, who died unm. in 1729. 



Mary, died unm. in 1775. 
Humberston, of Strokestown, in the 
county of Roscommon, m. first, in 
1684, Rhodia, daughter of Colonel 
Perceval ; and secondly, a MissMa- 
hon, and had, 

Edward, who d. unm. 9th Novem- 
ber, 1732. 
George.' 
The eldest son (and first authenticated an- 
cestor of the family), 

Nicholas Westby, esq. of Ennis, in the 
county of Clare, collector of the customs of 
tliati'ort, m. in 1698, Frances, daughter of 
John Stepney, esq. of Durrow, in the 
Queen's county, and acquired, as the mar- 
riage portion of his wife, the estate of High 



118 



WESTBY, OF THORNHILL. 



Park, in the county of Wicklow. By this ; 
lady (who died 29th March, 1732, proof of 
her will bears date in 1734) he had one son 
and two daugliters, viz. 
William, his heir. 

Jane, born at Ennis, 12th September, 
16yy, m. 13th June, 1717, to Robert 
Perceval, esq. of Knightsbrooke, in 
the county of Meatli. 
Frances, born at Ennis, 10th October, 
1701, died on the 13th of the same 
month. 
Nicliolas Westby d. 19th October, 1716, 
(Ills will was proved in the Court of Prero- 
gative of Dublin in the same year), and was 
s. by his son, 

William Westby, esq. of High Park, in 
the county of Wicklow, born 3rd November, 
1702, m. in 1743, Mary, daughter of Briga- 
dier-general Jones, by Mary, daughter and 
sole heiress of Richard Neville,* esq. of 
Furnace, in the county of Kildare, and liad 
issue, 

I. William, b. 19th November, 1745, d. 
young. 

II. Nicholas, heir to his father. 

MI. Edward, 6. 5th May, 1752, rf. young. 

IV. William, ofThornhill, represen- 
tative now of the family. 

V. Edward, wlio inherited High Park 
under the will of his eldest brotlier, 
and is the present Edward Westby, 
esq. of High Park. See Westby, 
of Hiffh Park. 

VI. George, 6.20th October, 1756, died 
in January, 1763. 

* By Mary, his wife, daughter of Richard 
Barry, esq. of The Rock, in' the county of Cork, 
and sister of James Barry, whose daughter and 
heiress, Judith, married, 8th June, 1719, John, 
first Lord Farnham, and brought him Newtown- 
Barry, and all the estates of that branch of the 
Barrymore family. Brigadier-General Jones, 
Sirs. Westby's father, who represented for many 
years the borough of Wexford in parliament, and 
once the county, was appointed colonel of the 
38th regiment of foot, the 25th December, 1729. 
His son, Arthur Jones, assumed the name and 
arms of Neville on inheritiTit;- the Furnace estates. 
He was great-grandfather of Henrietta Neville, 
who married, first, Edward, eldest son of Sir Ed- 
ward Bering, of Surrenden, in Kent ; and se- 
condly, Sir William Geary, of Oxenheath. 



I. Mary, b. 8th July, 1744, m. to Tho- 
mas Brown, esq. of New Grove, in 
the county of Clare, and died in Fe- 
bruary, 1776, leaving issue. 

II. Frances, b. 28th February, 1747, d. 
unm.6th July, 1808, and was buried 
in St. Peter's, Dublin. Will proved 
in 1809. 

III. Jane, b. 5th October, 1748, died 
unm. 11th March, 1825. Will proved 
in that year. 

IV. Martha, b. 29th November, 1749, 
died unm. 13th December, 1779, at 
tlie Hot Wells, near Bristol, and was 
buried in St. Peter's, Dublin. 

Mr. Westby, who served the ©ffice of sheriff 
for the county of Wicklow in 1733, died 12th 
October, 1757. His lady, surviving liim 
above thirty years, died on the 3rd October, 
1794. Their wills were proved in Dublin 
the respective years of their decease, and 
they were both interred in St. Peter's, in 
that city. He was s. by his eldest surviving 
eon, 

Nicholas Westby, esq. of High Park, 
b. 26th March, 1751, old style. This gen- 
tleman, who represented the borough of 
Tulsk, as well as the county of Wicklow, in 
several parliaments, rejected with a scorn 
a peerage offered by the government to in- 
fluc nee his vote on the important question of 
union, and patriotically opposed that mea- 
sure to the last. He served the office of 
sheriff for the county of Wicklow, and died 
unmarried 30th November, 1800. His will 
was proved in 1801, under which the man- 
sion and estate of High Park passed to the 
younger of his two surviving brothers, Ed- 
ward Westby, esq. while the representa- 
tion of the family, Sec. devolved upon the 
elder, William Westby, esq. ofThornhill. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth arg. on 
a chev. az. three cinquefoils pierced of the 
first ; second, arg. on a chief indented gu. 
three crosses pattee fitchee ; third, or, three 
garbs sa. 

Crest — A martlet sa. in the mouth a sprig 
or. 

Motto — Nee volenti nee volanti. 
Estates-^lu the county of Clare. 
Tonn Residence — 6, Merrion Square. 
Seat — Thornhill, near Bray. 



110 



WESTBY, OF HIGH PARK. 

WESTBY, EDWARD, esq. of Hig:h Park, in the county of Wicklow, h. 11th 
September, 17.5.5, called to the bar of Ireland in Hilary term, 1779, made a bencher 
of Kini;'.s Inn, Dublin, Trinity term, 1789, and was one of the masters in Chancery 
from 1788 to 1814; m. first, in 1787, Anne, daughter of Richard Palmer, esq. of 
Glannacurragh Castle, in the King's County, and by her, who died 2'2nd June, 1791, 
had issue, 

Frances, m. 18th October, 1816, to Richard Donovan, esq. of Ballymore, in the 

county of Wexford, and has issue. 
Mary, m. in 1817, to Joshua Nunn, esq. of St. Margaret's, in the county of Wexford, 

and has issue. 

Mr, Westby wedded, secondly, Phosbie, third daughter of Richard Palmer, esq. of 
Glannacurragh Castle, and has three sons, with three other daughters, namely, 

WiLLiAM-JoNES, b. 23rd November, 1802, a magistrate and deputy litnitenant for 
Wicklow, and high sheriif in 1827 ; m. 9th June, 1828, Catharine, daughter of 
Colonel Grogan, of Seaiield, in the county of Dublin, and has issue, 

1. William-Henky-Jones, b. 23rd July, 1831; bapt. at Kiltegan, 23rd August 
following. 

2. George-Jones, b. in York Street, Dublin, 3rd January, 1834 ; baptized at 
Kiltegan, 

1, Maria-Palmer. 
Nicholas-Hcnry-Jones, b. 13th July, 1805, formerly a lieutenant in the 2nd regiment 

of foot, and subsequently in the "ist royal dragoons, married and has issue, 
Henry-Humberston-Jones, b. 9th July, 1809, in holy orders, presented to the rectory 

of Oldcastle, in Meatli, in 1834. 

Martha-Jones. 

Anne-Palmer, m. in St. Peter's, Dublin, 2nd August, 1831, to Parsons, fifth son of 
Sir Hugh Crofton, bart. of Mohill House, in the county of Leitrim, and has issue. 

Jane-Jones, m. at Kiltegan church, Wicklow, 17th December, 1831, to James Per- 
ceval, esq. of Barntown House, in the county of Wexford, a major in the army, 
formerly a captain in the 95th regiment, now the rifle brigade, and has issue. 

Mr. Westby having, in 1814, disposed of his mastership in Chanceiy, which obliged 
him to reside in Dublin, retired to High Park, a mansion and extensive demesne 
devised him by his eldest brother, and having rebuilt the house, which was destroyed 
by fire in the rebellion of 1798, has continued since to reside there. He was high 
sheriff for Wicklow in 1807, 



ILintacie. 



For descent and arms, see Westby, of 
Thoknuill. 

Fstates — Killamoat, Ballykillmxirry, 
Rathduffbegg, Killcarney, Carrigbrack, 



Knocknagilky, and High Park, all in the 
county of Wicklow. 

Town Residence — 29, York Street, Dub- 
lin, 

Seat — High Park, near Baltinglas, 



T20 



GRAHAiM, OF FINTRY. 

GRAHAM, ROBERT, esq. of Fintry, b. 16th January, 1816, succeeded to the 
repiesentation of this branch of the ancient family of Graham, upon the demise of his 
father, 17th March, 1822. 



Hintage. 




Sir William Graham, lord of Kincar- 
dihe, chief of the name, and ancestor of the 
Pukes of Montrose, m. in 1406, for his se- 
cond wife,tlieLady Mary Stuart,* daughter 
of RoRF.RT III. kiiio- of Scotland, and widow 
of ( Ji orge. Earl of Angus, and of Sir James 
Kenncdv, of Dunure, progenitor of the 
Mar(inis of Ailsa. Of this marriage the 
sons were 

HoRKRT (Sir), who became " of Fintry." 
Patrick, first archbishop of St. An- 
drews, who obtained, with the pri- 
macy, a legatine commission to re- 
form tlie abuses of the church, and 
is described as " a singular good 
man, and of great virtue." He s. his 
half brother. Bishop James Kennedy 
in the see of Saint Andrews. 
William, ancestor of the Grahams, of 

Garvock. 
Harry. 

Walter, from whom descended the Gra- 
hams, of Knockdolian, in Carrick, 
and of Wallacetown, in Dumbarton. 
The eldest son. 

Sir Hobi-rt Graham, was styled of Fin- 
try, from part of his possessions in Stirling- 
shire, but altliough these lands were after- 



• The Lady Mary wedded, fourthly, Sir Wil- 
liam Edmonslone. 



wards exchanged, in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, with the family of Montrose, for others 
in Angus, Fintry has always continued to 
be the designation of liis descendants, and 
their usual place of residence in Angusshire 
was so named. Sir Robert, sometimes styled 
of Ewsdall, from having succeeded his father 
and mother in the barony of Malanork, in 
Dumfries, was, in conjunction with Sir James 
Scrymgeour, of Dudhope, appointed justi- 
ciary of all Scotland, benorth the Fortli. 
He m. Janet, dau. and heiress of Sir Richard 
Lovell, of Balumbie, (a branch of the ex- 
tinct Earls of Egmont) by Elizabetk,* his 
wife, dau. of Sir Henry Douglas, of Loch- 
leven, and had issue, 

Robert, bis heir. 

John, ancestor of Graham, of Clavkr- 
hoi'se, (*ee conclusion of this article). 

Margaret, m. to John Erskine.of Dun. 

Elizabeth, m. to Andrew Halliburton, 
of Pitcur. 
Sir Robert Graham, who exchanged, in 
1480, the lands of Ewsdall with Archibald, 
Earl of Angus for tliose of IJalargus, in 
Angus, which he bestowed on his second 
son, was succeeded at his decease by his 
eldest son, 

Robert Graham, of Fintry, who weddedf 
the Lady Elizabeth Douglas, daughter of 
John, Earl of Angus, and was succeeded by 
his son. 

Sir David Graham, tliird laird of Fintry, 
wlio m. a daughter of William, first Earl of 
Montrose, by Annabella his wife, daughter 
of John, first Lord Drummond, and left a 
son and successor, 

* " This lady, maid of honour to Joanna queen 
of . I AMIS I. of Scotland, was in the royal ajrart- 
ment when it was attacked by the assassins of 
that kinpf, in 1437 ; on the first alarm she went to 
secure the door, but the bar having been removed 
she thrust her arm into its jilace, in the hopes 
of keeping them out ; they broke her arm in forc- 
ino- open the door and finished their bloody 
tragedy." — Douglas. 

t In the marriage contract, dated 1476, failing 
Elizabeth, her sisters, Margaret, Lilias, and Ely- 
son, are successively betrothed to the said Robert 
Graham. 



CRAFIAM, or I'lNTMY. 



IV 1 



Wll.MAM (JllAMAM, foilltll ()(' FilltlV, W lu> 

olitaiaed, in ITi-jy Jiiid IMl, charters from 
.lvMi:s Y. coiistitiitin;^- his extensive hiiuis . 
in Forfarsliiro, Stirliiitishirc, and Perth- 
shire, into " two free haronrics, to l)e held j 
l)lencl» ol" tlie crown, to be called the l)aron- 
rics of Strathdichty, Coniitis, in Forfar- 
shire, and HnchlivyGrahani, in Monteith." 
lie appears to iiave been a man of litera- 
ture, and a Latin poem l)y him is printed 
on the reverse of the title i)at;(' of the second 
edition of a very rare book, " Bepartitum in 
Morali Philosophia Opusculnm : e\ variis 
auctoribus per Maoistrum Guilielmnin Man- 
derstonScotum nuperrinie CoUectum. Par- 
hisiis, 1523." Fintky married Catharine, 
daughter of John Beaton, of Jiaifonr, and 
sister of Cardinal Beaton, Archbisliop of 
St. Andrews and Chancellor of Scotland, 
and was succeeded by his son, 

Sir David Guaham, fifth of Fintry, who 
received the honour of kniu;hthood from 
James VI. He m. ]VIar<>aret, daughter of 
.James, Lord Osjilvy, ancestor of the Earls 
of Airlie, and had three sons and one daugh- 
ter, Alyson, m. to John Creighton, of Inner- 
niylie. His eldest son and successor, 

David Graham, sixth of Fintry, married 
Barbara, daughter of Sir James Scott, of 
Balwearie, (lineal descendant of the cele- 
brated Sir Michael Scott) and had two sons, 
viz. 

David, his lieir. 

James, who possessed the lands of Mo- 
norgan and Craigo. 
Fintry was beheaded at Edinburgh, in 1592, 
for his participation with the Earls of 
Huntley and Errol in the popish plot, and 
was s. by his son, 

David Graham, seventh of Fintry, who 
wedded Mary, daughter of Sir James Hal- 
liburton, of Pitcur, by Margaret his wife, 
daughter of Sir James Scrymgeour, of 
Dudliope, first Viscount Dudhope, and left 
two sons and one daughter, in. to Mackin- 
tosh, of Mackintosh. 

This laird spent a great portion of the 
family estates in the royal cause during 
the civil wars, and his second son, James, 
left the college of Saint Andrews to join 
the standard of their chief, the gallant 
Marquis of Montrose; in the account of 
whose public funeral, A.D. 16()1, by Bishop 
Wisliart, the father and son are thus men- 
tioned : — " The pnrse carried by David 
Graham, of Fentrie ; this noble gentleman's 
predecessor was the son of the Lord Gra- 
ham, then head of the house of Montrose, 
who, upon a second marriage on King 
James the First his sistc r, begot the first 
baron of Fentry, which, in a direct male 
line, hath coiitii\ued to this baron ; and as 
their birth was high, so their (pialifirations 
have in every respect been great, for in all 



ages since their rise, nothing unbecoming 
loyal suhjects or persons of honour could 
be laid to their charge, and lie who pos- 
sesseth it now can claim as large a share as 
any ol his aiu-estors. 

'"' The arms of the defnnct in mourning, 
by James (Jraham, of Bucklevy, son to the 
liaron of Fentry, a gentleman which no- 
thing coidd ever startle from his majesty's 
service, and tiiat he was a favourite of the 
deceased, and accompanied his son in the 
late Highland war, is sufficient to speak his 
l)raises." David Graham was succeeded 
by his son, 

John Graham, eighth of Fintry, who 
espoused the Lady Margaret Scrvuigeour, 
only child of James, Earl of Dundee, by 
the Lady Marjiaret Kanisey his wife, daugh- 
ter of the Earl of Dalhousie, and had one 
son, wlio died young. He was s. at his de- 
cease by his brother, 

Jamks Graham, ninth of Fintry, who had 
previously inherited from his uncle the es- 
tates of Manorgan, Craigo, and Bucklevy, 
which lands he entirely expended in the 
service of his royal master. In 1679 he was 
lieut. -colonel of the Angus regiment, and 
had the offer of a baronetcy from Charles 
II. but declined the proffered honour. He 
m. Ann, daughter of Col. Hay, of Killour,* 
by the daughter and heiress of Whitelaw, 
oi" Whitson and Whitelaw. The issue of 
this marriage were, 

I. David, his heir. 

II. William, colonel in the army, vr. in 
1691, Agnes, daughter of Sir William 
Foulis, bart. of Ingleby, in York- 
shire, and had several children, but 
the male line of his descendants is 
now extinct. 

I. Isabella, m. to Mylne, of Mylne- 
field. 

II. Jean, m. to Fletcher, of Balinshoe. 

III. Margaret, m. first, to Sir James 
Kinlock, bart. of that Ilk, and se- 
condly, to Ogilvie, of Balfour. 

The elder son, 

David Graham, tenth laird of Fintry, »i. 
Anna, eldest daughter of Robert Moray, of 
Abercairny, by Anna his wife, daughter of 
Patrick Gramme, of Inchbrakie, and had to 
survive youth one son and ten daugliters, 
viz. 

I. Robert, his heir. 

I. Anna, m. to Gardyne, of Middleton 
and Laton. 

II. Margaret, m. to Carnegy, of Bal- 
nanioon. 

III. Emily, m. first, to Hunter, of Burn- 

* Of the noble house of Kriioi., the Kili.our 
branch of the IIavs inherited the honours of the 
faniilv, anil became Earls of F.rrol, on the decease 
of George, the tenth earl, i. p. in 1674. — Bvi;Kt's 
Peerage and Baronetage. 



122 



GRAHAM, OF FINTllY. 



side, and secondly, to Sir William 
Nairne, bait, of Dunsinnane. 

IV. Isabella, married to Duncan, of 
Ardownie. 

V. Agnes, m. to Robertson, of Carnon- 
stie. 

VI. Jane, in. to — Rutheford, esq.' 

VII. Grizel, m. to — Graham, esq. 

VIII. Mary, m. to Guthrie, of Clepping- 
ton. 

IX. Elizabeth, m. to — Stewart, esq. 

X. Lilias, m. to — Wallace, esq. 
David Graham, was succeeded by his only 
son, 

RoBF.iiT Graham, eleventh of Fintry, 
who espoused, in 1735, Margaret, daughter 
of Sir William Murray, of Ochtertyre, by 
Catherine his wife, daughter of Hugh, tenth 
Lord Lovat,* and had issue, 

I. Robert, his heir. 

II. James, captain in the 1st regiment, 
or Royals, d. unmarried, at Naples, 
in 1779. 

III. David, East India Company's civil 
service, died unmarried, at Vellore, 
in 1789. 

I. Catharine,? ^^^j^^;^„^_ 

II. Helen, > 

III. Ann, w*. to Robert Fletcher, esq. 
of Balinshoe. 

IV. Margaret, ni. to Alexander Bower, 
esq. of Kincaldrum. 

V. Elizabeth, m. to William Douglas, 
esq. of Brigton. 

Fintry was s. by his eldest son, 

Robert Graham, 12th of Fintry, born 
17th January, 1749, who married Margaret- 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Mylne, esq. 
of Mvlnefield, (by Isabella his wife, only 
daugliter of Dr. George Gray, of Hunting- 
ton, younger son of Gray, of Hackerton, 
a scion of the ennobled house of Gray) and 
had issue, 

I. Robert, who was assassinated at 
Benares, by the treachery of a native 
chief, in 1799, aged twenty-four. 

II. John, heir to his father. 

III. Thomas, captain R.N. m. Maria, 
daughter of Admiral George Dundas, 
and died at Valparaiso, while in com- 
mand of the Doris frigate, 9th April, 
1822. 

IV. David, b. 28th January, 1785, died 
unmarried, Uth September, 1824. 

V. James-Scott, h. in October, 1796, (/. 
in 1804. 

I. Isabella-Gray, d. in infancy. 



* By Amelia his wife, daugliter of tlie Mar- 
quess of Athol, -.uid grand-daugliter of Charlotte de 
laTremonille, tlie celebrated ('ountess of Derby, 
who so gallantly defended the Isle of Man against 
Clroinwell. Her ladysliip was grand-daughter of 
William, first I'riuce of Orange. 



II. Isabella. 

III. Margaret, died unmarried, aged 
eighteen. 

IV. Anne, m. to General the Hon. John 
Brodrick, youngest son of George, 
fourth Viscount Middleton, and has 
issue. 

V. Elizabeth-Kinlock, died an infant. 

VI. Elizabeth, m. to James Keay, esq. 
of Snaigon, Perthshire. 

VII. Helen-Christian, married to Henry 
Cloete, esq. eldest son of Laurence 
Cloete, esq. of Zamdvleete, C. B. S. 
and has issue. 

vui. Mary-Catlicart. 

IX. Jemima-Agnes, m. to Major Wil- 
liam Bolden-Dundas, eldest son of 
Admiral George Dundas, (of the fa- 
mily of Dundas, of Manor). 

X. Rmily-Georgina. 

XI. Catherine-Margaret. 

XII. Roberta. 

Xiii. Caroline- A.- Mackay, WJ. 12th 
July, 1830, to A. Morton Carr, esq. 
solicitor of excise, in Scotland, (of 
the family of Carr, of Esholt and 
Helton Hall, in Northumberland). 
The twelfth laird of Fintry died 10th Janu- 
ary, 1815, and was s. by his son, 

John Graham, esq. thirteenth of Fintry, 
b. 24th April, 1778, who entering the army, 
at the age of sixteen, accompanied his regi- 
ment (the 90th) in the expedition to Isle 
Dieu in 1795. In 1797 he joined Lord 
Lynedock, then Col. Graham, at that period 
with the Austrian army. Returning from 
that service, he received the appointment of 
aid-de-camp to the Earl of Chatham, and 
proceeded with his lordship, in 1799, to the 
Helder. Subsequently, having raised one 
hundred men for the 93rd Highlanders, he 
obtained a majority in the regiment, and 
acted with it at the capture of the Cape of 
Good Hope in 1806, where he remained in 
command of the rifle corps until 1812, when 
lie returned to England on leave of ab- 
sence, and went with Lord Lynedock to Hol- 
land, in 1813, as aid-de-camp and private 
military secretary. In 1815, he resumed his 
command at the Cape, and was commandant 
of Simon's Town at the time of his decease, 
17th March, 1822. He m. 24th July, 1812, 
Johanna-Catliarine, daughter of Rodoipli 
Cloete, es(i. of W^esterford, Cape of Good 
Hope, and by her (who wedded secondly, 
in November, 1826, Capt. Edward Danford, 
49th regiment) had one son and three daugli- 
lers, viz. 

Robert, his heir. 

Johanna-Catharina. 

Elizabeth-Margaret. 

Isabella- Anne. 
Col. Graham was s. at his drccnse by his 
son, RoBKKi Graham, esq. now of Fintry. 



(iRAIlAM, OF FINTRV. 



1-23 



Anns — Or, on a cliiff sa. tlirce escallops 
of the lirst, siuromuled by a <loiil)le tressure 
to mark the royal descent. Three |)iles sa. 
as representing- the family of Lovel of 
lialumbie. 

Crest — A phcenix in flames. 

Motto — Bon fin. 

«B5raf)am, of Clabrrfjousr. 

John Graham, second son of Sir Robert 
Graham, the first of Fintry, oi)taiiie(l from 
Archibald, earl of Angus, a ciiarter of the 
lands of IJalargns, in Forfarshire. He vt. 
Matilda, daughter of Sir James Scrimgeour, 
constable of Dundee, and was succeeded 
l)y liis son, 

John Gkaham, of lialargus, who acquired 
in 1530, the lands of Kirkton, and subse- 
quently those of Clavcrhouse. He wedded 
Margaret, daughter of John Bethune, of 
Balfour, and had a son and successor, 

John Graham, of Claverhouse, living in 
1541, who m. Anne, daughter of Robert 
Lundin, of Balgony, in Fife, and was s. at 
his decease, about 1580, by his elder son. 

Sir William Graham, of Claverhouse, 
who, by Marian, his wife, daughter of 
Thomas Fotheringhanie, of Powie, had two 
sons, 

Gkorge, his heir. 

Walter, ancestor of the Grahams of 
Duntroon. 
Sir William died in October, 1642, and was 
s. by his son, 

George Graham, of Claverhouse, who 
died in April, 1645, leaving two sons, by 
the elder, 

Sir William Graham, of Claverhouse, 
he was succeeded. This laird augmented con- 
siderably the family estates, and obtained by 
charter, under the great seal, the lands and 
barony of Ogilvie. He 7n. the Lady Jean 
Carnegie, fourth daughter of John, first 
earl of Northesk, and had two sons, John 
and David; and two daughters, Margaret, 
in. to Sir Robert Graham, of Morphy ; and 
Anne, tn. to Robert Young, of Auldbar. Sir 
William was succeeded by his elder son, 

John Graham, of Claverliouse, a dis- 
tinguished, perhaps tlie most distinguished 
soldier of the era in which lie lived. Ani- 
mated from his earliest years by the study 
of the poets and orators of antiquity, as well 
as by the traditionary songs of the highland 
bards, Claverhouse entered, at a very 
youthful age, on a military life, and served 
in the low countries against the French in 
the war of 167-2, eminently signalizing him- 
self at the battle ofSeneff. Shortly after- 
ward he returned home, and obtained a 
regiment from Charles U. for the especial 
purpose of , forcing the non-conformists into 
communion with the established church. 



During the progress of the war which en- 
sued, his success was varied. In I67!>, he 
attacked a conventicle on Loudoun llill, in 
Ayrshire, and afti-r a close and furious en- 
gagement at Drumclog, suffered defeat, but 
retrieved his fortune in the well known ac- 
tion of Hothwell Bridge : the acts of cru- 
elty, lio\v(!ver, which followed, and which 
procured for Graham the appellation of 
liluudy t'lnvers, hav»; indelibly tarnished 
his gallantry and reputation. Li palliation, 
he justified the course Ik; had a(lopt<'(l by 
the allegation that " terror was true mercy, 
if it put an end to, or prevented war." 
After the flight of James H. by whom he 
had been created Yi.scouM' Divdke, and 
during the consequent proceedings in Scot- 
land, Claverhouse became chiefly conspicu- 
ous. When the ill-fated king withdrew to 
Rochester, he endeavoured to dissuade his 
departure from the kingdom : " Give me 
your majesty's commission to raise ten 
thousand of the disbanded soldiers," said 
the gallant and sanguine Dundee, " and 
marching through England with the royal 
standard at our head, we will drive the 
Dutch invader at the point of ithe sword 
into the sea."* This counsel proving inef- 
fective, Graham proceeded with his dra- 
goons to Stirling, and there called a parlia- 
ment of the friends of the abdicated mo- 
narch. The convention sent a party to ap- 
prehend him ; but he retired into Lockabar, 
and summoning a general rendezvous of 
the clans, raised upwards of two thousand 
men. With these he marched to Blair, in 
AtlioU, and Mackay, King William's gene- 
ral, advancing with four thousand foot and 
two troops of horse, they met at the pass of 
Killicranky, on the 17th June, 16H9. Mackay 
drew up his men in order of battle, and wished 
to bring on the engagement without delay ; 
but the Scottish commander well knowing 
that night would be of advantage to the 
highlanders, whether successful or defeated, 
delayed the attack until half an hour before 
sunset ; at that moment he ordered his troops 
to rush down from their station and begin 
the conflict in a series of small columns on 
the wings of the enemy, calculating that 
this onset was most likely to bring on an 
action liand to hand, in which he was cer- 
tain of the superiority of his clansmen. 
Such had been the disposition of Dundee's 
kinsman and model, the gallant Marquis of 
Montrose, at the battle of Alderne. The 
enthusiastic and impetuous charge of the 



* At a subsequent period, Dundee unsuccess- 
fully conjured his royal master, who was wasting 
time and means in Ireland, to embark, with a par't 
of his army for Scotland, where his presence would 
fix the wavering, and intimidate the timid, and 
where hosts of shepherds would start up warriors 
at the first wave of his banner on their mountains. 



•24 



GRAHAM, OF FINTRY. 



Scotch proved irresistible ; Mackay fled, 
defeated with tlie loss of two thousand 
men, and escaped to Stirling, apprehensive 
of the pursuit of Dundee. But the gallant 
Graham was no more. After a desperate con- 
flict with the enemy's artillery, he returned 
to cut off the retreat, but at the moment that 
his arm was extended to his troops, he re- 
ceived a shot through an opening in his ar- 
mour,* and dropped from horseback as he 
attempted to ride oif tlie field. He survived, 
however, to write a concise and dignified 
account of his success to jAMES.f Had he 
lived to improve this important victory, little 
doubt can be entertained that he would have 
recovered the whole of Scotland beyond the 
Forth. But his death was fatal to his party, 
by whom his memory has been cherished, al- 
most to adoration, and a poet thus patheti- 
cally addresses his shade, and bewails the 
loss sustained by Scotland ; 

Ultime Scotorum, potuit quo sospite solo ^ 

Libertas patriae salva fuisse tuse 
Te moriente novos accepit Scotia cives 

Acrepitque novos te moriente Decs. 
]ll:i tibi sujjeresse negat, tu non potes illi, 

F.igo Caledonia, nomen inane, vale 
'f iKjue vale gentis priscfe fortissime ductor, 

Uptime Scotorum, atque ultime, Grame, vale. 

" Graham of Claverhouse," says Sir 
Walter Scott, " was low of stature, and 
slightly, though elegantly formed , his ges- 
ture, language, and manners were those of 
one whose life had been spent among the 
noble and the gay. His features exhibited 
even feminine regularity, an oval face, a 
straight and well formed nose, dark hazel 
eyes, a complexion just sufficiently tinged 
with brown to save it from the charge of 
effeminacy, a short upper lip curved like 
that of a Grecian statue, and slightly shaded 
by small mustachios of light brown, joined 

* The buff coat Dundee wore at Killicranky is 
still preserved at Pennycuick House, the seat of 
Sir George Clerk, bart. and the fatal shot hole is 
under the arm pit. — Min.stre/siy of the Border. 

t King William hearing that the express dis- 
patched to Edinburgh with the account of the de- 
feat had been detained a day on the road, ex- 
claimed, " Dundee must certainly have fallen, 
otherwise he would have been there before it could 
have arrived." At a later period, William being 
urged to reinforce the troops in Scotland, leplied, 
" It is needless : the war died with Dundee." 



to a profusion of long curled locks of the 
same colour which fell down on each side of 
his face, contributed to form such a counte- 
nance as limners like to paint, and ladies 
to look upon. The severity of his character, 
as well as the higher attributes of undaunted 
and enterprising valour which even his 
enemies were compelled to admit, lay con- 
cealed under an exterior which seemed 
adapted to the court or the saloon, rather 
than to the field. The same gentleness and 
gaiety of expression which rpigned in his 
features seemed to inspire his actions and 
gestures ; and, on the whole he was gene- 
rally esteemed, at first sight, rather quali- 
fied to the votary of pleasure than ambition. 
JJut under this soft exterior was hidden a 
spirit unbounded in daring, and in aspiring, 
yet cautious and prudent as that of Ma- 
chiavel himself. Profound in politics, 
and imbued of course with that disregard 
for individual rights which its intrigues 
usually generate, this leader was cool and 
collected in danger, fierce and ardent in 
[lursuing success, careless of death himself, 
and ruthless in inflicting it upon others.* 
Such are the characters fornied in times of 
civil discord, when the highest qualities, per- 
verted by party spirit, and inflamed by 
habitual opposition, are too often combined 
with vices and excesses which deprive them 
at once of their merit and of their lustre." 

Lord Dundee »«. Jean, youngest daughter 
of William Lord Cochrane, and by her 
(who wedded secondly), William, third Lord 
Kilsyth, had a son, 

James, second Viscount Dundee, who 
died young, in December, 1689, and was 
succeeded by his uncle, 

David, third Viscount Dundee,who fought 
at Killicranky, and was outlawed. He died 
without issue in 1700. 

* All other punishments save death disgraced, 
he said, a gentleman, and all who were with him 
were of that rank, but that death was a relief 
from the consciousness of crime. It is reported, 
that having seen a youth fly in his first action, 
Dundee pretended he had sent him to the rear on 
a message ; the youth fled a second time ; — he 
brought him to the front of the army, and declaring 
that " a gentleman's son ought not to fall by the 
hands of a common executioner," shot him with 
his own pistol. 



1'25 



CR.EME, OF GARVOCK. 



GR7EME, ROBERT, esq. of Garvock, in the county of Perth, h. 4th September, 

1766; in. 1st September, 1802, Jane-Anne, only 
(laiig'hter of William Aytoiin, esq. second son of Ro<rer 
Aytoun, seventh laird of Inclidarnie, and chief of the 
family of Aytoiin, by whom he has had issue, 

Jamks, h. 23rd July, 1803. 

William, b. 30th December, 1806; d. 14th March 

1820. 
Robert, h. 13th June, 1811. 

Isabc'lla-Edmondstoun. 

Mary. 

Jane- Anne. 

Jaiiet-l?ollo. 

Katliariiie-Oliphant. 

This gentleman, who is in the commission of the peace 
and a deputy lieutenant for Perthshire, succeeded his 
father in 1812. 




Umtac^f. 



This family is directly descended from 
Sir V\ illiiiiii Graliaiu, of Kinciirdiiie, an- 
cestor of fbr (hiciil lioiist' of jNIontrose, 
through a priuctss of the royal line of Scot- 
land. 

The first who appears on record is 

William de Graham, who settled iu 
Scotland under Kiiig 1>avid I. He ob- 
tained from that monarcli a grant of the 
lauds of Abercorn and Dalkeith, and wit- 
nessed the charter to the monks of Holy- 
roodhouse in 1128. Directly descended 
from him was 

Sm William Graham, of Kincardine, 
styled iu the charters, " Williclums domi- 
nus de Grame de Kincardin." He was 
commissioner to treat with the English, 
11th December, 1406; had a safe conduct 
into England, loth May, 1412, and another 
from thence to Scotland about the release 
of James I., 16th April, 1413. A charter 
was granted 4th August, 1420, " Willielmo 
Domino de Grame militi et Mariotaj Stew- 
art, Sorori Roberti Ducis Albaniye Spouste 
dicti Willielmi," of the lands of Auld Mon- 
trose, Kinnaber, and Charleton, in the county 
of Forfar. 

By his first marriage Sir William Gra- 
ham had two sons, from the elder of whom 
descends the fiimily of Montrose. He w. 
secondly, the Lady Mary Stuart, second 
daughter of Ki7tff Robert IH., relict of 
George, Earl of Angus, and Sir James Ken- 
nedy, of Duumure, and subsequently the 



wife of Sir Archibald Edmonstone, of Dun- 
treith, and by her he had several sons, of 
whom, 

I. Sir Robert Graham, of Strathcar- 
ron, was ancestor of Grahams, of 
Fintry, of Claverhouse, Viscounts of 
Dundee, and the Grahams of Dun- 
troon (see p. 120). 

II. Patrick, was consecrated Bishop of 
Brechin, 1463, translated to the epis- 
copal see of St. Andrews, 1466. 

III. William, was the 

Graeme, of Garvock, and direct ancestor 
of the present family. He was a soldier, 
and for his faithful services to Kinff James 
I. his uncle, obtained, in early life, a grant 
of the lands and barony of Garvock, which 
was afterwards confirmed in 1473, and from 
him the estate has descended iu the direct 
line, from father to son, to the present time, 
as appears from documents in the family 
charter chest. He lived to an advanced 
age, and left a son, 

Matthew le Graeme, of Garvock, who 
succeeded to William in 1502, but died soon 
afterw ards, being advanced in years before 
his father's death. He was succeeded by 
his son, 

Archibald Gr.-eme, who fell at the dis- 
asteroiis battle of Flodden, on 9th Septem- 
ber, 1613, leaving a son and successor, 

John Gr*me, of Garvock, who married 
first, Mirabell Whyte, daughter of John 
Whyte, of Lumbany, and secondly, Katha- 



126 



GRAEME, OF GARVOCK. 



rine Arnot, daughter of Walter Arnot, of 
that Ilk, ill 1545. He left two sons, 

I. James, who succeeded him. 

II. John, of Balo-owan, ancestor of the 
Grahams, of Balgowan, and of the 
gallant Lord Lyndock, tlie hero of 
Barrosa. Among the sheriff" records at 
Perth, (tnno 15H6, there exist several 
contracts entered into betwixt " Jolin 
Graham, of Garvock, and John Gra- 
ham, of Balgourre his sone." In the 
same record and year, there is also 
mention made of " John Graham, of 
Balgourre, and Marjorie Rollock 
his spouse," designed " Lady Incli- 
braikie." She was eldest daughter 
of Andrew Rollo, of Duncrub, and 
widow of George Gramme, of Inch- 
braco. 

Jamks Gr.eme, of Garvock, succeeded to 
his father, John, and married Janet Bonar, 
daugliter of Bonar, of Kelty, in 1571, by 
whom lie had issue. He was succeeded by 
liis eldest son, 

NiMAN Gk.eme, wlio m. Elizabeth Oli- 
phant, daughter of Laurence Oliphaut, of 
Fergandenny, in 1606, and by lier he was 
fatlier of 

John Gii.eme, of Garvock, who m. Agnes 
Di ummond, daugliter of (ieorge Drumraond, 
of Balloch, in 1638. Tliis lady had only 
one brother, who was of weak intellect, 
and sold tlie estate of Ballock to the Earl 
of Perth, for the trifling sum of a bodle (a 
small Scotch coin) per day during his life- 
time. Her son, James Grsme, of Garvock, 
afterwards disputed the validity of the 
sale, claiming the estate through his mother, 
but tlie cause was tried before the earl liim- 
self, who was then chancellor of Scotland, 
and he decided in liis own favour. 

James Gk.t.me, of Garvock, succeeded to 
liis father, John, and on the 14th December, 
1677, he was served heir-in-general of John 
Graham, of Balgowan, (the second of that 
family) by a retour of that date upon re- 
cord, wherein tlie latter is designed the son 
of the brother of liis great grandfather, 
" Jacobus Grahame de Garvock haeres Jo- 
annis Grahame de Balgown Jilii fratis pro- 
avi." He purchased from Haldane, of 
Gleneagles, the lands of Kippen, a property 
in Strathern, about two miles distant from 
Garvock, which is still in the family. He 



married Anne Stewart, daughter of John 
Stewart, of Arntullie and Cardneys, in 1678, 
and was s. by liis eldest son, 

James Gk.eme, who married, first, Amelia, 
daughter of Sir Robert Moray, of Aber- 
cairney, by whom he had three sons, James, 
John, and Robert, and two daughters, Anna 
and Elizabeth. He married, secondly, in 
17-20, Bettie Bell, sister of Charles Bell, of 
Craigfovelie, but by her he had no issue. 
He was s. by his youngest and only sur- 
viving son, 

Robert Gr/emr, who married, in 1736, 
Katherine, daughter of James Oliphaut, esq. 
of Gask, by whom he had four sons, James, 
Lawrence, Charles - James - Stewart, and 
Robert, with two daughters, Amelia-Anna- 
Sophia and Margaret. This laird was in- 
volved in the rising of 1745, after which lie 
escaped to France, and entered into the 
French service, where he remained for se- 
veral years, leaving his estate to his eldest 
son. He returned, however, afterwards, 
and died in his native country. He was s. 
by his son, 

James Gr.t.me, of Garvock, who married, 
first, in 1764, Mary, daughter of the Rev. 
Henry Nisbet, of the family of Dean, by 
Miss Graham, of Duchray ; and secondly, 
Mary, daughter of Captain Robertson, of 
the British army. By his first wife he had 
five sons and three daughters, viz. 

Robert, his heir. 

James, 

Henry, all of whom died abroad 

Moray, " without issue. 

Lawrence, 

Janet, m. to Captain Rollo, grandson 
of Robert, fourth Lord Rollo, and 
has issue, 

''I 
Elizabeth, ^ 

Garvock d. in 1812, and was s. by his only 

surviving son, the present Robert Graeme, 

esq. 

Arms — Or, three piles, gu. issuing from a 
chief, sa. charged with as many escallops of 
the first. 

Crest — A lion rampant gu. 

Motto — Noli me tangere. 

Estates — Garvock and Kippen, both in 
Perthshire. 

Seat — Garvock. 



Katherine, > . .i ,• i 

'' both died unm. 



1^7 



FERRERS, OF BADDI^SLEY CLINTON. 

FERRERS. MARMION-EDWARD, esq. of Baddesloy Clinton, in the county 
of Warwick, h. 13th Octoher, 1813, inheritod the estates niid representation of this, 
the only remaining- hraiich of the once potent name of Ferrers, upon tlie demise of 
his fatlier, 10th August, 1830. 



1lmcnc(t. 




mn/ 




This ancient family, than wliicli iew can 
claim a liioher or more illustrious descent, 
derives from Walchelin, a Norman, whose 
son, 

Henry Ferrers, assumed the name from 
Ferriers, a small town of Gastinois, in 
France, otherwise called Ferrieres from 
the iron mines, with wliieh tliat country 
abounded, and in allusion to the circum- 
stance, he bore for his arms " .six horses' 
shoes," either from the similitude of his 
cognomen to the French Ferrier, or because 
the seigneurie produced iron, so essential to 
the soldier and cavalier in those rude times, 
when war was esteemed the chief business 
of life, and the adroit management of tlie 
steed, even amongst the nobility, the first of 
accomplisliments. Henry de Ferrers came 
into England with The Conqi'Ekor, and ob- 
tained a grant of Tutbury Castle, in the 

county of Stafford. He m. Bertha , 

and had issue, 

Robert, his heir. 
Eugeuulph, who d. s. p. 
W alkelin. of Radbourne, whose grand- 
son, Robert, living temp. Henry II. 
left two daughters, his co-heirs, viz. 
Margery, who wedded Sir John 
Chandos, and from this marriage 
lineally descends the present 



Edward - Sachevfrf.ll- Chan- 
dos Pole, esq. of Radliourn Hall, 
in the county of JJcrby. (See 
that fnmdji.) 
EliMiTKiiDE,' m. to Sir Williitm de 
Stafford. 
Tlie eldest son, 

R<u$ERT DE Ferrars, having contributed, 
at the head of the Derbyshire nu'ii, to Ki),^ 
Stephen's victory over David of Scotland 
at Northallerton, was created by that mo- 
narch Earl of Derby. He was lineal an- 
cestor of 

William de Ferrers, seventh earl of 
Derby, who married, for his second wife, 
Margaret, daughter and co-heir of Roger 
de Quinci, earl of Winchester, and had two 
sons, 

1. Robert, eighth earl of Derby, (for 
detail, see Burke's Extinct and Dor- 
mant Peerac/e). whose eldest son, 
John de Ferrers, inherited Chart- 
ley Castle, and was summoned 
to parliament 27th Edward I. 
as Baron Ferrers, of Chartley. 
His last male descendant, 
William de Ferrers, sixth Baron 
Ferrers, of Chartley, left at his 
decease, 28th Henry VI. an only 
son, 

Anne Ferrers, who wedded Wal- 
ter Devereux, who was sum- 
moned to parliament, jure uxo- 
1-is, as seventh Baron Ferrers, of 
Chartley. His lordship fell at 
Bosworth, adhering to the side 
of Richard, and was s. by his 
son, 

Sir John Devereux, eighth Baron 
Ferrers, of Chartley, who m. 
Cicely, sister and sole heiress of 
Henry Bourchier, earl of Ewe 
and Essex, and Baroness Bour- 
chier in her own right, (mater- 
nally descended from Thomas 
Plantagenet, son of Edward 
HI.), and had a son and suc- 
cessor. 



i:8 



FERUERS, OF BADDESLEY CLINTON. 



Walter Devekkiix, ninth Baron 
Ferrers, of Chartley, and first 
Viscount Hereford. His lord- 
ship was *. by his grandson, 

Walter Devereux, tenth Barou 
Ferrers, of Chartley, and first 
earl of Essex, whose son and 
successor, 

Robert Devereux, eleventh Ba- 
ron Ferrers, of Chartley, and 
the second and celebrated earl 
of Essex, m. Frances, daughter 
and heiress of Sir Francis Wal- 
singham, and relict of Sir Phili|) 
Sidney, by whom he left (with a 
son, Robert, third earl of Essex, 
and twelftli Baron Ferrers, who 
died issueless), two daughters, 
co-heirs to their brother, 

Frances, m. to William, duke 
of Somerset, whose male 
line failed in 1675, 
and 
Dorothy Dk\ frei'x, who wedded 
Sir Henry Sliirley, bart. of Stan- 
ton, and their grandson, 

Sir Robert Shirley, on the failure 
of the male line of the elder co- 
heir, having the abeyance termi- 
nated in his fiivour by Charles 
II. in 1677, was summoned as 
thirteenth Baron Ferrers, of 
Chartley. His lordship, who was 
created Earl Ferrers and Vis- 
count Tarn worth in 1711, was 
father of 
The Hon. Robert Shirley, who 
m. Anne, grand -daughter and 
sole heiress of John Ferrers, esq. 
of Tamworth Castle, and hence 
lineally descends George, Mar- 
quis Townshend, present Lord 
Ferrers, of Chartley. 
II. W^illiam, of whom immediately. 
The second son, 

William Ferrers, obtained, by gift of 
Margaret his mother, the co-heir of the 
earl of Winchester, the manor of Groby, in 
the county of Leicester, and assumed, there- 
upon, the arras of De Quinci, " gu. seven 
mascles or." He m. Eleanor, daughter of 
Matthew, Lord Lovaine, and, dying in 1287, 
was s. by his son, 

William Ferrers, who was summoned 
to parliamentas Baron Ferrers, of (iroby. 
His lordship's direct descendant, (for the 
intermediate line refer to Burke's Extinct 
and Dormant Peerage), 

William Ferijers, fifth Baron Ferrers, 
of Groby, wedded Philipi)a, daughter of 
Roger, Lord Cliflord, and dying 23rd Hen- 
m VL left three sons, viz. 

I. IIknrv, wiio died during liis fatlier's 



lifetime, leaving by Isabel, second 
daughterandco-heirof ThomasMow- 
b!ay,duke of Norfolk, an only daugh- 
ter, 

Elizabeth, who m. Sir Edward 
Grey, and carried the barony of 
Groby into the Grey family. 

II. Thomas (Sir), of whom presently. 

III. John, whence the Ferrers, of Mer- 
cute, now extinct. 

The second son. 

Sir Thomas Ferrers, knt. espoused Eli- 
zabeth, eldest sister and co-heir of Sir Bald- 
win Frevile, and inherited, in her right, 
Tamworth Castle. Sir Thomas died 37th 
Henry VI. leaving issue, 

1. Thomas (Sir), second lord of Tam- 
worth Castle, who m. Anne, sister of 
William, Lord Hastings, and was s. 
at his decease, 22nd August, 14th 
Henry VII. by his grandson. 

Sir John Ferrers, knt. of Tam- 
worth Castle, who wedded Do- 
rothy, daughter of William Har- 
per, esq. of Rushall, in Stafford- 
shire, and was father of 
Sir Humphrey Ferrers, of 
Tamworth Castle, who m. 
first, Margaret, daughter of 
Mr.SergeantThomas Pigot ; 
and, secondly, Dorothy, dau. 
and co-heir of Thomas Mar- 
row, esq. widow of Francis 
Cockain, of Pooley, and 
niece of Constantia Brome, 
wife of Sir Edward Ferrers, 
of Baddesley Clinton. Sir 
Humphrey died 1st Mary, 
leaving, by his first wife, a 
son and successor, 
John Ferrers, esq. of Tam- 
worth Castle, who m. Bar- 
bara, daughter of Francis 
Cockain, esq. by Dorothy 
Marrow, and had, with other 
issue, a daughter, Dorothy, 
m. to Edward Holte, esq. 
and a son, 
Sir Humphrey Ferrers, knt. 
of Tamworth Castle, who 
m. 5th Elizabeth, Anne, 
dau. of Humphrey Brad- 
burne, of Lee, in Derby- 
shire, and left at his decease, 
5th James I. a numerous pro- 
geny, of whom Susanna, the 
youngest daughter, wedded 
Sir George Gresley, bart. of 
Drakelow, and 
Sir John Ferrers, knt. of 
Tamworth Castle, the eldest 
son, succeeded his father. 
He m. Dorothy, daughter 



ITJIRERS, OF BADDESLEY CLINTON. 



1-J') 



of Sir Jolin Puckeringe, 
keeper oftlic great seal, and 
had (with three daugiitcrs, 
Frances, in. to Sir Jolin 
Packing-ton, of VVestwood ; 
Anne, nt. to Sir Simon Ar- 
cher, of Unil)ersla(le ; and 
Jane, m. to Sir Thomas 
Rous), a son and successor. 
Slit Hiimi'iiki:y Fk kkkiis, knt. 
of Tam worth Castle, who 
inherited and died in 1033. 
He wedded Anne, dangliter 
of Sir .Jolm Packington, and 
had by lier (wlio Jti. se- 
condly, Philip, earl of Ches- 
terfield), an only son, 
John Flukkrs, esq. of Tam- 
worth Castle, b. in 1G29, 
M.P. for Derbyshire at the 
restoration of Charles II. 
m. Anne, dau. of Sir Dudley 
Carleton, and had a daugh- 
ter, Dorothy, the wife of 
Richard, earl of Arran, and 
a son, 

Hi'.MPHREY (Sir), knt. 
who died in 1678, two 
years previously to his 
father, leaving, by Eli- 
zabeth his wife, dau. of 
Gervase Pigott, esq. of 
Thrumpton, Notts, an 
only dau. and heiress, 
Anne Ferrers, who espoused 
(as already stated) the Hon. 
Robert Shirley, eldest son 
of Robert, first Earl Fer- 
rers, and thirteenth Lord 
Ferrers, of Chartley, and 
had an only daughter and 
heiress, 
Elizabeth Shirley, who m. 
James Compton, earl of 
Northampton. Their only 
daughter and heiress. 
Lady Charlotte Compton, 
Baroness Ferrers and Comp- 
ton, m. George, first Mar- 
quess Townshend, and had 
a son and successor, 
George,V)scount Tam WORTH, 
who then became sixteenth 
Baron Ferrers, of Chartley. 
His lordship was created 
earl of Leicester in 1784, 
and inherited the Marqui- 
sate of Townshend at the 
decease of his father, as 
second marquess. He m. 
Charlotte, dau. of Eaton- 
Mainwaring Ellerker, esq. 
of Risby Park, and had 
George, present Marquis 
Townshend, and seventeenth 



II. 



Baron Ferrers, of ChartlcN , 
with several other children, 
one of whom, the Lady 
Harriet Anne Townshend, 
espoused F-IdwardFehrers, 
esq. of Baddesley Clinton. 
II. Henry (Sir), of whom we are more 
immediately about to treat. 
The second son, 

Sir Henry Ferrers, knt. of Hambleton, 
in the county of Rutland, wedded Margaret, 
daughter and co-heir of William Hikstall, 
es(|. of East Peckham, in Kent, and had 
(with a daughter, Elizabeth) a son and suc- 
cessor. 

Sir Edward Ferrers, b. in 1470; who 
m. in 1497, Constance, daughter of Nicho- 
las Brome, esq. of Baddesley Clinton, in 
the county of Warwick, by whom, who died 
30th September, 1551, he acquired that es- 
tate, and had issue, 

1. Henry, who m. in 1524, Catherine, 
daughter and co-heir of Sir John 
Hampden, knt. of Hampden, and 
predeceasing his father, in 1526, left 
an only child, 

Edward, successor to his grand- 
father. 
Edward, who /«. Elizabeth, daughter 
and heir of William Grey, esq. of 
Wood Bevington, in Warwickshire, 
and had three daugliters, of whom 
the eldest, Elizabeth, married Tho- 
mas Randolph, esq. who purchased 
the interest of the other sisters, and 
became sole lord of the manor. 

III. George. 

IV. Nicholas. 

I. Jane, m. to William Finden. 

II. Ursula, '/«. to — Beaufoy. 

III. Anne, m. to — Knightley. 

IV. Margaret, ?n. to Thomas Frogge- 
nall. 

V. Elizabeth, m. to — Hampden. 

VI. Alice. 

Sir Edwai-d Ferrers served the office of liigli 
sheriff for Warwickshire in the 5th and 10th 
of Henry VIII. ; he was s. by his grand- 
sou, 

Edward Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley 
Clinton, b. in 1526, who, in the 1st of 
Quee7i Mary, represented the borough of 
Warwick in parliament. He m. in 1548, 
Bridget, daughter of William, second Lord 
Windsor, and dying 10th Angust, 1564, (his 
widow survived until 1582), was s. by his 
eldest son, 

Henry Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, b. 26th January, 1549, whom Dugdale 
styles an eminent antiquarian, and di-- 
scribes as " a man of distinguished worth, 
reflecting lustre on the ancient and noble 
family to which he belonged." Camden, 
likewise, bears testimony to his exalted 
K 



130 



FI-RRERS, OF BADDESLEY CLINTOIS 



character, and to the extent of Ins know- 
ledge, uavticularlv iu antiquities. He in. 
in October, 1582, Jane, dau. and co-heir ot 
Henrv White, esq. of South Warnborn in 
Hampshire, son of Sir Thomas ^\hlte knt. 
and by her, who died 7th September, 1586, 
asied twenty- three, left at his decease, 10th 
October, l<'i33, a daughter, Mary, and a 
son and successor, ,-„ ,, , ^,. 

Edward Fkrrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton b. 1st November, 1585, sheriff of War- 
wickshire in the 17th Charles I. This gen- 
tleman espoused,24th February, 1611, Anne, 
eldest dau. of William Peyto, esq. of Ches- 
terton, and by that lady, who d. 12th Sep- 
tember, 1618, aged thirty-three, had one 
son, and two daughters, namely, Henry, 
his heir, Eleanor, and Catharine. Mr. 
Ferrers d. 22nd March, 1650-1, and was 
s. by his son, 

Henry Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, b. 6th December, 1616, sheriff of War- 
wickshire 16th Charles II. who, upon the 
death of John Ferrers, of Tamworth Castle, 
in 1680, became heir male of the family. 
He m. in April, 1638, Bridget, daughter of 
Edward Willoughby, esq. of Causell, Notts, 
and had a numerous family. He d. in 1698, 
• (his wife had predeceased him in the pre- 
ceding year), and was s. by his eldest son, 

George Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, b. in 1639, who d. 11th August, 1712, 
leaving by Elizabeth his wife, only daughter 
of William Kempson, esq. of Ardens Graf- 
ton, in Warwickshire, a daughter, Mary 
Magdalen, and a son, 

Edward Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, b. 5th January, 1658-9. This gentle- 
man wedded, 26th February, 1712, Teresa, 
dannhter of Sir Isaac Gibson, of Worcester, 
and'^by her, who d. in 1734, hud one son 
and one daughter, viz. 
Thomas, his heir. 
Mary, m. to — Berkeley, esq. 
Mr. Ferrers was s. at his decease, in 1729, 
by his son, 

Thomas Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, b. 4th April, 1713, who m. 10th June, 
1737, Margaret, daughter of John K imp- 
son, esq. of Henley in Arden, and had two 
sons and five daughters, viz. 
I, Edward, his heir. 
I!. Henry. 

I. Mary. 

II. Teresa. 

III. Frances. 

IV. Anne. 

V. Elizabeth. 

The elder son, 

Edward Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, inherited the estates upon the demise 
of his father in 1760. He j«. in 1763, Hes- 
ter, daughter of Christopher Bird, esq. of 



London, and by her, who d. in 1822, had 
two sons and seven daughters, viz. 
1. Edward, his heir, 
n. Thomas, a major in the army, who 
served during the whole of the pen- 
insular war, and was killed by a fall 
from the ramparts of a fortress in 
France. 

I. Hester, died unm. ^ -o u * 

II. Lucy, was the third wife of Robert 
'willoughby, esq. of Cliff, and left a 

daughter, m. to — Bateraan, esq. 
in. Frances, died unm. 

IV. Maria, m. to Court Granville, esq. 
of Calwich Abbey, in the county of 
Stafford. 

V. Catherine, ni. to — Edwards, esq. 

VI. Elizabeth, jh. in 1803, to John Ge- 
rard, esq. of Windle Hall, in Lan- 
cashire, and was mother of the pre- 
sent Sir John Gerard, hart, of Bryn. 

VII. Anne-Teresa, m. first, to Henry 
Clifford, esq. barrister-at-law, bro- 
ther to Sir Thomas -Hugh Clifford 
Constable, baronet, and grandson of 
Hugh, fourth Lord Clifford ; and, se- 
condly, to Edward Hebden, esq. 

Mr. Ferrers d. 25th February, 1794, and 

was s. by his son, 

Edward Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, b. 17th April, 1765, who m. 18th Au- 
gust, 1788, Helena, daughter and heiress of 
George Alexander, esq. of Stirtlec, in the 
county of Huntingdon, and had issue, 

I. Edward, his heir. 

II. George-Thomas, b. 21st December, 
1791, who m. 8th September, 1817, 
Mary, eldest daughter of George Gil- 
low, esq. of Hammersmith, Middle- 
sex, and had five sons and two daugh- 

tc*rs viz. 

1.' George- Joseph, b. 18th March, 

1819. 

2. Thomas-John, b. in 1821. 

3. Richard-Vincent, b. 12th April, 
1823. 

4. Edmund, b. 1824. 
6. Bernard, b. 1829. 

1. Mary. 

2. Sarah. 

I. Mary, m. to John-Bruno Bowdon, 
esq. of Southgate House, in the 
county of Derby. 

II. Magdalen, m. to George Pickering, 

esq. 
ill. Caroline. 
Mr. Ferrers d. 25th September, 1795, and 

was s. bv his son, 

Edward Ferrers, esq. of Baddesley Clin- 
ton, b. 31st January, 1790, a magistrate and 
deputy lieutenant 'for tlie county of "^ ar- 
wick, who in. nth March, 1813, the Lady 
Harriet-Anne-Ferrers Townshend, second 
daughter of George, Marquis Townshend, 



FERRERS, OF BADDESLEY CUN'TON. 



131 



and sixteenth Baron Ferrers, of Cliartley, 
and had issue, 

I. MARMTON-Ei)\v\Kn, his lieir. 

II. Charles, h. 2nd Scptcnihcr, 1814. 

III. (Jroby-Thonias, /;. l})fli July, 181G; 
died 2;?rd Sfi)teni1)er, 1831. " 

IV. Compton-CJerard,^. 12th May, 1818 

V. Taniworth-George, i. 22nd Septem- 
ber, 1827. 

I. Henrietta-Elizabeth. 

II. Maro^aret-Anne. 

IM. Constance-Charlotte. 
Mr. Ferrers died 10th August, 1830, and 
was su(;cee(led by his eldest son, the present 
IMakmion-Edward Fekreus, esq. of Bad- 
desley Clinton. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, vair 
or and gu. (ensigns of the feudal earls of 
Derby after the match of the third earl with 
Peverill) ; second, sa. six horse shoes arg. 
three, two, and one, Fi:riif.rs ancient ; third, 
gu. seven mascles or, a canton erm. Fer- 
rers of Groby. 

Crest — A unicorn passant erm. 

%* Prior to the extinction of the senior 
branch of the family seated at Tamworth 
Castle, the line of Baddesley Clinton bore 
" gu. seven mascles or, a canton erm ; but 
having now become sole surviving male 
heirs of this ancient house, the Ferrerses of 
Baddesley have resumed the old arms. 

Motto — Splendio tritus. 

Estate — Baddesley Clinton, in the Hem- 
lingford Hundred of the county of War- 
wick. 

Seat — Baddesley Clinton Hall, eight miles 
from Warwick. This ancient mansion re- 
ceived its first name from Bade, a Saxon, 
who held it in the time of Edward the Con- 
fessor, and its second from Sir Thomas de 
Clinton, of Coshill, who obtained the estate 
temp. Henry HI. in right of his wife Mar- 
gery, daughter and heiress of James de Be- 
siege, whence, after various transmissions, 
it passed by purchase, in the reign of Henry 
IV. to John Brome, a wealthy lawyer of 
Warwick, who resided in a house at the 
north end of the bridge, which long retained 
the name of Brome Place : at his decease, 
in consequence of a wound received in a 
dispute with one John Hear thill, the manor 



of Baddesley devolved on his son, Nichola.s 
Brome, and snbsctpieiitly by the marriage 
of his daughter, Constance, on Sir Edward 
Ecrnrs, grandson of Sir Thomas Ferrers, 
of Tamworth Castle. The hall is a struc- 
ture of very ancient date, though the time 
of its erection is not exactly known ; it is a 
stone building of low elevation, but of con- 
sidtral)Ie extent ; forming three sides of a 
square, of which the fourth, if it ever existed, 
has long since disappeared : a moat sur- 
rounds the mansion, and a bridge conducts 
to the entrance, leading through the lofty 
arch of an embattled gateway into the inner 
court. 

The History of Baddesley Clinton, 

By Henry Ferrers, esq. the Antiquary, 

temp. Elizabeth. 

This soiite and soyle from Saxon, Bade, a man of 

honest fame, 
Who held it in the Saxon's tyme, of Baddesley 

took the name, 
When Edward King the Confessor did weare the 

English crown, 
The same was then possest by a man of some 

renowne ; 
And England being conqiier'd in lot it did alyglite 
To Giffry Wirie, of noble birth, an Andegavian 

knight, 
A member Hamlet all this whyle, of Hampton 

here at hand, 
With Hampton so to Moulbray went as all the 

wive's land 
To Bisege, in that name it runs awhyle, and then 

is gone 
To Clinton as his heyre who leaves it to a younger 

son, 
And in that time the name of Baddesley Clinton 

was begun. 
From them agayne by wedding of their heyre at 

first it came 
To Conisby, and after him to Foukes, who weds 

the same. 
From Foukes to Dudley by a Sales, and so to 

Burdet past, , 

To JMitley Neat, by Mitley's will it came to Brome 

at last, 
Brome honours much the place, and afier some 

descents of Bromes, 
To Ferrers for a daughter's part of heyres in 

match it comes. 
In this last name it lasteth still, and so long — 

longer shall 
As God shall please who is the Lord and King 

and God of all. 



13-2 



REVELEY, OF BRYN Y GWIN. 



REVELEY, HUGH, esq. of Bryn y gwin, in the county of Merioneth, b. 15th July, 

1772; m. llth January, 1803, Jane, only daughter 
and heiress of Robert-Hartley Owen, esq. of Bryn y 
g-win, and has had issue, 

Hugh-John, h. 15th March, 1812. 
Jane-Frances, d. 16tli March, 1830. 

This gentleman, who is a B. C. L. of Christ Church, 
Oxford, was secretary to Sir John Mitford while Speaker 
of the House of Commons, and afterwards, when that 
learned person was constituted Lord Chancellor of 
Ireland, and created Baron Redesdale, filled the 
office of purse bearer to his lordship. 

Mr. Reveley is a magistrate and deputy lieutenant 
for the county of Merioneth, and was high slieriff 
in 1811. 




Hintac^c. 



The Reveleys, wlio trace their descent 
to the reign of Edwaud II. were originally 
seated in the manor house of Reveley, on 
tlie northern bank of the river Breamish, at 
the soutli eastern foot of Cheviot, and sub- 
sequently at Aucroft, in Northumberland, 
(for a detailed account, see vol. ii. p. 287). 
Their possessions, it would appear, were 
at one time considerable. la the reign of 
James I. George Reveley, of Aucroft, 
purchased from the last Lord Eure, the 
manors of Newton, Underwood, and Throp- 
hill, which Sir Simon Eure had acquired, 
temp. Henry III. from Lord Bertram, of 
Mitford. During the civil wars, William 
Reveley, of Aucroft (who had married a 
niece of the earl of Statford), with a body of 
troops I'aised by himself, fought for K'nig 
Charles, at the fatal field of Marstou Moor ; 
and was slain, having attained the rank of 
major, at the decisive battle of Nasehy. 

The father of this stout cavalier lies in- 
terred in the chancel of Mitford church, 
were a large mural monument, decorated 
with arms, bears the following inscription : 

" Here lyeth interred, with, 

in, tbis, mold, a, generous, and, 

Virtuous, \\ iglit, whose, 

due, deserte, cannot, be, tolde, 

from, slender, skill, unto, 

l)is, right: He, was, descended, 

from, a, race, of, worshipiull, 

Antiquities, loved, he, whs, 

in, his, life, space, of, high, ^ 

elce, of, low, degree, rest. 



B? a'am, in, this, house, of, clay, 
Reveley, unto, the, latter, day ; 

Underneath is his effigy cut in relief on the 
stone cover of his tomb, his hands lifted 
up as in the act of prayer : on the edge in 
capital letters appear these lines : 

Dartram to us so dutiful a son, 
if more were fit it should for thee be done, 
who deceased the 7th October, anno domiui 1622. 

On the marriage of 

WiLLL\M Reveley, esq. of Newton L^n- 
dt-rwood, (who was born in 16R2,) with Mar- 
gery, daughter and heiress of Robert AVil- 
ley, esq. of Newby Wiske, the seat of the 
family was removed from Northumberland 
to Yorkshire, and the Hall House of Newby 
Wiske erected. By the heiress of Willey, 
Mr. Reveley had issue, 

Willey, who succeeded to the estates 
of Newton Underwood and Newby 
Wiske. He m. in 1717, Rachel, 
daughter of Henry Neale, esq. of 
London, and was father of 

ELizABEfH, who m. John Mit- 
lORD, esq. of Exbury, and was 
great grandmother of 

Henry Reveley Mitford, 
esq. of Exbury, who inherits 
the estates of the Reveley 
family, (see vol. ii. p. 285). 

Gi-oRGE, of whom presently. 
Philadelphia, h. in 1688, who wcddtd 



RALFOUR, OF TRENARY. 



1 3:5 



Laiipdale Sniithson, vs([. second son 
of Sir Hnj^Ii Sniitlison, bart, and liud 
an only son, 

Sir HriJH Smiiiison, A. at N(>\vl)y 
Wiske, who was created Dukr 

of NOKTHUMBEKLAND. 

Mar<;ery, h. in UiSl), tn. to — Crohair. 
Barbara, died nnniarricd. 
Mr, Reveley died 24th February, 1726. 
His second son, 

Gkokc.i-; RiiVKLKY, esq. born in lGi)i), 
married Miss Elizabeth Tucker, and by Iier, 
who died in London, in .Inly, 1747, had two 
sons, HKNRY,liis lieir ; and Hugh, who died 
unmarried, 2nd May, 17()2. Mr. Reveley 
d. himself at Alicante, in Spain, in 1760, 
and was s. by his son, 

Hknry Rkveley, esq. born at Alicante, in 
1737, for many years a commissioner of the 
Excise. This gentleman, an excellent 
musician and connoisseur in the fine arts, 
formed a choice collection of the old 
masters' drawings and etchings now at 
Bryn y gwin. He was the autlior himself of 
a volume entitled " Notices of the drawings 
of the most distinguished masters," edited 
l)y his son, in 182G. Mr. Reveley wedded 
in 1771, Jane, sister of Sir Claude Champion 
de Crespigny, bart. and daughter of Philip 
Champion de Crespigny, esq. of Camber- 
well, by Miss Fonnereau, his wife, and by 



her, who died 1th February, 1829, aged 
eighty-six, had issue, 
HiMMi, Ills heir. 

Algernon, h. 27th Decem1)er, 1780, 
entered the India civil service as a 
writer in 1803, and, after remaining 
several years at Calcutta, returned 
and settled in England. 

Elizabeth-Anne, who ?h. in 1796, Cad- 

wallader Rlayney Trevor Roper, esq. 

of Plas Teg, in Flintshire, son of the 

Hon. and Rev. Mr. Roper, (son of 

Jjord Teynham), and cousin to Lord 

Dacre, from whom he inherited his 

estates in the counties of Flint and 

Kent. Mrs. Trevor Roper died 14tli 

June, 1816. 

Henrietta, w*. to Mattliew Buckle, psq. 

capt. R.N. son of Admiral Buckle, 

of Nork, in Surrey, (see vol. i. p. 

575). 

Mr. Reveley died in 1798, and was s. by 

his elder son, the present Hugh Reveley, 

esq. of Bryn-y-gwin. 

Ar7ns — Arg. a chev. engrailed gu. be- 
tween three stars of twelve points az. 
Crest — An estoile as in the arms. 
Motto — Optima revelatio Stella. 
Estates — In the county of Merioneth. 
Seat — Bryn-y-gwin, near Dolgellan. 



BALFOUR, OF TRENABY. 



BALFOUR, JOHN, esq. of Trenaby, in the county of Orkney, b. 6th November, 
1750; m. 10th November, 1783, Henrietta, sister of Sir Benjamin Sullivan, and of 
the Right Hon. John Sullivan, of Richings Park, but has no issue. 

Mr. Balfour, who represented, for twelve years, his native county, Orkney, in par- 
liament, succeeded his father in 1786, and his mother in 1796. 



Hintnge. 




The family of Balfour, which derived its 
name from its patrimony of Balor, or Bal- 
four, in Fifeshire, long enjoyed the hereditary 
office of sheriff' of that county, in which there 
were more freeholders of the name than of 
any other, even so late as the reign of 
Charles II. Besides many illustrious de- 
scendants in the female line, it has been en- 
nobled by three peerages, viz. Burleigh and 
Kilwinning, in Scotland, and Balfour of 
Clonawley, in Ireland. Although the pedi- 
gree goes back to the time of Di'Ncan 1. 
(1033 — 1039), the first mentioned in the pub- 
lic records is 

Sir Michael de Balfour, who obtained 
a charter from William the Lion, dtated at 
Forfar, about the year 1196. His son, 



134 



BALFOUR, OF TRENABY. 



Sir Ingelram de Balfour, was sheriff of 
Fife in 122t>, and d. in 1239, leav ing a son 
and successor, 

Henry Balfour, father of 

John Balfour, who fell anions: the flower 
of the barons of Fifeshire at the sack of 
Berwick by Edward I. 30th March, 1296, 
and was s. by his son, 

Sir Duncan Balfour, sheriff of Fife, 
one of the patriotic few who adhered to the 
fortunes of the renowned Sir William Wal- 
lace. He was slain 12th June, 1298, at the 
battle of Blackironside, where the Scottish 
hero defeated, with great slaughter, tlie 
English under Aymer de Valence, Earl of 
Pembroke. Sir Duncan's son, 

Sir John Balfour, who succeeded to his 
father's estates and office, that of sheriff of 
Fife. Sir John participated in the victory 
obtained at Dillecarew, in 1300, by Sir John 
Fraser and Sir W^illiam Wallace, but re- 
ceived a severe wound in the conflict. His 
son and successor. 

Sir Michael Balfour, sheriff of Fife in 
1314, died in 1344, leaving two sons, viz. 

I, John (Sir), who succeeded to the 
estates of Balfour, and to the office 
of sheriff of Fife. He d. in 1375, 
and left an only daughter and 
heiress, 

Margaret, who wedded Sir Ro- 
bert Bethune, and hence descend 
the Bethunes of Balfour. 

II. Adam, of whose line we have to 
treat. 

Sir Michael's second son, 

Adam Balfour, who married the grand- 
daughter of Macduff, brother of Colbane, 
Earl of Fife, acquired the lands of Pitten- 
crieft' in dowry. He died of wounds re- 
ceived at the battle of Durham, and was 
buried in Melrose Abbey, anno 1346. His 
son. 

Sir Michael Balfour, was brought up 
by his kinsman, Duncan, twelfth Earl of 
Fife, who gave, in 1353, " consanguineo suo 
Michaeli de Balfour," in exchange for Pit- 
tencrieff, the much more valuable lands of 
Mount Whanny. The Countess Isabella, 
daughter of Earl Duncan, also bestowed 
many grants upon her " cousin" Sir Mi- 
chael, who, at her death, without issue, 
should have succeeded as her nearest heir, 
all the descendants of Earl Colbane failing 
in her ; but the Regent Albany, who 
claimed the earldom, was a competitor too 
powerful to be lightly opposed, and Sir 
Michael seems to have waved his rights. 
He d. about 1385, and was succeeded by his 
eldest son, 

Michael Balfour, of Mountwhanny, who 
m. and had three sons, namely, 

I. George, his heir. 

II. John, of Balquevy, progenitor of 



the Balfours of Drumyler, Forret, 
Runderston, Torry and Boghall, 
Kinloch, &c. 
111. David, of Carroldstoue. 

The eldest son, 

George Balfour, of Munquhanny, had 
two sons, John (Sir), his heir, and James, 
of Ballo. The elder 

Sir John Balfour, sheriff of Fife in 
1449, predeceased his father, being killed 
at the siege of Roxburgh, 1460, leaving 
three sons, 
Michael. 

John, bishop of Brechin, lord chancel- 
lor of Scotland. 
James, sub-dean of Brechin. 
The eldest son, 

Michael Balfour, of Munquhanny, suc- 
ceeded his grandfather, and wedded Janet, 
daughter of Sir Andrew Ogilvy, of Inch- 
martin, by whom he had two sons and one 
daughter, 

Michael (Sir), his heir. 
John, of Baledimond. 
Margaret, m. to William, third Earl of 
Rothes. 
Michael was succeeded by his elder son. 

Sir Michael Balfour, of Munquhanny, 
an especial favourite of James IV. who, 
in 1493, " pro singular! favori quem ha- 
buit erga dictum Michaelem," erected his 
lands into a barony, to be called the Barony 
of Munquhanny. He m. Marjory, daugh- 
ter of Andrew Dury, of that Ilk, and had 
issue, 

Andrew, his heir. 

Margaret, m. to Patrick Wemyss, of 
Pittencrieff, master of the household 
to James V. 
Janet, m. to Patrick Kircaldy, uncle of 
the celebrated Sir William Kircaldy, 
of Grange. 
Sir Michael fell at Flodden, where his bro- 
ther-in-law, the Earl of Rothes, was also 
slain, and was 5. by his son, 

Andrew Balfour, of Mount^vhany, who 
wedded Janet, third daughter of Sir Alex- 
ander Bruce, of Earlshall, and had issue, 
I. Michael, his heir. 
n. Gilbert (Sir), of Westray, master of 
Queen Mary's household, sheriff of 
Orkney, fowd of Zetland, and cap- 
tain of Kirkwall Castle. 
III. James (Sir), of Pittendriech, a dis- 
tinguished actor in the turbulent times 
of the unhappy Mary and her son, 
James V. He was successively com- 
mendator of Pittenween, lord clerk 
register, lord president of the Court 
of Session, and governor of Edin- 
burgh Castle. Sir James m. Mar- 
garet, daughter and heiress of Mi- 
chael Balfour, of Burlic, and had, 



PALFOUR, OF TRENABY. 



1'^ 



with tlirtie daugliters, the eldest /«. to 
Sir Mieliiicl Arnot, of Aniut; the 
second, to Sir Jolin Henderson, ol' 
Fordel : and the tliird, to Barchiy of 
Coliairny : six sons, viz. 

1. MiciiAKL (Sir), of Burleigh, 
wlio was elevated to tlie |)eeraj>e 
7th August, l()0(j, as Loud Bal- 
four, of Burleigli. His lord- 
ship married twice, and left, by 
his second wife, Margaret, dau. 
of Lundie, of tliat Ilk, an only 
daugliter and heiress, 

MARCAKivr, Baroness Balfour, 
of Burleigh. Her ladyship 
wedded Robert (son of Sir 
Robert Arnot, of Ferny), 
wlio assumed tlie name of 
Balfour, and had the title of 
Lord Burleigh, in virtue of 
the royal mandate. His 
lordship died 10th August, 
1663, leaving one sou and 
four daughters, viz. 

John, Lord Balfour, of 
Burleigh, ancestor of 
the Lords Burleigh,* 
and of the Balfours of 
Ferny and Dunbog. 
Jean, m. in 1628, to Da- 
vid, second Earl of 
Weniyss. 
Margaret, m. to Sir James 
Crawford, of Kilbirny. 
Isabel, m. to Thomas, first 
Lord Ruthven. 

, m. to Arnot, of 

Ferny. 

2. James (Sir), created by James 
I. a peer of Ireland, by the 
title of Baron Clonawley. His 
lordship appears to have died 
issueless. 

3. Alexander, of Balgarvie, ances- 
tor of many families of the 
name. 

4. Henry (Sir), a general in the 
army of the States of Holland. 

* RoBEHT, fifth Lord Balfour, of Burleigh, 
being attached, when young, to a person of very 
inferior rank, was sent abroad, in the hojte that 
the sentiment would be obliterated. Before Ids 
departure, however, he declared that if the girl 
married in his absence he would, on Ins return, 
put her husband to death. He did return, and, 
true to his purpose, finding that she had wedded 
one Henry Stenhouse, a schoolmaster, at Inver- 
keithing, repaired directly to the schoolbouse, 
and inflicted a mortal wound on the unfortunate 
dominie, in the midst of his scholars; for this 
cold-blooded murder he was tried, convicted, and 
sentenced to decapitation, but found means to 
escape in the clothes of his sister. Taking p;u-t 
afterwards in the rising of 1715, he was attainted. 
He died issueless in 1757. 



5. William, who went to Ir( land. 

6. David, died at sea, on his voy- 
age to Holland. 

IV. David, of Balbutheis. 

V. George, prior of the Charterliouse. 

VI. Robert, of Grange, provost of St. 
Mary's. 

VII. John, of Rothlees. 

Andrew Ballbur was succeeded by his el- 
dest son, 

Michael Balfoiir, of Mountwhany, coni- 
mendator of Melrose, wiio espoused Janet, 
daughter of David Boswell, of Auchiiilek, 
by the Lady Janet Hamilton, sister of the 
Regent Arran, and dying in 1570, was s. by 
his son, 

Sir Michael Balfour, of Mounwhannie, 
who removed his residence, in 1588, to Nolt- 
land Castle, in the Island of Wcstray, in 
Orkney, which he inherited from his cousin- 
german, Archibald Balfour, of Westray. 
Sir Michael wedded Mariota Adamson, 
daughter of Patrick, archbishop of St. An- 
drews, and had two sons, 

I, Andrew (vSir), of Strathore and 
Mounwhannie, who m. Mary, daugh- 
ter of Sir James Melville, of Hal- 
hill, and was ancestor of the Bal- 
fours of Grange, who became ex- 
tinct in the beginning of the last 
century. 

II. Michael. 

The second son, 

Michael Balfour, of Garth, wedded 
Margaret, daughter of Malcolm Sinclair, 
of Quendal, in Zetland, great-grandson of 
William, the last Sinclair, Earl of Orkney, 
and had five sons and two daughters, 

I. Patrick, his heir. 

II. Robert, of Trenaby. 

III. John, of Garth. 



IV. George 



V. Michael, ancestor of the Balfours of 
Langskail. 

I. Ursula, m. to James Fea, of Cles- 
tran. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to James Sinclair, of 
Golt. 

The eldest son, 

Patrick Balfour, of Pbaray, was a 
staunch royalist, and though his age and in- 
firmities prevented his accompanying Mon- 
trose in the ill-fated expedition of 1650, 
his assistance in levying troops for tlie king's 
service, and the hospitable shelter aflbrded 
to the fugitives at Noltland Castle, vyhen the 
cause was ruined by the defeat atKirbuster, 
drew on him the wrath of the Scottisli par- 
liament, by which he was heavily fined, and 
put out of the commission of war for Ork- 
ney. He m. Barbara, daughter of Francis 
Mudie, of Breckness, and had two sons, 
George and Robert, by the elder of whom, 



136 



BALFOUR, OF TRENABY. 



George Bxlfolr, of Phaiay, he was 
succeeded in 1G64. Tliis laird married, first, 
Marjory, dau. of James Barkie, esq. of Tan- 
kerness, and had two sons and one daughter, 

Patrick, who died an infant, 
William, of Pharay, whose only child, 

Isabel, m. Archibald Stuart, of 

Brugh. 
Barbara, >«. to William Traill, esq. of 

Westness. 

He m. secondly. Lady Mary Mackenzie, 
only daughter of Murdoch, bisliop of Ork- 
ney, and, dying in 1706, left, inter alios, a 
son, 

John Balfour, of Trenaby, who s. to a 
portion of his father's estate. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Traill, of 
Skaill,and had five sons and one daughter: 
William, his heir ; Tliomas, of Huip ; John, 
M.l).; Robert; Archibald; and Mary, wt. 
to John Traill, of Westness. He died in 
1742, and was *. by his eldest son, 

William Balfour, of Trenaby, born in 
1719, who married, 9th February," 1744, Eli- 
zabeth Coventrie,* heiress of Newark, 
daughter of the Rev. Thomas Coventrie, 
and had issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Thomas, of Elwick, a colonel in the 
army, born .3rd February, 1752, 
and died, at Bath, in 1799. He m. 
in 1776, Frances Ligonier, niece of 
Field-marshal John, Earl Ligonier, 
commander-in-chief of the British 
forces, and only sister of Edward, 
second Earl Ligonier, by whom he 
had, 

John-Edward-Ligonier, captain in 
the 9th Foot, b. 11 th January, 
1780, killed at Alkmaar, 19th 
September, 1799. 

William, of Elwick, commander 
in the Royal Navy, born 8th 
December, 1781, married, first, 
Mary Balfour Manson, dau. of 
William Manson, esq. comptrol- 
ler of the Customs, at Kirkwall ; 
and secondly, Mary Margaret, 

* Her progenitor, William Covingtrie, settled 
in the Orkneys in 1613, and m. Jane Taylour. 
Their eldest son, John, m. Jane Kirkness, and 
liad an only son, David Covingtree, of Enhallow, 
who by his wife, Nicola Traill, daughter of James 
Traill, of Westive, had two sons, John Coving- 
trie, of Newark, who died unmarried, and the 
Rev. Thomas Coventry, who succeeded his bro- 
ther, and m. Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Lou- 
tit, of Lykin, by whom he had David Covengtrv, 
of Newark, who died without issue, and a daugh- 
ter Elizabeth, iii. to William Balfour, of Trenaby . 



daughter of Andrew Barkie, esq. 
and has issue by both ladies. 
Mary, m. to the Rev. Alexander 
Brunton, D. D. Professor of 
Oriental Languages in the Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh, but died 
19th "December, 1818, without 
issue. 
111. David, writer to the Signet, born 
28th October, 1754, m. Marion, dau. 
of George M'Litosh, esq. of Dun- 
chatton, and died 25th May, 1813, 
leaving issue, 

William, late lieutenant-colonel 
of the 82nd regiment, married 
and has issue. 
Mary, m. to Godfrey Meynell, esq. 
of Langley Meynell, in Derby- 
shire, and has issue, 
1. Elizabeth, wi. William Manson, esq. 
and had one child, Mary Balfour 
Manson, ni. to her cousin. Captain 
William Balfour, of Elwick. 
V Margaret, b. 27th January, 1747, d. 
unmarried. 

III. Catherine, b. 3rd March, 1749, d. 
an infant. 

IV. Mary, b. 29th May, 1757, ?«. to 
Captain George Craigie, of Savis- 
kaill, and died without issue 6th 
December, 1818. 

Mr. Balfour died in October, 1786, and was 
s. by his eldest son, the present John Bal- 
four, esq. of Trenaby. 

A mis — Arg. a cheveron sa. charged with 
an otter's head erased of the first, in base a 
saltier couped of the second : quartering 
Macdufl", Ogilvy, Dury, Bruce, Boswell, 
Adanison, Sinclair, Mudy, Mackenzie, 
Traill, and Coventry. 

Crest — A right arm, couped at the elbow, 
holding a baton. 

Motto — Forward . 

Estates — In Orkney. Noltland and Tre- 
naby form part of a large grant by Mary, 
Queen of Scots, to Sir Gilbert Balfour, of 
Westray, master of her household. Be- 
sides his valuable maternal estate of New- 
ark, Mr. Balfour inherited the property of 
his uncle, Thomas Balfour, of Huip, and 
has lately purchased the Gra^msay, Stenness 
and Gaersay estates from the representa- 
tives of the late Sir William Honyman, 
bart. 

Town Residence — 18, Curzon Street, 
May fair. 

Seats — Charleton Grove, Kent ; Noltland 
Castle and Trenaby House, Orkney. 



137 



WOOD, OF SWANWICK. 



WOOD, THE REV. JOHN, of Swanwick Hull, in the county of Derby, rector of 

Kingsley, in Stafibrdshire, and vicar of Pentridge, 
born 25th November, 1776; married, at Ulhng- 
ton, 22nd September, 1803, Emily-Susanna, eldest 
dauj^hter of Abel-Walford Bellairs, esq. of Stamford, 
and has issue, 

I. Hi'GH, in holy orders, h. 16th August, 1B04. 
II. John, b. lf)th May, 1807. 

III. Edward, b. 2:Jrd June, 1811. 

IV. William, b. 30th December, 1812. 

I. Emilia-Jane. 
II. Frances-Mary. 

III. Susanna. 

IV. Ellen. 
V. Cjvtherine. 

VI. Rose-Emma. 




r. Wood inherited the estates upon the demise of his 
ther. 



M 

father 



Uintngf. 



From old deeds and papers, it appears 
that this family possessed property at Swan- 
wick, in the early part of the 16th century, 
and that the same was settled in the third 
year of Philip and Mary, by Christopher 
Wood, upon a Hugh Wood, who resided 
thereon ; this, together, with portions of 
other ancient estates acquired by subse- 
quent marriages, is now enjoyed by the 
Rev. John Wood. 

Robert Wood, of Swanwick, married 
Anne, daughter and co-heir of John Row- 
botham, of Farley, and had, with a daughter, 
Anne, the wife of Bernard Lucas, esq. of 
Hasland (see vol. ii. p. 172), a son, 

John Wood, gentleman, of Swanwick, 
who married in 1722, Martha, daughter and 
co-heir of Jolni Wilson, esq. of Heanor, by 
Mary Richardson, of Smalley, his wife, and 
had, with other issue, a son and successor. 

The Rev. John Wood, of Swanwick, b. 
30th December, 1723, who d. without issue, 
in June, 17s6, at Edensor, in the county of 
Derby. His youngest Itrother, 

Hugh Wood, esq. of Swanwick, eventu- 
ally inherited the family estates. This 
gentleman wedded first, 28th December, 
1769, Sarah, daughter of Clement Rossing- 
ton, esq. of Scropton, in Derbyshire, but 



had no issue. He m. secondly, 14th March, 
1775, the cousin of his first wife, Mary, 
daughter of tlie Rev, Jonathan Peake, viciir 
of Dronfield, by Sarah, his wife, daughter 
of the said Clement Rossington, esq.* and 
had two sons and one daugliter, viz. 

John, his heir. 

Robert, of Ripley, b. 7th March, 1781. 

Mary. 
Mr. Wood was succeeded at his decease by 
his elder son, the present Rev. John Wood, 
of Swanwick. 

Ar7ns — Az. three naked savages ppr. in 
their dexter hands a shield arg. charged 
with a cross gu. in their sinister a club 
resting on their shoulders, also ppr. 

Crest — An oak tree ppr. charged witli 
acorns or. 

Estates — In Derbyshire, a portion pos- 
sessed since the reign of Edward VI. 

Seat — Swanwick Hall, Derbyshire. 



* By Sarah, his wife, daughter of Francis 
Burton, esq. lord of the manor of Dronfield, and 
Helena, his wife, daughter and heir of Cassibelan 
Burton, esq. only son of William Burton, esq. 
of Lindley, author of the History of Leicester- 
shire. 



138 



WOOD, OF SINGLETON LODGE. 

WOOD, GE0RGE-WILLL4M, esq. of Singleton Lodge, ib the county of Lan- 
caster, b. at Leeds 26th July, 1781 ; m. there the 22nd November, 1810, Sarah, 
daughter of Joseph Oates, esq. of Weetwood Hall, in Yorkshire, by Elizabeth his 
wife, eldest daughter of Joshua Rayner, esq. of Leeds, merchant,* and eventually co- 
heir, with her sister Sarah, the wife of William Smithson, esq. of Heath, of their 
brother Milnes Rayner, esq. By this lady he has an only child, 

Willi am-Rayner, h. 26th August, 1811. 

Mr. Wood, who succeeded his father in 1808, was one of the representatives in the 
last parliament for the southern division of the county of Lancaster. 



HinfclQf. 




BiNjAMiN Wood, gent, of Northampton, 
born Kith March, 1718, married, at Colling- 
tree, 2lst May, 1744, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Robert Wingreave, of Collingtree, near 
Northampton, and by her, who died 8th 
December, 1748, had a son, William. Mr. 
Wood died in September, 1783, was buried 
at Castle Hill Chapel, and succeeded by his 
son. 

The Rev. William Wood, of Leeds, in 
the countv of York, F.L.S. minister of Mill 
Hill Chapel, there, born at Collingtree, 
29th May, 1745. This gentleman wedded 
2yth September, 1780, Louisa Anne, daugh- 
ter of George Oates, esq. of Newton Hall, 
by Sarah, his wife, only surviving daughter 
and heir of Joseph JoUey, of Manchester, 
merchant, (descended from Jolin Jolley, of 
Leek, in tlie county of Stailord, ancestor of 
Hylton JoUifte, esq. member in the pre- 
sent parliament for the borough of Peters- 



field, whose progenitor, Thomas Jolley, esq. 
of Cofton Hall, in the county of Worcester, 
assumed the surname of Joliffee). Of this 
marriage there were issue, 

George W^illiam, heir to his father. 
William, born at Leeds, 4th August, 
1782, died unmarried in London, 
April, 1811, and was buried at Is- 
lington. 
Frederick, born 3rd June, 1784, died 
22nd June, 1796. 

Louisa-Anne, m. at Leeds, 26th No- 
vember, 1823, to tlie Rev. Samuel 
Crawford, of that borough, minister 
of Call Lane Cliapel, and has surviv- 
ing issue, two sous and one daugh- 
ter, viz. 

William Crawford, born 8th No- 
vember, 1824. 

Alexander Crawford, born 6th 
March, 1832. 

Jane Crawford, born 7th June, 
1828. 
Mr. Wood died at Leeds, 1st April, 1808, 
(Mrs. Wood, 24tli September, 1800), was 
Ijuried at Mill Hill Chapel, and succeedt d 
by liis son, the present George William 
Wood, esq. late M.P. for South Lanca- 
shire. 

Arma — On a chief, sa. an open Bible, 
ppr. clasped gold, between two mill rinds 
of tlie first. 

Crest — A boar passant reguardantsa. col- 
lared, chained and hoofed or, before a tice. 



ppr. 
Motto- 
Seat — 



—Civil and religious liberty. 
Singleton Lodge, Lancashire. 



By Sarah, daughter of William ^Jilnes, of Chesterfield, in the county of Derby 



139 



BIIAILSFORD, OF BAKKWlTll HOUSE. 



BRAILSFORD, THOMAS, esq. of Barkwith House, in the county of Lincoln, lord 

of the manor of Toft Hill and Toft Grange, in that 
shire, b. 10th October, 1787; m. Mth January, 1815, 
Anne, daughter of James Shipley, esq. by Elizabeth 
his wife, one of the co-heiresses of the late William 
Heathcote, esq. of the colony of Demerara, and of 
Stuncliffe Hall, in the county of Derby, and has issue, 

I. Thomas, h. 2nd November, 1815. 

II. Samuel, h. 1st May, 1819. 

III. .lohii-Artkur-Heathcote, h. 18th April, 1822. 

IV. William, b. 2nd June, 182r>. 











I. Eliza. 
III. Alsina. 



II. Ellen. 
IV. Emma-Dorothea. 



Mr. Brailsford, who is a deputy lieutenant of the 
county of Lincoln, inherited a portion of his estates 
upon the demise of his great-uncle in 1808, and the 
remainder at the death of his uncle in 1 820. 

Hmenge. 



" The ancient family of Brailsford," says 
Lysoiis in his Magna Britannia, " was of 
Brailsford, in the county of Derby, temp. 
Henry II. Nicholas, the first who as- 
sumed the name, was son of Elsinus, who 
lived in the reign of William the Conqueror. 
In the time of Richard II. the heiress of 
the elder branch married Bassett of Chedle. 
John Brailsford, the representative of a 
younger branch, settled at Senior, in Huck- 
iiall, in the reign of Edward VI. was ser- 
vant to Sir John Harpur, in 1G62; his 
father had sold the family estate, but Senior 
was then possessed by a cousin, as ajjjjears 
by Dugdale's Visitation of Derbyshire." 

Thomas Brailsford, of South Norman- 
ton, descended from the Brailsfords of 
Senior, married sometime before the year 
1689, Elizabeth Smyth, of Bolsover, an 
heiress, and had a son and successor, 

Thomas Brailsford, of Bolsover and 
South Normanton, father, by Frances Mac- 
hon, of Mansfield, his wife, whom he wed- 
ded, 30th September, 1713, of Samuel 
Brailsford, of Rowthorne, who died in 
1808, and of 

Thomas Brailsford, of Bolsover and 
South Normanton, in the county of Derby, 
who espoused in 1740, Ellen Newbould, of 
Mansfield Woodhouse, Notts, and had two 
sons and one daughter, viz. 
Thomas, his heir. 

Samuel, born in April, 1745, i)i. in 
August, 1786, Mary, daugliter of 
Nicholas Christian, esq. of Castleton, 
in the Isle of Man, and died in 1798, 
leaving two sons, 



Thomas, successor to his uncle, 
Samuel, army surgeon, who died 

at Pendennis Castle, Cornwall, 

in 1809. 

Elizabeth, d. an infant. 
Mr. Brailsford was succeeded by his elder 



son. 



Thomas Brailsford, esq. of South Nor- 
manton, born in 1742, at wliose decease, 
without issue, in 1820, the estates and re- 
presentation of the family devolved on bis 
nephew, the present Thomas Brailsford, 
esq. of Barkwith House. 

Arms — Or, a cinquefoil sa. on a chief 
indented ermine, two pommes each charged 
with a cross arg. 

Crest — A unicorn's head arg. erased gu. 
armed and maned or, entwined by a serpent 
ppr. and charged on the neck with a pomme 
and thereon a cross, as in the arms. 

Motto — In Jehovah, fides mea. 

Estates — Messuages and lands at South 
Normanton, conveyed by deed by Anne 
Brailsford to her nephew, Tiiomas Brail.s- 
ford, grandfiither of the Tliomas Brailsford 
who married Elizabeth Smyth, in December, 
1627. Messuages and lands in Bolsover 
at Chesterfield, and at Mansfield AVood- 
house. Mansion and lands at East Bark- 
with, in Lincolnshire, purchased by the pre- 
sent proprietor's great uncle, Samuel Brails- 
ford, in 1770. Manor of Toft Hill and Toft 
Grange, in the same county, bought from 
Lady Banks, in 1820. 

Seat — Barkwith House. Lincolnshire. 



140 



LOWRY, OF POMEROY HOUSE. 

LOWRY, ROBERT-WILLIAM, esq. of Pomeroy House, in the county of Ty- 
rone, m. 6th February, 1815, Anna, only daughter of Admiral Graves, of the enno- 
bled family of the same name, and has issue, 

Robert-William. 
Joliii-Fetherstone. 

Hester. 

Elizabeth. 

Anna. 

Mr. Lowry, a magistrate and deputy lieutenant for the county of Tyrone, succeeded 
his brother in 1807. He was sheriff in 1812. 



UinCfitte. 





John Lowry, esq. sprung- from an ancient 
Scottisli family, migrated to Ireland, and 
settled at Aheiiis, in the county of Tyrone. 
He m. first, a daughter of Hamilton, of 
Bally fallow, and by her, who died at Lon- 
donderry, during its celebrated siege in 
1689, left one son and three daughters, viz. 
I. William, who went to the East Indies, 
and died unm. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to Francis Perry, esq. 
of Tathyreagh, in Tyrone. 

II. Margaret, m. to John Keys, esq. of 
Cavancurr, in the count)' of Done- 
gall. 

III. Mary, m. to Archibald Woods, esq. 
of Trinsallah, in the same shire. 

Mr. Lowry wedded secondly. Miss Mary 
Buchanan, a Scottish lady, and had 

II. John, who died unm. 

III. RoBKRT, successor to his father. 

IV. Catharine, m. to Samuel Perry, esq. 
of Moylagbmore. 



V. Rebecca, m. to William Moore, esq. 
of Drumond. 

VI. Anne, m. to Robert M'Clintock, 
esq. of Castrues. 

VII. Jane, m. to John M'Clintock, esq. 
of Trintaugh. 

The only surviving son, 

Robert Lowry, esq. of Ahenis, espoused 
Anne, daughter of the Rev. James Sinclair, 
of Hollyhill, rector of the parish of Loch 
Patrick (second son of Sir James Sinclair, 
of Caithness, by Anne, his wife, daughter of 
James Galbraith, esq. M. P. for John's 
Town in 1661), and had issue, 

I. Robert, of Melbury, in the county of 
Donegall, M.P. who m. Margaret, 
daughter of the venerable Archdeacon 
Hamilton, but d. s. p. 

II. GALBRAiTH,of Ahenis, thrice elected 
knight of the shire for Tyrone. He 
m. Sarah, second daughter and co- 
heir of John Corry, esq. and had, 
with a daughter, Anne, the wife of 
William Willoughby Cole, Lord En- 
niskillen, a son and heir, 

Armar Lowry, esq. of Ahenis, 
who assumed the additional 
surname of Corry, and was 
raised to the peerage, as Earl 
of Belmore. His son is the 
present earl. (See Burke's 
Peerage and Baronetage.) 
HI. James, of whom presently. 
Mr. Lowry, of Ahenis, was succeeded in his 
principal estates by his elder surviving son, 
while the younger. 

The Rev. James Lowry, rector of Clog- 
heny, founded the branch seated at Pomeroy 
House. This gentleman m. Hesler, dau. of 
William Richardson, esq. of Richhill. M.P. 
for the county of Armagh, and had i.-aue. 



BAGWELL, OF MARLFIELD. 



14! 



I. RoBKRT, Lis lieir. 

II, John, in lioly orders, rector 



of 



Sommerset. 
III. James, in holy orders, of Rockdale 

House. 
I. Hester, m. to Major Thomas Dick- 
son, M.P. of Woodville, in the 
county of Leitrim. 
The eldest son, 

RoBEUT LowKY, esq. of Pomeroy House, 
wedded Eliza, daughter of Major Tighe, 
a cavalry officer, resident at Ballyshannon, 
a scion of the Tighes of Michelstown, in 
Westmeath, and had issue, 

I. James, his heir. 

II. Robert-William, successor to his 
brother. 

III. John, late an officer" 

in the 8th regiment. I both now on 

IV. Armer, late an officer half-pay. 
in the 45th regiment. J 

V. William, late lieutenant of H. M. 
King George IV. yatch. 

I. Hester. 

II, Elizabeth. 



Mr. Lowry was succeeded by his eldest 
son, 

James Lowry, esq. of Pomeroy House, 
an officer in the 14th ligiit dragoons, at 
whose decease, without issue, in 1807, the 
estates and i-epresentation of this branch of 
the Lowry family passed to his brother, the 
present Robert-William Lowky, of Po- 
meroy House. 

Arms — Sa. a cup arg. with a garland be- 
tween two laurel branches, all issuing out 
of the same vert. 

Crest — A garland of laurel between two 
branches of the same ppr. 

Mottoes — Virtus semper viridis, and Flo- 
reant lauri. 

Estates — The manor of Chichester and 
Leggin, including the town of Pomeroy, in 
the barony of Dungannon, and county of 
Tyrone, possessed about one hundred and 
fifty years ; and property at Baskine, in 
Westmeath, acquired in marriage, by the 
present proprietor. 

Seat — Pomeroy House, near Dungannon. 



BAGWELL, OF MARLFIELD. 

BAGWELL, JOHN, esq. of Marlfield and Oaklands House, in the county of Tip- 
perary, and of East Grove, in the Cove of Cork, b. 3rd April, 1810, inherited the 
estates upon the demise of his uncle, tlie Right Hon. William Bagwell, M.P. in 
1826. Mr. Bagwell is in the commission of the peace for the counties of Tipperary 
and Waterford, and in the deputy lieutenancy of the former, of which shire he was 
high sheriff in 1834, 




Z 



John Backwel, or Bagwell, (brother of 
Backwell, the original proprietor of the 
Bank, in London, now the firm of Child and 



Co. and also of William Backwel, the 
author of " The Mystery of Astronomy 
made easy to the meanest capacity," pub- 
lished in 1655, in eight volumes), a captain 
in Cromwell's army, settled in Ireland, 
where he married, and had a son, 

William Bagwell, esq. of Ballylough- 
ane, in the county of Tipperary, where he 
was possessed of twelve hundred acres, hav- 
ing bought the fee in 1707, and in 1712, he 
purchased the lands of Gormanstown, in 
the same shire. He was *. by his only son, 

John Bagwell, esq. who became an emi- 
nent banker at Clonmell, and purchased the 
Burgagery, and other estates, producing the 
annual income of twenty thousand pounds. 
He married the daughter of the Rev, Mr, 
Shaw, of Dublin, a presbyterian clergy- 
man, and d. in 1754, leaving two sons and 
three daughters. His second son, 

William Bagwell, esq. was elected in 



142 



D'ARCY, OF KILTULLA. 



1756, for the borough of Clonmell, and 
his return being subsequently petitioned 
against, was established by a majority of 
one only. He m. in 1749, the daughter of 
John Harper, esq. and thus acquired the 
estates now held by the Bagwell family, in 
the county of Cork. He died in 1756, and 
left, with three daughters, a son and heir, 

John Bagwell, esq. who purchased Marl- 
field, in the county of Tipperary, and the 
patronage of the borough of Clonmell, the 
member for which borough the Bagwells 
returned until the passing of the reform 
bill. In 1775, Mr. Bagwell contested un- 
successfully the representation of the city of 
Cork ; in 1790, he was declared, by a com- 
mittee of the House of Commons, member 
for the county of Tipperary, Mr. Matthew, 
the late earl of Landaflf, being unseated ; 
and in 1793, be raised the Tipperary regi- 
ment of militia, to which he was appointed 
colonel. He wedded in 1774, Miss Hare, 
daughter of Richard Hare, esq. of Ennis- 
more, and sister of William, present earl of 
Listowell, by whom he had issue, 

William, his heir. 

Richard, who °m. in 1808, Margaret, 
eldest daughter of Edward Croker, 
esq. of Ballinaguard, in the county 
of Limerick, and had issue, 
John, successor to his uncle. 
Edward. 
Margaret. 



Mary, 
Jane. 

T> •' • ^ who both died unmarried. 
Benjamin, ^ 

Margaret, m. to John Keily, esq. of 

Strangally Castle. 
Jane, ?m. to Lieutenant General Sir 

Eyre Coote, of West Park, Hants. 
Catherine, m. to John Croker, esq. of 

Ballinaguard. 
Mary, m. to Henry Langley, esq. of 
Brittas Castle. 
Colonel Bagwell was succeeded at his de- 
cease, by his eldest son, 

The Right Hon. Colonel William Bag- 
well, of Marlfield, M.P. a privy counsellor 
and muster master general for Ireland, at 
whose decease, unmarried, in 1826, the es- 
tates devolved on his nephew, the present 
John Bagwell, esq. of Marlfield. 

Aj-ins — Paly of six arg. and az. on a chief 
gu. a lion passant arg. 

C7-est — Out of a mural crown a demi bull, 

all ppr. 

Motto — In fide et in bello fortis. 

Estates — In the counties of Tipperary, 
Cork, &c. 

Seat — Marlfield, and Oaklands House, 
near Clonmell ; and East Grove, cove of 
Cork. 



D'ARCY, OF KILTULLA. 




D'ARCY, JOHN, esq. of Kiltulla House and of Clifden Castle, both in the county of 

Galway, b. 26th November, 1785; m. first, on the 4th 
June, 1804, Frances, daughter of Andrew Blake, esq. 
of Castle Grove, and niece of the late Viscount Net- 
terville, by whom (who died 15th April, 1815) he has 
issue, 

I. Hyacinth-John. 

II. Patrick. 

III. James. 

I. Isabella. 

II. Julia, m. to Richard Levingston, esq. 

He wedded, secondly, 3rd March, 1821, Louisa-Bag-ot, 
daughter of the late Walter Sneyd, esq. of Keele Hall, 
in Staffordshire, and his wife, the Hon. Louisa Bagot, 
sister of the present Lord Bagot, and has five other 
sons and two daughters, viz. 

I. Edmund. v. Norman. 

II. Henry. 

III. Hichard. 1. Elizabeth, 
jv. ^^ illiam. ii. Louisa. 



4^ "%- % 




4^ <Q&'# 



D'ARCY, OF KILTULLA. 



143 



Mr, D'Arcy, who has been for the last twenty-five years in the commission of the 
peace, served the office of high sheriff' for the county of Galway in 1811. Me is the 
founder of the beautiful town of Clifden, on the Bay of Anber, now in the most flou- 



rishing- condition. 



Hmcaae. 



Tlie fiunily of T)e Arcy ranks with tlic 
most eniiiH'iit establislird in England by the 
NoiiMAN CoNQi'r.sr, and amongst the peer- 
ages of past times, tlicre are two bakomks 
in abeyance, one forfeited BAKONV, and 
tliroe EXTINCT BARONIKS, all of which liad 
been conferred upon members of the house 
of D'Arcy, beside the extinct Earldom of 
HoLDERNESS. VVlieu the general survey 
was made, 

Norman dk Arci enjoyed not fewer than 
thirty-three lordships in the county of Lin- 
coln, which be derived directly from the 
CoNQUKROR, and of which NoCTON became 
the chief residence of himself and his des- 
cendants for several generations. He was 
*. by his son, 

Robert D'Arcy, Avho founded a priory 
of Augustin monks at Nocton, and was 
otlierwise a bountiful benefactor to tiie 
church. He was s. by his son, 

Thomas D'Arcy, who, in the 12th of 
Henry II., on the assessment in aid of 
marrying that king's daughter, certified that 
he then held twenty knights' fees de veteri 
feoff'amcnto, with half a knight's fee, and a 
fourth part de novo, for which he paid £13. 
6*. 8d. He d. in 1180, and was *. by his 
son, 

Thomas D'Arcy, whose son and heir, 

Norman D'Arcy, joining the baronial 
standard, in the time of Kiny John, had his 
lands seized by the crown, and retained un- 
til the general pacification in tl e beginning 
of Henry IH.'s reign. He died soon after, 
and was s. by his son, 

Philip D'Arcy, of Nocton, a distin- 
guished soldier in the reigns of John and 
Henry III. He m. Isabel, daughter and 
co-heir of Roger Bertram, of Mitford, (see 
vol. ii. page 2»2) and dying in 1263, was s. 
by his son, 

' Norman D'Arcy, of Nocton, who m. in 
the 43rd Henry III. Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Delafeld, and had issue, 

Philip, who inherited Nocton, and was 
summoned to parliament, as a baron, 
from 2.9th Decemljer, 129L», to 20tb 
October, 1332. He died in the latter 
year, and was *. by his son, 

Norman, second baron, who d. in 
1340, and was succeeded by his 
son, 
Philip, third baron, at whose de- 
cease issueless, this barony or 



D'Arcy fell into abeyance, be- 
tween his next heirs, namely. 
Sir Philip de Limburo, knt. son 
of Julian, eldest sister of the 
first baron, and 

Agnes, wife of Sir Roger de 
Pedwardine, younger sister of 
the same nobleman. 
John, of whom presently. 
Robert, of Stailingburgh, in the county 
of Lincoln, who left an only daughter 
and heiress, Margaret, the wife of 
John Argentine. 
The second son, 

John D'Arcy, an eminent soldier and 
statesman in the reigns of the first, second, 
and third Edwards, filled some of the high- 
est offices of the government, and was 
eventually summoned to parliament in the 
6th year of Edward III. In the time of 
Edward II. he was governor of Norhain 
Castle, sheriff of the counties of Notting- 
ham, Derby, and Lancaster, and Justice of 
Ireland. On the accession of Edward III, 
he was made sheriff of Yorkshire and go- 
vernor of York Castle, and re-constituted 
Justice of Ireland, to which high office 
and the government of the country he was 
re-appointed in the next year. While in 
Ireland, Lord D'Arcy at the head of an 
army marched into tlie province of Ulster 
to avenge the death of his wife's nephew, 
William de Burgh,* Earl of Ulster, but be- 
fore his arrival tlie country people had 
already taken ample revenge, by destroying 
no less than three hundred persons in one 
day. The lord justice thereupon changed 
his course, and leaving Thomas Burke, his 
lieutenant, in Ireland, joined the king in 
Scotland, who was then pursuing the vic- 

* William de Burgh, third Eahl of Ulsteu, 
was murdered in the twenty-third year of his 
age, anno 1333, by Robert Fitz- Richard JVIande- 
ville and his servants, near the Fords, in his way 
to Carrie kfergus. His wife, the Lady JNJaud 
Plantagenet, daughter of Henry, Earl of Lancas- 
ter, and granddaughter o{ King Henry III., with 
her daughter, the sole heiress of her deceased 
lord, returned immediately to England, and the 
assassination causing a prodigious outcry, the 
Lord Justice D'Arcy called a parliament, by whose 
advice he sailed for Carrickfergus, but before his 
arrival the country people had destroyed the mui-- 
derers, with their abettors, killing, in one day, 

more than three hundred persons Rurre's Feer- 

ace and Baronetv^'e. 



144 



D'ARCY, OF KILTULLA. 



torious career which placed Edward Baliol 
on tlie Scottish throne. Lord D'Arcy was 
subsequently constable of the Tower of Lon- 
don, and ambassador at the courts of France 
and Scotland. He finally shared in the 
glory of Cressy, and was constituted Jus- 
tice OF Ireland and Constable of the 
Tower for life. He married first, Emeline, 
daughter and co-heir of Walter Heron, of 
Hedleston, in the county of Northumber- 
land, by whom lie had 

John, his successor, second Lord D'Ar- 
cy, for whose line, see Burke's Ex- 
tinct and Dormant Peerage. 
Roger, from whom the D'Arcys of Es- 
sex sprang. 
Adomar. 
His lordship wedded secondly, 2nd July 
13-29, the Lady Joane de Burgh, daughter 
of Richard de Burgh, Earl of Ulster, and 
his wife, Maud, daughter and heir of Hugh 
de Lacie, the younger, Earl of Ulster, by 
this lady he had another son and daughter, 
viz. 

William. 

Elizabeth, m. to James Butler, second 
Earl of Ormonde. 
Lord D'Arcy died 30th May, 1347, and was 
*. in his title by the eldest son of his first 
marriage, John, second lord. The only 
son of his second marriage, 

William D'Arcy, born at Maynooth, 
in the county of Kildare, in 1.330, hav- 
ing had divers lands assigned to him in 
consideration of his father's great public 
services, settled at Flatten, in the county of 
Meath. He m. Catharine, daughter of Sir 
Robert Fitzgerald, of AUoone, in Kildare, 
and was s. by his son, 

John D'Arcy, of Flatten, who married a 
daughter of Fettyt, baron of MuUingar, 
and left a son and successor, 

William D'Arcy, of Flatten, who m. 
Anne, daughter of — Barnewall, of Cricks- 
town, and was father of 

John D'Arcy, of Flatten. This gentle- 
man wedded the Hon. Margaret Fleming, 
elder daughter of David, Lord Slane, who 
died in 1463, and co-heir of her brother, 
Thomas, Lord Slane, who died issueless, in 
1471. He was s. by his son, 
John D'Arcy, of Flatten, who had two 



sons, 



I. John, of Flatten, who was succeeded 
by his son, 

William (Sir), of Flatten. This 
gentleman was constituted, in 
1523, vice-treasurer of Ireland. 
He was the author of a Avork, 
entitled "The Decay of Ireland, 
and the Causes of it," and was 
" a man," says Harris, in his 



Writers of Ireland, " of wisdom 
and learning, and one who, for 
his good services to the Englisli 
interest in that country, had great 
merit." He died far advanced 
in years, in 1540, and left, with 
other issue, a daughter, Eleanor, 
m. to Robert Flunket, fifth Lord 
Dunsaney, and a son and suc- 
cessor, 
Christopher, of Flatten, who 
VI. first, Elizabetli Draicott, 
and secondly, M<iry,dau. of 
Sir Nicholas Whyte, of 
Leixlip, master of the Rolls, 
by whom (who m. secondly, 
Robert Browne, of Mul- 
rankan, and thirdly. Sir 
Nicholas St. Lawrence, 
twenty-first Lord Howth) 
he had three sons. His 
eldest son, 

George D'Arcy, of Flat- 
ten was slain in the ser- 
vice of Queen Eliza- 
beth, leaving by Cicelia 
his wife, daughter of 
Cliristopher Ffagan, an 
alderman of Dublin, a 
daughter, Bridget, the 
VFife of John Fitzpa- 
trick, esq. of Castle- 
town, ancestor of the 
Earls of Upper Ossory, 
and a son, 
Nicholas D'Arcy, of 
Flatten, a minor in 
1G17, wlio ibrfeited 
the estates in 1641. 
II. Nicholas. 

The younger son, 

Nicholas D'Arcy, was a captain of horse, 
and being quartered in Mayo, m. Jane, 
daughter and heir of O'Duraghy, of Fartry, 
in that county, and was succeeded by his 
son, 

Thomas D'Arcy, father of 
CoNYERS D'Arcy, who was succeeded by 
his son, 

Nicholas D'Arcy, of Kiltulla, in the 
county of Galway, who had two sons, 
James, his lieir. 

Richard, whose only daughter married 
Robert Blake, of Ardfry, and was 
mother of the Riylit Hon. SiR Rich- 
ard Blake, of Ardfry, of the privy 
council in the time of Charles I. 
M.F. for Galway in 1639, and speaker 
of the supreme council of confeder- 
ated catholics, at Kilkenny, in 1648. 
From Sir Richard lineally descends 
the noble house of Wallscourt. 
The elder son, 

James D'Arcy, of Kiltulla, surnamed 



D'ARCY, OF KITTTIT.rA. 



ur. 



Riveac/Ii, or the Sirart/n/, was a person of 
great influence and power in the province 
of Connaii<;lit, of wliich he was made ViCK 
PRESiDiiNT by Queen Elizabkth. He was 
likewise chief nia;;istrate of tlie town of 
Galway, wliere there is a rnoiiurnent to his 
memory, in the Franciscan Ahl)ey. He d. 
in IC03, leaving seven sons and a daughter, 
viz. 

I. Nicholas, whose two sons, James 
and Dominick, both d. s. p. The 
elder, who was a barrister-at-law, 
settled his large estates in the coun- 
ties of Galway, Mayo, Roscommon, 
and Clare, on his first cousin, James 
D'Arcy, of KiltuUa. 

II. Martin, ancestor of the D'Arcys of 
Clunuane, in the county of Clare. 

IIT. James, from whom the families of 
Ballybocock, Gorteen, Hounswood, 
and Tuam. 

IV. Anthony, who, beside sons, from 
whom sprung the D'Arciks of Brest, 
in France, had two daughters, 

Catherine, in. to Marcus French, 
esq. ancestor of the Frenches of 
Rahasane. 

Anastace, m. to James Daly, esq. 
of Carrownekelly, in the county 
of Galway, and was mother of 
Dennis Daly, who was a justice 
of the common pleas and a 
privy counsellor in the time of 
James II. 

V. Mark. 

VI. Andrew, whose daughter wedded 
Richard Martin, esq. barrister-at- 
law, ancestor of the Martins of Tul- 
lyra, in the county of Galway. 

VII. Patrick. 

1. Anastace, m. to Sir Domir.ick Brown, 

knt. iind was mother of Geotfrey 

Brown, (from whom the Browns of 

Castlemagarret), and four daugiiters. 

The youngest son, 

Patrick D'Arcy, esq. of KiltuUa, b. in 
1598, is described by Harris as " a gentle- 
man educated in the profession of the com- 
mon law, who was an active member of the 
house of commons, in the parliament as- 
sembled at Dublin, in 1640, when the pa- 
pists had a share in the legislature as well 
as the protestants." By an order of the 
house, a speech of his was subsequently 
published, under the title of " An Argu- 
ment, delivered by Patrick D'Arcy, esq. 
in the parliament of Ireland, the 9th of 
June, 1641." This argument was made at 
a conference of the house of commons with 
a committee of the lords, in the castle of 
Dublin, upon certain questions propounded 
to tlie judges of Ireland, in full parlia- 
ment, and upon the answers of the judges 
to the said interrogatories. Himself and his 
3. 



nephew, Geoflrey Browne, were amongst 
the commissioners appointed by the general 
assi'ml)ly of confederate catholics, held at 
Kilkenny in the time of the grand rebellion, 
to conclude a peace with tlie Marquess of 
Ormonde, the king's lieutenant; and " the 
drawing up of tlu; articles was left to the 
said Mr. Patrick D'Arcy and Mr. Geoffrey 
Browne, and by them performed according 
to the sense of tiie assembly." These articles 
were signed and sealed 28th March, 1646, 
by tlie lord lieut«!nant, on the king's behalf ; 
and by the Lord Muskery, Sir Robert 
Talbot, John Dillon, Patrick D'Arcy, and 
Geolfry Browne, on the part of the con- 
federates, in the presence of the marquess 
of Clanricarde, the Lord Digby, Sir Mau- 
rice Eustace, and Doctor Gerald Tennell." 
D'Arcy was hereupon constituted by the 
assembly one of the commissioners to raise 
an army of ten thousand men, and to tax 
the kingdom for their pay, in support of 
the royal cause. He died in Dublin, aymo 
1668, and was interred at Kilconnel, in the 
county of Galway, leaving by his wife, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Peter French, 
an only son, 

James D'Arcy, esq. of KiltuUa, who m. 
Frances Trusnot, a lady of Jiritanny, whose 
father was captain of a man of war, in the 
service of Louis XIII. and her mother, 
Anne Keating (his wife), was maid of honor 
to Henrietta-Maria, Queen Consort of 
Charles I. By this lady, Mr. D'Arcy, who 
d. in 1692, had issue, 

Hyacinth, his heir. 

Anne. 
Frances. 
Bridget. 
Clare. 

The son and heir. 

Hyacinth D'Akcy, of KiltuUa, a captain 
in the army, h. in 1665, m. Catherine, 
daughter of John D'Arcy, esq. of Gorteen, 
in the county of Mayo, and had issue, 

I. Patrick, who m. Anne, only daugh- 
ter of Walter Blake, esq. of Oran- 
more, in the county of Galway, but 
died s. p. 

II. John. 

III. James, who m. first, Jane, daughter 
of Richard Martyn, esq. of Dangan, 
in the county of Galway, and had a 
son, Richard, who married in De- 
cember, 1751, at Bourdeaux, a rich 
American widow, the daughter of — 
Kirwan, esq. James wedded, se- 
condly, Mary, daughter of Matthew 
Shee, of Nantz, and had other issue. 

IV. Martin, m. in 1752, Mary, daughter 
of Thomas D'Arcy, of Brest. 

V. Hyacinth, died unm. 

VI. Stephen, whom. Miss Anne French, 



[AG 



GOODFORD, OF CHILTON CANTELO. 



of the Rahasane family, and had 
several sons and daughters. 

VII. Francis. 

vin. Walter, m. Anastasia, daughter 
of John D'Arcy, esq. of Gorteeu. 

IX. Sylvester, d. unm. 

I. Anastasia, 7?i. to Denis Daly, esq. of 
Raford, in the county of Galway, 
and had a son and heir, 

Denis Daly, esq. of Raford, who 
in. the Lady Anne Burke, elder 
daughter of Michael, earl of 
Clanrickarde, and had daughters 
only, his co-heirs, one of whom 
married, in 1832, Andrew Blake, 
esq. son of Colonel Blake, of 
Firbough. 

II. Franc«s, m. to R. French, esq. of 
Duran, in the county of Galway. 

III. Catharine. 

Capt. Hyacinth D'Arcy's second son, 

John D'Arcy, esq. espoused Jiine, daugh- 
ter of Sir Robert Lynch, bart. of Castle 
Cara, and had issue, 

I. Hyacinth, m. Frances, youngest 
daughter of Henry O'Brien, esq. of 
Stone Hall, in the county of Clare, 
(see p. 110), but died s. p. 

II. John, of whom presently. 

III. Patrick, member of the Royal 
Academy of Science at Paris, d. s. p. 

The second son, 

John D'Arcy, esq. married in 1752, 
Catharine, daughter of Col. Isidore Lynch, 
of Drincong Castle, and had one son and 
one daughter, viz. 

Hyacinth, his heir. 
Jane, m. first, to her kinsman, M. Le 
Comte D'Arcy, lieutenant-general 



of the armies of the king of France, 
grand cordon of St. Louis, first aid- 
de-camp to Louis XVI. and member 
of the Academic of Science. The 
count died of the cholera morbus, in 
1780, on his route to assume the 
command of the troops in Flanders. 
The countess wedded secondly, Mat- 
thew Talbot, esq. of Castle Talbot, 
in the county of Wexford. 

Mr. D'Arcy was s. by his son. 

Hyacinth D'Arcy, esq. This gentle- 
man m. first, Mary, dau. of F. Blake, esq. 
of Rahara, in the county of Roscommon, by 
whom lie had no issue ; and secondly, in 
1784, Julia, daughter of Mark Lynch, esq. 
of Barna, in the county of Galway, by whom 
he had one daughter, who died unmarried, 
and two sons, 

John, his heir, the present John 
D'Arcy, esq. of Kiltulla andClifden 
Castle. 

Mark. 

Arms — Az. semee of cross crosslets and 
three cinquefoils, arg. 

Crest— A. spear broken in three pieces 
or, headed arg. and banded together in the 
middle by a riband, gu. 

Motto— -\in dieu, un roi. 

Estates — The family estates in the 
counties of Mayo, Roscommon, Sligo, Gal- 
way, and Clare, now all forfeited, with the 
exception of the lands of Kiltulla, Longford, 
and Clifden, which were given as compen- 
sation, at the restoration of Charles II. 

Seats — Kiltulla House, and Clifden 
Castle. 



GOODFORD, OF CHILTON CANTELO. 



GOODFORD, JOHN, esq. 




of Chilton Cantelo, in the county of Somerset, b. 27th 
December, 1784; m. 4th January, 1810, Charlotte, 
fourth daughter of Montague Cholmeley, esq. of Easton, 
in Lincolnshire, and sister of the late Sir Montague 
Cholmeley, bart. by whom he has had issue, 

Henry, b. 2nd April, 1811. 
Charles-Old, b. 15th July, 1812. 
Montague-John, h. 20th November, 1822. 
Mary-Ann, d. 5th February, 1833. 
Maria. 
Penelope. 

Mr, Goodford succeeded his father 14th August, 1787. 
He is an active magistrate for the counties of Somerset 
and Dorset, and a deputy lieutenant and chairman 
of the Quarter Sessions in the former, of which he 
served the office of sheriff in 1816. 



DAYRELL, OF LILUNGSTON DAYRELL. 



U7 



1Clnc^(^c. 



SAMT'i'.r, GooDFOun, of Yeovil, m. first, 
in May, 171(5, Ann. daui^litcr of Pliilip 
Taylor, of Weymouth, and had by her, 

Samuel, his heir. 

Ann. 

Elizabeth, m. in February, 1747, to 
John Daniel, of Yeovil. 
Mr. (Joodford wedded, secondly, in July, 
1731, Elizabeth, relietof John Old, of Yeo- 
vil, and daughter of Jeremiah Hayne, but 
had no other issue. His only son, 

Samuel Goodford, esq. of the Inner 
Temple, and of Trent, in the county of 
Somerset, who tn. in October, 1739, Mary, 
only surviving- child of John and Elizabeth 
Old, and had by her, who died in 1767, one 
daughter, Mary, m. in July, 1767, to Tho- 
mas Blakemore, esq. of Briggins Park, 
Herts, and a son and successor, 

John -Old Goodford, esq. of Yeovil, 
who served the office of sheriflf for So- 
mersetshire in 1774. He m. in October, 
1776, Maria, second daughter of Edward 
Phelips, esq. of Montacute House, and had 
issue, 



John, his heir. 

Maria, who d. 6th April, 1816. 

Elizabeth, »«. in 1812, to James-Paul 
J}ri(lg{!r, esq. of JJu('kingham, in Sus- 
sex, lieutenant-colonel 12th light dra- 
goons, and (I. 26th May, 1828. 

Harriett, d. unm. 
Mary-Ann, d. young. 

Mr. Goodford d. 14th Augu.st, 1787, and 
was *. by his son, the present John Good- 
ford, esq. of Chilton Cantelo. 

Arms — Az. on a chev. between three 
boars' heads arg. langued and couped gu. 
as many pellets. 

C?-est — A boar's head arg. langued gu. 
charged on the neck with a pellet. 

Estates — Manors of Chilton Cantelo, Old 
Sock, and Mudford, with lands in Yeovil, 
Preston Bermondsey, Ashington, Mudford 
and Chilton Cantelo, in the county of So- 
merset, acquired in 171.5, and subsequently. 

Seat — Chilton Cantelo, near Yeovil. 



DAYRELL, OF LILLINGSTON DAYRELL. 

DAYRELL, RICHARD, esq. of Lillingston Dayrell, in the county of Bucking- 
ham, b. 1st April, 1779 ; m. first, in 1802, Ann, only child of Gabriel Parker, gent, 
and had one son, Richard Meyrick, b. in 1806, who died in 1810. He wedded, 
secondly, in 1807, Frances -Elizabeth, eldest daughter of John Dax, esq. master 
of the Exchequer Office of P^eas. Mr. Dayrell w^as formerly a captain in the 85th 
regiment, but was obliged to retire from the service at the early age of nineteen, 
owing to the loss of a leg. He is a magistrate and deputy lieutenant for the county 
of Bucks, and was high sheriff in 1808. Captain Dayrell succeeded his uncle in 1803. 



ULintagt. 




The family of Dayrell or Darell was 
established in England by one of the com- 
panions in arms of the Conqueror, and the 
name of its founder appears on the roll 
of Battel Abbey. Numerous divergent 
branches were planted in various counties, 
and for centuries flourished in all ; the prin- 
cipal were those of Calehill and Scotney* 
in Kent; of SESAYf in Yorkshire; of LiT- 
tlecoteI in Wilts; of Pageham in Sussex ; 

* See vol. i. p. 133. 

t The last male heir of Sfsay, Sir Geodgf. 
Darell, died in 1466, leaving a daughter and 
heiress, Joan, who married Sir Guy Dawnev, of 
Cowick, in the county of York. 

i The LiTTLECOTE line was founded by Wit- 



14S 



DAYRELL, OF LILLINGSTON DAYRELL. 



and of Trewornan§ in Cornwall. The 
Dayrells of Lillingston Dayrell derive from 
a common ancestor with the Calehill family, 
and have possessed the broad lands which 
they now hold ever since the Conquest. 

EicHARD Dayrell, brother of Elias 
Dayrell, was seised in fee of a messuage in 
Lillinaston Davrell, in the conntv of Buck- 
ingham, temp. Richard I. or John, and 
was father of a daughter, Alice, the wife of 
Peter Crendon. The next possessor on 
record, 

— Dairell, of Lillingston Dairell, in 
Bucks, and of Hanworth, in Middlesex, had 
two sons, Ralph, his heir ; and Lawrence, 
the first rector of Lillingston, living in 1255, 
who h;id a son, Richard. The elder son, 

Ralph Dairell, of Lillingston Dairell 

i.iAM Darell, sub-treasurer of England, temp. 
RicHAKD n. who married Elizabeth, daughter 
imd heiress of Thomas Calston, esq. lord of Lit- 
tlecote, in Wiltshire, and acquired with her that 
estate. He had issue, 

I. George, his heir. 

II. Richard (Sir), also sub-treasurer of Eng- 
land, who m. Margaret, daughter and co- 
heir of Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somer- 
set, and relict of Humphrey Stafford, Earl 
of Buckingham. By this lady, a direct 
descendant of the royal line of Plantagenet, 
Sir Richard left an only daughter and 
heiress, 

Margaret, m. to James Touchet, Lord 
Audley. 

III. Constantine, of Collingborne, in. Julia, 
daughter of Robert Collingborne, and had 
a son, 

William, who acquired the lands of 
Pageham, in Sussex, by marriage 
with Joan, daughter and heiress of 
William Knottesworth. He was 
father of 

Mar MA DUKE, of Pageham, whose 
will, dated ]7th June, 15.58, was 
proved the following July. He 
m. Anne, daughter of Richard 
Scott, esq. brother of Sir Regi- 
nald Scott, of Scotts Hall, Kent, 
and left an only daughter and 
heiress, 

iVIarv, who wedded the Rev. 
J^DWAUD Darei.l, third son 
of Thomas Darell, esq. of 
Scotney, and had issue, 

1. Thomas (Sir), of Page- 
ham. 

2. Philip. 

3. John. 

4. IMarmaduke (Sir), knt. 
of Fulmere, Bucks (cof- 
ferer to James I. and 
Charles I.), who m. 
Anne, daughter of John 
Lennard, esq. of Knoll, 

<J See vol. i. p. '368. 



and Hanworth, living in 10th Henry IH. 
married, it is supposed, an heiress named 
Juliana de Barre, and had three sons, viz. 

Henry, his heir. 

Richard, who gave donations to Suffield 
Abbey in 1253. 

Robert, also a benefactor to the same 
abbey, as was his son, Ralph. 
The eldest son and heir, 

Henry Dairell, of Hanworth and Lil- 
lingston, who flourished in the reigns of 
Henry HI. and Edward I. wedded twice. 
By his second wife, Alicia, whose mother. 
Christian, was daughter and heiress of 
Alexander Hampden, he appears to have 
had no issue. By his first, Jolianna, daugh- 
ter and co-heir of Roger de Samford, and 
first cousin to Alicia de Samford, wife of 

in Kent, and had two 
sons, Sampson (Sir), of 
Fulmere ; and Marma- 
duke, of Horstow, in 
Lincolnshire. 

5. Christopher. 

6. Henry. 

7. George, D. D. pre- 
bendary of Westmin- 
ster, who m. Anne, 
daughter of John Da- 
rell, esq. of Calehill, 
and died in 1631. 

1. Elizabeth, ?n. to George 
Shakerley, gent, of 
Ottam. 
William Darell, of Littlecote, was succeeded by 
his eldest son, 

Sir George Darell, knt. of Littlecote, who 
married, first, Margaret, daughter of John, Lord 
Stourton, and had an only daughter, Elizabeth, 
m. to Sir Henry Seymour, who died 7th Henry 
V^Il. He wedded, secondly, Jane, daughter of 
Sir William Hawke, knt. by Margaret, his wife, 
daughter of Sir Richard Widvile, and left a sou 
and successor. 

Sir Edward Darell, knt. of Littlecote, who 
m. first, Jane, daughter of Sir Richard Croft, 
knight banneret ; secondly, Mary, daughter of 
Sir John Radcliffe, Lord Fitzwalter ; and thirdly, 
Alice, relict of Sir Edward Stanhope. By his 
first wife. Sir Edward had two daughters, one of 
whom, Anne, wedded Sir John Hungerford, and 
one son, 

John Darell, esq. who was slain at Arde, in 
Picardy, during the lifetime of his father. He 
m. Jane, daughter of John Fettyplace, esq. of 
Shifford, and was father of 

Edward Darell, esq. of Littlecote, living 
temp. Edward VI. whom. Elizabeth, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Essex, knt. and had, with a daughter, 
Eleanor, the wife of Egremund Ratcliffe, a son 
and successor, 

William Darell, esq. of Littlecote, living in 
1.587, who alienated to Sir John Popham the 
estate of Uttlecote. For the curious tradition of 
the supposed murder at Littlecote House, and of 
the conse(|uent ruin of this branch of the family, 
refer to vol. ii. p. xii. 



DAYRELL, OF LILLINGSTON DAYRELL. 



149 



Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford, lie had a 
daii<;liter, Emma, m. to Richard de Grusssi't, 
and a son, 

SiK [lAi.rii Daikkll, of Liilingston l)ai- 
rcll, alive in 12S2, uiio married and had 
one son, Henry, antl a daughter, tlie wife ol" 
John de liockhampton. Sir Ralph was s. 
by his son, 

IluNUY Daikki.l, of Lillinj>ston, in 1309, 
who married a lady named Emma, but of 
what family is not recorded, lie was suc- 
ceeded by 

John Daikkll, Lord of Lillin<>ston ])ai- 
rell, in IMMB, who is presun\ed to have been 
son of his predecessor. This John was 
father of 

Roc.KK Daiiu'.i.i,, of Lillinoston Dairell, 
who represented Buekinu,hamshire in seve- 
ral parliaments (hirin<i- the reigns of Ri- 
chard II. and HiiNKY IV. and presented to 
Hanworth rectory in 1362. He m. Joan, 
<laughter and heiress of Thomas Agmonde- 
sham, and had, with Thomas, Nicholas, and 
Roger, an elder son, his successor, 

John Daikkll, of Lillingston Dairell, 
alive in the 3rd of Hknky Y. He married 
Eleanor, daughter and co-heir (with her 
sisters, tlie wives of Chetwood and In- 
goldesby,) of Thomas Langport, of Bifield 
and Foxcote, and had two sons, viz. 
Paul, his heir. 

Thomas, to whom his mother granted, 
39th Henry VI. lands in Dodford 
and Foxcote. 

John Dairell died in 1417, and was s. by his 
son, 

Paul Dairell, of Lillingston Dairell, 
who wedded Margaret, sister of Sir Joliii 
Prisot, chief justice of the Court of Common 
Pleas, and dying 29th March, 1491, left, 
with a daughter, Isabel, m. to Richard 
Pigott, esq. of Rippon, in Yorkshire, and of 
Beckampton, Bucks, a son and successor, 

Thomas Dairell, of Lillingston Dairell, 
who served the office of sherift' for the 
counties of Bedford and Buckingham in the 
11th and 20th of Henry VII. He m. Do- 
rothy, daughter of Henry Danvers, of Lon- 
don, third son of John Danvers, of Col- 
thorpe, and had issue, 

I. Paul, his heir. 

II. Henry. 

III. Richard, who, it appears, applied to 
«| the Heralds' College for a renewal of 

the family arms. 

IV. George, who occurs as rector of 
Lillingston in 1556. 

Thomas Dairell was succeeded by his eldest 
son, 

Paul Dairell, esq. of Lillingston Dai- 
rell, who married, first, temp. Henry VIII. 
Margaret, daughter of John Cheney, of 
Cheshanibrys, in Buckinghamshire ; se- 
condly, Susannah, daughter of — Crewe, 



esq. ; and thirdly, Dorothy,* daughter of 
Joim Young, es(i. of Crome Dabitot, in 
V\ orcestershire. By the iirst he had, 

I. Paul, his heir. 

II. Francis, who married Anne, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Woodford, and wijs 
father of 

Edmund Dayrell, esq. of Lam- 
port, who m. tiie daugliter and 
heirtss of — Ishan), esq. of 
Northamptonshire, and was suc- 
c<'ede(i by his son, 

Abel bAYKEi.i., est], of Lam- 
port, who »i. Eli/aheth, dau. 
of J. Miller, esq.of Draugh- 
ton, Northants,and had (ive 
sons and four daughters, viz. 
John, Edmund, Paul, Abel, 
William, Mary, Elizabeth, 
Dorothy, and Anne. 

I. Dorothy, m. first, to Walter Young, 
of Loudon, merchant ; and secondly, 
to John Quarles, also a London mer- 
chant. 

II. Anne, m. to Edward Leigh ton, esq. 
of Watlesborough, in Shropshire. 

Paul Dayrell died 25th May, 1556, seised 
of the manor, 1 messuage, 5 cottages, and 
1000 acres of land, in Lillingston Dayrell ; 
1 messuage, 80 acres of land, and a water- 
mill, in Twyford and Charendon ; 1 mes- 
suage, 2 crofts, 20 acres, and a dove-house, 
in Lechampstead ; 1 messuage and 85 acres 
of land, in Foxcote. His elder son and 
successor, 

Paul Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston Day- 
rell, sherilf of Buckinghamshire in the 5th 
and 22nd of Elizabeth, married Frances, 
daughter of William Saunders, esq. of 
Welford, and had issue, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Francis, ancestor of the Dayrells 
OF Shudy Camps, in Cambridgeshire 
{See that family). 

III. William. 

IV. Walter, some time reader of Gray's 
Inn, who died 21st June, 1623, and 
was buried in the church of St. Ni- 
cholas, at Abingdon, in Berkshire, 
where a marble fixed on the north 
wall bears the following inscription : 
" A memorial of Walter Dairell, esq. 
(who) deceased June 21, mdcxxiii, 
in the lxh year of his age, at Graies 
Inn, where he was some tyme an 
approved reader; and here intercd, 
where he was the careful recorder of 
the toune (Abingdon) ; Lillingstone 



* 'ibis lady had been married twice pre- 
viously ; first to ^^ illiam Haddon, father of Wal- 
ter II addon, a famous reformer, ami secondly to 
William Saunders, esq. of Welford, Northampton- 
shire. 



150 



DAYRELL, OF LILLINGSTON DAYRELL. 



(the seat of the ancient family De 
Hairell, vulgarly Dairell,) uas ho- 
noured with his birth, but this toun 
is trusted with the treasure of his 
bones. His worth claimes Fame for 
his trumpet, and Memory itself for 
his monument. In the famous uni- 
versity of Oxford he w^as hopeful, — 
in the Innes of Court compleat, — the 
barr found him not merely tongue- 
deep, or a verbal lawyer, for he was 
eminent, as well for soundness of 
judgement as flourish of speech. His 
law was not opposite to the Gospel ; 
the advancement of the clergy being 
his joy, and the beauty of God's 
House his delight. He was a man 
of an even temper, abhorring the 



licentious libertine, and yet not en- 
couraging the undisciplined disci- 
plinarian. His wife was Alice, the 
daughter of Thomas Mayot, gent, of 
Abingdon, with whom he perfected 
the circle of 26 yeares marriage so 
happily, that no division was known 
betwixt them but his death. The 
issue he had by her was three sons 
and three daughters, the lively mo- 
dells of himself, in whom he yet out- 
lives mortality. Ad victorem ne 
querent tumuli fastum nam mem- 
phida vincet, Marmor quod Dairell 
indicit hie situs est. Posterity doth 
owe the memorial to the Piety of 
Alice, his loving wife." Walter 
Dayrell's issue were, 

1. Paul, living in 1695, who mar- 
ried 13arbara, daughter of Sir 
John Sidney, fourth son of Sir 
Henry Sidney, and dying in 
1698, left one son and two 
daughters, viz. 

Pembroke, living unmarried 

in 1699. 
Mary, m. to .John Pierce, 
grandson to tlie Bishop of 
Bath and Wells. 
Alice. 

2. Thomas, who died without issue. 

3. Walter, archdeacon of Win- 
chester, d. s. p. 

1. Frances, «i. first, to Robert 
Hovendon, esq. of Stanton- 
Harcourt, in Oxfordshire ; and 
secondly, to Thomas Gorges, of 
the family of the Lord Gorges 
of Ridgley. 

2. Alice, m. to Charles Halloway, 
of Oxford, serjeant-at-law, who 
died in 1679, aged eighty-four. 

3. Mary, m. to Thomas Kyte, esq. 
uncle to Sir William Kyte, of 
Ebberington, in Gloucestershire. 



Paul Dayrell died in 1606, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son. 

Sir Thomas Dayrell, knt. of Lillingston 
Dayrell, who married Margery, daughter 
and co-heiress of Robert Home, Bishop of 
Winchester, and had issue, 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Peter, successor to his brother. 

III. Henry, d. in 1585. 

IV. John. 

V. Paul. 

I . Anne, in. to Timothy Egerton, esq. of 
Walgrange and Leek, in the county 
of Stafford, son and heir of Thomas 
Egerton, master of the mint to Queen 
Mary. 

II. Marv, m. loth May, 1614, to Sir 
Henry St. George, knt. garter king 
of arms, and had issue, 

1. Sir Thomas St. George, garter 
king of arms, who m. Clara, 
daughter of the Rev. John Pym- 
low, rector of Cliffe, and had a 
daughter, Eleanor, the second 
wife of Thomas Coote, esq. of 
Coote Hill, one of the justices 
of the Court of King's Bench in 
Ireland. 

2. William St. George, a colonel 
of foot in the service of Charles 
I. slain at the storming of Lei- 
cester in 1645. 

3. Henry St. George, garter king 

of arms. 

4. Richard St. George, ulster king 

of arms. 

1. Elizabeth St. George, m. Col. 
Richard Bourke. 

2. Mary St. George, m. to Ferdi- 
nando Hastings, esq. of Braun- 
ston, in Leicestershire, fifth son 
of Sir Henry Hastings. 

3. Frances St. George, m. to 
George Tucker, esq. of Milton 
and Crayford, in the county of 
Kent, and had issue, 

John Tucker, under secretary 
to Queen Anne and keeper 
of the state papers, died un- 
mai'ried. 
Frances Tucker, m. to Ri- 
chard Dayrell, esq. of 
Lillingston. 
III. Rebecca, m. to George Ovven,*sq. 
Sir Thomas, whose portrait is at Stowe, 
painted at the age of fifty-four, in 1607, 
and bearing the quartered arms of Dayrell 
and Hampden, died in 1617, and was s. by 
his son, 

Thomas Dayrell. esq. of Lillingston 
Dayrell, high sheriff for Bucks 3rd Charles 
I. who died without issue 11th May, 1628, 
and was s. by his brother, 

Peter Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston Day- 



DAYRELL, OF I.ILhlNCiSTON DAYUELL. 



I.M 



rell, a devoted royalist, who attended KIik/ 
Chaki.I'.s I. to Ox lord, and was included in 
the list of <;(!ntleni<ui intended to have heen 
honoured with the knit^lilliood of the royal 
oak. (See Appendix to vol. i.) lie m. tirst, 
Catiieriiie, dau;;hter of Kdward Cuthhert, of 
London ; stn-ondly, Klizaheth, dauj;liter of 
Anthony Pralt, escj. of Weldon, in North- 
amptonshire ; and tliirdly, Klizaheth, daugh- 
ter of .lohn Wickstead, esq. of Cambridge. 
IJy Elizabeth Pratt, his second wife, wlio 
died lltii October, KiHd, aged ninety-nine, 
Captain Day rell had issue, 

I. Thomas, died unm. in 1669. 

II. Peter, died 23rd February, 1670, 
leaving no issue by Elizabeth Pol- 
lard, his wife. 

III. Anthony, heir to his father. 

IV. Paul, successor to his nephew. 

V. Richard, who inherited from his 
brother Paul. 

I. Frances, m. to Matthew Wilkes, 
esq. of Leighton Buzzard. 

II. Anne, died unmarried. 

III. Maria, supposed to have married 
— Wheeler, esq. 

IV. Eleanora, wife of — Reed, of 
Olney. 

Capt. Dayrell's third son and eventual suc- 
cessor. 

The Rev. Anthony Dayiiell, rector of 
Lillinoston, married Miss Anne Perkins, 
and died 30th November, 1676, aged fifty- 
six, leaving a son and heir, 

Thomas Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston 
Dayrell, at whose decease unmarried the 
estates and representation of the family 
reverted on his uncle, 

Paul Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston Day- 
rell, who married first, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Anthony Fecket, citizen of London, and 
had a daughter, Frances, the wife of Henry 
Goldsmith, gent. He wedded secondly, 
Margery, daughter of — Palmer, esq. but 
by her, who married secondly, — Disney, 
esq. had no issue. Dying in 1690, he was 
succeeded by his brother, 

Richard Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston 
Dayrell, who m. Frances, daughter of 
George Tucker, esq. of Crayford, in Kent, 
and had issue, 

I. Peter, his heir. 

n. Thomas, successor to his brother. 

III. John, died unm. 

IV. Paul, died unm. 1755. 

I. Frances, b. 1703-4, m. William Da- 
rell, esq. of St. Mary-le-Strand, Lon- 
don, (son of Thomas Darell, esq. of 
Chacroft, Hants, and grandson of 
Thomas Darell, esq. of Trewornan, 
in Cornwall, sprung from a scion of 
the Pageham line), and had a son, 



Henry St. (Jeorge Darell, who 
iidieriled the estate of Col- 
drinick, under the will of his 
first cousin, Charles Trelawny, 
esq. and assumed the surname 
and arms of Trelawny. (See 
vol. i. p. 369). 

II. Elizabeth, ) ^^,,^^ ,,i,,j „„n,.irriod. 

III. Catharine, ) 

Mr. Dayrell <lied in 1701, and was suc- 
ceeded by his eldest son, 

PErER Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston Day- 
rell, who died ccelebs in 17'26, and was suc- 
ceeded by his brother, 

Thomas Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston 
Dayrell, who m. Mary, daughter of the 
Rev. Stephen Townshend, rector of Preston 
Bissett, Bucks, and dying in 1729, left a sou 
and successor. 

The Rev. Richard Dayrell, D. D. 
rector and lord of the manor of Lillings- 
ton Dayrell, b. in 1720, at Preston Bissett. 
This gentleman wedded Anne, daughter of 
Sir John Langham, bart. of Cottesbrooke, 
in Northamptonshire, and niece to Richard 
Viscount Cobham, and had by her, who d. 
in 1730, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II. Paul, successor to his brother. 

III. Henry, capt. R.N. b. in June, 1746,^ 
m. in 1776, Mary Martha Penelope, 
eldest daughter of John Miller, gent. 
of Buckingham, and had one son and 
three daughters, viz. 

Richard, successor to his uncle, 
Paul, and present proprietor. 

Anna-Maria, who m. the Rev. 
John Theodore Archibald Reed, 
rector of Leckhampsted, Bucks, 
and had issue. 

Frances-Langham, who ni. Wil- 
liam Read, gent. 

Pliillis-Elizabeth-Georgiana, who 
died in infancy. 

IV. John-Langham, b. 2nd July, 1756, 
in holy orders, rector of Lillingston 
Dayrell, who m. first, Mary, daugh- 
ter of William Wilson, gent, and 
secondly, Frances, only child and 
heiress of the Rev. Mr. Knight, rector 
of Lillingston Lovel, Oxon. 

Dr. Dayrell died 14th April, 1767, aged 
forty-seven, and was succeeded by his son, 
Richard Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston 
Dayrell, a captain in the 10th dragoons, 
who entailed the family estates on his 
brothers and their heirs male, with re- 
mainder, in default of such issue, on the 
Dayrells of Lamport. Captain Dayrell, 
who was in the commission of the peace 
and lieutenancy for Bucks, and had served 
the office of sheriff, died in 1800, unmarried, 
and was succeeded by his brother, 



162 



DAYRELL, OF SHUDY CAMPS. 



Pai'L Dayrei.l, esq. of Lillingston Day- 
rell, b. in June, 1740, a captain in the o2nd 
regiment, who resided in America, where 
he married, and died without issue, in 1803, 
when the estates and representation of the 
family devolved on his nephew, the present 
Richard Dayrkll, esq. of Lillingston Day- 
rell. 

.4 rw5— Quarterly ; first and fourth, az. 
a lion rampant or, crowned arg. Second 
and third, arg. three bars sa. charged with 
six cinquefoils of the first. 

Crest — A goat's head erased ppr. 

Motto — Secure vivere mors est. 

Estates — In Buckinghamshire. The 
manor and estate and presentation to the 



rectory of Lillingston Dayrell has been 
held by the family from the" Conquest. 

Seat — Lillingston Dayrell, four miles 
from Buckingham. The family now re- 
sides at Padbury Lodge. 

\* The present Captain Dayrell pos- 
sesses a purlieu'horn which shews the right 
his family enjoys of hunting the outflying 
deer of the king's forest of Whittlebury, 
and other adjacent confines. An anecdote 
is told of one of his ancestors, who while 
hunting the purlieus drove a deer to a 
boundary, and the animal endeavouring to 
leap feli backwards across the ditch, and 
the forest keepers, who were on the alert, 
attempting to sieze him, Dayrell drew his 
hanger and cut the deer in two, exclaiming 
" I have the haunches, you may have the 
rest." 



DAYRELL, OF SHUDY CAMPS. 

DAYRELL, FRANCIS, esq. of Shudy Camps Park, in the county of Cambridge, 
b. 18th July, 1798, a captain in the army, inherited the estates, upon the demise of 
his father, in Aug-iist, 18"21. 

Captain Dayrell is in the commission of the peace for Cambridgeshire. 



Hmcaat. 




This is a branch of the eminent and ancient 
stock of Dayrell, of Lillingston Dayrell, 
in the county of Buckingham, (see p. 147.) 
■ Francis Dayrell, esq. second son of 
Paul Dayrell, esq. of Lillingston, high 
sheriff for Buckinghamshire in 1579, mar- 
ried Barbara, daughter of Anthony Powell, 
esq. of the county of Gloucester, and had 
one son and three daughters, viz. 
Thomas (Sir), his heir. 

!5''^?^*' I both died nn 
i* ranees.) 



im. 



Susan, m. to Thomas Winne, clerk of 

the checque to the band of gentlemen 

pensioners temp. Charles I. 

Francis Dayrell died 29th January, 1614, 

was interred in Bittlesden Chapel, under the 

following inscription : 

Hie jacet Franciscus Dayrell, filius Pauli Dayrell 

de Lillingston 

qui obiit 29 .Tanuarii 1614. 

Quid tua vita. Dolor, quid mors, tibi meta dolorum ; 

Mors vitam sequitur, vita beata necem : 
Ergone defunctum vita lacrymabimur absit, 
Praestat abesse viris possit ut esse Deo. 

and succeeded by his son, 

Sir Thomas Dayrell, knt. who seated 
himself at Shudy Camps, in the county of 
Cambridge. Of this gentleman it is re- 
corded in his monumental inscription, that 
" he was eminent for his loyalty and ser- 
vices to their majesties Charles I. and IL 
in the civil wars, was universally esteemed 
for his great learning, and beloved of all who 
knew him, and particularly by the county of 
Cambridge, where in his old age he served 
in the quality of deputy lieutenant and 
justice of the peace to the time of his death. 
In his younger years, he was of Lincoln's 
Inn. where from the comelyness of his 
person, he was chosen, by the consent of 



COSBY, OF STRADUALLY. 



I.VJ 



tlie four inns of court, to coniniand that 
jTiaiid masiiiie (in wliicli numy i;f ntlcinrn o( 
finiiient nott- and quality in the succeeding 
times liad tlicir several parts), that was 
represented bel'ore their majesties, the kinjr 
and ([ueen, in llie banqueting;- liouse, at 
VViiitehall, on Candlemas ni^ht, in the year 
KJU.'J, and a second tinn^ by special direction 
from their majesties to Sir Italph I'renian, 
then lord mayor of London, at Merchant 
Taylor's Hall, when his majesty, as a mark 
of his royal favour, was |)leased to confer 
on him the honour of kni<;hth()od." 

Sir Thomas m. Sarah, daui;hter and co- 
heir of Sir Hugh Windham, bart. of Fils- 
den Court, in the county of Dorset, and 
had issue, 

Thomas, died unm. 

Francis (Sir), his father's heir. 

Maumadiikk (Sir), successor to his 

brother. 
Wyndham, died unm. 

Mary, died unm. 

Sarah, ?«. to Francis Windham, esq. 
only son of Sir George Windham, 
and was ancestor of the Windhams 
of Cromer, (see vol. ii. page 244). 

He died in 1G69, and was succeeded by his 
son, 

Sfk Francis Paykki.f,, knt. of Shu<ly 
Camps, who m. Elizabeth, daughter and 
co-heir of Edward Lewis, esq. of the Van, 
in the county of Glamorgan, but dying 
without issue, in 1(575, the estates devolved 
on his brother. 

Sir Marmadukk Dayrkli,, of Shudy 
Camps. This gentleman wedded first, Mary, 
only daughter of Sir Justinian Isham, bart. 
of Lamport, in Northamptonshire, l)ut had 
no issue ; and secondly, Mary, daughter 
and heiress of William Glasscock, esq. of 
Farnham, in Essex, by whom he left, at 
his decease in 1712, a son and successor, 

Francis Dayrkll, esq. of Shudy Camps, 



who m. I';ii/abeth, daughter of Peter \V itch- 
comb, escj. of liraxted Lodge, Essex, and 
one of the co-heiresses of Sir Jirownlow 
Sherrard, bart. of Lobthorp, in Lincoln- 
sliire, and had a son, 

Marmadi'ki; Davrki.i,, esq. of Slmdy 
Camps, living in 1784, who espoused Hen- 
rietta, daughter of Warner Temi)est, esq, 
ol the Island of Antigua, and had, with three 
daughters, all now deceased, except the 
youngest, Maria, two sons, 
Marmadiikk, his heir. 
Fran(;is- Valentine, deceased. 
Mr. Dayrell was succeeded at his decease 
by his elder son, 

Marmadiikk Dayrf.ix, es(|. of Shudy 
Can)ps, who m. in 1797, Mi Id red- Rebecca, 
daughter of the late Sir Kobert Lawley, 
bart. and sister to Lord Wenlock, by whom 
he had issue, 

Francis, his heir. 

Thomas, in holy orders, rector of Mars- 
ton, Yorkshire, 6. in 1H02, m. Maria, 
daughter of the late Rev. Mr. Hawks- 
worth, and has one son and one 
daughter. 
Cliristopher-Jeaftreson, b. in 1808. 
Robert-William, b. in 1812. 

Jane-Elizabeth, m. to the Rev. Fitz- 
gerald Wintour, of Barton, in the 
county of Nottingham, and has two 
sons and two daughters. 
Mr. Dayrell died in August, 1821, and was 
s. by his eldest son, the present Francis 
Dayrell, esq. of Shudy Camps. 

Ar7ns—Az. a lion rampant or, crowned 
arg. armed and langued gu. 

C7'est—Out of a ducal coronet a goat's 
head erased ppr. 

Motto— YhtvLS mille scuta. 

Estates— In Cambridgeshire. 

Seat — Shudy Camps Park, Cambridge- 
shire. 



COSBY, OF STRADBALLY. 



COSBY, THOMAS-PHILLIPS, esq. of Stradbally Hall, in the Queen's County, 
b. 20th September, 1803 ; inherited, on the demise of his father, on the 22nd Ja- 
nuary, 1832. 

This g-entleman was sheriff of his native county in* 1834, and one of the 
governors thereof prior to the alteration recently made by parliament in the local 
jurisdiction of Ireland. He continues in the commission of the peace, and is beside a 
deputy lieutenant. 



151 



COSBY, OF STRADBALLY. 



Hiucagc. 




In the time oi Queen Mary, this family, 
originally of the counties of Leicester and 
Lincoln, settled in Ireland, and it has since 
moved in the first grade of country gentle- 
men. 

Robert Cossbye,* of Hermastou, in 
Lincolnshire, living in 1516, m. Isabel, dau. 
and heiress of Ralph Pare, esq. of Great 
Leak, Notts, (by Isabel, his wife, daugliter 
and heiress of John Blake, of Hermaston), 
and had a son and heir, 

John Cosbie, who wedded Mable, daugh- 
ter of — Agard, of Foston, in Nottingham- 
shire, and had two sons, namely, Richard 
Cosby, of Great Leake (whose only daugh- 
ter and heiress, Bridget, became the wife 
of William Towers, gent, of Thunnocke), 
and 

Francis Cosbie, the patriarch of the fa- 
mily in Ireland, a man famed for personal 
courage, as well as civil and military ta- 
lents. When young he served in the wars 
of Henry VIII. in the Low Countries, and 
was not undistinguished. His abandon- 
ment of his native soil arose from the down- 
fall of the Protector Somerset, whose 
daughter Mary, widow of Sir Henry Pay- 
ton, knt. he had married. Deeming the 
disgrace and death of that once potent no- 
bleman a sentence of exclusion from place 
and preferment in England, against his im- 
mediate connections at least, Cosbie, Mary 
Seymour, his first wife, being then dead, 
emigrated to Ireland, taking with him his 
second wife, Elizabeth Paulines, and the 
two surviving sons of the first. Here, in 
tlie land of his adoption, he soon found the 

* Son of John Cossebye, grandson of William 
CossEBYE, and great-grandson of Rokeut Cossk- 
BY, of Cossebye, in the county of Leicester. 



opportunity of establishing a reputation, 
which he despaired of efi'ecting in the land of 
his birth. He became an active defender of 
the Pale against the inroads of the Irish ; 
and his vigilance, zeal and success attract- 
ing the observation of government, he was 
appointed by Queen Mary, under her ma- 
jesty's sign manual, dated 14th February, 
1558, General of the Kern, a post of 
great trust and importance in those times. 
In 1559 he represented the borough of Tho- 
mastown in parliament, when he was con- 
stituted by Queen Elizabeth sherift' of the 
county of Kildare, being denominated in 
his patent, (dated '24th January, in the first 
year of her majesty's reign), " of Evan," 
now " Munster Evan," which place he 
held under an old grant from the crown, 
and was invested at the same time with the 
extraordinary and unenviable privilege of 
exercising martial law under his own au- 
thority solely, and of dealing out such 
punishments, even the most penal, as he 
should deem meet. 7\.rbitrary power has 
rarely consorted with justice or mercy, and 
few have passed through the fiery ordeal of 
its unhallowed possession with reputation 
unscathed, for few have been found virtuous 
or firm enough to withstand the temptation 
of persecuting their fellows. Unhappily for 
the memory of Francis Cosbie, his name may 
not be written down amongst the merciful ; 
but in his day, and in the wretched land 
over which he became a ruler, oppression 
and cruelty were of such frequent occur- 
rence as to become familiar to men's minds, 
and to be stripped of more than a moiety of 
the horror that tyranny usually inspires. 
Cosbie, in furtherance of his commission, 
caused a gallows to be erected in the imme- 
diate vicinity of his own residence, on a spot 
still bearing the name of Gallows-hill, and 
there he is accused of having committed 
the most atrocious excesses. One practice 
is recorded, that of hanging his victim alive 
in chains, and placing within view a loaf of 
bread, in order to aggravate the excruciat- 
ing tortures of hunger ; his conduct, how- 
ever, received the high commendation of the 
lord-deputy, Sidney, who, in the state papers, 
represents the district over which General 
Cosbie so ruthlessly presided to be in such 
profound tranquillity, under that officer's 
government, that it was almost useless to 
make the country shire ground. Coshie 
eventually fell at tlie battle of Glandillough, 
at the head of the Kern which he valiantly 
led to the charge, although then seventy 
years of age. Of this action, and the ge- 
neral's death, Camden gives the following 



COSBY, OF STRADBALLY. 



nunative : " When Aitliur, Loun (iiu;Y, 
luiided iti Ireland to assuiiut the liiHitiHiaiicy, 
before he had been invested with tlie sword 
and the other insi>;iiia of oHice, learninir that 
some rebels, under the connnand of Fitz- 
Eustace, and Phelim M'nui!,h, a chief of 
the nunierons sept of the O'lJyrnes, wJio 
had their retreat in (ihindilloiinh, twenty- 
five miles south of l)ul)lin, were devastatinj;- 
the adjacent country, conunanded the lea- 
ders of the band, assembled from all quar- 
ters to welcome his arrival, to take the Held 
witli himself aj^ainst the insurgents, who, 
upon being apprised of the movement, re- 
treated into the valley of (Jlandillouoh, a 
grassy spot, fit for leeding sheep, but so full 
of marshy ground, rocky precipices, and 
thick shrubby woods, by which the vale was 
entirely encom|)assed, that the paths and 
l)asses were hardly kiiowu to its own inha- 
bitants. On the army's reaching this place, 
Cosby, general of the ligbt Irish foot, de- 
nominated Kerns, aware of the many advan- 
tages it aiforded the enemy, described to the 
other leaders the danger to be encountered 
in attacking him there, but at the same time 
exhorted them with the utmost intrepidity 
to brave all peril ; and putting himself at 
once, although seventy years of age, at the 
head of his men, led them to the charge. 
The instant, however, the royal army had 
entered the valley, it was overwhelmed with 
a shower of arrows like hailstones from the 
rebels, who lay concealed on every side 
amongst the bushes and underwood, so that 
they could not even be discovered. The 
greater part of the invaders fell, and the re- 
mainder, struggling through the most peril- 
ous passes amongst the precipices, escaped 
with difficulty to the lord-lieutenant, who 
awaited the event on the brow of the hill, with 
the Earl of Kildare, and James Wingfield, 
engineer-general, who well knowing the 
risk encountered, kept one of his nephews, 
(Jeorge Cai-ew, jun. with him against his 
will. There were lost in this attack Peter 
Carew the younger, George Moore Audley, 
and Cosby himself, a man nourishing in mi- 
litary glory." 

By his first wife, Mary, the Duke of So- 
merset's daughter, and Sir Henry Peyton's 
widow, Francis Cosbie had three sons, viz. 

Alexandkr, inheritor of the estates. 

Henry, who died before his father set- 
tled in Ireland. 

Arnold, who served under Robert, Earl 
of Leicester, with great reputation 
in the Low Countries, rt/m« 1586, with 
the celebrated Sir Philip Sidney, 
and was at the battle of Zuptoii, 
where Sir Philip received his mortal 
wound. Captain Cosbie remained 
after the Earl of Leicester's return 
to England, and obtained from Queen 



Ei-iZABKiii,* in consideration ol' his 
good services, a ixMision of three 
shillings per day on the Irish estab- 
lishment, until lie should be other- 
wise provided for in the army of 
that kingdom. Notwithstanding this 
apparent proti^ction of the court, he 
sull'ered, in two years afterwards, 
the utmost penalty of the criminal 
law, for killing the Lord Jiourke, of 
Castle Connel, in a duel on Finchley 
Common, the queen peremjitorily 
refusing to extend to him her royal 
mercy. 
By his second wife, Elizabeth Paulmes, 
General Cosbie had an only child, 

Catherine, m. to Archibald Moor, esq. 
but d. issueless. 

Although the active service in which 
General Cosbie was constantly engaged 
seldom permitted him to have a fixed place 
of abode, he seems to have considered and 
used the Abbey of Stradbally as the seat of 
his family : it was then, evidently from tlie 
ruins which rem.ained until the year 1722, 
an extensive and handsome pile of build- 
ing ; but Colonel Cosbie having let the 
ground in that year to Colonel Nathaniel 
Mitehel, he pulled down the greater part of 
those venerable remains of antiquity for 
materials to build his mansion-house, leav- 
ing nothing standing but part of an old cha- 
pel, which is still visible. Francis Cosbie 
was s. by his eldest son, 

Alexander Cosbie, esq. of Stradbaliy 
Abbey, who seems to have been engaged 
during the whole of his time in warfare with 
the O'Moores. Camden, in his life of Eli- 
zabeth, recounts his being once taken by 
treachery during a conference with Rory, 
Of/e, near Leighliii, and that he was rescued 
when bound to a tree, by Harpole, but not 
before he had received a wound from a knife, 
inflicted by Rory. This Francis possessed 
the same arbitrary power over the lives and 
limbs of his countrymen that was con- 
ferred upon his father, and seems to have 
abused it quite as barbarously. The tradi- 
tion of the country records, that he was 
wont to hang multitudesof his enemies upon 
a sallow tree near the abbey ; and he was 
accustomed to remark, that his sallow 
looked melancholy and denuded, whenever 
he observed it without the appendage of one 
or two of his foemen dangling from its 
branches: hence the soubriquet of Sillage, 
or the " Sallow," conferred upon the family. 
His excesses were, however, so unjustifia- 
ble, notwithstanding the latitude of his com- 
mission, that he found it necessary to solicit 



* By her majesty's letter to the Lord-deputy 
Fitzwiiliains, dated at Greenwich, 'i7th .\nrii, 
1588. 



L-36 



COSBY, OF STRADBALLY. 



and obtain a patent of iiideniiiity from the 
(|iieen, wliich lier majesty styles " her par- 
don to Alexander Cosbie for the crnelties 
that happened dnring his ^vars with the 
O'Moores/' This instrument is dated 6th 
December, 1593. 

He married DoRCAS, daughter of Wil- 
liam Sydney,* esq. of Orford, in Kent, and 
had fifteen children. This lady, who had 
been one of the maids of honour to Qitef7i 
Elizabeth, obtained, throuo-h Jier influen- 
tial connexions at court, grants in Ireland 
(in Leix) so extensive, that at one period 
the family were the territorial lords 
of more than a moiety of the Queen's 
County. Amongst other estates thus ac- 
quired, the towns of Ballynakil, Ballyroan, 
and Mountrath, with a considerable portion 
of Maryborough, beside the lordships of 
Gallin, Rushhall, and Trimahoe may be 
enumerated ; but of that splendid inherit- 
ance all that now remains to the Cosbys is 
Trimahoe. t The grantee, herself, alienated 
the town of Ballynakil and the lordship of 
Gallin for one hundred pounds, which she 
received in silver shillings — of so little value 
did she regard the possession of lands which 
her husband and sons were so frequently 
obliged to defend «ith their swords. It is 
worthy of remark that in all grants, and 
even in private writings, Dorcas continued 
to use the name of Sydney, and never as- 
sumed that of her husband. With the ex- 
ception of intervals passed at Penshurst in 
visiting their distinguished relatives there, 
Alexander Cosbie and his wife resided en- 
tirely at the Abbey of Stradbally, and en- 
joyed high reputation amongst the English 
settlers. The feud with the O'Moores, en- 
during however in all its lawless violence, 
came at length to issue, in 1596, and proved 
fatal to Cosbie and his eldest son. In that 
year Anthony O'Mooke, the chief of the 
insurgent clans, bearing his name, sent to 
demand a passage over Stradbally bridge, 
but the requisition being deemed by Cosby 
a challenge, was promptly and peremptorily 
denied, and preparations were commenced 
without loss of time to defend the pass, 
should the enemy attempt to force it. That 
attempt being made by O'Moore, on the 
19th of May, the Lord of Stradbally, at the 
head of his Kern, accompanied by his sou 
and heir, Francis, who had married, about 
a year previously, Hellen, daughter of Tho- 
mas Harpole, esq. of Shrule, and had born 



* Grand-nephew of William Sydney, Lord of 
Cranleigb. 

t 1 he inheritance of this estate from Doners 
Sydney entitles the Cosms to quarter the Sydney 
arms; and the freqiient occurrence of Sydnfy as 
a Christian name in the fainilv, may be traced to 
the connexion formed through that lady. 



to him a son, William, but nine weeks 
before, met his foe in deadly combat on the 
bridge, while the conflict was witnessed 
from a window in the abbey by Dorcas 
Sydney and her daughter-in-law. For 
some time the valour of the Cosbies was ir- 
resistible, and the fortune of the dav ap- 
peared to be theirs. Alexander, however, 
pursuing his advantage with extraordinary 
impetuosity, received a wound which proved 
at once mortal, and instantly turned the tide 
of battle. The Kern, with melancholy 
howling for the fate of their leader, began to 
give way, when Francis Cosby, fearing that 
he should be entirely abandoned, lea])ed 
over the bridge in the hope of making good 
his retreat to the abbey ; but the instant 
! that he had cleared the battlements, he was 
t mortally wounded, and fell dead into the 
' river. These scenes, one should have ima- 
gined, would have appalled the now widowed 
ladies who had witnessed them ; yet it is re- 
corded that Hellen Harpole, with the cool- 
est presence of mind, cautioned her mother- 
in-law to retain in her recollection how the 
elder Cosbie fell before his son, her husband, 
who had, by thus inheriting the estates even 
for a few minutes, entitled her to her thirds, 
or dowry. It is not known how the ladies 
eventually escaped; but the infant, Wil- 
liam Cosby, was carried olf and preserved 
by his nurse. O'Moore, pursuing his vic- 
tory, took possession of the abbey, and, 
after sacking, committed it to the flames, 
when many of the patents, and other valu- 
able documents of the family, were de- 
stroj'ed in the conflagration. 

The issue of Alexander Cosby and Dor- 
cas Sidney, were 

I. Francis, b. 1st January, 1571, and 
baptized with much ceremony in St. 
Patrick's Church, Dublin, the lord 
deputy standing god-father. He was 
captain of the Kern, and fell, as 
already stated, immediately after 
his father, at the battle of Stradbally 
Bridge, on the 19th of Alay, 1590, 
leaving by his wife, Hellen Harpole, 
(who wedded secondly, Sir Thonsas 
Loftus, of Killian, in the King's 
County), an infant child, William, 
b. in 1596, who succeeded him. 

II. William, b. in 1573, ) both died 
ill. John, b. ill 1574. \ young. 

IV. Richard, successor to his nephew. 

V. Humphrey, b. 20th September, 1581, 
(I. young. 

VI. Charles, b. 12th September, 1585, 
m. a daughter of the Loftus family. 

vif. John, b. 4th August, 1589, d. 
young. 

VIII. , a son, d. in infancy. 

IX. Arnold, .6. 20th June, 1591, settled 



COSBY, OF STUADBAl.LV. 



I. 



>i 



ill tlio county of Cavan, and planted 
a brancli oftlie family tlieri>. 

I. Mal)lc, h. VlXh Aut;"iist, loDH, ///. \^^ 
(jcorH'c llar|iol(', cstj. ot Slinilr, in 
flio Qiit'cn's ('(jinity, and d. in IG3i, 
leaving; issue. 

II. Kosc, /;. in tin' (luccn's lionsc, a( 
Otlord. in Kent, "iOtli Novcnihcr, 
lo8"2, said to liave wedded a Lord 
How til. 

III. Elizabeth, b. 8tli Sep-- 
tenilxr, 1,j84. 

IV. Kditii, />. I Itli Autyust, Theseladics 
1588. \ all died 

V. Mary, b. Kith Jiilv. young-. 
l.'iJiO." 

VI. Anne. -* 

The melancholy catastrophy of Alexander 
Cosby and his son appears to have created 
a strong- public feeling at the time, and the 
queen taking the state of the family into her 
gracious consideration, was i)leased to grant, 
by letters patent, in which the circumstances 
of the battle of the bridge are recited, to 
DoKCAS Sydney and Hkllkn Haui'ole, the 
wardship of the infant, William Cosby, 
besides conferring upon them pensions, in 
considerations of the many essential ser- 
vices rendered by their husbands to the 
crown. Alexander Cosby was succeeded, 
although for a few minutes only, by his 
eldest son, 

Francis Cosby, esq. ofStradbally Abbey, 
who being slain, as stated above, never en- 
joyed the inheritance, but left it to his 
infant child, 

William Cosby, esq. of Stradbally 
Abbey, who died young, when the estates 
reverted to his uncle, 

Richard Cosby, esq. who thus became 
" of Stradbally Abbey," and in order to 
repair the loss occasioned by the destruction 
of the family records, at the time of the 
burning- of the abbey, obtained nnder the 
commission of Kivy James I. for the remedy 
of defective titles, a new patent, of the 
same import as the old one, which is still 
extant. This Richard, who was captain of 
the Kerne, and esteemed of great martial 
courage and ability, eagerly solicitous on 
becoming chief of his line, to avenge the 
death of his father and brother, dared the 
O'iVFooRES to a pitched battle, and the chal- 
lengf! being- accepted, the contending clans 
met once more (A.D. 1606), in the glyn of 
Augnahily, under the rock of Dunnamace, 
when a most bloody conflict ensued, ter- 
minating in the triumph of Cosby, and the 
total defeat of his foes, who were never 
afterwards able to make head against him. 
Capt. Cosby himself displayed great per- 
sonal boldness, and received so many dan- 
gerous wounds in the action, that he could 
not be removed from the field to Stradbally, 
but was carried to Dysert House, then the 



seat of Sir Kobert I'igot, where he remaiin-d 
a considerable time before he was so far 
recovered as to be enabled to return home. 
I)nring his confinement, l'!li/,al)i;tli I*i;;()l, 
one of the daughters ol' his hospitable iiost, 
attended him with so much kindness and 
care, that he subsequently solicited her 
hand, ami she became his wife soon after 
his re-establishment at Stradbally. Tliis 
union, ;dthough in every otlu-r point unex- 
ceptionable, proved in a high degree pre- 
judicial to tli(^ fortunes ol' the family, for 
his mother, JJorcas Sydney,* who enter- 
tained a deep rooted , antipathy to the 
J'igots, taking- offence at the alliance, im- 
mediately went over to Kngland, where she? 
married a second husband. Sir Thomas 
Zouch, and left all her estates in Ireland, 
excepting Timahoe, to the Zouches, while 
she leased that for a long term to Sir 
Thomas Loftus, who had become, in 161;0, 
the second husband of her daughter-in-law, 
Hellen, the widow of Francis Cosby. 
Richard Cosby had, by Elizabeth Pigot, 
who died in 1669, four sons and a daughter, 
viz. 

I. Alexander, his heir. 

II. Francis, b. .5tli July, 1612, member 
of parliament lor Carisford, m. Anne, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Loftus, of 
Killian, by whom (who d. in l67o), 
he had issue, 

1. Alexander, successor of his 
uncle. 

2. Thomas, of Vicarstown, m. 
Anne, daughter of Sir William 
Smith, and dying in 1713, left 
a son, 

Francis, of Vicarstown, who 
wedded Anne, daughter of 
— Pigot, esq. and by her, 
who d. 30th March, 1783, 
had, with two daughters, 
Frances and Anne, two 
sons, viz. 

Thomas, of Vicarstown, 
an officer in the army, 
6. in 1742, who left at 
his decease, 10th De- 
cember, 1788, a son, 
Thomas Cosby, of 
Vicarstown, who 
inherited theStrad- 
bally estates on the 
decease of Admi- 
ral Cosby. 

* Dorcas survived Sir Thomas Zouch, who 
died in 1625. There is in the Sydney papers a 
letter from the earl of Pembroke to his uncle, 
Robert, earl of Leicester, promising to support 
her in a ditierence nliich she had with Sir fid- 
ward Zouch, her husband's son and heir, at the 
same time assuring him th-at Sir Edward would 
not wrong her. 



1.38 



COSBY, OF STRADBALLY. 



Francis, who d. at the 
Cape of Good Hope, in 
1776. 
3. Sydney, of Ballymanus, wlio 
m. Sarah, daujii^hter of— Hard- 
ing, esq. and d. in 1716. leaving, 
Francis, of Polesbridge, m. 
to Judith, daughter of — 
Pigot, esq. and dying in 
1763, left a son, Sydney, 
who wedded Henrietta, 
daughter of Henry Hughes, 
esq. of the barony of Forte. 
Arthur, of Rathcrea, b. in 
1705, m. Anne, daughter of 

— Bowen, esq. and had a 
daughter, Anne, the wife of 

— Clarke, esq. 

Anne, m. to Colclough Fitz- 
gerald, esq. of Ballyrider. 
lit. Sydney, b. 2nd October, 1613, m. a 

daughter of — Seger, esq. 
i\'. William, captain in the army, wed- 
ded Jane, daughter of — Staflford, 
esq. and d. 13th September, 1683, 
leaving a son, 

Richard,whow.Thoniasine, daugh- 
ter of Francis Brereton, esq. 
and had a son. Captain William 
Cosby. He (Richard) died in 
1730. 

I. Dorcas, jh. to W^illiam Loftus, esq. 
of Ballymann, (see vol. i. p. 210). 
Richard Cosby* was «. by his eldest son, 

Alexander Cosby, esq. of Stradbally, b. 
8th February, 1610, who espoused Anne, 
daughter of Sir Francis Slingsby, knt. of 
Kilmore, in the county of Cork, but dying 
without issue, was x. by his nephew, 

Alexander Cosby, esq. of Stradbally 
Hall, who wedded Elizabeth, daughter of 
Henry L'Estrange, esq. of Moystown, in 
the King's County, by whom (who d. in 
1692), he had eleven sons and five daugh- 
ters, namely, 

I. Dudley, his heir. 

II. Francis, d. young. 

III. Henry, captain of foot, d. in Spain, 
in 1715. He had 7n. a MissHiggins. 

IV. Thomas, major of foot, m. Jane, 
daughter of Henry Loftus, esq. and 
sister of Nicholas, Viscount Loflus, 
of Ely, by whom he had two daugh- 
ters, 

Anne, in. to Charles Davis, esq. 
Jane. 

V. Loftus, captain of foot, d. at Mar- 
seilles, 3rd January, 1726. 

* On gaining the victory of Dunnamace, Ri- 
chard Cosby, to distinguish himself from the rest 
of his family, obtained a new grant of arms, viz. 
three leopards' heads, with a chevron table, re- 
taining the canton, with some alterations. 



VI. Srymer, ^ 

VII. Sydney, > all died young. 

VIII. Harpole, ) 

IX. Alexander, lieut.-col. in the army, 
and lieutenant-governor of Nova 
Scotia, where he died 26th Decem- 
ber, 1743, leaving by Anne his wife, 
daughter of Alexander Winnard, esq. 
of Annapolis, two sons and two 
daughters, viz. 

William, a captain in the army, 
died of the small pox, at Wind- 
sor, in 1748. 

Phillips, who eventually inherited 
Stradbally. 

Elizabeth, m. to Capt. Foye. 

Mary, m. to Capt. Charles Cot- 
terel. 

X. William, a brigadier general in the 
army, colonel of the Royal Irish, 
governor of New York and the 
Jerseys, equerry to the queen, &c., 
married Grace, sister of George 
Montague, Earl of Halifax, K. B. 
and left by that lady (who died 
25th December, 1767) at his de- 
cease, 10th March, 1736, the follow- 
ing issue, 

William, an officer in the army. 
Henry, R.N. d. in 1753. 
Elizabeth, m. to Lord Augustus 

Fitzroy, second son of Charles, 

Duke of Grafton. 
Grace, ni. to — Murray, esq. of 

New York. 

XI. Arnold, d. young. 

I. Anne, m. to William Wall, esq. of 
Coolnamuck, in the county of Water- 
ford. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to Lieutenant-general 
Richard Phillips, colonel of a regi- 
ment of horse, and governor of Nova 
Scotia, and died 24th January, 1739. 
The general died in 1752, aged 101. 

III. Jane, b. in 1661. 

IV. Dorcas, m. to — Forbes, esq. 

V. Celia, m. to William Weldon, esq. 
of Rosscumro, in the King's County. 

Alexander Cosby died in 1694, and was *. 
by his eldest son, 

Dudley Cosby, esq. of Stradbally Hall, 
lieut.- colonel in the army, and M.P. for the 
Queen's County. This gentleman married 
Sarah, daughter of Periam Pole, esq.f of 
Ballyfin, in that shire, and had 

Poole, his heir. 

Sarah, /h. to Robert Meredith, esq. of 
Shrowland, in Kildare. 
Col. Cosby died 24th May, 1729, and was *. 
by his son, 

t Bv Anne his wife, daughter of Henry Col- 
i.EY, esq. of Castle Carbery, in Kildare. 



COSBY, OI- S'l'RADBALLY. 



159 



Polk Cosby, esq. of Stnidbally Hall, wlio 
wedded Mary, daughter and eo-luMi- ol' 
Henry Dodwell, esq. ol" Manor l)o<lvvell, in 
tlin county ol" Hoseomnion, and left i)y her, 
who died yth January, 17 12, at Ids decease, 
20th May, 17(iG, a daugliter, Sarali, born in 
17:iO, married lirsl, to the Right Hon. yVrthnr 
U|)ton, of (lastle Upton, and secondly, to 
Robert, Earl of Farnhani, (iiis lordship's 
second wile, see Bijkki:'s Pecrayc and 
Baronetuiie,) with a son, his successor, 

I)i'di.i:v-.\lkxam)i:k-Sydnky Cosby, esq. 
of Stradbally Hall, who was created, in 
17G8, a peer of Ireland, under the title of 
Bakon Sydnky, of Leix, in the Queen's 
County. His lordship iield no military em- 
ployment, but was minister plenipotentiary 
to tlie court of Denmark. He espoused, in 
December, 1773, the Lady Isabella St. Law- 
rence, dau. of Tliomas, first Earl of Hovvth, 
and aunt of the present earl, but died 
in the ensuing month, 17th .lanuary, 1774, 
without issue, leaving the estate burdened 
with the enormous debt of £;i(),()00. arising 
from his own imprudent expenditure. His 
peerage became of course extinct, while the 
inheritance reverted to (the only surviving 
son of LiKi T.-CoLOML Alexandkr Cosby, 
governor ol" Nova Scotia, by his wife, Anne 
Winned, of Annapolis, and grandson of 
Alexander Cosby, of Stradbally Hall, and 
liis wife, Elizabeth L'Estrange) his lord- 
ship's cousin, 

Phillips Cosby, esq. then a captain in 
the royal navy. This gentleman, to relieve 
iiimself from the encumbrance left by his pre- 
decessor, was obliged to alienate a moiety 
of the Stradbally estate, but he had pre- 
viously to establish his right by the issue of 
a suit at law of four years' endurance against 
the claim of the Earl of Farnham, founded 
upon the alledged heirship of Sarah, Lord 
Sydney's sister, and his lordship's second 
countess ; but Lord Sydney, having made a 
will in his (Cosby's) favour, and republished 
it when his lordslup married Lady Isabella 
St. Lawrence, the jury, without leaving the 
box, decided that the property was Captain 
Cosby's. In his professional career Captain 
Cos1)y, before and after his accession to the 
family estates, w^as actively engaged, and 
established the reputation of a gallant and 
experienced officer. In 1760, he was ap- 
pointed commander of liis majesty's sloop, 
the Laurel. In 1761, he was made a post 
captain ; the next year he commanded the 
Isis, of fifty guns and three hundred and fifty 
men, in the Mediterranean, under the flag 
of Vice-admiral Sir Charles Saunders. From 
1765 to 1770 (years of peace) he was captain 
of the Montreal frigate, of thirty-two guns 
and two hundred and forty men, in the same 
sea. In 1769 he brought home the remains 
of his Royal Highness the Duke of York, 
brother of King George III. who had died 



abroad, and having docked his sliip, sailed 
back to his station in the Mediterranean, 
where he soon after had the honour of en- 
t('rtaining on board his Imperial Majesty, 
Joseph II. Evh'ekok of (jekmany, and a 
numerous train of nobility, the emperor 
l)resenling him with a gold enamelled snutt' 
box, of great value, in acknou ledgment of 
his politeness and hospitality. He had 
afterwards the honour to receive, as a pas- 
senger, his Serene Uiylnuss, the hereditary 
Pkince oi' IJkhnswick, (brother-in-law to 
his own illiKstrious sovereign, Geoiuje IH.) 
and landed the prince at the Gulph of 
Frejus, on his way to Persia, wlio re- 
warded him with a splendid diamond ring. 
In 1770, he was called home, and reached 
Spithead in July, when he was appointed, 
within a brief interval, collector of Basse- 
terra, in the Island of St. Christopher's, 
to which post he immediately repaired, but 
did not remain long abroad. In January, 
1774, he came, as already stated, into the 
possession of the family estate, and re- 
sided at Stradbally Hall for the next four 
years, but the war then breaking out, he 
resumed his professional duties, and being 
appointed to the command of the Centaur, 
of seventy-four guns and six hundred and 
fifty men, was second in the van division in 
the action of the 27th July, 1778, ofl' Ushant, 
under Admiral Kepple, (afterwards Lord 
Kepple,) against the French fleet. From 
that period, until nearly the close of the 
American war. Captain Cosby was con- 
stantly employed in the Altantic, in com- 
mand of the Robust, of seventy-four guns 
and six hundred men, and on the 16th March, 
1781, led the English fleet, on both tacks, 
against the French off" the Cape of "Virginia. 
In this action the Robust sustained the fire 
of three ships, until she became a complete 
wreck, and was taken in tow by the America 
of sixty-four guns. The vice-admiral, (Ar- 
buthnot) in his communication with the ad- 
miralty, bore honourable testimony to Cos- 
by's gallant conduct, as well as in a letter* 

* Copy of a letter from Vice-admiral Arbuth- 
not to Captain Cosby. 

" Sir, 
" You have, during the time that we left Gard- 
ners' Bay, conducted yourself like an experienced 
diligent officer, particularly on the IGth instant, 
in which you have approved yourself a gallant 
naval commander, that has done honour to your- 
self and country ; and both j'ourself, officers, and 
ship's company have my warmest thanks for your 
sjiirited conduct. 

" I have ordered the America to assist you 
with twenty men, and so soon as we get to anchor 
you shall have every assistance that is in the 
power of Sir, &c. 

" M. ARBUTHNOT. 
" Royal Oak, off Cape Charles, 
16th March. 1781.'" 



160 



LAMPLUGH, OF LAMPLUGH. 



addressed to the captain himself, immedi- 
ately after the engagement. In 1782, the 
Robust, from her dismantled condition, on 
returning to England was put out of com- 
mission, and Captain Cosby repaired to 
Stradbally Hall. In the year 1785 he was 
again caiied out, and then constituted com- 
modore, and commander-in-chief of all his 
majesty's ships and vessels in the Medi- 
terranean, when he sailed from Spithead in 
the Trusty of fifty guns, three hundred and 
thirty-seven men, having previously hoisted 
the broad pendant. He remained on his 
station until 1789. In 1790, on the expec- 
tation of a war with Spain, Captain Cosby 
was appointed commander-in-chief of his 
majesty's ships employed at Cork, in the 
service of raising men for the fleet, with 
power to hoist a l)road pendant on board 
any of the ships wherever he might happen 
to be, and to have a captain under him : in 
the September of the same year, he attained 
the rank of rear-admiral of the White, but 
peace being preserved by the submission of 
Spain, he returned to Stradbally, at the 
close of the year. In 1792, being again in 
active service, he was appointed commander- 
in-chief at the port of Plymouth, and pro- 
moted soon after to vice-admiral of the 
Blue ; being subsequently engaged, at the 
commencement of the war, with republican 
France, he attained, in succession, the gra- 
dations of vice-admiral of the Red, of ad- 
miral of the Blue, and of admiral of the 
White. He finally returned to Stradbalh 1 
Hall to reside, on the 27th April, 1799. 
Admiral Cosby m. in August, 1792, Eliza, 
daughter of W. Gunthorpe, esq. and sister 
of W, Gunthorpe, esq. of Southampton, but 
liaving no issue, was s. at his decease by 
(the great-great grandson of Francis Cosby, 
M.P. for Carisford, and Anne his wife, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Loftus, of Killian, 
which Francis was second son of Richard 
Cosby, of Stradbally, and Elizabeth Pigot) 
his kinsman, 



Thomas Cosby, esq. of Vicarstown, who 
m. Miss Johnstone, an heiress, of the An- 
nandale family, and had three sons, viz. 
Dudley-Sydney, drowned, 3rd July, 

1787. 
Francis, drowned, at Cork, 25th Au- 
gust, 1791. 
Thomas, successor to the estates. 
Mr. Cosby rl. 10th December, 1788, and 
was *. by his only surviving child, 

Thomas Cosby, esq. of Stradbally Hall, 
governor of the Queen's County, who ni. in 
1802, Charlotte-Elizabeth, daughter of the 
Right Hon. Thomas Kelly,'lord chief-justice 
of the court of Common Pleas, in Ireland, 
and had issue, 

I. Thomas-Phillips, his heir. 

II. William, in holy orders, m. Miss 
Jephson, niece of Lord Dunnallv, 
and has one son, Thomas. 

III. Sydney. 

IV. Wellesley-Pole. 

I. Frances-Elizabeth. 

II. Harriett, »?». to Frederick Trencli, 
esq. of Sopwell Hall, nephew and 
heir presumptive of Lord Ashtown. 

Mr. Cosby, who served the office of sheriff 
for the Queen's County, died 22nd Januarj', 
1832, and was s. by his eldest son, the pre- 
sent Thomas-Phillips Cosby, esq. of Strad- 
bally Hall. 

Arms — Arg. a chevron between three 
leopards' faces sa. on a canton of the first, 
a saltier vert between a cross crosslet in 
chief, and a dexter hand couped at the 
wrist in base gu., in the dexter side a lizard, 
and in the sinister a lucy haurient vert. 

Crest — A grifl^n, his wings erect, gu. 
supporting a standard, the head broken off, 
or. 

Motto — Audaces fortuna juvat. 

Estates — In the Queen's Countj'. 

S'eflf— Stradbally Hall. 



LAMPLUGH, OF LAMPLUGH. 

(Jlohj ?iampIugI)=l(Japrr, of ILampIugf),) 



RAPER-LAMPLUGH, JOHN-LAMPLUGH, esq. of Lamphigh, in the county 
of Cumberland, and of Lotherton, in Yorkshire, h. at Abborford 19th July, 1790: 
m. 2.5th October, 181o, Jane, second daughter of Benjamin Brooksbank, esq. of 
Healaugh Hall, in the West Riding- of York. 

This gentleman, Avhose patronymic is Rapkr, assumed by sign manual, 10th March, 
1825, the additional surname and arms of Lamplugii. 



LAMPLUCH, OF LAMPLUOTl, 



101 



Hincnac. 




cA^ 



^^ 




" Lamplugh, in the fells," says Denton, 
" is that manor-house and seignory in the 
barony of Egremont, which gave name to 
tlie ancient family of Lamplughs, a race of 
valourous gentlemen successively, for their 
worthyness knyghted in the field, all or 
most of them." 

Adam de Lamplugh (son of Sir Robert de 
Lamplugh, lord of Lamplugh, in Cumber- 
land, and of Hailkord, in Lancashire, temp. 
Henry II. and Richard I.), had a con- 
firmation, with many privileges, from Ri- 
chard de Lucy, lord of Coupland. His son, 

Sir Robert de Lamplugh, of Lamplugh, 
knighted 43rd Henry III. wedded a lady, 
named Meliora, who paid a relief to Henry 

III. on her marriage, and was succeeded by 
his son, 

Ralph de Lamplugh, living 7th Edward 
in., who married Margaret* — , and had a 
son, 

Sir Robert de Lamplugh, knt. of Lamp- 
lugh, who, by Constance his wife, had three 
sons, William, who d. s. p. ; John, heir to 
his father ; Ralph, with a daughter. Chris- 
tian. The eldest surviving sou, 

Sir John de Lamplugh, knt. 9th Ed- 
ward I. was great grandfather of 

Sir Thomas de Lamplugh, knt. who 
represented the shire of Cumberland 8th 
Richard II. Sir Thomas was succeeded 
by his son, 

John de Lamplugh, father of 

Hugh de Lamplugh, living 13th Henry 

IV. who espoused Margaret, daughter of 
Thomas Pickering, and had a son and suc- 
cessor, 

Sir John de Lamplugh, high sheriff of 
Cumberland in the 8th of Henry V. and 

* This lady was impleaded by Cospatrick, son 
of Orme, and Lord of Workington, for the ward- 
ship of Robert, lier son, and lost the tuition of 
him. 

3. 



11th Henry VI. whom. Margaret, daugliter 
of Jolin Eglesficld, and had a son, 

Sir Thomas dk Lamplugh, knt. 7th Ed- 
ward IV. who in. Eleanor, daughter and 
co-heir of Sir Henry Fenwictk, of Fenwick, 
in the county of Northuniljcrland, and was 
fatlier of 

John dk I^amplugh, living 19th Edward 
IV. whose son, 

John de Lamph'(;ii, living 1st Henry 
VII. m. Isabell, daughter of Sir John de 
Pennington, knt. and had issue, 
John, his heir. 

Thomas, of Skellsmore, in Cumberland, 
whose son, 

Adam Lamplugh, marrying Agnes, 
daughter of Robert Ben, of Cum- 
berland, had, with two daugh- 
ters, Jane and Mary, a son, 
Thomas Lamplugh, of Little 
Riston, in Yorkshire, anno 
158 f, who 7H. Jane, daughter 
of Robert Fairfax, esq. of 
Pockthorpe, and had issue, 

1. Christopher, of Ris- 
ton, in 1612, who mar- 
ried Anne, daughter and 
co-heir of Thomas Ro- 
per, of Octon. 

2. Thomas, who pur- 
chased the manor of 
Ribton, in Cumberland, 
and died in 1670, aged 
eighty-three, leaving, 
by Agnes his wife, (with 
another son, Richard,* 

I who m, Frances, dau. 

of Sir Christopher Low- 
ther, bart. of White- 
haven). 
Thomas Lamplugh, 
D. D. archbishop 
of York,t who ;«. 

* This Richard de Lamplugh left a daughter, 
Jane, m, first, to John Senhouse, esq. of Nether- 
hall ; and secondly, to Charles Orf'eur, esq. of 
Plumland, in Cumberland. 

t Dr. Lamplugh, sometime felloiv of Queen's 
College, Oxford, was successively rector of Bin- 
field, in Berkshire, of Charlton-on-Ottmore, in 
Oxfordshire, principal of St. Alban's Hall, Ox- 
ford, archdeacon of London, prebendary of Wor- 
cester, vicar of St. JNIartin's in the Fields, dean of 
Rochester, bishop of Exeter, and Archbishop of 
York, in which see he was enthronized by proxy, 
19th December, 1688. He died at Bishopthorpe, 
5th May, 1691, aged seventy-six, and was buried 
in 'York INIinster, where his monument bears the 
follovring inscription : " Hie in spe resurgendi 
depositum jacet quod mortale fliit Reverendissimi 
in Christo Patris Thoma; Lamplugh, archiepiscopi 
Eboracensis, S. T. P, ex antiqua et generosa 
M 



16-2 



LAMPLUGH, OF LAMPLUGH. 



Catherine, daugh- 
ter of Edward Da- 
venant, D. D. ne- 
phew of John Da- 
venant, Bishop of 
Salisbury, and had 
ason and successor, 

Thomas Lamplugh, 
D. D. archdeacon 
of Richmond, b. in 
1661, who married 
a lady named Mar- 
garet, and had, 
with other issue, a 
son and heir, 

Thomas Lamplugh, 
rector of Bolton 
Percy, and canon 
residentiary of 
York, of whom 
hereafter, as in- 
heritor of Lamp- 
lugh, upon the de- 
mise and under the 
devise of Thomas 
Lamplugh, esq. 

John de Lamplugh, was s. by his son. 

Sir John de Lamplugh, knt. of Lamp- 
lugh, sheriff of Cumberland 29th Henry 
Vin. who m. first, Isabella, daughter of Sir 
Christopher Curwen, of Workington, (see 
vol. i. p. 578) and had by her a son, 

John, his heir. 
He m. secondly, Catherine, daughter and 
co-heir of Guy Foster, of Howsam, and had 
three daughters, viz. 

Mary, m. to Thomas Skelton. 

Mable. 

Frances, m. to David Fleming, third 
son of Hugh Fleming. 

Sir John was s. by his son, 

John Lamplugh, of Lamplugh, who m. 
two wives, by the first, Jane Blennerhasset, 
he had one son, Edward, who died issue- 
less, and by the second, Isabel, daughter of 
Christopher Stapleton, of Wighill, another 
son, his successor, 

Richard Lamplugh, esq. of Lamplugh, 
father, by Alice Warde his wife, of 

John Lamplugh, esq. of Lamplugh, who 
m. Elizabeth, dau. of Sir Edward Musgrave, 
knt. and dying in 1636, was s. by his son, 

John Lamplugh, esq. of Lamplugh, b. 
in 1619. This gentleman, devoted to the 
joyal cause during the civil war, was 
colonel of a regiment of foot under Prince 
Rupert, and fought at Marston Moor, in 
1644, where, commanding the Yellow Co- 

Lamplughorum de Lamplugh, in agro Cumbriensi 
Familia oriundi." There is no positive proof that 
his Grace was exactly descended as stated in the 
text, though the presumptive evidence of the fact 
is stroag. 



lours, he received several wounds, and was 
taken prisoner. He m. first, Jane, daugh- 
ter of Roger Kirby, esq. of the county of 
Lancaster ; secondly, Frances, Lady Low- 
ther, daughter of Christopher Lancaster, 
esq. of Stockbridge, in Cumberland, and 
thirdly, Frances, daughter of Thomas Lamp- 
lugh, esq. of Ribton. By the last only he 
had issue, viz. 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

II. Edward, d. unm. 
HI. John, d. s. p. 

I. Elizabeth, second wife of Henry 
Brougham, esq. of Scales, in Cum- 
berland. Upon the demise of Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Thomas Lamplugh, 
in 1773, the male line failing, this 
Elizabeth became heir general of the 
senior branch of the house of Lamp- 
lugh, of Lamplugh, which is now re- 
presented by her eldest male des- 
cendant, Henry, Lord Brougham 
and Vaux. (See Burke's Peerage). 

II. Phoebe, appears to have died unm. 
Col. Lamplugh was succeeded at his decease 
by his eldest son, 

Thomas Lamplugh, esq. of Lamplugh, b. 
in 1657, who served the office of sheriff for 
Cumberland in the 13th William HI. His 
son and successor, 

Thomas Lamplugh, esq. of Lamplugh, 
by Frances his wife, had an only dau. and 
heiress, 

Elizabeth, m. to George Irton, esq. of 
Irton, but died s. p. devising by will, 
dated 6th November, 1773, her estate 
at Dovenby, to the Rev. Thomas 
Lamplugh, of Copgrove, in the county 
of York, for life, with remainder, 
in default of male issue, to Peter 
Brougham, descended from Eliza- 
beth Lamplugh, of Lamplugh. He 
succeeded in 1783, and died in 1791 
s. p. when Dovenby passed to his niece 
and heiress, Mary Dykes (see vol, i. 
p. 265). 
Mr. Lamplugh d. in 1737, and bequeathed, 
by will dated 1734, " the capital messuage of 
Lamplugh Hall, and the demesne lands of 
Lamplugh, &.c. to his, the testator's, cousin," 
The Rev. Thomas Lamplugh, rector of 
Bolton Percy, and canon residentiary of 
York Minster, grandson of the archbishop 
of York. This gentleman m, 17th April, 
1721, Honor, daughter of William Cha- 
loner, esq. of Guisborough, in the county 
of York, and had issue, 
I. Thomas, his heir. 

I. Honor, d. unm. 2nd January, 1795. 

II. Mary, died unm. before 1783. 

III. Katlieriiie, co-heir to her brother 
Thomas, m. tiie Rev. Godfrey Wol- 
ley, rector of Thurnscoe, and of 
Warmsworth, and, dying in 1804, 
left issue, 



I 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



1G3 



EdwardWollcy,ofFiilford Grange, 
and Nether Hall, in the county 
of York, wlio assumed the sur- 
name and arms of Copley in 
1810. He d. in 1813. 

Thomas Wolley, vice-admiral of 
the White, married, and has 
issue. 

Godfrey Wolley, in holy orders, 
rector of Hutton Bushel, died in 
1822. 

Isaac W^olley, captain R.N. m, and 
had issue. 

Honor Wolley, m. to the Rev. 
Anthony Fountayne Eyre. 

Cordelia Wolley, m. to George 
Bower, esq. of Sheffield. 

Katherine Wolley, m. to John 
Raper, esq. of Lotherton, and 
was mother of the present John 
Lamplugh Lamplugh Raper, 
esq. of Lamplugh. 

Mary Wolley. 

IV. A.NNE, co-heir to her brother, who 
711. 8th October, 1750, John Raper, 
esq. of Abberford, in the county of 
York, and dying in July, 1783, left 
a son, 

John Raper, of Abberford and 
Lotherton, who s. his uncle, 
Thomas Lamplugh, at Lamp- 
lugh. 

V. Jane, m. to Samuel Pawson, of 
York, merchant. 

VI. Sarah, d. young. 

The Rev. Thomas Lamplugh was s. by his 
only son, 



The Rev. Thomas Lamplugh, of Lamp- 
lugh, rector of Copgrove and Goldcsbo- 
rougii, and prebendary of Wistow, who m. 
Mary, daughter of James Collins, gent, of 
Knaresborough and Foleyfote, but, dying 
without issue in 1783, was s. by (the son of 
his sister Anne) his nephi'W, 

John Rapi.r, esq. of Abberford and Lo- 
therton, who then became also " of Lamp- 
lugh." He VI. at Fulford, Ifith October, 
1789, Katherine, third daughter of the Rev. 
Godfrey Wolley, by Katherine, his wife, 
daughter of tlie Rev. Thomas Lamplugh, of 
Lamplugh, and had two sons and one daugh- 
ter, viz. 

John-Lamplugh Rapek, his heir. 
Henry Raper, of Lincoln's Inn, bar- 
rister-at-law, b. 12th February, 1795, 
m. 16th December, 1824, Georgiana 
third daughter of John Moore, esq. 
captain in the 5th regiment of Dra- 
goon Guards. 
Ann Raper, m. to James Brooksbank, 
merchant, of London, second son of 
Benjamin Brooksbank, esq. of Hea- 
laugh Hall, in the West Riding of 
Y^ork. 
Mr. Raper d. the 3rd of July, 1824, and was 
«. by his elder son, the present John Lamp- 
lugh Lamplugh-Raper, esq. of Lamplugh. 

Arms — Or, a cross fleury sa. 
^ Crest — A goat's head arg. attired and 
bearded or. 

Estates— In Yorkshire and Cumberland. 

Seats — Lamplugh Hall, Cumberland ; 
Lotherton, in Yorkshire. 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



BLOUNT, MICHAEL-HENRY-MARY, esq. of Maple-Durham, in the county of 

Oxford, b. 8th August, 1789; m. 15th May, 1817, 
the Honorable Elizabeth Petre, fourth daughter of Ro- 
bert-Edward, tenth Lord Petre, and has surviving 
issue, 

MichaelCharles, h. 19th April, 1819. 

Edmund- Walter. 

Charles- John. 

Arthur- William. 

John. 

Mary-Catharine. 
Charlotte-Elizabeth. 
Georgiana-Frances. 
Henrietta-Matilda. 

Mr. Blount is a magistrate and deputy lieutenant for 
Oxfordshire, and served the office of sheriff in 1832. 
He inherited the estates at the decease of his father, 
'29th October, 1821. 




164 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



Hincnge. 



' The origin and history of this most 
ancient and distinguished family has been 
elaborately investigated by Sir Alexander 
Croke, kilt. LL.D. of Studley Priory, in 
Oxfordshire, (see vol. i. p. 354,) wlio traces 
it from the Counts of Guisnes, in Picardy, 
a 'race of nobles, descended themselves 
from the Scandinavian rulers of Denmark. 
RoDOLPH, third count of Guisnes, had three 
sons, by his wife, Rosetta, daughter of the 
Count de St. Pol, all of whom accompa- 
nied the Norman in his expedition against 
England, in 1066, and contributing to the 
triumph of their chief, shared amply in the 
spoils of conquest. One of the brothers 
returned to his native country ; the other 
two adopted that which they had so gallantly 
helped to win, and abided there ; of these. 
Sir William le Blount, the younger, was 
a general of foot, at Hastings, and was re- 
warded by grants of seven lordships in 
Lincolnshire ; his son was seated at Sax- 
lingham, in Norfolk, and the great-grand- 
daughter of that gentleman, sole heiress of 
her line, Maria le Blount, marrying in 
the next century. Sir Stephen le Blount, 
the descendant and representative of her 
great-great-great uncle. Sir Robert le 
Blount, united the families of the two 
brothers. 
The elder brother. 

Sir Robert le Blount, had the com- 
mand of the Conqueror's sliips of war, and 
is styled " Dux Navium Militarium." His 
portion of the Spolia opima embraced 
thirteen manors in Suffolk, in which county 
he was the first feudal Baron of Ixworth, 
(the place of his residence), and lord of 
Orford Castle. He m. Gundreda, youngest 
daughter of Henry, Earl Ferrers, and had 
a son and heir, 

Gilbert le Blount, second baron of 
Ixworth, who came into England with 
his father. This feudal lord founded a 
priory of black canons, at Ixworth, and 
marrying Alicia de Colekirke, was s. by his 
son, 

William le Blount, third lord of Ix- 
worth, tetnp. Henry II. who rebuilt the 
priory of Ixworth, which had been de- 
stroyed during the contest between the 
Empress Maud and King Stephen. By his 
wife, Sarah, daughter of Hubert de Mon- 
chensi, he was father of 

Gilbert or Hubert le Blount, fourth 
baron, living 20th Henry II. 1)7.3, who 
wedded Agues de L'Isle (de Insulfi), who 
was alive 10th Richard I. (1198), he had 
two sons, namely, 

William, b. in 1153, who inherited as 



fifth Lord of Ixworth, and mar- 
rying Cecilia de Vere, had issue, 
William, his successor. 

Agnes, m. to Sir Wil-~j 

LIAM DE Criketot. I co-heirs 
RoisiA, m. to Robert \ to their 
DE Valoings, lord of brother. 
Orford, in Suffolk. J 
This baron d. at the age of thirty- 
two, in 1185, and was *. by his son, 
William le Blount, sixth lord of 
Ixworth, who was standard 
bearer to Simon de Montford, 
earl of Leicester, and fell at 
Lewes, on the 14th May, 1264. 
He was afterwards attainted in 
parliament, when the barony of 
Ixworth became forfeited. He 
had married .Alicia de Capella, 
(who lived to the 10th Edward I. 
anno 1281), but having no issue, 
his sisters became his heirs. 
Stephen (Sir). 
The chief branch of the family, the barons 
of Ixworth having, as above stated, ex- 
pired with the sixth feudal lord, at the 
battle of Lewes, the representation devolved 
upon the line of the younger son of Gilbert, 
by Agnes de L'Isle. 

Sir Stephen le Blount, who was living 
in the 10th Richard I. anno 1198. He 
espoused his kinswoman, Maria le Blount, 
sole daughter and heiress of Sir William 
LE Blount, the descendant and represen- 
tative of Sir William le Blount, of Sax- 
lingham, in Suffolk, one of the brothers who 
came over with the Conqueror, and thus 
the lines of the two brothers merging formed 
the parent stock, whence have since sprang 
the different families of the nam*. Of this 
marriage there were two sons. Sir John 
Blount (the younger, who m. Constance, 
one of the sisters and co-heirs of Sir 
Richard de Wrotham, justice of the com- 
mon pleas), and the son and heir, 

Sir Robert le Blount, who was a 
witness to the charter of Hilton Abbey, in 
Staffordshire, in the 8th Henry III. anno 
1223. He wedded Isabel, daughter and 
co-heir of the feudal lord of Odinsels, and 
acquired the manor of Belton, in the county 
of Rutland, as a part of the lady's portion. 
He died in the 17th Edward I. anno 1288, 
leaving two sons, viz. 

I. Ralph (Sir), lord of Belton, who 
recovered lands, 14th Edward I. 
anno 1285, in Saxliiigham, which 
had been his grandfather's. He m. 
Cecilia, or Alicia, daughter and co- 
heir of Sir John Lovet, of Hampton 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



165 



Lovet, ill the county of Worcester, 
and was grand liitluT of Siii John 
Blount, suninioiicd to parlianiciit as 
Bakon Bloi'NT, of Bolton, in the 1st 
Edwakd Iir. anno l.'l'i? ; and of 
Nicholas dk Bi.oint, who adopted 
the surname of (/Kokk, and was an- 
cestor of tlie Chokes, of Studlcy 
Priory, (see vol. i. p. 354.) 
M. Wn.MAM (Sir). 
Upon the extinction of the noble house of 
Blount of Belton, the representation de- 
volved on the descendant of Nicholas le 
Blount, and now vests dc jure in Sir Alex- 
ander Croke ; but the name surviving; in 
the descendants of the younger son, 

Sir William le Blount, they may cer- 
tainly claim, without urgin<; any unwar- 
rantable pretension, to be de facto chiefs. 
Sir William espoused the Lady Isabel de 
Beaucliamp, daughter of William, first Earl 
of Warwick, and widow of Henry Lovet, of 
Elmley Lovet, in the county of Worcester. 
He d. in the 9th or 10th of Edward H. 
(1315 or 1316), having had issue, 

Peter, one of the clianiberlains in 1313 

to A'/w^'^Edward^II. died issueless. 
Walter. 
The second son, 

Sir Walter le Blount, of the Rock, in 
the county of Worcester, married Johanna, 
third sister and co-heir of Sir William de 
Sodington (who died 30th Edward I. ataio 
1301), and thus became proprietor of the 
manor of Sodington, in the county of Wor- 
cester. He d. in 1322, and was s. by his son, 
Sir William le Blount, who had a com- 
mand in Scotland in 1335. He m. Mar- 
garet, tliird daughter and co-heir of Theo- 
bald de Verdon, Lord of Alton Castle, in 
the county of Stafford, lord justice of Ire- 
land. The lady was born in 1310 ; there 
were no issue of the marriage, and Sir Wil- 
liam dying lltli Edward III. anno 1,337, 
seised of the Castle of Weobly, in Here- 
fordshire ; Batterby, and lands in Fenton, 
Romesore, and liiddnlph, in the county of 
Stafford ; Sodington and Timberlake, in 
Worcestershire, was s. by his brother. 

Sir John le Blount, then tliirty-nine 
years of age, who was in the service of the 
Earl of Lancaster, and had obtained from 
tliat nobleman a grant for life of the manor 
of Passingham, in the county of North- 
ampton ; he had also lands from the earl 
in Holland and Unffield, in (he county of 
Derby, and at Tiberton, in Gloucestershire. 
He m. two wives ; first, Isoi.da, daughter 
and lieir of Sir Thomas de Mountjoy, by 
wliom he acquired a large accession of 
estates, and had issue, 

John (Sir), who wedded twice ; first, 
Juliana, daughter of — Foulluirst ; 
and secondly, Isabella, daughter and 
heir of Sir Bryan Cornwall, of K inlet. 



By the second he was ancestor of 

the IJIoiints of K inlet, now repre- 
sented ijy VVilliani Lacon Cliildc, esq. 
By the first he had a son, 

John Bi.ount, of Sodington, aged 
fourteen at the (hicease of bis 
grandfather in 1.358. From this 
gentleman we pass to his lineal 
descendant. 
Sir Waiter Bi.ount, knt. of 
Sodington, who was created 
a baronet, 5th October, 
1642 (see Burke's Peerar/e 
and /iarotu'taf/e). The fifth 
in succession from this gen- 
tleman. 
Sir William Blount, sixth 
baronet, ?». in 1766, Mary, 
elder daughter and co-heir 
of James, Lord Aston, of 
Forfar, and one of the re- 
presentatives of the elder 
branch of the family of Sir 
Ralph Sadlier (see vol. ii. 
p. 562). The present Sir 
Edward Blount, hart, of 
Sodington, only son of the 
late Sir Walter Blount, and 
nephew of Edward Blount, 
esq. of Bryanstone-square, 
member in the late parlia- 
ment for Horsham, is grand- 
son of this marriage. 
Walter, who d. s. p. 
His second wife was Eleanor, second daugh- 
ter of John Beauchamp, of Hache, in the 
county of Somerset, and widow of John 
Meriet, of Meriet, in the same shire ; by 
this lady he left at his decease in the 32nd 
of Edward HI. a7mo 1358,* a son, the 
heroic 

Sir Walter Blount, so celebrated for 
his martial prowess in the warlike times of 
Edward HI. Richard II. and Henry IV. 
and immortalized by the muse of Shak- 
si'EARE for his devotion, even unto death, 
to King Henry. Sir Walter fell at the 
battle of Shrewsbury on the 22nd June, 
1403, Avherein, being standard-bearer, he 
was arrayed in the same armour as his royal 
master, and was slain, according to the poet, 
in single combat by the Earl of Douglas, 
who had supposed lie was contending with 
the king himself. 

Blunt. What is thy name, that in the battle thus 
Thou Grossest me ? what honour dost thou seek 
Upon my head ? 

Doug. Know then, my name is Douglas ; 

And I do liaunt thee in battle thus, 
Because some tell me thou art a king. 

Blunt. They tell thee true. 

* About this time the family began to omit 
the pretix Lk to their name, calling themselves 
Blount only. 



166 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



Doug. The Lord Stafford dear to-day hath 
bought 
Thy likeness ; for, instead of thee, King Harry, 
The sword hath ended him : so shall it thee, 
Unless thou yield tliee as my prisoner. 

Blunt. I was not born a yielder, thou proud Scot ; 
And thou shalt find a king that will revenge 
Lord Stafford's death. 

[they fight, and Blunt is slain. 
Enter Hotspur. 
Hot. O Douglas, hadst thou fought at Holme- 
don thus, 
1 never had triumph'd upon Scot. 

Doug. All's done, all's won, here breathless lies 

the king. 
Hot. Where? 
Doug. Here. 

Hot. Tliis, Douglas ; no, I know full well : 
A GALLANT KNIGHT he was, his name was Blunt, 
Semblably furnished like the king himself. 

In this battle the inipctiiovis Hotsphk, the 
renowned Percy, likewise met his doom. 
Having thus rehearsed the dramatic version 
of the valiant soldier's death, we retrace our 
course, to detail some passages in his event- 
ful life. In 1367, we find Sir Walter ac- 
companying the Black Prince, and his bro- 
ther the Duke of Lancaster (Jolin of Gaunt), 
upon the expedition into Spain, to aid Peter 
the Cruel, King of Castille, and assisting 
on the 3rd of April in that year at the 
battle of Najara, which restored Peter to his 
throne. Thenceforward for a series of years, 
indeed until the prince's decease, he appears 
to have been immediately and confidentially 
attached to the Duke, having chosen his 
wife, whom he married about the year 1372, 
from amongst the ladies in the suite of 
Constantia of Castille (eldest daughter 
of Peter, and his successor on the throne, 
who became the royal consort of John of 
Gaunt), when the princess visited England 
in 1369. In 1398, the duke granted one 
hundred marks a-year to Sir Walter for the 
good services which had been rendered to 
him by the knight and his wife, the Lady 
Sancia. The Lady Sancia's maiden desig- 
nation was Donna Sancha de Ayala. She 
was the daughter of Don Diego Gomez de 
Toledo, alcalde mayor, and chief justice 
of Toledo, and notario mayor, or principal 
secretary of the kingdom of Castille, by his 
wife, Inez Alfon de Ayala, one of the most 
ancient and illustrious houses in Spain. 
John of Gaunt at his decease appointed 
Sir Walter one of his executors, and be- 
queathed him a legacy of one hundred 
marks, £66. 6s. Sd. 

In 1374, Sir Walter's half brother. Sir John 
Blount, of Sodington, conveyed to him nu- 
merous manors, wliich lie had inherited 
from his mother, Isolda, heiress of the 
Mountjoy family. In 1381 he became pro- 
prietor, by purchase, of the large estates of 
the Bakepuiz family, in the counties of 
Derby, Stafford, Leicester, and Hertford. 



In 1385 he obtained a charter for a fair and 
free warren in his demesne lands at Barton, 
and other manors in Derbyshire. In 1399 
he was ranger of Needwood forest, and 
knight of the shire for the county of Derby. 
By his wife. Donna Sancha, who survived 
him, and lived until 1418, he left issue, 

I. John (Sir), his heir, one of the great 
warriors who have immortalized the 
reign and times of Henry V. 

II. Thomas (Sir), successor to his bro- 
ther. 

III. James (Sir), who m. Anne, daughter 
of Roger Parker, esq. of Lellinghall, 
and was father of Roger Blount,* 

* This Roger Blount, of Grendon, in the 
county of Hereford, wedded Elizabeth, daughter 
of Sir Robert Whitney, of Whitney, and had two 
sons, viz. 

Thomas, his heir. 

^^ alter, of Eldersfield, ancestor of the 
Blounts of Eldersfield, Churchtown, Min- 
tie, and Bristol. 
The elder son, 

Thomas Blount, of Bromyard, m. the daughter 
of Sir Richard Bridges, and was father of 

Walter Blount, of Grendon, who left, by 
Peryn, daughter of Thomas Barton, of Barton 
Hall, three sons, namely, 

I. John, who m. Joan, daughter of Sir Ri- 
chard Bodenham, and had one son, James, 
who m. a daughter of Sir Edward Mervin, 
and had two daughters, Anne, the wife of 
R. Berrington, of Stoke Lucy, and Eliza- 
beth, of Myntridge of Bosbury. 

II. Thomas. 

III. Richard, of Monkland, who died s. p. 
The second son, 

Thomas Blount, esq. of Hereford, who served 
as captain under Lord Mountjoy at Toumay, m. 
Maria, daughter of David Lloyd, esq. and had 
two sons, Edmund of Pembridge, sheriff, 8th 
Henry VII. and 

Roger Blount, esq. of Grendon, who espoused 
Maria, daughter of VV. Berington, esq. of Wins- 
ley, and had issue, 

I. Richard, barrister-at-law, married Rachel 
Smith, and had two daughters, Anne, the 
wife of Wallop Brabazon, esq. brother to 
the Earl of Meath, and Elizabeth, of — 
Clarke of Wellington. 

II. Thomas, who died s. p. 

III. John, lieutenant-colonel in the army of 
St. Macor, Flanders. 

IV. I2dmund, who died s. p. 

V. James (Sir), standard-bearer to Lord 
Mountjoy, died s.p. 

VI. Myles, of Orlton, of whom presently. 

I. Jane, m. to James Bridges, esq. of the Ley, 
Herefordshire. 

II. Elizabeth, to. to — Vaughan, esq. 
The sixth son of Roger Blount, of Grendon, 

Myles Blount, esq. of Orlton, died in 166", 
leaving, by Anne Bustard, of Addlebury, inter 
alios, two sons, Thomas the Lawyer, an antiquary 
and writer of celebrity, and 

Myles Blount, esq. father of 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



167 



of Grendon, ancestor of the Bi.oijnts 
of Grendon, Eldersfield, Orleton, &c. 
IV. Peter, d.s.p. 

I. Constantia, wi. to John Sutton, Lord 
Dudley. 

II. Anne, m, to Thomas Griffith, of 
Whichnor, in the county of Salop, 
livin<;- in 1416. 

Sir Walter was succeeded by his eldest son. 
Sill John JJlount, K. G. who was {gover- 
nor of Calais, and defeated in Aquitaine, 
in 1412, a French army commanded by a 
marshal of France, for which achievement 
he was created a knight of the garter the 
next year. In 1418, when Rouen was be- 
sieged by A'jHr/ Henry V. Sir John Blount 
assisted at the siege. He died without 
issue, and was s. by his brother, 

Sir Thomas IJlount, treasurer of Nor- 
mandy, who was then seated at Elwaston,in 
Derbyshire, and to whom the Duke of Exe- 
ter gave one thousand marks (£666. 6s. 8d.) 
to found a charity at Leicester. Sir Tho- 
mas »j. first, Margaret, daughter of Sir 
Thomas Greseley, knt. of Greseley, in the 
county of Derby, and dying in 1456, left 
two sons and three daughters, viz. 

I. Walter (Sir), lord high treasurer of 
England, created, in 1464, by patent. 
Baron Mountjoy, a dignity which 
expired with his descendant, Charles 
Blount, Earl of Devonshire, in 1606. 
(See Burke's Extinct and Dormant 
Peerage.) 

II. Thomas (Sir), of whom presently. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to Ralph Shirley, of 
West Neston, in Sussex. 

II. Sanchia, m. to Edward Langford. 

III. Agnes, m. to — Wolseley. 

Upon the extinction of the Lords Mountjoy, 
the representation of the family devolved 

Thomas Blount, esq. who m. Miss Mary Mos- 
tyn, and dying in 1731, left a son, 

Edward Blount, esq. who m. Miss Cotham, 
and had issue, 

I. Thomas, M. D. 

II. Edward, died in 1805. 

III. Roland, m. Elizabeth, daughter of John 
Davies, esq. of Henfryn, and d. in 1812, 
leaving a daughter, 

Elizabeth- Helen, m. first, to John 
Browne, esq. of Belfast, and secondly 
to Jonadab William Hunt, esq. of 
Northwicb. 

IV. William, M.D. of Hereford, h. in 1760, 
m. ]\Iary, daughter of Lacon Lambe, esq. 
of Bedney, Herefordshire, and bad issue, 

1. William, of Cumberland Street, mar- 
ried a daughter of the late Thomas 
Wright, esq. of Fitzwalters, in Essex, 
and by her (who is deceased) has one 
son. 



2. Catherine 



•.\ 



one of whom married 
Dr. Matthews. 



upon the descendant of the second son, the 
al)ovc named 

Sir Thomas Blount: proceed we there- 
I fore with his line. \i\ 1462, King Edward 
IV. granted him the manor of Milton Ross, 
and other estates in the counties of Leicester 
and Lincoln, and appointed him, in the 
same year, treasurer of Calais. He married, 
first, Agnes, daughter and heir of Sir Jolin 
Hawley, knt. of Canons Utterby, in Lin- 
colnshire, and had issue, 

I. Robert, born in 1459, who died in 
1514. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to Richard Hansard. 
Sir Thomas espoused, secondly, Catharine, 
daughter of Sir Gervase Clifton, of Clifton, 
Notts, and left by that lady, at his decease, 
8th Edward IV. 1468, an only son, 

Richard Blount, who m. Elizabeth, 
only daughter and heir of William de la 
Ford, of Iver, in the county of Bucking- 
ham, by whom he acquired the estate in that 
place, and j)urchasing the manor of Maple 
Durham Gurney, in the county of Oxford, 
on the 1st February, 1489, fixed his perma- 
nent abode there. He served the office of 
sheriff for Bucks and Bedfordshire in the 
18th Henry VII. a. d. 1502. He d. on the 
31st November, 1508 (buried at Iver, 
Bucks), leaving one son and two daughters, 
viz. 

Richard (Sir), his successor. 

Anne, to. to Francis Conyers, of Wa- 

kerley, in Northamptonshire. 
Elizabeth, m. to Thomas Woodford, of 
Burnham, in the county of Bucks. 
The son and heir. 

Sir Richard Blount, of Maple Durham 
Gurney, was one of the gentlemen of the 
chamber to King Henry VIII. of the 
Privy chamber to Edward VI. and held 
various offices of trust under Elizabeth, 
amongst others that of lieutenant of the 
Tower. He m. Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
Richard Lister, chief-justice of England, 
and sister of Sir Michael Lister,* knight of 
the Bath, by which lady he had is.sue, 
Michael (Sir), his successor. 
Richard (Sir), who resided at Dodsham 
or Dysham, in Sussex. He m. the 
Hon. Elizabeth West, second daugh- 
ter of William, first Lord De la 
Warre, by whom (who d. in 1595) he 
had a son, William. 

Elizabeth, m. to Nicholas St. John, of 
Lidiard Tregoze, ancestor of the 
Viscounts Bolingbroke. 

Barbara, in. to Francis Shirley, of East 
Grinstead, in Sussex. 
Sir Richard d. 11th August, 1564, was bu- 

* From this gentleman, the Christian name of 
" Michael " came into the familv. 



168 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



ried under a splendid monument in the 
church of St. Peter in Vinculis, in the 
Tower, erected ^by his widow (whose will 
was proved 26th June, 1582), and s. by his 
elder son, 

Sir Michael Blount, of Maple Durham, 
born in 1529. This gentleman succeeded 
Sir Owen Hopton as lieutenant of the 
Tower ;* and in the list of prisoners deli- 
vered to him on assuming office, 6th Julj', 
1590, we find Philip, Earl of Arundel, and 
Sir Thomas Fitzherbert, of Norbury, be- 
side twenty-nine others, in all thirty-one. 
On the 1st of April, 1570 Queen Elizabeth 
sent her letter of trust to Sir Michael to re- 
ceive the loan money. In 1581 (4th Febru- 
ary) he purchased the manor of Maple 
Durham Chawsey, for £900, and soon after 
erected the fine mansion of Maple Durham, 
still existing in the most perfect state. He 
was sheriff of Oxfordshire in 1586 and 
1597. On the death of Charles Blount, 
Earl of Devonshire, ;3rd April, 1606, Sir 
Michael Blount claimed the Barony of 
Mountjoy, one of the honours of that no- 
bleman, as his next heir, but imsuccessfully. 
He m. Mary, sister and co-heir of Thomas 
Moore, esq. of Bicester, in Oxfordshire, by 
whom (who d. 23rd December, 1592) he had 
five sons and six daughters, namely, 

I. Richard (Sir), his successor. 

II. Thomas, b. 2nd April, 1567, m. 

, daughter and co-heir of John 

Brocket. 

III. Charles (Sir), b. 5th November, 
1568, knighted at Cadiz, in 1.596, 
supposed to have been drowned at 
sea in 1598, on his passage to Ire- 
land. 

IV. Henry, b. 17th August, 1571, rf. 5. p. 

V. Robert, b. 3rd February, 1573. 

I. Catharine, b. 11th April, 1563, jm. to 
Sir John Blount, alias Croke, of 
Chilton Bucks and Studley Priory, 
one of the justices of the king's 
bench, ancestor of Sir Alexander 
Croke, historian of the Blount family. 

II. Mary, b. 16th November, 1565. 

III. Anne, ? i ., i- •, 

IV. Elizabeth, S ^«*'' '^''^ y°""^- 

V. Frances, b. 23rd February, 1569. 

VI. Elizabeth, b. 28th July, 1574. 
The date of the decease of Sir Michael 
Blount is not upon record. He was buried 
under a sumptuous monument near his 
father, in St. Peter's Church, in the Tower, 
and s. by his eldest son, 

Sir Richard Blount, knt. of Maple 
Durham, b. 28th June, 1564, rn. first, Cicily, 
daughter of Sir Richard Baker, of Sising- 
hurst, in Kent, and had issue. 



* In Queen Elizabeth's time there was no con- 
stable of the Tower. 



I. Charles (Sir), his heir. 

II. Walter, b. in 1600, d. 26th April, 
1619. 

HI. Richard, born about 1601, a com- 
missioner for the loan money in 1626, 
sheriff for Oxfordshire in the same 
year, w. Frances, dau. of Sir John 
Burroughs, garter king of arms. 

IV. Lister, of Bicester, in the county 
of Oxford, called after his godfather, 
Charles Lister, esq. of New Windsor, 
m. Joyce, daughter of Sir Allen Aps- 
ley, lieutenant of the Tower. 

I. Mary. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to George Browne, of 
Caversham, son and heir of Sir 
George Browne, second son of Sir 
Anthony Browne, Viscount Mon- 
tague. 

HI. Frances, m. to Sir William Dor- 
mer, third son of Sir John Dormer, 
of Dorton, Bucks. 
Sir Richard wedded secondly, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Francis Moore, knt. of 
Favvley, in Berkshire, and increased his 
family by the three following children, 

V. William, of Kidniore End, who m. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Ralph 
De la Vale, of Seton, in Northumber- 
land, by whom (who d. 22nd March, 
1706), he had. 

Lister, of whom hereafter, as 
inheritor of Maple Durham, 
under the settlement of his 
cousin, Walter Blount, who 
d. in 1671. 

Walter, / , ^, , 
Charles, \^oth d. s. p. 

VI. Henry, d. in 1622. 

IV. Jane, m. to Sir William Moore, of 
Fawley, in the county of Berks. 
This proprietor of Maple Durham, d. 22nd 
November, 1619, and was *. by his eldest 
son. 

Sir Charles Blount, knt. of Maple 
Durham, who built the almshouses there in 
1598. This gentleman, a zealous supporter 
of the royal cause, had his house plun- 
dered by the parliamentary army, in 1642-3, 
and was slain himself fighting under the 
royal banner, at Oxford, on the 1st June, 
1644. His estates were ordered to be sold 
by parliament, 18th November, 1652. He 
711. Dorothy, daughter and sole heir of 
Sir Francis Clerke, knt. of Houghton 
Conquest, in Bedfordshire, and by her (who 
was buried at Maple Durham, 19th October, 
1646, will proved 18th March, 1647), had 
two sons and two daughters, viz. 

1. Michael, who succeeded his father. 

M. Walter, heir to his brother. 

I. Anne, tn. first, to John Swinburne, 
esq. of Capheaton, in Northumber- 



BLOUNT, OF MAPLE-DURHAM. 



169 



land ; and secondly, to Francis God- 
frey, esq. 
II. Elizabeth. 
The eider son, 

MiCHAKL Hi.ouNT, esq. of Maple Durham, 
succeeded his father, but was killed by a 
footman at Charing Cross, 25th April, 1649, 
when about twenty years of age ; dying 
unni. he was s. by his brother, 

Walter Blount, esq. of Maple Durliam, 
who 7/1. first, Philippa, daughter of — Ben- 
lowes, esq. of Essex. That lady dying in 
lfi67 (issueless), he wedded secondly, Do- 
rothy, daughter of Edmund Plowden, esq. 
of Plowden, in the county of Salop, by whom 
he had a daughter, Elizabeth, who died an 
infant. He died liimself in May, 1671, 
having by deed, of the fAh February, in the 
previous year, settled the estates of Maple 
Durham on his cousin, (refer to Sir Richard 
Blount, who married, for his second wife, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Francis Moore, 
and died 2"2nd November, 1619), 

Lister Blount, esq. b. in 1654, who thus 
became of " Maple Durham." This gen- 
tleman m. in 1683, Mary, daughter of An- 
thony Englefield, esq. of White Knights, 
and had surviving issue, 
Michael, his successor. 

Teresa, b. at Paris, 1.5th -i These two 
October, 1688. ladies were 

Martha, b. 15th June, [ the intimate 
1690. J friends of 

Pope, and their friendship is fre- 
quently reverted to in his works. 
They first became acquainted with the 
poet atWhite Knights, near Reading, 
the house of their grandfather, a great 
lover of poetry and admirer of Pope. 
The close vicinity of White Knights, 
Maple Durham, and Binfield, and 
the marked attention paid to the 
author's rising reputation, created an 
intimacy between the families, which 
was cemented by the conformity of 
their religious and political senti- 
ments. " Their acquaintance," says 
Dr. Johnson, " began early, the life 
of each was pictured on the other's 
mind, their conversation was there- 
fore endearing, for when they met 
there was an immediate coalition of 
congenial notions." When Pope 
needed more than the common offices 
of friendship, and when the gentle 
attentions of female kindness could 
alone soothe his continued infirmities, 
those consoling services in his hour 
of weakness and pain he experienced 
from the Misses Blount. He and they 
were constantly together, and if at any 
time absent they carried on a con- 
tinued correspondence. By his will, 
dated a few months before his death. 



the poet bequeathed to the younger 
Miss Blount £100, the furniture of 
the grotto, the urns in his garden, 
and the interest of his whole property 
for her life. Miss Martha Blount, the 
Partiuiiia of Pope, died in 1763. 
Miss Teresa Blount (who assumed 
the name of Zei)liilinda in her cor- 
respondence with Mr. Moore, who 
styled himself Alexis,) died in 1759. 
Mr. Blount died 25th June, 1710, and was 
s. by his son, 

Michael Blount, esq. of Maple Durham, 
b. 26th March, 1693, m. in 1715, Mary- 
Agnes, daughter and co-heir of Siii Joseph 
TiciiBORNE, of Tichborne, in the county of 
Hants, (and his wife, Mary, daughter of 
Anthony Kenipe, esq. of Slindon, in Sus- 
sex,) by which lady (who was born in 1695, 
and died 19th May, 1777, aged eighty-two) 
he had three sons and two daughters, 
namely, 

I. Michael, his heir. 

II. Henry-Tichborne, b. 6th December, 
1723, ordained a catholic priest, at 
Arras, 30th March, 1748, appointed 
President of Douay College in 
1770, and resided there until 1780. 
He subsequently took up his abode 
in the convent of English nuns at 
Louvain, and accompanied those la- 
dies to England in 1794. He died 
at Maple Durham, 29th May, 1810, 
in his eighty-seventh year. 

III. Walter, b. 13th December, 1727, d. 
a Benedictine monk, at Douay, 14th 
October, 1746. 

I. Mary, b. 19th November, 1716, m. to 
Sir Henry Tichborne, bart. and died 
10th February, 1799, in her eiglity- 
third year. 

II. Frances, born 1st October, 1717, a 
Benedictine nun, at Brussels, died 
there in 1740. 

He died on the 2nd November, 1739, and 
was s. by his eldest son, 

Michael Blount, esq. of Maple Dur- 
ham, born 14th April, 1719, m. 16th August, 
1742, Mary-Eugenia, eldest daughter of 
Mannock Strickland, esq. of Lincoln's Inn, 
by whom (who was born 10th July, 172:5, 
ami died 12th De(;ember, 1762) he liad 
issue, 

I. Michael, his heir. 

II. Joseph, b. 15th July, 1752, married 
Mary, daughter of Francis Canning, 
esq. of Foxcote, in the county of 
Warwick, (the lady was born in 1752, 
and was living in March, 1835,) by 
whom he left at his decease (he died 
at St. Cyr, near Lyons, and is in- 
terred there) 

1. Joseph, born in 1779, m. first, 
Jane, daughter of John Satcr- 



SCOTT, OF MALLENY. 



thwaite, esq. of Mansergh Hall, 
Westmoreland, but there was no 
issue of tliat marriage. He wed- 
ded, secondly, 19th February, 
1816, Anne, only daughter of 
Mr. Richard Martin, of Hurst- 
borne Tarrant, in Hampshire, 
and by this lady had an only 
daughter. 
2. Michael, m. Catharine, daughter 
and co-heir of Francis Wright, 
esq. of Bedford Square, London, 
(by his wife, Catharine Petre, 
who wedded, after the death of 
Mr. Wright, Michael Blount, 
esq. of Maple Durham,) and has 
issue. 

1. Elizabeth, m. in July, 1802, to 
Ralph Riddell, esq. of Felton 
Park, in Northumberland. 

2. Frances. 

I. Mary-Eugenia, born 14th February, 
1745, 771. first, 15th November, 1765, 
to Charles Stonor, esq. of Stonor, 
(see vol. ii. p. 444,) and secondly, 
in 1783, to Thomas Canning, second 
son of Thomas Canning, esq. of Fox- 
cote, in Warwickshire. 

II. Martha, born in 1762, rf. unmarried, 
5th February, 1780, 

Mr. Blount died 5th February, 1792, and 
was s. by his eldest son, 

Michael Blount, esq. of Maple Durham, 
b. 4th July, 1743, m. first, at Bristol, 15th 



April, 1781, Eleanora, second daughter of 
Maurice Fitzgerald, esq. of Punchers' 
Grange, in the county of Kildare. By this 
lady, who died on the 12th May, in the next 
year, and was buried at Maple Durham, 
he had a daughter, Maria-Eugenia, b. in 
January, 1782, d. 2nd August, 1791. He 
wedded, secondly, 27th August, 1787, Catha- 
rine, daughter and sole heir of John Petre, 
esq. of Belhouse, in the parish of Stanford 
Rivers, Essex, and widow of Francis Wright, 
esq. of Bedford Square, by whom he had 
two sons and two daughters, namely, 

Michael-Henry-Mary, his successor. 
Walter-Thomas-Mary. 

Henrietta, m. 16th September, 1811, to 
John Wright, esq. of Bellsize Park, 
Hampstead. 

Juliana-Mary, m. to — Nolan. 

Mr. Blount died 29th October, 1821, and 
was s. by his son, the present Michael- 
Henry-Mary Blount, esq. of Maple Dur- 
ham. 

AvTits — Barry, nebule or and sa. ; quar- 
tering Ayala, Castille, and Beauchamp. 

Crest — A wolf passant sa. between two 
cornets, out of a ducal coronet or : also, a 
foot in the sun, %vith the motto, " Lux tua, 
via mea." The latter is the crest now gene- 
rally adopted. 

Estates — In Oxfordshire, 
Seat — Maple Durham. 



SCOTT, OF MALLENY. 




SCOTT, THOMAS, esq. of Malleny, in the shire of Midlothian, b. 25th December, 

1745, a deputy lieutenant for that county. 

This gentleman, a general in the army, and, with one 
exception, the oldest officer in the British service, ob- 
tained an ensigncy in the 24th regiment 20th May, 
1761, and his career has since been highly distin- 
guished. He served under Prince Ferdinand during 
^^^ \~ ' y' the whole of the campaign of 1762, and carried the 

\i^ "Sj^X X colours of his regiment at the battle of Wellemstall, 

and at the attack of the British picquets on the Fulda. 
In 1763, returning home, he was stationed in Ireland, 
and obtained his lieutenancy in 1765. In 1776, he 
accompanied his regiment to America, served two cam- 
paigns under General Burgoyne, with a company of 
marksmen attached to a large body of Indians, and 
acquitted himself so much to the satisfaction of his 
commanding' officer. Brigadier Fraser, that he twice 
received thanks in public orders. After the battle of 
the 19fh September, 1777, the critical situation of Burgoyne rendering it indispen- 
sably necessary to communicate with Sir Henry Clinton, the commander-in-chief, 




SCOTT, OF M ALLEN V 



171 



two officers were selected, who should take different routes, to apprize Sir Henry of 
the perilous position of the British forces. Captain Scott, who was well known as an 
excellent pedestrian, was chosen as one of the envoys, and accomplished his journey 
with great address and coura<^e. In 1788, he returned to Europe; in 1791, served, 
during' the Spanish armament, with a detachment of the .OSrd regiment, for six 
months on board his majesty's ship Hannibal, commanded by Sir John Colpoys, and 
proceeding-, in 1793, to the continent with Sir Ralph Abercromby, assisted at the 
sieges of Valenciennes and Dunkirk, and in the attack in which the Austrian General 
D'Alton was killed. He was also at the siege of Niewport, and received the commis- 
sion of major for his exertions in its defence. 

During the three days that Prince William of Gloucester commanded the brigade, 
which consisted of the 14th, 37th, and 53rd regiments. Major Scott was attached to 
the staff of his royal highness, was present at the attack of the village of Fremont, 
and participated in the action of the 24th May, being wounded that day in the inside 
of the right thigh by a musket ball. In 1794, he was appointed lieutenant- colonel of 
one of the battalions of the 94th, and in the following year proceeded with it to 
Gibraltar, and in 1796 to the Cape of Good Hope. He served the whole of the cam- 
paign of 1799, in the Mysore country, and was at the capture of Seringapatam. In 
1800, Colonel Scott, in consequence of ill health, deemed it expedient to return to 
Europe, and left Hindostan. The Indiaman, however, in which he was a passenger, 
being boarded and taken by a French privateer, in the British Channel, close to the 
Isle of Wight, Colonel Scott was detained some weeks at Cherbourg until exchanged, 
in consequence of an application to the French government by the desire of the Duke 
of York. In 1801, he was appointed colonel by brevet; in 1802, inspecting field 
officer of the Edinburgh recruiting district; in 1803, deputy inspector-general of the 
recruiting service in North Britain; in 1804, brigadier-general; in 1808, major- 
general on the staff; and, in 1813, lieutenant-general. It is a remarkable circum- 
stance in the history of General Scott's life, that from the time he was appointed 
ensign to his promotion to the rank of general, a period of no less than fifty-two 
years, he had served without ever being on half pay or unemployed. Since his retire- 
ment from his staff appointment, the general has chiefly resided at Malleny, where, 
after a long and severe military career, he enjoys a well-earned repose, alike distin- 
guished for his benevolence, hospitality, and kindness to his tenants. 



Umcage. 



The ScoTTS of Malleny, an ancient branch 
of Buccleugh, appears to have separated 
from the parent stock during its residence 
in Lanarkshire. The first of the family that 
settled in Midlothean was 

James Scott, of Scotsloch, who lived in 
the reigns of Queen Mary and James VI. 
He was father of 

Laurence Scott, of Clerkington, a dis- 
tinguished person in the time of Charles I. 
wlio was appointed clerk to the privy coun- 
cil, and one of the principal clerks of ses- 
sion. From several charters under the 
great seal, it appears that his possessions 
were extensive in Edinburglishire. He m. 
Elizabeth, daughter of Hop Pringle, of 
Torsance, and had, with two daughters, one 
VI. to Lauder, of Hatton, and the other to 
Houstoun, three sons, viz. 
William, his heir. 

James, vvlio received from liis father 
the lands of Bonnytoun, in West 
Lothian. 



Laurence, ancestor of the Scotts of 
Bavelaw. 
The eldest son, 

Sir William Scott, of Clerkington, 
received the honor of knighthood from 
Charles I. and was appointed in 1642, one 
of the senators of the college of justice. 
He married first, a daughter of Morrison, 
of Preston Grange, and had a son, Lau- 
rence, his heir. He married secondly, 
Barbara, daughter of Sir John Dalmahoy, 
of that Ilk, and had by her, three sons and 
three daughters, viz. 

I. John, successor to his brother. 

II. James, of Scotsloch. 

III. Robert, dean of Hamilton. 

I. Barbara, m. first, to a son of Stewart, 
of Blackball ; and secondly, to Sir 
William Drummond, of Hathornden. 

II. Agnes, m. to Sir John Home, of 
Renton. 

HI. , 111. to Ogilvie, of Muckle, in 

Angus. 



172 



SCOTT, OF MALLENY. 



Sir William Scott was succeeded by his 
son, 

Laurence Scott, esq. of Clerkington, 
who married a daughter of Sir John Dalma- 
hov, and had two daughters only, the elder, 
the wife of George Winram, esq. of Ege- 
mouth, and the younger, of Robert Ken- 
nedy, esq, comptroller of the customs, at 
Borrowstones. Dying thus without male 
issue, he was succeeded by his brother, 

John Scott, esq. who received from his 
father in patrimony, the lands and barony 
of Malleny, in Midlothian, which has ever 
since been the chief title of the family. He 
m. Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Nicolson, 
of Cockburnspath, and had, with two daugli- 
ters, the elder m. to Sir William Calder- 
wood, of Polton, one of the senators of the 
college of justice ; and the younger, to her 
cousin, Laurence Scott, of Bevelaw, two 
sons, viz. 

I. Thomas, his heir. 

u. William, an advocate at the Scottish 

bar, who married, first, Magdalen, 

daughter and heiress of William 

Blair, esq. of Blair, and had one son, 

1. William, who inherited the es- 
tate and assumed the surname of 
Blair. He died without issue, 
in 1732, when he settled his lands 
upon the children of his father's 
second marriage. 

William Scott (the elder), wedded 
secondly, Catherine, only daughter 
of Alexander Tait, merchant, in 
Edinburgh, and had five sons and 
six daughters, who all assumed the 
surname of Blair, viz. 

2. Hamilton Blair, esq. of Blair, 
major in the Scots Greys, who 
m. Jane, youngest daughter of 
Sydenham Williams, esq. of 
Herringston, in the county of 
Dorset (see vol. i. p. 617), and 
dying in 1782, left, with two 
daughters, Agatha, m. to Lieu- 
tenant - General Avarne ; and 
Jane, to Robert Williams, esq. 
of Cerne Abbas, in Dorsetshire, 
a son and successor, 

William Blair, esq. of Blair, 
colonel of the Ayrshire re- 
giment of Fencible Cavalry, 
who m. Magdalen, eldest 
daughter of the late John 
Fordyce, esq. of Ayton, in 
Berwickshire, and had five 
sons, and seven daughters. 
Of the latter, the eldest, 
Catherine, married Matthew 
Fortescue, esq. of Stephens- 
town, in the county of Louth ; 
and the third, Jane Louisa, 
was wife of Colonel Jackson, 



of Enniscoe, in the county 
of Mayo. 

3. Alexander Blair, surveyor of 
the customs, at Port Glasgow, 
who VI. Elizabeth, only daughter 
of John Hamilton, esq. of 
Grange, in Ayrshire, and had 
issue. 

4. John Blair, captain of foot, who 
fell at Minden, in 1759. 

5. Thomas Blair, a cornet in the 
Scots Grevs, killed at the battle 
of Vald, in 1747. 

6. William Blair, a lieutenant of 
foot, killed at Oswego, in India, 
in 1756. 

1. Anne Blair, m. to David Blair, 
esq. of Adam ton, and had a 
daughter, Catherine, the wife of 
Sir William Maxwell, bart. of 
Monreith. 

2. Magdalen Blair, m. to Sir Wil- 
liam Maxwell, bart. of Monreith, 
and had, with other issue, a 
daughter, Jane, wife of Alex- 
ander, duke of Gordon. 

3. Janet Blair, m. to Alexander 
Tait, esq. one of the principal 
clerks of session, and had issue. 

4. Barbara Blair, in. to William 
FuUarton, esq. of that Ilk, and 
had issue. 

5. Catherine Blair, died unm. 

6. Mary Blair, m. to Sir John 
Sinclair, bart. of Stevenston, and 
had issue. - 

John Scott died in 1709, and was succeeded 
by his son, 

Thomas Scott, esq. of Malleny, who m. 
Isabel, daughter of Sir John Lauder, bart. 
of Fountain Hall, one of the senators of the 
college of justice, and had four sons and six 
daughters, viz. 

I. John, who entered the Portugese 
military service, wherein he remained 
several years, and having returned 
to Scotland, died at Malleny, 20th 
September, 1791. 

II. Thomas, the present General Scott, 
of Malleny. 

III. James, who commanded a ship in 
India, and died there. 

IV. Alexander, who served in the Scots 
Brigade, in Holland, and attained 
the rank of major in the British 
army. He now resides at Lymphoy, 
on the estate of Malleny. 

V. Archibald, who was in tlie military 
service of the East India Company, 
and fell in action. 

VI. Francis Carteret, who went in 1774, 
collector of customs, to Montego 
Bav, in Jamaica, and returned in 
1800. He m. in 1801, Charlotte- 



M'KERREIX, OF Mll.LIIOUSI' 



l7:j 



Elizabeth, elilest daughter of tlie late 
Major General George Cunningham, 
of the Scots Brigade and had six 
sons and five daughters, viz. 

1. Thomas, b. at Ravelrig, in the 
county of Midlothian, iu 1H02, 
and died in is;32. 

2. Carteret-George, captain in the 
hon. East India company's ser- 
vice )ti. first, in 1830, Charlotte, 
daughter of the late Colonel 
M'Dougal, and grandniece of 
George, marquis of Tweeddale. 
This lady died in 1831, and Capt. 
Scott wedded secondly, in 1833, 
Emily, daughter of Capt. Fre- 
derick Holmes Coflin, R.N. 

3. George, in the ishand of Ja- 
maica. 

4. Alexander, captain in the 53rd 
regiment. 

5. John, lieutenant in the same 
regiment. 

G. Stair - Primrose, bred to the 
law. 

1. Isabella-Frances, wi. in 1824, to 
George More Nisbett, esq. of 
Cairnhill, in the county of La- 
nark, and has two sons and three 
daughters, 

2, Charlotte, died in 1814. 



3. Jane. 

4. Charlotte-Elizabeth. 
6. Lavinia-Cockburn. 

VII. Hamilton, in the military service 
of the East India company, killed in 
action. 

VIII. George, who after serving in the 
West Indies, and attaining the rank 
of lieutenant-colonel in the British 
army, retired from the line, and is 
now lieutenant-colonel of the Edin- 
burgh regiment of North British 
Militia. 

I. Margaret. 

II. Jane. 

III. Susan. 

IV. Molly. 

The second but eldest surviving son of 
Thomas Scott, is the present General Scott, 
of Malleny. 

Arms — Or, on a bend az. a star between 
two crescents of the first, for Scott, of 
Buccleugh, and, for difterence, in base an 
arrow bendways, ppr. feathered and barbed 
arg. 

Cj-est — A stag lodged, ppr. 

Motto — Amo probos. 
■ Estates — In Midlothian. 

Seat — Malleny House, by Carrie. 



M'KERRELL, OF HILLHOUSE. 

M'KERRELL, JOHN, esq. of Hillhouse, in the county of Ayr, late master of the 
Mint at Madras, succeeded his father in 1820. 



Uintage. 




The M'Kerrells have flourished, from a 
remote period, in the shire of Ayr, but, with 



many other Caledonian families, have to 
deplore, that by the spoliation of the Jirst 
Edward, in the thirteenth century, and the 
destruction by fire of the herald's ar- 
chives at Edinburgh, in the seventeenth, 
they are deprived of direct evidence in 
tracing their origin, and can now deduce it 
on presumptive proof alone. The tradition 
from sire to son bears that they came out of 
Ireland, and it carries back the possession 
of the estate of Hillhouse full five hundred 
years, to the glorious era of Rokekt the 
Bruce, a period when vast changes occur- 
red in the proprietary of the soil, and when 
the chiefs of numerous houses, still in a 
high state of prosperity, were endowed by 
that illustrious prince. 

The name Kiriell appears on the roll of 
Battle Abbey ; hence the family is pre- 
sumed to be of Norman descent, its advent 



174 



M'KERRELL, OF HILLHOUSE. 



from Ireland rather upholding than up- 
setting the presumption, if the swarm of 
Anglo-Norman adventurers who joined the 
banner of Eakl Strongbow, and invaded 
that country in 1170, be taken into consider- 
ation. " Of the Norman barons," says Sir 
Walter Scott, " Scotland received from time 
to time sucli ^numerous accessions, that they 
may be said, with few exceptions, to form 
the ancestors of the Scottish nobility, and of 
many of the most distinguished families 
amongst the gentry ; a fact so well known, 
that it were useless to bring proof of it 
here," 

KiRIELL, KiREL, KiRREL, Or KeRRELL, 

(as at various times spelt), is a surname now 
very rarely to be met with. It is said to 
exist in Sweden, another proof of Norma- 
nic origin : in Scotland, the family of Hill- 
house alone bears it. 

The first of the name, and the most remote 
now on Scottish record. Sir John M'Kirel,* 
distinguished himself at the celebrated battle 
of Otterburn, 19th August, 1388,by wound- 
ing and capturing Rouel de Percie, who 
held the second command in the English 
host, and whose brother, the renowned 
Hotspur, was made prisoner by Sir John 
MoNTGOMERiE,f (fiom whom spring the 
earls of Eglinton), in the same sanguinary 
conflict. That this Sir John M'Kirel was 
an ancestor of the Hillhouse family, the 
circumstance of the latter bearing the arms| 
which he acquired by his prowess in that 
celebrated battle appears conclusive, al- 

* Mac, or " Son of," was a common prefixture 
in both Scotland and Ireland. 

t The death of Sir John Montgomerie's son, 
Huofh, in this bloody raid has been commemorated 
in the old and popular ballad of Chevy Chace : 
Against Sir Hugh Montgomerie 

So straight his shaft he set. 
The grey goose wing that was thereon. 
In his heart's blood was wet. 

X If heraldry may be trusted, and for long 
after its institution its purity as a science, and its 
utility still in restoring the severed links of affinity 
when broken asunder, through loss of documen- 
tary evidence, are manifest, the arms of this family 
must have been those of Sir John M'Kerel, for 
they are founded on the Percie coat, which was 
az. five fusils in fess or. The arms of M'Kerrel 
being az. three fusils gu, on a fess or, within a 
bordure engrailed for distinction, leaving no ques- 
tion but that in consequence of the capture of 
Percie, this formed one of those cases described 
by heralds of anus by conquest: for as M'Kerrel 
was then a knight, (chevalier, in Froissart), and 
no other honour or reward being recorded of him, 
it follows that this augmentation to, or grant of 
arms, was his reward ; and tlieir iuheritage, cou- 
pled with Froissart's record, is the best of all 
proofs of the descent of the present family of 
Hillhouse from Sir John, and also of the correct- 
ness of one part of the tradition above. 



though a chasm of nearly two centuries 
occurs in tlie pedigree. 

The following is Froissart's account of 
the battle of Otterbourn, and the mention of 
M'Kirel : 

" De touts les besognes, batailles et ren- 
contres qui sont cy dessous en ceste histoire 
(dont ie traitte et ay traitte) grandes, moy- 
ennes et petites, ceste cy, dont ie parle pour 
le present, en fut I'une des plus dures, et 
des mieux combattues sans feintise, car 11 
n'y auoit homnie, chevalier, n'escuyer qui 
ne s'acquittast et fit son devoir, et tout main 
a main. Cette battaille fut quasi pareille a 
la bataille de Becherel : car aussi elle fut 
moult bien combattue e longuement. Les 
enfants au Compte de Northomberllande, 
Messire Henry et Messire Raeul de Persy 
(qui Ik estoient soueraines capitaines) s'ac- 
quitterent loyaument par bien combattre : 
et quasi pareil party, que celui, par qui le 
Comte de Douglas fut arreste, auint et cheut 
a Messire Raoul de Persy ; car il se bouta 
si auant entre ses ennemis, qu'il fut enclos, 
et durement naure, mis a la grosse haleine, 
pris et fiance d'un Chevalier, lequel estoit 
de la charge et du meme hostel de Moray, 
et I'appeloit on Jehan Makirel. En le pre- 
nant et fian^ant, le Cheualier Esco^ois de- 
manda a Messire Raoul de Persy, qui 
I'estoit, (car il estoit si muiet que point ne 
le cognoissoit) et Messire Raoul (qui estoit 
si outre que plus ne pouuait, et luy couloit 
le sang tout aual, qui I'affoiblissoit) luy 
dit; je suis Messire Raoul de Persy. 
Adonc dit I'Escocois, Messire Raoul r^- 
coux ou non recoux, ie vous fiance mon 
prison nier. Je suis Makirel. Bien dit 
Messire Raoul, je le veieil, mais entendez a 
mois, car ie suis trop durement naure, et 
mes chausses et mes greues sont la toutes 
emplies de sang. A ces mots estoit le 
cheualiere Esco^ois ententif, quand delez 
luy il ouyt crier Moray et au compte : et 
recit le compte et sa banniere droit deiez a 
luy. Si luy dit Messire Jehan Makirel, 
Monseigneur, tenez. Je vous bailie Mes- 
sire Raoul de Persy pour prisonnier ; mais 
faites entendre a luy, car il est durement 
naure. Le Comte de Moray de ceste pa- 
role fut r^iouy moult grandement : et dit, 
Makirel, tu as bien gagne les esperons. 
Adonc fit il venir ses gens, et leua charger 
Messire Raoul de Persy : lesquels luy ban- 
derent et etancherent ces playes. Si se 
tanoit la bataille fort et dure et ne sauoit on 
encores lesquels en auroient le meilleur ; 
car ie vous dy qu'il y eut la plusieurs 
prises et recousses faites, qui toutes ne vin- 
drent pas a cognaissance." 

The next of the name, although probably 
there were six intermediate links at least, 
from whom the chain continues unbroken, 

William M'Kerrel, of Hillhouse, th. in 
1.577, Elizabeth, daughter of John Fuller- 



M'KERRl'lJ., OF II 1 1.1, HOUSE. 



17. -J 



ton, of I)reg;liani, by Flclcn, daughter of Sir 
J. Clialmers, of Gadgirth, and was s. by liis 
son, 

VVw.i.iAM M'Kf.kkki,, of Ilillliou.sc, whose 
name is ainonj;- tlic witnesses to the marriage 
of James Fuilarton, of tliat Ilk, in 1624. 
His son, 

Magister William M'Keiiri:l, of Ilill- 
house, appears in tlie retour, dated 16';}(), as 
proprietor of several lands in the parish of 
Dundonald, and of Knoek Gall, in the parish 
of Ochiltree. In l(j>%' he is retoured heir 
to his father in tlie fifty-shilling lands of 
Godring,* and of the Kemnioeh land, and 
was succeeded himself at his decease by 
his son, 

William M'Kerrkll, of Hillhouse, whose 
retour is dated in 1643, and who was s. by 
his brother, 

John M'Kerrell, of Hillhouse, who m. 
about the year 1670, Elizabeth Wallace, 
daughter of the Bishop of the Isles, and was 
father of 

John M'Kerrell, of Hillhouse, who 
wedded Elizabeth, daughter of William 
Fairlie, of Fairlie, by his wife, Jane, only 
daughter of the last Sir William Mure, of 
Rowallan,t and had issue, 
William. 
John. 

Jean. 
Elizabeth. 
He was s. by his eldest son, 

William M'Kerrell, of Hillhouse. This 
laird m. Mary Vaux, of French extraction, 
whose family sought refuge in this country 
from the persecution which followed the 
revocation of the edict of Nantz. Her fa- 
ther was in holy orders, and one of the 
canons of St. Paul's cathedral. By this 
lady he had William and John, with a 
daughter Elizabeth. He was s. by his 
elder son, 

William M'Kerrel, esq. of Hillhouse, 
at whose decease, unmarried, the estates 
devolved on his brother, 

John M'Kerrel, esq. of Hillhouse, who 
married Margaret, sister of the late William 



• Now RosEMOUNT, the property and seat of 
Lord James Stuart, M.P. for the Ayr district of 
boroughs. 

t The Mures of Rowallan were of great anti- 
quity and consideration in the shire of Ayr, and 
were distinguished by their alliance with the royal 
famdy of Scotland, through the marriage of Knig 
RonERT II. (the first of the Stuart dynasty) with 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Adam Mure, of Row- 
allan, when residing at his castle of Dundonald, 
in liyle Stuart. From that union Ibieallii des- 
cended James VI. of Scotland, and first of Eng- 
land. The present marchioness dowager of Has- 
tings is now the representative of the family of 
Rowallan, and possesses the estate (see vol. i. 
p. 453). ^ 



Fulton, esq. of Park, in the county of Ren- 
frew, and had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. John, married first, Miss Ilervey, of 
Edinburgh, and had John, Alexander, 
and William. He wedded secondly, 
Helen Stuart, niece of Robert Ma- 
rice, esq. of Craig, and had a fourth 
son, Archibald. 

III. Robert, who »«. Miss Sliultz, of 
Frankfort, and had one son and two 
daughters, viz. 

Robert. ' 

Margaret. 

Augusta-Jane, m. to Count Segure, 

the French charge d'affaires at 

Palermo. 

IV. Fulton, married first, to his cousin- 
german, Elizabeth, daughter of Ful- 
ton, of Hartfield, but had no issue. 
He wedded secondly, Mary, daugh- 
ter of James M'Call, esq. of Brea- 
head, and had three daughters, Sarah, 
Margaret, and Mary. 

I. Margaret, married to the late Moses 
Crawfurd, esq. of Newfield, and had 
issue. (See vol. i. p. 554.) 

II. Mary. 

III. Elizabeth, m. to Col. John Reid, of 
the Hon. East Ind. service, and died, 
leaving a dau. Elizabeth M'Ker- 
rell Reid, who wedded James Cam- 
bell, esq. of Treesbanks, (refer to 
vol. ii. p. 359). 

IV. Jane, ?w. to lier cousin, Robert Ful- 
ton, of Hartfield, late lieut.-colonel 
of the 79th Foot, with which regi- 
ment he served in Egypt and the 
Peninsula ; she has issue, 

Robert Fulton, captain in the 79th 

regiment. 
John Fulton, lieutenant in the East 

India Company's service. 
William Fulton. 
Jane Fulton. 

V. Marion, vi. to the late James Kihble, 
esq. of Whittford and Greenlaw 
House, in the county of Renfrew, 
and had one son, Robert Kibble, who 
died young. 

VI. Agnes, m. to John-Edward Wright, 
esq. of Boltoa-on-Swale, (see vol. ii. 
p. 678). 

Mr. M'Kerrell died in 1811, aged seventy- 
nine, and was s. by his eldest son, 

William Mc Kerkell, e.sq. of Hillhouse, 
who 7n. first, Miss Reid, sister of the late 
Robert Reid, esq. of Adaniton, but had no 
issue. He wedded secondly. Miss Gowan, 
by whom he had five sons and four daugh- 
ters, viz. 

John, his heir. 
Robert, died in India. 



176 



PRICE, OF CASTLE MADOC. 



William, d. young. 

Henry. 

James, d. in 1833. 

Janet. 

Margaret. 

Anne, m. to James Brown, esq. and has 

issue. 
Mary. 

This gentleman, who had the honour of 
raising, at Paisley, the first volunteer corps 
embodied in Scotland during the French 
revolutionary war, died in 1821, and was *. 



by his eldest son, John M'Kerrel, esq. 
now of Hillhouse. 

A}-tns — Az. three fusils gu. on a fess or, 
within a bordure engrailed. 

Crest — An ancient warrior in armour, 
with a shield and spear, a star over the 
latter's point. 

Motto — Dulcis pro patria labor. 

Estates — In Ayrshire. 

Seat — Hillhouse, four miles south of Ir- 
vine. 



PRICE, OF CASTLE MADOC. 

Ueprcsfiittng ^Potoell, of CTastle iHaUoc. 

PRICE, HUGH, esq. of Castle Madoc, in the county of Brecknock, b. 29th 
March, 1786; 7n. 30th September, 1818, Sophia-Juliana-Bulama, daughter of the 
late Francis Brodie, esq. barrister-at-law, and has had issue, 

Charles-Powell, b. 10th September, 1821, now deceased. 
Hugh-Powell, b. 16th November, 1822. 
Grace-Powell. 
Eleanor-Powell. 

Mr. Price succeeded his father 13th June, 1803. He is in the commission of the 
peace for the county of Brecon, and served the office of sheriff in 1815. 



Iliiuage. 




The Prices deriving their estates from 
the Powells of Castle Madoc, we shall 
commence with the descent of that ancient 
family until it merges in that of Price. 

Caradog Vreichvras, or Caradog with tlie 
brawny arm, a prince of the Cornish Britons 
at the close of the fifth and in the early part 
of the sixth centuries, one of the knights of 
Kiiiff Arthur's Round Table, and in the 
"Welsh Triads stvled one of the three cele- 



brated commanders of cavalry, was direct 
ancestor of 

Maenyrch, Lord of Brecon, whose son, 

Bleddyn ap Maenyrch, was Lord of 
Brecon in the reign of William Rufns of 
England, at which period the lordship was 
invaded by Bernard Newmarch, a Norman 
adventurer*, who, with his followers, de- 
feated the forces of Bleddyn. The unfor- 
tunate chieftain being slain in the battle, 
was by his sons conveyed to the abbey of 
Strata Florida, in Cardiganshire, and there 
buried. His extensive domains were, how- 
ever, seized upon by Newmarch, and for 
the most part divided between himself and 
his Norman followers. Nevertheless, Bled- 
dyn's sons still retained a portion of their 
father's patrimony, and from one of them, 
named Blegwryd, descended, in the fifth 
degree, 

EiMON, who dwelt in Llyuel, in the 
county of Brecon, and was called Einion 
Sais, because he could speak the English 
language. Third in descent from Einion 
was 

Llewelyn, who wedded Matilda, daugh- 
ter of leuan ap Rys ap Ivor, of Elvel, and 
had two sons, Howel, ancestor of the 



PRICR, OF CASTLE MADOC. 



177 



Powells of Castle Madoc, and David Gam, 
so celebrated in history as the enemy of 
Owain C.lyndwr, and supporter of the En- 
j^lisli interest ; but nioic renowned l)y his 
prowess on tlie field of .\/i\<(>riir, in coniins;- 
to the rcsene of K'ukj IIknuy wiien the 
gallant monarch was placed in a situation 
of imminent |)eril. Here David Cam re- 
ceived a mortal wound, but, before he 
breathed his last, had the honour of knight- 
hood conferred upon him by his royal 
master. Llewelyn's elder son, 

Howi-.r., espoused Margaret, davighter of 
Gwilim Philip Thomas ap Elydr, and had 
two sons and two daughters, viz. 
GwiLYM DEW, his heir. 
Thomas, who m. first, a daugliter of 
John Mear, of Brecon, and iiad two 
sons, Owen and Rees, who married 
in Yorkshire. Thomas wedded, se- 
condly, Margaret Winstone, of Wil- 
lersley, and had a daughter, Alice, 
the wife of Thomas Havardiiir. 

Maud, m. to Morgan David Powel 

Vychan. 
Margaret, m. to Gwilim Thomas Grif- 
fith ap Owen Gethin. 
The elder son, 

GwiLYM DEW, married Mary, daughter of 
Jenkin Richard Jenkin, of Aberyscir, and 
was s. by his son, 

HowEL DEW, father, by Maud, his wife, 
daughter of Roger Madoc Rich David, of 

GwiLYM, who m. Catherine, daughter of 
John Rees Jenkin, of Glynnedd, and had a 
son, 

HowEL, of Argoed, who wedded, first, 
Margaret, dau. of William John Havard, 
and had one sou, Thomas, his heir, and one 
daughter, Maud, the wife of John Meredith 
Watkiu Morgan. He married, secondly, 
Elinor, daughter of Roger Vanghan, and by 
her was father of William of Buallt, ances- 
tor of the Powells of Cilmeri. Howel's 
elder son, 

Thomas Powell, esq. married Sibil, 
daughter of Sir William Vaughan, knt. and 
was s. by his son, 

William Powell, esq. of Castle Madoc, 
who wedded Matilda, daughter of Griffith 
Jefl'rey, of Glyntawe, and left a son and 
successor, 

Hugh Powell, esq. of Castle Madoc, 
living in 1600, who m. Elizabeth, daughter 
of Thomas Gwyn, of Trecastle, and had 
three sons with one daughter, namely, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Another son, 

III. Thomas, who m. Anne, daughter of 
Howel Gwyn. of Trecastle, and left 
a daughter, Mary, the wife of Capt. 
Thomas Price, of Devynock. 

3. 



I. Jennet, m. to Watkin Pritchard. 
Flugh Powell died in 1C24, and was s. by his 
son, 

William Powell, esq. of Castle Madoc, 
who died in Hi:??, leaving by Anne, bis wife, 
daughter of Rees Kemeys, esq. of Llanvair 
ys coed, witii five daughters, three sons, 
namely, Hi'<;ii, his heir; Thomas, who m. 
tiie daughter and co-heir of Lewis ({wyn, 
esq. of Bishop's Castle, but died without 
issue; and (Jrilhth. The eldest son, 

Hi'(;ii Powell, esi]. of Castle Madoc, 
wedded Catherine, daughter of Roger 
Vaughan, of Mertliyr, and had, with two 
daughters, Margaret, the wife of Geffrey 

Williams, esq., and , m. to Rees 

Penryn, esq., two sons, CilAKLES, his heir, 
and George, who espoused Anne, daughter 
of John Herbert, esq. of Court Henry. 
Mr. Powell died in !()8(), and was s. by his 
son, 

Charles Powell, esq. of Castle Madoc. 
This gentleman married Elizabeth, daugliter 
of George Gwyn, of Llanehvedd, and sister 
to Sir Rowland Gwyn, by whom he left at 
his decease in 1729, with younger children, 
a son and successor, 

Hugh Howell Powell, esq. of Castle 
Madoc, b. in 1683, who m. Margaret, dau. 
and heir of Walter Thomas, esq. of Talwen- 
fawr, and had two sons and five daughters, 
viz. 

I. Charles, his heir. 

II. Hugh, colonel in the army, d. s. p. 

I. Elizabeth. 

II. Penelope, who wedded Roger 
Price, esq. of Maes-yr-Onn, son of 
Roger Price, esq. and had several 
sons and daughters, who all died 
issueless, excepting the second son, 
the Rev. 

Hugh Price, of whom hereafter 
as INHERITOR of the Casile 
Ma DOC estate. 

III. Dorothy. 

IV. Margaret. 

V. Catharine. 

Mr. Powell died in 1749, and was s. by his 
son, 

Charles Powell, esq. of Castle Madoc, 
who married Catherine, daughter of Hugh 
Penny, esq. of Cefn, and had two daugh- 
ters, Catherine, his heir; and Margaret, 
who died unmarried in her father's lifetime. 
Mr. Powell died in 1796, and w as *. by his 
only surviving child, 

Catherine Powell, of Castle Madoc, 
at whose decease unmarried in September, 
1798, the estates passed to (the son of her 
aunt Penelope) her cousin. 

The Rev. Hugh Price, M.A. rector of 
Rettendon and Little Ilford, in the county 
N 



DUN DAS, OF DUDDIXGSTOUN, 



of Essex, who then became of *' Castle 
Madoc." He m. Sarah, daughter of John 
Turner, esq. of King's Stanley, and had 
issue, 

Charles, who died young. 

Hugh, heir to his father. 

Anne. 

Sarah. 

Mr. Price died I3th June, 1803, and was 
succeeded by his only surviving son, the 



present Hugh Price, esq. of Castle Ma- 
doc. 

Estates — In Breconshire. 

Seat — Castle Madoc. The present edifice 
was erected by one of the Powells in the 
year 1588, according to the inscription on 
an iron plate over the entrance, which 
bears the three spears' heads and chevron : 
before its erection, there stood a castellated 
mansion with a keep, over which was an 
artificial mound, still in existence, on which 
stood the Welsh tower. 



DUNDAS, OF DUDDINGSTOUN. 



DUNDAS-HAMILTON, GABRIEL, esq. of Duddingstoun, in West Lothian, suc- 
ceeded his father in 1820, m. Isabella, eldest daughter 
of James DeHftistoun, esq. of Dennistoun* and Col- 
grain, in Dumbartonshire, by Miss Dreghorn his wife, 
heiress of Ruchill, and had issue, 




1. 


John, b. in 


1805, 


captain 


of the 1st foot 


II. 


James. 








III. 


David, d. in 


1833. 






IV. 


Gabriel. 








V. 


Robert. 








VI. 

1. 


George. 
Margaret. 








II. 


Grace. 








III. 


Jessie. 








IV. 


Marion. 








V. 


Elizabeth. 









Mr. Hamilton-Dundas was formerly an oflScer in the 
3rd foot guards, and served with his regiment in Egypt. 
He is major commandant of the West Lothian yeo- 
manry, deputy lieutenant for Haddingtonshire, and in 
the commission of the peace for the counties of Had- 
dington and Lanark. 



Uincage. 



This is a branch of the ancient stock of 
DuNDAS of Dundas (see vol i. p. 643). 

Sir William Dundas, of that Ilk, who 
was served heir to his father in 1494, mar- 
ried Margaret, daughter of Archibald Wau- 
chope, of Niddery, an ancient and still dis- 
tinguished family, and had two sons, 

I. James (Sir), ancestor of the Dun- 
dases of Dundas, Arniston, &c. 

II. William, progenitor of Dudding- 
stoun. 



The second son, 

William Dundas, espoused Marjory 
Lindsay, heiress of Duddingstoun, and with 
her acquired that estate. He was succeeded 
by his elder son, 

William Dundas, of Duddingstoun, who 
resided for many years in Sweden, and 
married a lady of that country. He left 
no male issue, and was succeeded by his 
brother, 

David Dundas, of Duddingstoun, who 



• Vor an account of the ancient family of Dennistoun, and their alliance with the royal family of 
Scotland through Isabella Dennistoun, grandmother of King Robert 111. see \\ odd's Douglai. 



DUNDAS, OF DUDDINCSTOUN. 



179 



married Marjory, daujilitor of John Ilamil- 
toii, of Orhiston, great-grandson of (iavin 
Hamilton, fourth son of Sir James Hamil- 
ton, Lord of Cadzow. By her he had two 
sons, 

I. James. 

II. George, ancestor of the family of 
Dun DAS of Manor. 

The elder son, 

Jamks Dundas, of Duddingstoiin, mar- 
ried Isabella, daughter of William Maule, 
son of Thomas Maule, of Pan mure, and 
uncle of Patrick, first Earl of Panmure, by 
Bethia Guthrie, daughter of Alexander 
Guthrie, of the family of Guthrie of Guthrie, 
by Janet, daughter of Henderson of Fordel. 
By her he had, 

I. Gkorge, b. in 1612. 

II. William. 

I. Bethia, b. in 1614, wife of James 
Home, brother of Home of St. Leo- 
nards. 
Duddingstoun was *. by his son, 

George Dundas, of Duddingstoun, a 
parliamentarian in the civil wars temp. 
Charles L and one of the committee 
of estates in 1649. In 1636, he married 
Catherine Moneypenny,* daughter of John 
Moneypenny, of Pitmilly, an ancient 
family still existing in great respectability, 
which had for its cadets the Lords Money- 
penny, and the Seigneurs de Concressault 
in France. Catherine's mother was Susan- 
nah Colville, daughter of Sir A. Colville, 
commendator of Culross, by Nicolas, daugh- 
ter of Dundas of Fingask, by a daughter of 
Bruce of Clackmannan. George Dundas 
died in 1684, and his wife, Catherine Money- 
penny, in 1694. They had twelve children, 
of whom, John, the eldest surviving son, 
born in 1641, succeeded his father, and be- 
came 

John Di'Ndas, of Duddingstoun. He 
married, in 1670, Anne, daughter of Sir 
David Carmichael, of Balmedie, descended 
from the ancient family of Carmichael of 
Carmichael, by the Hon. Anne Carmichael, 
daughter to James, first Lord Carmichael, 
and aunt to the first Earl of Hyndford. By 
her, who died in 1711, he had eight sons 
and four daughters, of whom 

I. George, succeeded him. 

II. David, b. in 1673, was called to the 
bar ; he died unm. 

III. John, of Newhalls, b. in 1682, m. 
Christian, daughter of David Mure, 
of Blackhorn, and had a son, David, 
of Newhalls. 



* (Catherine Moneypenny 's paternal grand- 
mother was Euphemia Colville, daughter of Sir 
James Colville, of Easter Wemyss (father of the 
first Lord Colville), by Janet Douglas, of Loch- 
leven, niece of William, Earl of Morton. 



I. Anna, b. in 1677, m. to Moncriefl' of 
Hhynd, and d. in 1723. 

II. Isabella, b. in 1680, m. to Binning 
of Wallingford, and d. in 1724. 

The eldest son, 

Gr.oKUE Di'NDAS, of Duddingstoun, mar- 
ried Magdalen Lindsay-C'raufurd, daughter 
of Patrick Lindsay-Craulurd, of Kilbirney, 
granddaughter of John Lindsay, fifteenth 
I'arl Craufurd and first Earl of Lindsay, 
niece to Janu's and William, Dukes of Ha- 
milton, sister to John Lindsay-Craufurd, 
Viscount Garnock, and to Margaret, Coun- 
tess of Glasgow. Jiy this lady he had, 
among other children, who left no issue, 

John, his heir. 

Agnes, wife of Gabriel Hamilton, of 
Westburn, a cadet of Hamilton of 
Torrance, and eventual inheritor of 
the estates. 

The son and successor, 

John Dundas, of Duddingstoun, married 
Lady Margaret Hope, daughter to Charles, 
Earl of Hopetoun, by Lady Henrietta 
Johnstone, daughter of William, Marquis 
of Annandale. They had no issue ; and 
on the death of John Dundas, the Dudding- 
stoun estates passed for a few years to the 
heir male, David Dundas, of Newhalls, son 
of John, younger son of John Dundas, of 
Duddingstoun ; but on his death they re- 
verted to the daughter of George Dundas 
and Magdalen Lindsay-Craufurd, 

Agnes Dundas, of Duddingstoun, who 
m. Gabriel Hamilton,t of W^estburn, and 
had issue, 

i Sir John de Hamilton, Lord of Cadzow, 
married Janet, daughter of Sir James Douglas, of 
Dalkeith, and had three sons, viz. 

I. James (Sir), of Cadzow, ancestor to the 
ducal house of Hamilton. 

II. David, ancestor of the Hamiltons of Dal- 
serf. 

III. Thomas, of Darngaber. 
The third son, 

Thomas Hamilton, of Darngaber, married 
Helen, daughter of Sir Henry Douglas, of Loch- 
leven, and had James, ancestor of the Hamiltons 
of Raploch, represented by Hamilton of Barns, 
and 

Thomas Hamilton, who m. the heiress of Tor- 
rance of Torrance, and was ancestor of the Ha- 
miltons of Torrance, Westburn, Aitkenhead, and 
various other families. A cadet of the family of 
Torrance, 

Andrew Hamilton, of Westburn, whose name 
occurs in a deed under the privy seal in 1604, 
was father of 

Gabriel Hamilton, of Westburn, who lived 
during the protectorate of Cromwell and tlie 
reign of Charles II. In 1648, he was one of the 
committee of war for the county of Lanark, and 
joining, after the restoration, the covenanters, 
had to endure severe pecuniary penalties. He m. 
Margaret, daughter of Cunninghame of Gilbert- 



isn 



DUNDAS, OF DUDDINGSTOUN. 



I. Gabriel Hamilton, of Westburn, 
b. in 1736, a captain in the army, 
died immediately after he had been 
amongst the first to enter the Moro 
Castle, at the Havannah. 

II. Archibald Hamilton. 

III. Hope-Archibald Hamilton. 

IV. George Hamilton. 

V. Hamilton. 



VI. John Hamilton, b. in 1745, his 
father and mother's sole surviving 
son and heir. 

VII. David Hamilton. 

I. Margaret Hamilton, wife of Captain 
Nasmyth, ll.N. and had no issue. 

II. Graham-Christian Hamilton. 

III. Agnes Hamilton. 

IV. Agnes Hamilton. 

V. Magdalen-Elizabeth Hamilton. 

VI. Christian Hamilton, wife of the 
Hon. Charles Napier, of Merchiston 
Hall, second son of Francis, fiftli 
Lord Napier, by Lady Henrietta 
Hope, daughter of Charles, Earl of 
Hopetoun, and was mother of 

1. Francis Napier. 

2. Hamilton Napier. 

3. Charles Napier, of the royal 
navy, recently so celebrated by 



field, by a daughter of Cunninghame of Craigends, 
a cadet of Glencaime, and had issue, 

I. Gabriel, his heir. ^ 

II. Archibald, successor to his brother. 

III. James. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to James Hamilton, of New- 
ton, cadet of Silverton Hill, and had a 
daughter, Elizabeth, wife of John Gray, of 

• Dalmarnock. 

II. , wife of A. Lang, esq. of Overton, 

in Dumbartonshire. 

in. , m, to Buchanan of Achintoshaw, 

in Dumbartonshire. 
Gabriel Hamilton died in 1669, and was s. by his 
son, 

Gabriel Hamilton, of Westburn, who died 
without issue, and was succeeded by his brother, 

Archibald Hamilton, of Westburn, who m. 
first, a daughter of Hay of Craignethan, but 
had no issue ; and secondly, Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Claud Hamilton, of Barns, rejiresentative 
of the family of Raploch, by Anne, daughter of 
Sir Walter Stewart, of AUanton, and had, 

I. Gabriel, his heir. 

II. Robert, died without issue. 

I. Anne, vi. to the Rev. l\lr. Millar, of Mill- 
heugh, minister of Hamilton, and was 
mother of John Millar, the celebrated 
lawyer, and author of " Essays on the 
British Constitution and the Origin of 
Ranks." 

He was succeeded by his son, 

Gabrikl Hamilton, of Westburn, who married, 

as stated in the text, Agni:s Dundas, heiress of 

Duddingstoun. 



the victory he achieved as ad- 
miral of the fleet of Donna 
Maria, Queen of Portugal, by 
whom he has been created Count 
Cape St. Vincent. He is mar- 
ried and has issue. 
4. Thomas - Erskine Napier, of 
Woodcote, a colonel in the army, 
who married Miss Margaret 
Falconner, and has one daugh- 
ter. 

1. Harriet Napier, wife of George 
Gordon, of Hallhead, nephew to 
the Earl of Aberdeen and the 
Duchess of Gordon, and has 
issue. 

2. Agnes-Dundas Napier, died in 
1816 unmarried. 

3. Christian-Graham Napier, who 
died in 1811, m. Charles Camp- 
bell, of Combie, and had issue. 

vii. Mary-Anne Hamilton, »t. to Robert 
Gray, of Carntyne, representative of 
the families of Gray of Dalmarnock, 
and Hamilton of Newton, and had 
an only son, 

John-Hamilton Gray, of Carntyne, 
born in December, 1800, in holy 
orders, vicar of Bolsover and 
Scarcliff, in the county of Derby, 
who married Miss Johnstone, of 
Alva, and has one daughter. 
Gabriel Hamilton, of Westburn, died many 
years before his wife, Agnes Dundas, who 
lived to a very advanced age, dying about 
the year 1798. During a long widow- 
hood she achieved the difficult task of re- 
storing the dilapidated estates of her hus- 
band's family, and at the close of her life 
found herself seated with augmented wealth 
in the ancient halls of her youth, in which 
she was succeeded by her eldest surviving 
son, 

John Hamilton-Dundas, of Dudding- 
stoun and Westburn, who inherited all the 
family estates. He married Grizzel, daugh- 
ter of John Hamilton, of Barns, represen- 
tative of the great Raploch branch of the 
house of Hamilton, descended from John, 
Lord of Cadzow. By her he had 

Gabriel, his heir. 

John, -\ who died before their father, 
David, 1 all officers in the army, navy, 
James, ( or the East India Company's 
George, J service. 

Marion. 

Agnes. 

Margaret. 

Magdalen-Elizabeth. 

Eleanor. 
Mr. Hamilton-Dundas died in 1820, and 
was succeeded by his only surviving son, 
the present Gabriel Hamilton-Dundas, 
esq. of Duddingstoun. 



DUNDAS, OF DUDDINGSTOUN. 



iHl 



jFanitlirs of liintrsaij nuti dTratofui U. 

On the death of Lady Mary Lindsay 
Crawfurd, in 18:33, th(! lepreseiitatiDii of 
these distinguished families devolved on lier 
nearest relatives the l-^arl of Glasgow and 
Mr. Hamilton Dundas. 

Family of Lindsay. 

William or. Lindsay, lived in the reign 
of David L of Scotland. He is mentioned 
in 1145. His descendant, 

David de Lindsay, who died 1230, m. 
the daughter and co-heir of Joiin de Crau- 
furd, and with her acquired the barony of 
Craufurd. His descendant, 

Sir David Lindsay, of Craufurd, mar- 
ried, in 1325, Mary, daughter and co-heir 
of the great house of Abernethy, and had 
three sons, founders of the great branches 
of the family of Lindsay, 

I. Sir James Lindsay', of Craufurd, 
ancestor to the first branch, the Earls 
of Craufurd. 

II. Sir Alexander Lindsay, of Gle- 
nesk, ancestor to the Earls of Bal- 
carras. 

III. Sir William Lindsay, of Byres, 
ancestor to the Lords Lindsay, of 
the Byers who became Earls of Crau- 
furd, of the second branch, the se- 
cond subdivision of which branch is 
represented by Mr. Hamilton Dun- 
das conjointly with the Earl of Glas- 
gow. 

The last descendant of the elder brother, 
(Sir James Lindsay, of Craufurd), was Lu- 
dovic, fourteenth Earl of Craufurd, who died 
about 1646. He resigned his titles to the 
crown, and obtained a new patent in favour 
of John, Lord Lindsay, of the Byres. 

This John, Lord Lindsay, was the re- 
presentative of the third of the above 
mentioned brothers. He was lord high 
treasurer of Scotland, and had been created, 
1641, Earl of Lindsay, and on the death of 
Earl Ludovic became fifteenth Earl of Craw- 
ford. He married Lady Margaret Hamil- 
ton, daughter to James, second marquis, 
and sister to James and William, first and 
second Dukes of Hamilton. By her he 
had, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Patrick, of whom hereafter. 

I. Anne, wife of John, Duke of Rothes. 

II. Christian, wife of John, Earl of 
Haddington. 

III. Helen, wife of Sir Robert Sinclair, 
of Hevenson, bart. 

IV. Elizabeth, wife of David, Earl of 
Northesk. 

The eldest son, 



William, sixteenth Earl of Crauford and 
second Earl of Lindsay, was ancestor of the 
first subdivision of the second i)ranch of the 
Earls of Craufurd, which failed in the per- 
son of General John Craufurd, eighteenth 
earl, in 174i>, when the titles and estates 
devolved on the descendants of Patrick, 
second son of the fifteenth earl, and ne- 
phew of the Duke of Hamilton ; which 

Patrick Lindsay, married, in 1664, Mar- 
garet Craufurd, daughter and heiress of Sir 
John ('raufurd, of Kilbirney, and assumed 
the surname and arms of Craufurd. By her 
he had, 

I. John. 

I. Margaret, wife of David, Earl of 
Glasgow, great grandmother of the 
present earl. 

II. Anne, wife of Hon. Henry Maule, 
son of the Earl of Panmure. Her 
son. Lord Maule, d. without issue. 

III. Magdalen, wife of George Dundas, 
of Duddingstoun, great grandmother 
of Mr. Hamilton Dundas. 

The Hon. P. Lindsay Craufurd was 5. by 
his son, 

John Lindsay Craufurd, who was cre- 
ated, in 1703, Viscount of Garnock. His 
grandson, 

George, fourth Viscount Garnock, suc- 
ceeded to the earldoms of Crawford and 
Lindsay on the death of General John 
Craufurd, the eighteenth earl, in 1749, and 
became nineteenth earl of the second sub- 
division of the second branch. His son, 

George Lindsay Crauford, twentieth 
earl, died without issue, in 1808, when the 
honours of the family became dormant, as 
they continue. His lordship's sister. 

Lady Mary Lindsay Crawfurd, d. unm. 
in 1833, and was succeeded in the estates, 
both of the Crauford and Garnock fami- 
lies, by the Earl of Glasgow, as heir of 
entail, while the honour of representing 
these two distinguished families is divided 
between his lordship and Mr. Hamilton 
Dundas, as the descendants of two sisters, 
co-heiresses of line. 

Family of Craufurd, of Kilbirney. 

Galfridus de Crawfurd lived in the 
reign of Kiny William tlie Lion, in the 
latter part of the twelfth century ; and is 
supposed (from strong presumptive evi- 
dence, see vol. ii. p. xiv.) to have sprung 
from a younger son of the old Earls of 
Richmond. 

Sir John Crawfurd, of Crawfurd. his 
successor, d. in 1248, in the reign of Alex- 
ander n., and left two daughters, his co- 
heirs, the elder was wife of Hugh de Doug- 
las, progenitor of the family of Douglas, and 
the younger was wife of David de Lindsay, 
ancestor of the first and second branches of 



182 



DUNDAS, OF DUDDINGSTOUN. 



the Earls of Crawford, and of the Earls of 
Balcarras. 

But besides this family, which was ac- 
counted the chief of the name, another 
branch of the Crawfurds was settled in Ayr- 
shire. Sir Reginald Crawfurd lived about 
the year 1220, and married Margaret, heiress 
of James, Lord of Loudon ; their descen- 
dants were the powerful family of Craw- 
furd, OF Loudon, which ended in an heiress, 
Susannah, married to Sir Duncan Campbell, 
and hence sprang the Earls of Loudon. 
(See vol. i. p. 551.) 

Malcolm Crawfurd, of the Loudon 
family, married the dau. and co-heiress of 
Galbraith, Lord of Greenock, by whom he 
had 

Malcolm Crawfurd, who in the reign of 
James IIL married Marjory, daughter and 
heiress of John Barclay, of Kilbii-ney, the 
last of the male line of the distinguished 
race of Barclay, Lords of Ardrossan. By 
her he had 

Malcolm Craufurd, of Kilbirney, who ob- 
tained a charter of the lands of Kilbirney, 
in 1499. He married Marion Crighton, 
daughter to Robert, Lord Sanquhar, and 
dying in 1500, was s. by 

Robert Crawfurd, of Kilbirney, who m. 
Margaret, sister to the first Lord Semple, 
and had a son, 

Lawrence Crawfurd, of Kilbirney. It 
appears that a portion of the ancient lord- 
ship of Crawfurd, in Lanarkshire, (tlie 
greater part of wliich had passed to the 
Lindsays, Earls of Crawfurd, by marriage,) 
still continued in the possession of the house 
of Kilbirney, as descended from this ancient 
stock. These remnantsof the barony of Craw- 
furd, this Lawrence exchanged with Sir 
James Hamilton, of Finnart, for the lands 
of Drumray, in Dumbartonshire. He also 
made a pious and charitable donation in 
1547, the year of his death. He m. Helen 
Campbell, daughter of Sir Hugh Campbell, 
of Loudon, by whom he had, 

I. Hugh. 

II. John, of Easter Greenock. 

III. Thomas, ancestor to the Crawfurds, 
barts. of .Jordanhill, and the Craw- 
furds, of Cartsburn. 

The eldest son and heir, 

Hugh Crawfurd, of Kilbirney, a zealous 
adherent of Queen Mary, had by Marga- 
ret his wife, daughter of Sir John Col- 
quhoun, of Seep, a son and successor, 

Malcolm Crawfurd, of Kilbirney, who 
m. Margaret, daughter of John Cuningham, 
of Glengarnock, by whom he left at his 
decease, in 1595, a son and heir, 



John Crawfurd, of Kilbirney, who m. 
Margaret, daughter of John Blair, of Blair, 
and dying in 1622, was succeeded by his son, 

John Crawfurd, of Kilbirney. He m. 
Mary, daughter of James, Earl of Glen- 
cairn, and died in 1629. His son. 

Sir John Crawfurd, of Kilbirney, cre- 
ated a BARONET in 1642, died in 1661. 
He in. first, Margaret Balfour, daughter of 
Robert Lord Burleigh, and secondly, Mag- 
dalen, daughter of David, Lord Carnegie, 
son and heir of David, first Earl of South- 
esk, by the latter he left at his decease, in 
1661, two daughters, 

I. Anne, wife of Sir Archibald Stewart, 
bart. of Blackball and Ardgowan. 

II. Margaret, on whom her father 
settled his estate, obliging her heirs 
to bear the name of Craufurd. This 
lady, 

Margaret Craufurd, of Kilbirney, ?«. 
Patrick Lindsay, second son of John, fif- 
teenth Earl of Crawford and first Earl of 
Lindsay. The issue of this marriage were 
only three, 

1. John, great grandfather of the late 
and twentieth Earl of Craufurd, and 
of Lady Mary Lindsay Craufurd. 

I. Margaret, wife of David, Earl of 
Glasgow. Her ladyship was great- 
grandmother to the present Earl of 
Glasgow. 

II. Magdalen, m. to George Dundas, 
of Duddingstoun, and was great- 
grandmother of Gabriel Hamilton 
Dundas, esq. of Duddingstoun. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, arg. 
a lion rampant gu. langued az. holding 
within his paws a man's heart, ppr. for 
Dundas, of Duddingstoun ; second and 
third, gu. three cinquefoils pierced ermine, 
within a bordure potent and counterpotent 
of the second and the first, for Hamilton, 
of Westburn. Quartering Lyndesay, Craw- 
furd, Dreghorn, &c. 

Crests — First, a hand, holding a star az. 
for Dundas ; second, a hand, holding a 
spear ppr,, for Hamilton. 

Mottoes — Essayez, for Dundas. Et arma 
et Virtus, for Hamilton. 

Estates — In West Lothian and Lanark- 
shire. 

Seats — Duddingstoun, in West Lothian, 
and Ruchill, in Lanarkshire ; Westburn 
and Gilbertfield Tower, the old seats of the 
Hamiltons and Cunninghames, were sold 
ten years ago. 



183 



WILSON, OF ESHTON HALL. 

WILSON, MATl'HEW. esq. of Eshfon Hall, in the county of York, b. 10th 
August, 177'2; m. at Garjj^rave 2-Jth November, 18^)0, his first cousin, Mary-Clive, 
only surviving- daughter and heiress of Matthew Wilson, esq. of Eshton Hall, and 
widow of the Rev. Henry Richardson-Currer ; by this lady he has issue, 

I. Matthew, a mai^istrate for the West Riding, 
and for tlie county of Lancaster, baptized at 
Gargrave 26th October, 1802; educated at Har- 
row School ; gentleman commoner and B. A. 
of Brazennose, Oxford ; married 15th .lune, 1826, 
at St. .James's, Westminster, So))hia - Lc»uisa- 
Emerson, only daughter and heiress of Sir Whar- 
ton Amcotts, bart. of Kettlethorpe, in the county 
of Lincoln, twenty years M.P. for East Retford, 
(by Amelia-Teresa Campbell, his second wife.) 
and by her, who died at Kildwick Hall 29th Sep- 
tember, 1833, and was buried at Gargrave, has 
one surviving son, 

Matthew-Wharton, b. at Bierley Hall 20th 
March, 1827, baptized at Gargrave. 
II. Henry-Currer, in holy orders, b. 8th October, 
1803, registered at Gargrave 2nd April, 1805, 
A. M. of Lincoln College, Oxford, rector of 
Marton and vicar of Tunstal. 

I. Margaret-Frances-Anne-Clive, baptized at Gargrave. 

II. Frances-Mary, baptized at Gargrave. , 

III. Henrietta-Fourness, baptized at Gargrave, m. there 10th November, 1829, Charles 
Hampden, only son of Charles-Hampden Turner, esq. of Rook's Nest, near God- 
stone, Surrey, by Mary Rhode his wife, and has one son, Charles Hampden, b. 
27th .January, 1832, and two daughters, Henrietta-Margaret-Mary and Frances- 
Sarah Hampden. 

Mr. Wilson is a magistrate and deputy lieutenant for the West Riding and for the 
county of Lancaster. He rebuilt Eshton Hall in the years 1825 and 1826. 




ILmcage. 



Matthew Wilson, esq. a merchant, of 
London, son of Robert and Alice Wilson, of 
Brigsteare, in the parish of Haversham, in 
Westmoreland, settled this family at Esh- 
ton, by purchasing the hall, estate, and 
manor, together with the lands of Nether 
Heselden, in the parish of Arnecliflfe, from 
Sir Robert Bindloss, bart. of Berwick Hall, 
in the county of Lancaster. The convey- 
ance bears date 21st January, 1646, and he 
came to reside at Eshton Hall, 30th May, 
1648. He died in London, November, 1656, 
and was buried in St. Mary's, Abchurch. 
His successor, 

John Wilson, esq. of Eshton Hall, during 
whose minority Captain John Backhouse, of 
Yellands, and his wife, Agnes, sister of the 
said Matthew, resided at Eshton Hall, (after- 
wards at Nether Heselden, devised them h\ 



his will), inherited in 1684 from Thomas 
Hammond, of Thresfield Hall, all that gen- 
tleman's estates. In 1700, he resigned Esh- 
ton to his eldest son, Matthew, and passed 
the remainder of his life at Threshfield H all, 
where he died 7th May, 1706, intestate, and 
was buried at Gargrave. At his death his 
property was valued at £500 per annum in 
land and £50;)0 money. His younger chil- 
dren received £1250 each. By Dorothy, 
his wife, who was buried at Gargrave, 9th 
October, 1684, he had issue, 

I. Matthew, his heir. 

II. John, baptized at Gargrave in 1678, 
d. in 1705. 

III. Francis, baptized at Gargrave, 27th 
February, 1681, who resided many 
years at Threshfield Hall, but he 
afterwards purchased and settlt^d at 



184 



WILSON, OF ESHTON HALL. 



Crownest, near Settle. He jh. Mar- 
garet, daughter of Anthony Sparke, 
esq. of Bisliop Auckland, and had 
an only daughter and lieiress, 

Dorothy, w. to — Bowser, esq. of 
Bishop Auckland. 

I. Dorothy, baptized at Gargrave in 
1682, m. there, 17th May, 1701, to 
Henry Conlthurst, esq. of Gargrave, 
and died in 1708. She had six sons, 
who all died without issue. 

II. Anne, baptized at Gargrave, 18th 
April, 1(583, m. at Linton, 9th April, 
1706, John Tennant, gent, of Chapel 
House, in the parish of Burnsal, and 
by him (who wedded, secondly, .Jane 
Serjeantson, maternal aunt of the 
late Lord Grantley,) had issue, who 
all died young excepting Dorothy, 
the wife of Samuel Dunn, esq. of 
Howden. 

John Wilson was s. at his decease by his 
eldest son, 

Matthew Wilson, esq. of Eshton Hall, 
educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, 
who ni. Anne, daughter of Francis Black- 
bourne, esq. of Marrick Abbey, in Swale- 
dale, and by her, who was buried at Gar- 
grave, 13th Marcli, 1723, had five sons and 
four daughters, viz. 

I. John, died an infant in 1705. 

II. Matthew, heir to his father. 

ni. Timothy, died an infant in 1711-12. 
IV. Roger, LL.B. baptized at Gargrave, 
20th October, 1711, of Emanuel Col- 
lege, Cambridge, vicar of Wiggen- 
hall, St. Magdalen, Norfolk, and 
incumbent curate of the parochial 
chapel of Colne, in Lancashire. He 
m. Thomasine, daughter of Thomas 
Bate, esq. of Garbaldisham, in Nor- 
folk, and died in 1789 (he was buried 
at Otley), having had a daughter, 
Elizabeth, who died young, and a 
son, 

Matthew, of Manor House, Otley, 
deputy - lieutenant for Lanca- 
shire, and for the North Riding 
of the county of York, late cap- 
tain in the 4th regiment of Royal 
Lancashire Militia, m. Martha, 
daughter and co-heiress of Wil- 
liam Barcroft, esq. of Foulridge 
Hall and Moyna, and died 28th 
February, 1826. 
V. W^illiam, died young. 

I. Catherine, m. to Mr. Thomas Swain- 
son, of Stockport. 

II. Dorothy, baptized at Gargrave, 7th 
January, 1701-2, vi. to Hugh Tillot- 
.«on, esc]. of Skipton, and had a son, 
Mattliew Tillotson, wlio died 8tli 
March, 181.0, leaving all his estates 



to Matthew Wilson, esq. of Eshton 
Hall. 

III. Anne, baptized in 1703, m. first, to 
Mr. John Swainson, of Skipton ; and 
secondly, to James Morley, esq. of 
Scale House. The ancestor of the 
latter gentleman, Francis Morley, 
esq. of Winnington, married Cas- 
sandra Lambert, sister of the cele- 
brated parliamentary general. 

IV. Elizabeth, m. to Mr. Samuel John 
Swire, of Swadford, of the Cononley 
family (see vol. ii. p. 342). 

Matthew Wilson died in 1717, was interred 
at Gargrave 12th November, and succeeded 
by his son, 

Matthew W^ilson, esq. of Eshton Hall, 
baptized at Gargrave 14th October, 1706, 
of Trinitv College, Cambridge, who married 
Margaret, daughter of Henry Wiglesworth, 
esq. of Staidburn, by Anne, his first wife, 
daughter and co-heiress of John Cromack, 
esq. of W' iswall, near Whalley,* and had 
issue, 

I. Matthew, his heir. 

II. Henry, A.M. of St. John's College, 
Cambridge, rector of Staidburn and 
vicar of Otley, baptized at Gargrave, 
23rd January, 1723, m. Anne, daugh- 
ter and heiress of Thomas Fourness, 
esq. of Otley, and left at his decease, 
13th December, 1781 (he was buried 
at Otley, where a monument is 
erected to his memory), two sons and 
one daughter, viz. 

1. Thomas-Fourness, in holy or- 
ders, B.A. of Trinity College, 
Cambridge, b. 22nd July, 1769, 
now of Burley Hall, near Otley, 
perpetual curate of Silsden and 
White Chapels, a magistrate for 
the liberties of Cawood,Wistow, 
and Otley, m. at York, 1st 
March, 1813, Eleanor, daughter 
of Sir Robert Eden, bart. of 
Windlestone House, in Durham, 
and niece of the Lords Auckland 
and Henley. By her he has 
issue, 

1 . John-Eden, b. 30th Novem- 
ber, 1813. 

2. Morton-Eden,i. .'30th June, 
1817. 

3. Thomas-Fourness, b. 17th 
May, 1819. 

4. Robert, b. 6th May, 1822. 

1. Eleanor- Anne. 

2. Maria-Frances. 

2. Matthew, now of Eshton Hall. 

* By Anne, his wife, daughter and heiress of 
Jolin Brigges, esq. of Sawley. The other daugh- 
ter and c-o-heiress of Cromack was second wife of 
John Bradyll, esij. of Bortlield. 



WILSON, OF ESHTON HALL 



185 



1. Rebecca, vi. at Otley, 27tli 
Aui^ust, 1811, to John Teiniaiit 
Stansfiekl Tcnnaiit, esq, of Clia- 
pel House, late in the coiinnis- 
sioii of the peace, and ('aptain in 
the 3rd West York Militia. By 
him, who (lied 14th An^nst, \H:U), 
and was hniied in Otley (31uirch, 
she left at her decease, 8th De- 
ceniher, 181!>, being interred at 
Coniston Chapel, one son,. John- 
Robert, b. 17th January, 1815, 
and Margaret-Anne-Wilson. 

I. Anne, died an infant. 

II. Margaret, baptized at Gargrave, 
10th September, 1734, m. at Skipton, 
15th August, 1763, the Rev. Thomas 
Butler, rector of Benthani and \V hit- 
tington, and archdeacon of the diocese 
of Chester, youngest son of Edmund 
Butler, esq. of Kirkland Hall, in 
Lancashire. She died 24th March, 
1818, and was buried at Bentham, 
having had three sons and four 
daughters, all now deceased except 
Jane, relict of E. Thornton, esq. of 
Whittington Hall, Westmoreland. 

Mr. Wilson died 27th March, 1769, was 
buried at Gargrave, and succeeded by his 
son, 

Matthf.w Wilson, esq. of Eshton Hall, 
of St. John's College, Cambridge, barrister- 
at-law, b. r2th February, 1730, and regis- 
tered at Gargrave. He 711. 7th July, 1759, 
Frances,* daughter of Richard Clive, esq. 

* This lady lineally derived from the royal line 
of Plantagenet. 

Edward L=f=Eleanor of Castile 



Lady I^lizabeth= 
Plantagenet 



William de Bohun: 
Earl of North- 
ampton 



=IIump]irey de Bohun, 
Earl of Hereford 

:Elizabeth de Badles- 
mere 



Elizabeth de Bohun=pRichard Fitzalan, 

Earl of Arundel 

I 

Elizabeth Fitzalan=pSir Robert Gousell, 

Duchess of Nor- | knt. 

folk 



Joan Gousell=pThomas Stanley, baron and 

1 K.G. 
Catherine Stanley=:John Savage, of Clif- 
I ton 



of Styche, in the county of Salop, member 
for Montgomeryshire in several successive 
parliaments, and sister of Robert, first Lord 
Clive. By this lady, who was born I'ith 
February," 1734, and "died 3rd October, 1798, 
he left at his decease, 16th April, 1802, 
(being buried at Gargrave, where a monu- 
ment is erected to himself and his wife,) an 
only daughter and heiress, 

MAK(;AKKr-CMVK Wilson, of Esliton 
ILill, b. 22nd April, 17(54, who wedded, 
first, at Gargrave, 3rd February, 1783^ the 
Rev. Henry Richardson, A.M. rector of 
Thornton, who assumed shortly before liis 
death the surname and arms of Cirrkk, 
upon inheriting the estates of Sarah Currer 
(see p. 94), and had by him, who died 10th 
November, 1784, and was buried at Thorn- 
ton, where a monument is erected to his 
memory, an only daughter, 

Francks-Mary Richardson-Currf.r, 
lieiress to her father and repre- 
sentative of the ancient families of 
Richardson of Bierley and Currer of 
Kildwick (see p. 111). 

The heiress of Eshton married, secondly, 
at Gargrave, 24tb November, 1800, lier first 
cousin, Matthew Wilson, esq. now of 
Eshton Hall. 

Arms — Sa. a wolf rampant or, in chief 
three estoiles of the last. 

Crest — A demi-wolf or. 

Motto — Res non verba. 

Estates — In the parishes and townships 
of Eshton, Gargrave, Sawley, Skipton, 
Carlton, Threshfield, Linton, Hebden, Arn- 
clifle, Otley, Cowling, Winterburn cum 
Flasby, and Bank Newton, all in York- 
sliire. 

Seat — Esliton Hall, Gargrave, Craven. 



John Savage=f=Dorothy Vernon 

I ' 

Alice Savage=y=William Brereton, of Brere- 

I ton 
AVilliam Brereton=^Anne Booth 

Jane Brereton, who m. Richard Clive, 
esq., and from this marriage lineally de- 
scended Frances Clive, who wedded 
Matthew Wilson, esq. of Eshton. 



186 



CLERK-RATTRAY, OF CRAIGHALL RATTRAY. 



RATTRAY-CLERK, ROBERT, esq. of Craighall Rattray, in the shire of Perth, 

h. in December, 179G ; m. in February, 1824, 
Christina, daughter of the late J. Richardson, 
esq. of Pitfour, and has issue, 

James, h. in October, 1832. 
Adam, h. in December, 1833. 

Elizabeth-Susan. 
Jane. 

Charlotte-Mary. 
Helen-Christina. 

Mr. Clerk-Rattray, who is a magistrate and 
deputy lieutenant for Perthshire, s. his father, 
the late James Clerk-Rattray, one of the 
barons of the Exchequer in Scotland, •29th 
August, 1831. 




Hincagc. 



The surname of Rattray is derived from 
the barony of the same name in the county 
of Perth, and was assumed at a very remote 
era. The first of the family upon record, 

Alanl's de Ratheriff, who lived in the 
reigns of William the Lion and Alexan- 
der II. was father of 

Sir Thomas de Ratpray, who received 
the honour of knighthood from Alexander 
III. By Christian his wife, he acquired 
part of the lands of Glencaveryn and Kin- 
caldrum, in Forfarshire, as appears from 
an agreement, " super controversia inter 
dominum Thomam de Ratrey militem, ac- 
torem nomine Christinee uxoris suae, ex 
parte una, et viros religiosos abbat. et con- 
vent, de Aberbrothick ex altera ; super limi- 
tibus terrarum de Glencaveryn et Kyncal- 
drum ; &c." This deed, to which the seals 
of the earl of Buchan, the bishops of St. 
Andj-ews and Brechin, the earl of Marr, 
Sir Thomas Rattray and his spouse, are ap- 
pended, bears date in 125^3. In 1267, Sir 
Thomas witnessed a donation to the priory 
of St. Andrew, and in 1272 obtained from 
Simon, abbot of Dunfermline, the lands of 
Bendathen. He died shortly after, leaving 
EusTATii's his heir, and John, witness to a 
deed in the time of Alexander III. 

The elder, 

EusTATlus de Ratreff, designed " Do- 
minus de eodem," temp. Alexander III. 
was father of 

Sir Adam Ratreff, of Ratreff, who is 
styled in Prynne's Collections, " Nobilis 
vir dominus de Ratreff, anno 1291," and in 
Rymer's Feed. Angl. when Sir Adam, with 



many others, was compelled to submit to 
King Edward I. it is stated, " Nobiles viri 
Adam de Retrefe et Willielmus de Maule 
fecerunt fidelitatera dicto regi, anno 1292." 
He testified a charter in Macfalane's Col- 
lections, wherein he is designed, " Dominus 
Adam de Retrefe miles," 4th October, 1294, 
and in 1296 was again compelled to swear 
allegiance to Edward of England. Sir 
Adam died before the year 1315, and was s. 
by his son, 

Alexander de Ratrie, of that Ilk, one 
of the barons of the parliament held at Ayr 
in 1315 by Robert Bruce, to arrange the 
deed of succession to the crown. He died 
*. p. and was s. by his brother, 

EusTATius DE Ratrie, of that Ilk, who 
was tried for a conspiracy ag'ainst Robert 
I. in August, 1320, but acquitted. His son 
and successor, 

John de Rattrie, of that Ilk, living in 
the reign of David Bruce, had, with a 
daughter, Margaret, wife of John de Meg- 
hill, of Meghill, a sou and successor, 

John de Rattrie, of that Ilk, who is 
witness in a confirmation granted by Sir 
William Scot, of Balweary, " dilecto con- 
sangiiineo suo Johanni de Lindsay, filio 
Alexandri Lindsay de Cavill en Fife," dated 
at Balweary, " in festo sanctte Margaretaj 
Reginae," lOth June, 1399. He died at the 
close of the reign of James I. and was *. by 
his son, 

Patrick Rattray, of that Ilk, mentioned 
in a charter of Sir Walter Haliburton, 24th 
July, 1453, and in one to the monastery of 
Aberbrothick in 1456. He was father of 



CLERK-RATTUAY, OF CRAIGHAU. RATTRAY. 



S7 



Sir Silvester Rattray, ol that Ilk, wliu 
was ap|)oiiitt'(l one of'tlie ambassadors extra- 
ordinary to treat with the court of England, 
for wiiicii he obtained a safe conduct, dated 
r2th June, 1463, and is then designed " Do- 
niinus Silvester de Rattray miles." He was 
a person of gre;it inlluence at the Scottish 
court, possessed an ample inheritance, and 
sat in the parliament of 1481. He ni. Alison 
Hepburn, and had a son and successor. 

Sir John Ratiray, of that Ilk, wiio was 
knighted by James IV. He m. Klizabeth, 
daughter of James, second Lord Kennedy, 
and had three sons and one daughter, viz. 

I. John, a military officer, who wedded 
Margaret Abercrombie, but died in 
Holland before his father, without 
issue. 

II. Patrick, ) -it,- 

III. Silvester, r"'"''''^''y^^''''- 

1. Grizel, m. to John Stewart, third earl 
of Athol. 
After the decease of Sir John, a calamitous 
and almost ruinous contest arose between 
his younger sons, and their brother-in-law 
the earl of Athol. Tradition affirms that the 
earl, having married Sir John's only daugh- 
ter, deemed himself entitled to a portion at 
least of the Rattray estate, and being a per- 
son of great power and authority, came, 
with a considerable body of men, took pos- 
session of the castle of Rattray, and carried 
off the family writs ; while Patrick Rattray, 
the second son, totally unable to resist so 
potent a nobleman, retired to the castle of 
Craighall, which he gallantly defended, and 
succeeded in holding together with the lands 
of Craighall and Kinballoch ; the Athol fa- 
mily continuing to possess the greater part 
of the lands of Rattray, until they were 
evicted from them by an appraising at the 
instance of Sir Robert Crichton, of Clunie, 
about the beginning of the seventeenth cen- 
tury. The said 

Patrick Rattray, dying unmarried, the 
representation of the family devolved upon 
his brother, 

Silvester Rattray, who endeavoured 
to serve himself heir to his father and bro- 
thers at Perth, in which county his lands 
lay, but found it impossible, because (as the 
writ bears) the earl of Athol and his friends 
are " magn<B potestatis et fortitudinis" in 
that town. Rattray applied in consequence 
to Khic/ James V. and obtained from his 
majesty a commission under the great seal 
to have service done at Dundee. In this 
commission it is narrated that Patrick, his 
brother, had been " postpositus et impedi- 
tus" for the space of twelve years by the 
said earl, from getting himself served in the 
lands that fell to him by the death of his 
father and brother John ; and that, post lites 
magnasque expensas per dictum Patriciura 



in pntfata materia, prtefatus comes niisit 
Walterum Leslie, Johannem Stewart, aliaii 
John of Lorn, Thomas Laing, David Stewart, 
suos servitores, et eorum complices, et dic- 
tum Patricium in sua capella ipsius loci de 
Kynballoch interficere causavit : et idem 
Silvester informatur, (|uod dictus comes, et 
sui complices, sibi similiter facere inten- 
dunt, si sua brevia de hujusmodi terris pro- 
sequi volet." This extraordinary commis- 
sion is dated at Edinburgh 17th October, 
153.'J, to vvhich the great seal is ap|)ended, 
and in (consequence Silvester Rattray was 
served heir to his father Sir John, and to 
his brothers John and Patrick, in the barony 
of Craighall and Kynballoch, and infeft 
therein at Dundee in 1534, He m. Mar- 
jory, daughter of Andrew, third Lord Gray, 
(relict of Kennenmouth, of that Ilk,) and 
had, with a daughter, Elizabeth, jh. to John 
Blair, of Ardblair, a son and successor, 

David Rattray, of Craighall and Kyn- 
balloch, who was served heir to his father 
before the sheriff of Perth, in the lands of 
Kynballoch, and certain others lying within 
the barony of Rattray, anno 1554. He 
wedded Isabel, daughter of Alexander 
Ramsay, of Banff, and had two sons, 

George, his heir. 

Silvester, minister at Auchtergevan, 
ancestor of Rattray, of Dalnoon. 

David Rattray, who got a charter in 1566, 
from Richard Livingstone and John Spens, 
the commissioners for receiving resignations 
and granting new infeftments of church- 
lands, of the estate of Chapletoun, died in 
the commencement of the reign of James 
VI. and was succeeded by his eldest son, 

George Rattray, of Craighall, served 
heir to his father before the sheriff of Perth, 
6th August, 1586. He m. Janet, daughter 
of George Drunimond, of Blair, and had a 
son and successor, 

Silvester Rattray, of Craighall, infeft 
in all his father's lands by a charter under 
the great seal, dated 26th October, 16(»4. 
He m. Agnes, daughter of Lambie, of Duu- 
kenie, and had two sons, viz. 
David, his heir. 

Silvester, bred to the church, progeni- 
tors of the Rattrays of Persie. 
The elder son, 

David Rattray, of Craighall, served heir 
to his father 22nd June, 1613, obtained from 
Charles I. a charter of the lands and barony 
of Myretown, Herries, the four merk land 
of Skeith, the forty shilling land of Mel- 
tone, Kirkinner, &c. in the shire of Wigton, 
dated 2ud February, 1629, and subsequently 
(in 1640) from the same monarch, of the 
lands and barony of Saltoun, in the counties 
of East and Midlothian. He died soon 
after, and by Agnes Hay, his wife, left a 
son. 



188 



CORBETT, OF ELSHAM AND DARNHALL. 



Patrick Rattray, of Craighall, who, 
upon his own resignation, got a charter 
under the great seal from Charles I. dated 
28th February, 1648, of the lands of Craig- 
hall, Kynballock, &c. containing a JSovoda- 
mus, and erecting them into a free barony, 
to be called Craighall Rattray, in all time 
coming. He m. Anne Drummond, daugh- 
ter of John, second Lord Maderty, and had, 
with a daughter, m. to Ogilvie, of Balfour, 
a son and successor, 

James Rattray, of Craighall, wlio had a 
charter under the great seal, dated 30th 
April, 1672, of the lands of Chapletoun, &c. 
containing a iSovodamns. He was after- 
wards served heir in general before the 
sheriff of Perth, to Sir John Rattray, of 
that Ilk, who was " tritavus patris Jacobi 
Rattray, de Craighall, latoris praesentium ;" 
and at the same time, heir in special to 
Patrick, his father. He wedded Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir George Hay, of Meginch, 
and had a son, 

Dr. Thomas Rattray, of Craighall, a 
man of singular piety and learning, who 
was served heir to his father before the 
sheriff of Perth, on the 13th July, 1692. 
He espoused Margaret Galloway, daughter 
of Thomas, Lord Dunkeld, and had two 
sons and three daughters, viz. 

I. James, of Craighall, who m. Marjory, 
daughter of John Graham, esq. of 
Balgowan, and had issue. 

II. John, an eminent surgeon in Edin- 
burgh, who m. first, Christian, daugh- 
ter of George Main, esq. of that city ; 
and secondly, Mary, daughter of 
George Lockhart, esq. of Carnwath. 
By both wives he had issue. 

I. Margaret, m. to Dr. Clerk, sprung 
from a scion of Pennywick ; of this 
lady liereafter. 

II. Jean, vi. first, to Sir James Elphin- 
stone, bart. and secondly, to Colonel 
George Mure, a brother of Caldwell. 

III. Grisel, m. to William Mace wen, 
esq. writer to the signet. 

Dr. Rattray died in 1743, and was s. by his 
elder son, James. His eldest daughter, 



(by whose descendant Craighall Rattray is 
now possessed), 

Margaret Rattray, wedded in 1720, 
the celebrated Dr. John Clerk, president of 
the Royal College of Physicians, at Edin- 
burgh, and for more than thirty years the 
first medical practitioner in Scotland. He 
purchased the lands of Listonshiels and 
Spittal, in Midlothian, and got a charter 
under the great seal. By Margaret, his 
wife, Dr. Clerk had five sons and one 
daughter, viz. 

I. Thomas Clerk, of Listonshiels. 

II. Robert Clerk, a colonel in the 
army. 

III. David Clerk, of whom presently. 

IV. Hugh Clerk, in the East India 
Company's service, died unm. 

V. Duncan Clerk, a Lisbon merchant. 

I. Margaret Clerk, died unm. 
Dr. Clerk's third son, 

David Clerk, M.D. of Edinburgh, phy- 
sician to the royal infirmary, married Helen, 
daughter of James Duff, esq. of Craigston, 
in the county of Aberdeen, and dying in 
1768, left two sons, James and Robert, by 
whom the elder, 

James Clerk, esq. became of "Craighall 
Rattray," and assumed the surname of 
Rattray. This gentleman distinguished 
himself at the Scottish bar, and was con- 
stituted a baron of the Exchequer. He 
m. in January, 1791, Jane, daughter of 
Admiral Duff, of Fetteresso, and dying in 
1831, left, with one daughter, Jane, a son 
and successor, the present Robert Clerk- 
Rattray, esq. of Craighall Rattray. 

Aims — Az. three cross crosslets fitcliee 
or. 

Ci-est — On a mullet, a flaming heart ppr. 

Supporters — Two serpents. 

Motto — Super sidera votum. 

Estates — Craighall Rattray, in Perth- 
shire, traced in the family to the eleventh 
century ; Bonnington, in Midlothian, ac- 
quired in 1774. 

Seats — Craighall Rattray. 



CORBETT, OF ELSHAM AND DARNHALL. 



CORBETT, THOMAS-GEORGE, esq. of Elsham, in the county of Lincoln, and 
of Darnhall, in Cheshire, succeeded his father 8th February, 1832. Mr. Corbett 
represents the Northern Division of Lincolnshire in parliament. 



CORBETT, OF ELSIIAM AND DARNHALL. 



189 



Hmcnctc. 





Z 



This is a junior brancli of one of the most 
noble and ancient families, whose descent 
can be traced, by authentic records, to a 
period preceding the Norman Conquest. 

Corbet (to whom Le Carpentier, in his 
Histoire du Cambray, gives the surname of 
Hugh), was a man of considerable impor- 
tance in the Pais de Caux, in Normandy. 
He had four sons, Hugh, Roger, Renaud, 
and Robert. Hugh, the eldest son, was like 
his father, a knight, and from him descended 
the Corbets of France. Renaud, the third 
son, was the ancestor of the Corbets of 
Flanders. Roger and Robert, the second 
and fourth sons, accompanied their father 
in the expedition of the Conqueror, and 
obtained from that monarch large posses- 
sions, chiefly in Shropshire, where their 
relation, Roger de Montgomery, earl of 
Shrewsbury, was their patron and lord par- 
amount. 

Robert Corbet, the fourth son, and 
younger of the two brothers who came with 
their father to England, held fifteen manors 
in Shropshire, under Earl Roger de Mont- 
gomery ; his male line ended with his son, 
Robert Corbet, lord of Alcester, who left 
no issue, though many genealogists (See 
Burke's Extinct Peerage, &c.) have erro- 
neously described him as the ancestor of the 
Barons Corbet, of Caus, of whom hereafter. 

Roger Corbet, the second son of Cor- 
bet, and elder of the two brothers who 
served under the Norman, held twenty- 
four manors in Shropshire, and one in 
Montgomeryshire, from his kinsman. Earl 
Roger de Montgomery, and was also highly 
in the confidence of Robert de Belesme, the 
third Earl of Shrewsbury. This Roger 
Corbet, the progenitor of all the Shrop- 
shire Corbets and their various branches, 
had three sons, William, Ebraid, and Simon. 



William Corbet, the eldest son, was 
seated at Wattlcshorough, in tlie county of 
Salop, and had tliree sous, viz. 

I. Thomas. 

II. Robert (Sir), of Caus, knt. whose 
younger son, Kicliard, accompanied 
Kiny Richard I. to tlie siege of 
Aeon. The eldest son, Sir Robert 
Corbet, was lord of ('aus, in the 
22ud Henry H. and was ancestor 
of the Barons ('orbet, of Caus, now 
extinct, (see Burke's Extinct Peer- 
(i(/e), and of the Corbets, formerly of 
Leigh, but now of Sundorne Castle, 
near Shrewsbury. 

in. Philip. 
The eldest son, 

Thomas Corbet, succeeded his father, at 
Wattlesborough, and had two sons, 

I. Roger, his heir. 

II. Thomas, ancestor of the Corbets of 
Hadley, and King's Bromley, which 
line ended in an lieiress, married to 
John Grevile, in the reign of 
Henry V. 

The elder son, 

Roger Corbet, succeeded at Wettles- 
borough, and was father of 

Sir Richard Corbet, knt. who married 
Joan, daughter and heiress of Bartholomew 
Thoret, of Moreton, otherwise Moreton 
Thoret, in the county of Salop, now called 
Moreton Corbet, and still in the possession 
of the lineal descendants of this marriage. 
Sir Richard removed from Wattlesborough 
to Moreton, where he was succeeded by his 
son, 

Richard Corbet, father of 

Sir Robert Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, sheritf of Shropshire in 1288, who, 
by his wife, Matilda, was father of 

Sir Thomas Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, whose son, 

Sir Robert Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, died in tlie 49th Edward HI. and 
was succeeded by his son. 

Sir Roger Corbet, knt. of IVforetou 
Corbet, who acquired the estate of Shaw- 
bury, in the county of Salop, (now the pro- 
perty of his descendant. Sir Andrew Corbet, 
bart.) by marriage with Margaret de Erd- 
ington, the lieiress of that place. Their 
son, 

Robert Corbet, of Moreton Corbet, was 
sherift" of Shropshire in 1419, and married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir William Mallory, 
knt. Their son. 

Sir Roger Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, married Elizabeth, daughter and 
sole heir of Thomas Hopton, of Hoptoa 



lOU 



CORBETT, OF ELSHAM AND DARNHALL. 



Castle, in the county of Salop, by whom he 
was lather of 

Sir Richard Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, who married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Walter, Lord Ferrers, of Chartley ; and 

their son, 

Sir Robert Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, sheriff of Shropshire in 1507, mar- 
ried Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Henry 
Vernon, knt. of Nether Haddon. She sur- 
vived her husband fifty years, and was 
called " the old Lady "Corbet, of Shaw- 
bury." She had by Sir Robert Corbet, 
witii three daughters, three sons, viz. 

I. Roger (Sir), his heir. 

II. Richard, sheriff of Shropshire in 
1561. 

in. Reginald, who married Alice, sister 
and co-heir of William Gratewood, 
of Adderley and Stoke-upon-Tern, 
in the county of Salop, whose father, 
John Gratewood, became possessed 
of those estates by marriage with 
Jane, sister and co-heir of Sir Row- 
land Hill, knt. lord mayor of London. 
This Reginald Corbet was a judge in 
the North Wales circuit, and a jus- 
tice of the queen's bench, and was 
ancestor of the line of Corbet, of 
Stoke and Adderley, baronets, now 
extinct. 

The eldest son, 

Sir Roger Corbet, succeeded his father 
at Moreton Corbet. He was sherift" of 
Shropshire in 1530, and married Ann, 
daughter of Andrew Lord Windsor, by 
which lady he had issue, 

I. Andrew (Sir), his heir. 

II. Walter. 

III. Robert. 

IV. Jerome. 

Sir Roger was s. by his son. 

Sir Andrew Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, who was sheriff of Shropshire in 
1551. By his wife, Jane, daughter of Sir 
Robert Needham, knt. he had seven sons 
and three daughters, viz. 

1. Robert, his heir, 
n. Richard (Sir), knt. of whom here- 
after. 

III. Reginald,^ 

IV. Roger, C who all d. s. p. 

V. Francis, ) 

VI. Vincent (Sir), knt. of whom here- 
after, as ancestor of the Corbets, 
now of Moreton Corbet, and Corbetts 
of Elsham and Darnhall. 

VII. Arthur, d. s. p. 

I. Anne, married Sir Walter Leveson, 
knt. of Lilleshall. 

II. Margaret, married Thomas Harley, 
esq. of Brampton Bryan. 

III. Mary. 



The eldest sou, 

Robert Corbet, succeeded his father in 
1578, and received the honour of knight- 
hood. He married Ann,daughter of Oliver, 
Lord St. John, of Bletsoe, by whom he had 
two daughters, who conveyed large estates 
to their husbands, viz. Elizabeth, wife of 
Sir Henry Wallop, knt. (ancestor of the 
Earl of Portsmouth), and Anne, wife of Sir 
Adolphus Carey, knt. In tlie Moreton Cor- 
bet estates, however, he was succeeded by 
his brother, 

Sir Richard Corbet, knight of the Bath, 
who died without issue, in 1606, and was 
succeeded by his eldest surviving brother. 

Sir Vincent Corbet, knt. of Moreton 
Corbet, who married Frances, daughter and 
heir of William Humfreston, esq. of Hum- 
frestou, in the county of Salop, and had 
issue, 

I. Sir Andrew Corbet, knt. of More- 
ton Corbet, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of William Boothby, esq. 
and was ancestor of the present Sir 
Andrew Corbet, hart, of Moreton 
Corbet, (See Burke's Peerage and 
Baronetage), and of SiR Vincent 
Corbet, bart. whose widow, Dame 
Sarah Corbet, was created Vis- 
countess Corbet, of Linslade, for 
life, (See Burke's Extinct Peerage). 

II. Robert, of whom hereafter. 

I. Margaret, married first, to Thomas 
Corbet, esq. of Stanwardine, in the 
county of Salop ; and secondly, to Sir 
Thomas Scriven, knt. of Frodesley, 
in the county of Salop. 

II. Mary, married Sir Richard Hussey, 
knt. of Albright Hussey, in the 
county of Salop. 

Sir Vincent's second son, 

Robert Corbet, esq. succeeded to the 
Humfreston estate. He married Bridget, 
eldest daughter and heiress of Sir James 
Pryse, knt. of Ynysymaengwyn, in the 
county of Merioneth, (which lady re-married 
to Sir Walter Lloyd, knt.) and by her had 
issue, 

I. Vincent, of Ynysymaengwyn, an- 
cestor of the Corbets of that place. 
(See vol. ii. p. 91.) 

II. Thomas, of whom presently. 

III. James. 

I. Elizabeth. 

II. Bridget. 

III. Jane. 

IV. Mary. 

The second son of Robert, (by his wife 
Dorothy), 

Thomas Corbet, acquired the estate of 
Nash, in the county of Pembroke, and had, 
with other issue, a son, 

WiLiiAM Corbett, (who adopted the 
mode of writing his name with two ^s). 



PIGOTT, OV EDGMOND. 



191 



Ho. was secretary to the Admiralty, and 
iKirried Eleanor, one of the three daughters 
and co-heirs of Colonel John Jones, of Nan- 
toes, in tiie county of Cardigan, by whom 
he had three sons, viz. 

I. Thomas, who married, and had an 
only child, Elizabeth. 

II. \'incent, who died uura. 

III. William. 
Tiie youngest, 

William Cokbett, was cashier of his 
niajesty's navy, and married first, Mary, 
daughter of Thomas Staniford, esq. ser- 
jeant-at-law, by whom he had a son, 

I. Thomas, born in 1730, of whom 
presently. 

William Corbett, esq. married secondly, 
Sarah Dighton, and by her had issue, viz. 

II. Andrew, married to Augusta, fourth 
daughter of John, earl of Bute, and 
sister of John, marquis of Bute. 

I. Charlotte, married to John Philipps 
Adams, esq. of the county of Pem- 
broke. 

The eldest son of William Corbett, by his 
first wife, Mary, 

Thomas Cokbett, esq. was of Darnhall, 
in the county of Chester, married Eliza- 
beth, only child and heir of Humphrey 
Edwin, esq. of St. Albans, in the county of 
Herts, by Mary, his wife, daughter of Wil- 
liam Thompson, of Elsham,in the county of 
Lincoln, esq. and by the death of her ma- 
ternal uncle, Robert Thompson, esq. with- 
out issue, in 1788, she became sole heir of 
her said grandfather, and entitled to quarter 
the arms of Thompson. By this lady Tho- 
mas Corbett had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Edwin, who married Ann, daughter 



of the late John Blackburne, esq. of 
Hale, M.P. for the county of Lan- 
caster, and lias issue, Edwin, and 
several other children. 

Mr. Corbett d. 18th December, 1808, and 
was *. by liis son, 

William Cokbktt, esq. of Darnhall, who 
in accordance with the will of his maternal 
great uncle, Robert Thompson, esq. of El- 
sliam, took the name and arms of Thompson, 
in addition to those of Cokbett, by royal 
licence, dated 20th July, 1810; he married 
in 1794, Jane Eleanor, eldest daughter of 
General Ainslie, and niece of the late Sir 
Robert Ainslie, bart. ambassador to the 
Ottoman Porte, and by her liad (with se- 
veral other children), the present Thomas 
GEOK(iE Corbett, esq. of Elsham, who suc- 
ceeded his father in the family estates, 3rd 
February, 1832, and is one of the repre- 
sentatives of the northern division of the 
county of Lincoln, in the present parlia- 
ment. 

Arms — Or, a raven, ppr. 

Crest — An elephant and castle, ppr. 

Motto — Deus pascit corvos. 

Estates — Darnhall, in the county palatine 
of Chester, purchased by William Corbett, 
secretary to the Admiralty, but which had 
formerly belonged to another branch of the 
family. See Ormerod's History of the County 
Palatine. Elsham, in the county of Lin- 
coln ; and Ryther, in the county of York, 
derived from the Thompson family, a branch 
of which was elevated to the peerage, by the 
title of Baron Haversham. (See Burke's 
Extinct Peerage.) 

Seats — Elsham, in the county of Lincoln ; 
and Daruhall, in the county of Chester. 



PIGOTT, OF EDGMOND. 



PIGOTT, The Rev. JOHN-DRYDEN, of Edgmond, in the county of Salop, 
rector of the same place and Habberley, m. 3rd February, 1806, Frances, second 
daughter and co-heir of Henry Bevan, esq. of Shrewsbury, by whom he has issue, 



John-Dryden, in holy orders, b. 18th April, 1808, B.A. of Christ Church, Oxford. 

William-Henry. 

Arthur-James. i. Louisa-Harriott. 

Leighton-Price. n. Frances-Sarah. 

Francis. m. Augustus-Honora. 

VI. Frederick. iv. Arabella. 
VII. George-William. v. Rosamond-Dorothy-Heiirietta-Ord. 

Mr. Pigott s. his father in 181 1. 



II. 
III. 

IV. 
V. 



19-2 



PIGOTT, OF EDGMOND. 



Unuat^c. 




In an elaborate MS. compiled and em- 
blazoned in the College of Arms, contain- 
ing " Sundrie Ancient Remembrances of 
Arms, Genealogies, and other Notes of 
Gentillity belonging to the Worsliipfull 
Name and Families of Pigot or Picot," it 
is stated that *' In the first reign of the 
Normans there flourished in this land two 
noble familys of the surname of Pigot ; and 
that they were of the like noble linage or 
oflTspring in the Dutchy of Normandy before 
the Norman conquest of England, appeareth 
by the reverend testimonies of our ancient 
Heralds books and chronicles : the first 
whereof being named otherwiles Pigot and 
Picot, was Viscount Hereditary of Cam- 
bridge Sheer or Grantbridge, and Baron of 
Boorne or Brune in the said County in tlie 
reign of King William the Conqueror. 
After his death, Robert Pigot, his sonn, 
succeeded in the Baronie, and he forfeited 
the same by takeing part with Robert, Duke 
of Normandy, against William Rufus ; and 
King Henry tlie First gave the same to 
Payne Peverell. This Peverell married 
tlie sister of the said Lord Robert Pigot, as 
Mr. Cambden noteth in his description of 
Cambridgeshire." 

" The other family of the Pigots tliat is 
said to have been of noble title about the 
Conqueror's time, did flourish in the west 
parts of tlie realm, namely, in Wales, on 
the Marches thereof, as it seemeth. For 
Humphrey Lloyd and Doctor Powell in 
their Chronicles of Wales, p. 167, aflirm 
that in the reign of King Henry the First, 
anno 1109, Cadocan ap Blethin, Lord of 
Powes, married the daughter of the Lord 
Pigot, of Say, a nobleman of Normandie, 
and had divers townes and lordships in that 
countrie by gift of the said Pigot, and a son 
also, by his daughter, named Henry, to 



whom the King gave a portion of his uncle 
Jerworth's ransome, which Jerworth ap 
Blethin was the said King's prisoner. 

" It is supposed from a branch of this 
Pigot are lineally descended those Pigotts, 
which have many ages since continued at 
Chetwin, in Shropshire, their arms being 
3 fiizills or millpecks as aforesaid, likewise 
in Flintshire, Cheshire, Herefordshire, &c. 
whereof there are many gentlemen remain- 
ing in Wales to this day, as is reported and 
known." 

Of the Cheshire branch of Pigot, it is 
known by authentic records that Gilbert 
Pigot or Pictiot, was mesne lord of Brox- 
ton, at a period approximating to the Nor- 
man conquest. Robert Pigot, and William, 
his son, by charter, granted to the monks of 
St. Werberg, in Chester, the town of Chelle- 
f'ord ; and another, Gilbert Pigot, was a 
benefactor to the abbey of Pulton, in that 
county, in the year 1210. 

RichardPigot, "o/' C7*e*/aVe," presumed 
to have been of the family of Pigot, of 
Butley, in that county, and to have been 
descended from Gilbert, lord of Broxton, 
before mentioned, married the daughter 
and co-heiress of Sir Richard de Peshale, 
of Chetwynd, in the county of Salop, and 
with her obtained that fine estate. His 
grandson, 

Robert Pigott, of Chetwynd, was sheriff 
of Shropshire in 1517, and he (as also did 
several of his descendants) bore for arms, 
azure, a chevron between three mullets or, 
on a chief ermine, three fusils sable. The 
chevron and mullets were borne by the 
Peshales of Chetwynd, in consequence of 
the marriage of Sir Richard de Peshale, 
sheriff of Shropshire in 1333, with Joan, 
daughter and heir of Reginald, son of Sir 
John de Chetwynd, by which marriage the 
Chetwynd estate was obtained by the Pe- 
shale family. Robert Pigott, esq. married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir John Blunt, knt. 
of K inlet, by whom he had issue, 

Thomas Pigott, esq. of Chetwynd, whose 
son, 

Robert Pigott, esq. of Chetwynd, was 
sheriff of Shropshire in 1574. By Eliza- 
beth, his wife, daughter of William Gatacre, 
esq. of Gatacre, in the county of Salop, he 
liad numerous issue, and was succeeded by 
his eldest son, 

Thomas Pigott, esq. of Chetwynd, sheriff 
of Shropshire in 1615, he married Dorothy, 
daughter of Thomas Eyton, esq. o*' Eyton, 
in the county of Salop, and dying in 1620, 
was succeeded in his estates by his son, 



PIGOTT, OF EUGMOND. 



I9:i 



Wai.tf.r Pkiott, os(|. of Clictwyiid, 
slicriH" of Sliropsliire in l(J'24, wlio iiiarricd 
Katharine, <laii<ihter of Sir Richard Leve- 
son, kilt, and had a son, 

Thomas Pkjott, esq. of Chetwynd, wlio 
married Anne, daughter of K'alpli Sneyd, 
esq. of Keele, in tlie county ol Stad'ord, and 
dying in l(Hk'), was succeecled l)y liis .son, 

Walter Pigott, esq. of Cluitwynd, who 
married Anne.daughter of Sir John Dryden, 
hart, of Canons Ashhy, in the county of 
Northampton, and liad issue, 

I. Robert, his heir. 

II. Dryden, rector of Edgmond, in the 
county of Salop. 

I. Mary. 
Walter Pigott died in 16G9, and was suc- 
ceeded by his eldest son, 

Robert Pigott, esq. of Chetwynd, sheriff 
of Shropshire in 1GJ>7, who married Frances, 
daugliter of William Ward, esq. of Wil- 
lingsworth, in the county of Stafford, (brother 
of Edward, Lord Dudley and Ward), by 
wliom he had issue, 

I. Robert, his heir, born 21st Novem- 
ber, 1699. 

II. John. 

III. Thomas. 

IV. William, rector of Edgmond and 
Chetwynd, in the county of Salop, 
ancestor of Colonel Pigott, of Dod- 
dershall Park. (See that family.) 

V. Benjamin. 

VI. Francis. 

I. Honor, married to John Harvey, esq. 

II. Ann, married to Richard Lyster, esq. 
of Rowton, in the county of Salop. 

Mr. Pigott was succeeded in his extensive 
estates by his eldest son, 

Robert Pigott, esq. of Chetwynd Park, 
in the county of Salop, and of Chesterton 
Hall, in the county of Huntingdon. This 
gentleman married, first, Diana, dau. and 
co-heir of Richard Rocke, esq. of Shrews- 
bury, but had no issue. He married, se- 
condly, Anne, daughter of — Peers, esq. 
of Criggion, in the county of Montgomery, 
by whom he had 

I. Robert, his heir. 

II. Thomas. 

III. William, rector of Chetwynd and 
Edgmond, of whom hereafter. 

I. Frances. 

II. Honor. 

III. Ann. 

IV. Rebecca, married John Mytton, esq. 
of Halston. 

The date of Mr. Pigott's death is known by 
the remarkable wager recorded in Bur- 
rows' Reports, under the title of " The Earl 
of March versus Pigott," in whicli Lord 
Mansfield decided, that the impossibility of 
a contingency is no bar to its becoming the 
3. 



subject of a wager, provided the iiiijiossi- 
Itiiity is unknown to l)oth tlie parties at tlie 
time of laying it. The case was this : Mr. 
R. Pigott and Mr. Codrington agreed to run 
their fathers^ lives one against the other. 
Sir William Codrington I)ciiig a little turned 
of fifty ; Mr. Pigott, senior, upwards of 
seventy; but the latter was alreadii dead. 
He died in Shroi).shire, (l.>0 miles from 
London), at two o'clock in tin; morning 
of the day on which the bet was mad^ at 
Newmarket, after dinner. This circum- 
stance was at the time unknown to, and not 
even suspected by either party ; but hence 
Mr. Pigott was induced to resist payment 
of the five hundred guineas, for which the 
wager was laid ; and Lord March, after- 
wards the well-known Duke of Queens- 
berry, who had taken Mr. Codrington 's bet, 
was compelled to bring his action, in which 
he succeeded. Dying thus, in May, 1770, 
Mr. Pigott was succeeded at Chetwynd, by 
his eldest son, 

Robert Pigott, esq. who served the 
oflice of sheriff for Shropshire, in 1774, soon 
after which, becoming alarmed (as it is 
said) at the gloomy aspect of affairs in this 
country, consequent upon the commence- 
ment of the American war, he sold the 
ancient inheritance of Chetwynd, which had 
been in his name for twelve generations, 
and hastened to rescue seventy thousand 
pounds, the inadequate consideration which 
he had received for it, from bis anticipated 
wreck of the kingdom, by retiring to the 
continent, and there lost a considerable part 
of this property, on the failure of those to 
whom he had entrusted it. He lived for 
some time at Geneva, married abroad, and 
had a son, who died before him. His own 
death happened at Toulouse, on the 7th 
July, 1794. 

Thus terminated the principal line of the 
family of Pigott, of Chetwynd, but the 
family itself was continued by 

The Rev. William Pigott, rector of 
Chetwynd and Edgmond, brother of the 
last Robert Pigott, of Chetwynd. He mar- 
ried Arabella, daughter of John Mytton, 
esq. of Halston, in the county of Salop, by 
whom he had issue, 

I. William, who was a captain in the 
82nd regiment of Foot, and died at 
Gibraltar, in 1795. 

II. John-Dryden, his successor in the 
Edgmond estate. 

I. Arabella. 

II. Anne, married .John Corbet, esq. 
of Sundorne Castle, in the county of 
Salop. 

III. Mary. 

IV. Harriott. 

The Rev. William Pigott died 9th March, 

1811, in his seventieth year, and was suc- 

O 



194 



HARLAND, OF SUTTON HALL 



ceeded in his estates by his son. the present 
Rev. John- Dkvdkn Pigott, rector of 
K(l<vniond and Habburley, in tlie county of 
Salop. 

Arms— Ermine, three fusils (conjoined 
in fess) sal)le. 



Crest — A wolf's head erased arp;. langned 
gules. 

Estates — The manor, estate, and ad- 
vowson of the rectory, of Edgmond, in the 
county of Salop, with other lands in the 
counties of Salop and Montgomery. 

Seat — Edgmond, Shropshire. 



HARLAND, OF SUTTON HALL. 

HARLAND, WILLIAM-CHARLES, esq. of Sutton Hall, in the county of York, 
b. 25th .lanuary, 1804, m. 17th May, 1827, Catherine, only daughter of Robert 
Eden Buncombe Shafto, esq. of Whitworth Park, in the palatinate of Durham, by 
Catherine, third daughter of Sir John Eden, bart. of Windlestone Hall. 

This g-entleman, who succeeded his aunt, Lady Hoar Harland, in 1826, is a deputy 
lieutenant for the county, and member of parliament for the city of Durham. 



Uineaae 




The original surname of this family, in- 
discriminately spelt Hoar, Hoare, Hoore, 
and Hoor, but most anciently Hore, is of 
great antiquity in Middlesex, Surrey, and 
the adjoining counties. Alardus le Hore 
paid fines to Kiiiff John in 1208 for lands 
in Muriel, Bucks ;* Walterus le Hore held 
lands, in the year 1235, of Henry III., in 
Leatherhead, in the county of Surrey, for 
the service of finding a house to contain 
prisoners ; f and Robertus le Hore was 
living in London in 1331. Another Wal- 
terus le Hore, accompanying the Earl 
of Northampton, with numerous nobles, 
knights, and other gentlemen, into " parts 
beyond the sea," on the king's service, had 
letters of protection and attorney from Ed- 



* Cap. I)om. Westm. 

+ Mannino's Hist, of Surrey and Placita Co- 
ronae, 19th Hin. III. 



WARD in. anno 1337. John Hoor had simi- 
lar letters from Henry IV. in 1405, to ac- 
company the king's son, Thomas, Duke of 
Lancaster.! John Hore was at the siege 
of Rouen in the train of Henry V. ; and 
Thomas Hoore or Hore was justice of the 
peace for Southwark in 1496. We find the 
name in London and its vicinity during the 
succeeding reigns till that of James I. The 
connected pedigree in the Herald's College 
commences with 

William Hoar, born about the year 1680, 
who inherited a small estate in Middlesex. 
He ni. Miss Martha Baker, and dying in 
1739, was buried at Stepney, leaving one 
son and two daughters, viz. 
George, his heir. 

Martha, m. to Thomas Davison, esq. of 
Blakiston, in Durham, and was mo- 
ther of Thomas Davison, who inhe- 
rited the estate of Kippax Park, in 
Yorkshire, and assumed the surname 
of Bland. (See Bland, of Kippax 
Park.) 
Susanna, m. to the Rev. Joseph Butler, 
rector of Shadwell and prebendary 
of St. Paul's. 
The only son, 

George Hoar, esq. of Middleton St. 
George, in the county of Durham, born at 
Limehouse, was keeper of the regalia of 
England in the Tower of London. He 
wedded, at Redmarshall, 1st January, 1750, 
Frances, daughter of William Sleigh, esq. 
of Stockton-npon-Tees, by Mary, his wife, 
daugliter of Charles Bathurst, esq. of Clintz 

i Rymer's Foedera. 



CHILIJK, OF KINLCT. 



195 



and Arkondiilc, M. P. for liichiiioiid (sec 

vul. ii. p. (i;j), and had issue, 
William, his iicir. 

George, of Tvvyford Lodi^c, Hants, who 
tn. Miss Elizabeth Cooke, but was 
divorced. 
Charles, who assumed the surname and 
arms of ILakland, 2(ith May, 1HU2, 
liaving married, at Kasin<;wood, dur- 
inj;- that year, Anne, only dau{;hler 
and heiress of Philu* Hauland, esq. 
of Sutton Hall, and widow of the 
Rev. Henry Goodriek. He was sub- 
sequently created a baronet, l)ut 
dying without issue, the title expired. 
His widow, the heiress of Sutton 
Hall, survived until the 24th June, 
182f), when she was succeeded by the 
nephew of her husband, the present 

WlLLL-iM-CnARLES HaRLAND, eSq. of 

Sutton Hall. 

Thomas, an admiral in the royal navy, 
VI. at Marylebone, 20th May, 1788, 
Katherine-Dorothy, daughter of Pe- 
regrine Bertie, esq. of Low Layton, 
Essex, and assumed the surname and 
arms of Bkktie. 

Ralph, of Bath, m. 21st June, 1788, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Peregrine 
Bertie, esq. and sister of his brother's 
wife. 

Mary, in. at St. James's, Westminster, 
8th January, 178.5, to Richard Mark 
Dickens, esq. colonel of the 34th 
regiment, and had issue. 

Frances. 



George Hoar's eldest son, 

WiLLLAM Hoar, es(|. barrister-at-law, 
wedded ;jOlli Nov(nii)er, 1780, Aiini', daugh- 
ter of John Wilkinson, esq. of Stockton- 
u|)on-Tees, and had issue, 

WiLLiAM-CiiARLEs, his heir. 

Anne. 
Mr. Hoar, who assumed the surname of 
Harland, di<!d in December, 1834, and was 
succeeded by his son, the present William- 
Charles Harland, esq. of Sutton Hall. 

Ajtns — Quarterly; 1st and 4th, ar. on a 
bend between two cottizes three stags' heads 
caboshed az. for Harland. 2nd and 3rd, 
(piarterly, sa. and gu. over all an eagle dis- 
played, with two heads arg. within a bordure 
invecked, counterchanged, for Hoar. 

Crests — 1st. A sea horse ppr. holding be- 
tween his hoofs a stag's head caboshed az. 
charged with an escallop, for Harland. 
2nd. An eagle's head erased arg. cliarged 
with a label of three points, pendant from 
the beak an annulet, for Hoar. 

Estates — Sutton Hall and Huby, in the 
North Riding of Yorkshire : a portion of 
the property was in the family before the 
Restoration, and another granted to Captain 
Richard Harland for his services in the 
royalist army at the battle of Marston 
Moor. Also the Middleton estate near 
Darlington, in the county of Durham, which 
has been possessed for some time by the 
family. 

Seat — Sutton Hall, Yorkshire. 



CHILDE, OF KINLET. 




'i^\ 
v^^*^ 



CHILDE, WILLIAM-LACON, esq. of Kinlet, in the county of Salop, b. 3rd Ja- 
nuary, 1786; 7ri. 13th August, 1807, Harriet, second daughter of the late William 
Cludde, esq. of Orleton, (see vol. i p. 483,) and has issue, 

I. William-Lacon, b. 6th June, 1810. 

II. Jonathan, ft. 8th October, 1811. 

III. Charles-Orlando, b. 27th December, 1812. 

IV. Edward-George, b. 23rd December, 1818. 
V. Arthur, b. 2nd April, 1820. 

I. Harriet. 
II. Anna-Maria. 

III. Catherine. 

IV. Lucy, ? , . 

,, i\/r f twins. 

V. Mary, S 

Mr. Lacon Childe, who is a magistrate for the counties 
of Salop and Worcester, and a deputy lieutenant for 
the former shire, succeeded his father 3rd February, 
1824. He served the office of sheriff for Shropshire in 
1828, and represented the borough of Wenlock in the 
first parliament of George IV. 




lOG 



CHILDE, OF KINLET. 



Hmtnge. 



The patronymic of this ancient family 
was Baldwyn ; and the unwearied research 
of the late Rev. John-Brickdale Blakeway, 
of Shrewsbury, as evinced, in his account of 
the " Sheriffs of Shropshire," has proved, 
almost beyond a doubt, that these Baldwyns 
derive their descent from Bawdewyn, who 
occurs in the roll of Battel Abbey, as one 
of the companions of William the. Con- 
ijueror, who was afterwards castellan of 
Montgomery under that monarch, and from 
whom that town acquires its Welsh appella- 
tion Tre-Faldww., or The Town of Baldwin. 
That this family of Bawdewin, Baldwyn, 
or Baldwin, for the name has been written 
in these and many other ways, was seated 
at Dodelebury, or Diddlebury, (more re- 
cently denominated Delbury), in Corvedale, 
in Shropshire, from a very remote period, is 
beyond all question. A pedigree, drawn 
up with great care, commences with an un- 
doubted progenitor, Bawdewin de Brugge, 
(i. e. Bawdewin of Bridgenorth), whose son, 

George Fitz Bawdewin, had the manor 
of Kingsmeade, in Yorkshire, the steward- 
ship of Montgomery Castle, and lands in 
Ho])e Bowdler and Smethcote, in the county 
of Salop. The fact of George Fitz Bawde- 
win holding the stewardship of Montgomery 
Castle, strongly indicates a connexion be- 
tween him and Bawdewin, the Norman cas- 
tellan, of the same fortress. Two centuries, 
however, must have elapsed between any 
contemporary of the Conqueror and Bald- 
win de Brugge : for Roger Baldwyn, 
grandson of the aforesaid George, is known 
to have died in, or not long before, the year 
1398. This Roger is presumed to be the 
first of the family who obtained Dodele- 
bury, for his wife Jane was daughter and 
heiress of William de Wigley, by Alice le 
Childe, whose great grandfather, John L'En- 
fant, or the Child, is stated to have married 
Emblema, the daughter and co-heir of Rich- 
ard Acheley, the younger, of that place, a 
descendant of William Achilles, as the 
name is there written, who is found in the 
Testa de Nevill of the reign of Henry III. 
to hold the tenth part of a knight's fee in 
Dodelebur, of the barony of Walter de 
Clifford. 

William Baldwin, of Diddlebury, grand- 
son of Roger, had passed the middle age of 
life in 1458, for he then bestowed his lands 
in Manslow upon his son, 

John Baldwin, and Elizabeth his wife. 
Their son, 

John Bawdwyn, yeoman of the crown, 
occurs in the roll for the collection of a 
benevolence (as it was called) in Shrop- 
shire, in the year 1491. This gentleman, 



by his situation about the royal person, had 
the opportunity of introducing at court his 
eldest son, 

William Bawdewyn, who during the 
reign of Queen Mary, enjoyed the confi- 
dential office of cupbearer to her majesty, 
and was still living in 1576, when Sir Henry 
Compton, knt. Lord Compton, granted to 
him, by the name of William Baldwyne, of 
Diddlebury, gentleman, the manor and ad- 
vovvson of Kyre Wyard, in Worcestershire. 
He d. without issue, and was s. in estate by 
his brother, 

Richard Baldwyn, who married at Ship- 
ton, in the county of Salop, on the 7th No- 
vember, 1545, Margery, daughter of Law- 
rence Ludlow, of Moore House, in Corve- 
dale, and was s. by his eldest son, 

Thomas Baldwyn, b. iu 1546, who, like 
his grandfather and uncle, spent many of 
his years within the circuit of a court, as 
agent to the Earl of Shrewsbury, then en- 
gaged in the dangerous office of guarding 
the Scottish queen. In Lodge's Illus- 
trations, vol. ii. p. 234, is a letter signed 
" T. Bawdewyn," and directed to the earl 
of Shrewsbury, 1st July, 1580. It informs 
his lordship that Elizabeth is resolute 
against his going to Chatsworth with Qneeti 
Mary, A letter of the earl's to Mr. Bald- 
wyn (ib. 257) proves the great confidence 
that nobleman placed in him, and expresses' 
an anxiety to be permitted to resign his 
burdensome charge of guarding the queen, 
adding, " I have too many spyes in my 
house already, and mind to make choice of 
others I may trust." Hunter's History of 
Hallamshire contains a letter directed to 
Mr. Baldwyn, by the name of " my loving- 
friend Mr. Thomas Bawdewine, at Could 
Harbar in London," dated April, 1581, and 
proving that he was not unknown to the 
ministers of Elizabeth ; and in the same 
work " one Baldwin " is mentioned as a 
confidential agent of the earl of Shrews- 
bury. In a room in Beauoharap's Tower, 
in the Tower of London, anciently the place 
of confinement for state prisoners, were dis- 
covered, some years ago, a number of in- 
scriptions, chiefly made with nails, and all 
of them the autographs of the unfortunate 
individuals %vho thus endeavoured to beguile 
for a time the tedious hours of confinement. 
They have been published in the thirteenth 
volume of the Archseologia, and since, in 
Mr. Brayley's history of that fortress. 
Among them is one which runs thus : 

158,5. Thomas Bawrewix. Jui.i. 
as veutuf. makf.tii life 
so sin cawseth death. 



I 



CHILDK, O!' K INLET. 



197 



To vvliich is added a representation of a 
pair of scales, evidently iiitimatinj; the wri- 
ter's confidence in liis own iiit('<;ritv, and 
desire to obtain justice. Mr. IJrand, who 
has written an ehiborate dissertation on 
these inscriptions, not finding, as he says, 
either in " tlie State Papers, Uynier's Fce- 
dera, Strype, Dod, nor Howe, " any men- 
tion of this person, " suspects he had been 
imprisoned here for counterfeiting tlie 
queen's coin." But there is not a sliadow 
of doubt that lie was the Tiiomas Bahlwyn 
al)ove-mentioned, and the suspicion of tlie 
learned commentator is, consequently, un- 
just to his memory. His epitaph, still re- 
maining at Diddlebury, records his escape 
from the sea, the sword, and the cruel tower. 

" (Jui mare, qui ferrum, durae qui vincula turris 
Quondam transivit;" 

which, of course, it would not have done if 
the allusion had been calculated to awaken 
so disgraceful a recollection : but his im- 
prisonment had a higher and more honour- 
able origin. The trembling anxiety of 
Elizabeth and her ministers, respecting 
the safe custody of their most important 
captive, the queen of Scots, and the un- 
grateful and harassing task imposed upon 
the earl of Shrewsbury, as her keeper, are 
alike matter of history. Perhaps, when 
Elizabeth's illegitimacy in the eyes of the 
other sovereigns of Europe, and Mary's 
pertinacious claim to her crown, supported, 
as it was ready to be, by every state and 
almost every individual of the Catholic 
faith, be taken into fair consideration, tlie 
vexatious treatment of that illustrious pri- 
soner will lose somewhat of tlie character 
of tyranny and cruelty ascribed to it ; 
but, in the mean time, it is notorious that 
every avenue of escape, possible or im- 
possible, was guarded ,with the narrowest 
scrutiny, and every precaution adopted 
which the most experienced gaoler could 
suggest. It has been shewn that Thomas 
Bawdewin was connected with the earl of 
Shrewsbury, and in the State Papers of Sir 
Ralph Sadlier is a letter from Curie, the 
Scotti'^h queen's secretary, to the same gen- 
tleman ; much cannot be collected from it, 
for it is written in a kind of cypher ; but 
this, under the circumstances, would make 
it more alarming and of greater apparent 
importance ; it evidently relates to some 
business of the royal captive, and, from the 
repository in which it was found, it must 
have reached the hands of government. All 
this was quite sufficient in those days to 
warrant the apprehension of any one to 
whom so suspicious a paper was addressed ; 
it bears date September, 1584, the year 
preceding the inscription tliat has been 
quoted, and must inspire a wish to learn the 
issue of its author's confinement ; and this 



is supplied by a passage in the pedigree 
ain'ady mentioned; but whether Mr. Baw- 
dewin was re-ajipointed, after his release, 
to liis former oliicial station, and thus ob- 
tained an entire vindication of his character, 
or whether the appointment preceded his 
iniprisoniiient, is not stated in this docu- 
ineiit, the passage from uliich is as follows : 
— " Thomas Bawdewin,* esq. of Diddle- 
bury, by the privie counsell of Queen Eli- 
zabeth, appoynted as . . . . (here is a 
blank) for the allayres of Mary, (jueen of 
Scots, and George, earl of Salop, after tliree 
years imprisonment in the Tower, married 
Bertran, (this should be Gertrude), daugli- 
ter of Robert Corbett, esq. of Stanwardiiie." 
After this liberation, he adopted a motto 
from the iisalinist, piously ascribing the 
event to a merciful Providence : Per Deum 
memu transilio murum. He had reason, 
indeed, to congratulate himself upon his 
escape ; for it was seldom, in those (/olden 
days, that any one could do so, who had 
once attracted the sinister notice of the 
state. Upon the whole it seems most pro- 
bable, tiiat, when released, he quitted the 
dangerous vortex of a court, and retired to 
his paternal estate in Corvedale, where he 
died at a good old age, in October, 1614, 
and where his posterity continued, for five 
generations, until Richard Bawdewin sold 
the Diddlebury estate to Frederick Corne- 
wall, esq. captain R.N. father of the late 
Bishop Worcester, whose son is the present 
proprietor. 

William Baldwin, second brother of 
Thomas Bawdewin, the prisoner, was of 
Elsich, in the chapelry of Cerfton and 
parish of Diddlebury. The family name had 
been hitherto written indiscriminately ; but 
from this point of divergence, the two 
branches chose to distinguish themselves by 
a different mode of spelling. William's 
son, 

Charles Baldwyn, esq. was born in 

* John Bawdewin, second son of this 1'homas, 
was servant, in 1616, to Edward 'I'albot, soon af- 
terwards Earl of Shrewsbury, and son to Earl 
George, in whose service Mr. Bawdewin, the 
father, was so long continued. In those days, a 
gentleman's son was not considered as submitting 
to any degradation by serving a nobleman, or 
even a knight, in a menial capacity. Mr. Talbot, 
in a letter published in the Strafford Letters, 
(page 3), uses the phrase " John Bawdewin, my 
man ;" and so in some curious depositions pre- 
served in the History of \\ lialley, p. '223, touch- 
ing a right of pews in the parish church. Sir John 
1'owneley is represented as saying (it was in the 
reign of IIknhy Ylll.) " my man, Shuttleworth, 
made this form, and here will I sit when 1 come." 
The gentleman whom the knight blufHy calls " my 
man," was, however, (says Dr. Whitaker,) a 
person of property, and was probably his prin- 
cipal agent, or perhaps one of his esquires. 



198 



CHILDE, OF KINLET. 



1593, and in the troubles which marked 
the earlier part of the ensuing century, 
strenuously sujjported the royal cause. He 
represented tlie town of Ludlow, in tlie 
long parliament, until he was disabled, 
(February 5, 1643,) for deserting (as the 
term was) the service of the house, being in 
the king's quarters, and adhering to that 
party. He married, in 1617, one of the 
daughters and co-lieirs of Francis Holland, 
of Burwarton, in Shropshire, and either his 
estate or delinquency was greater than 
those of his cousin, Edward Bawdewin, of 
Diddlebury, for while the latter was ad- 
m'Ued to compound for £245. Mr. Baldwin 
was obliged to pay nearly double that sum. 
He had two sons, who both rose to the 
honour of knighthood, and to great emi- 
nence in different departments of the law, 
Samuel (Sir), his heir. 
Timothy (Sir), who was admitted of 
Baliol College, Oxford, in 1634, (being 
then fifteen years of age,) of the 
Inner Temple in the following year, 
became a fellow of All Souls, and 
had obtained so high a character for 
knowledge, intrepidity, and loyalty, 
as to be selected by the university to 
be one of its council on the occasion 
of the parliamentary visitation. He 
was ejected from his fellowship, but 
was afterwards restored, and enjoyed 
it in 1663, when, by the name of 
Dr. Timothy Baldwyn, he published 
Zouch's Tract on the Admiralty. He 
became also a master in Chancery, 
and chancellor of the diocese of 
Chester. In " Wood's Athente" a 
more extensive account of his history 
may be found. He wj. first, Ellen, 
daughter of Sir William Owen, knt. 
of Condover, and relict of Sir George 
Norton, knt. of Abbots Leigh, near 
Bristol, and secondly, Mary, daugh- 
ter of Gerard Skrymshire, esq. of 
Aqualate, a very distinguished royal- 
ist, relict of Nicholas Acton, esq. of 
Brockleton, in the county of Wor- 
cester, but left no issue. 
The elder son. 

Sir Samuel Baldwyn, born in 1618, pur- 
sued the study of the common law, was ad- 
mitted of Baliol College and of the Inner 
Temple, at the same time, with his brother, 
was made a Serjeant in 1669, king's Ser- 
jeant in 1672, and deceasing in 1683, was 
buried in the Temple church, being styled 
on his monument, " of Stoke Castle," an 
estate which he rented, on a long lease, 
from the Earl of Craven, and of which place 
his brother. Sir Timothy was sometimes 
called. Sir Samuel married the daughter 
of Richard Walcot, esq. of London, mer- 
chant, and was succeeded at his decease in 
1683, by his eldest surviving soji. 



Charles Baldwyn,' esq. of Elsich anti 
Stoke Castle, who m. Elizabeth, daughter 
and heir of Nicholas Acton, esq. by Mary, 
his wife, sister and co-heir of Edwin Skrym- 
sher, esq. of Aqualate, and had issue, 

I. Edwin, died unm. 

II. Acton, who 711. Elinor, daughter of 
Sir Charles Skryrasher, knt. of Nor- 
bury, but d. s. p. 

III. Charles, heir. 

IV. Samuel, who m. Katherine, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Lamplugh, D.D. 

I. Elizabeth. 
Mr. Baldwin d. 4th January, 1706, aged 
fifty-five, and was s. by his son, 

Charles Baldwin, esq. who jn. first, 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Allgood, esq. 
of Newcastle, and widow of Sir Patrick 
Strahan, of Glenkindy, Aberdeenshire, and 
had two sons and two daughters, Charles, 
his heir, Samuel, who d. s. p., Elizabeth, 
and Barbara. He wedded, secondly, Anne, 
daughter of Robert Gayer, esq. of Stoke, 
Bucks, and widows of Francis Aimesley, 
LL. D. but by her had no issue. His son 
and successor, 

Charles Baldwyn, esq. of Aqualate, re- 
presented the county of Salop for many 
years in parliament. He wedded Catherine, 
elder daughter and co-heir of William La- 
con Childe, esq. of K inlet, by Catherine 
his wife, daughter of Samuel Pytts, esq. of 
Kyre, and had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. Charles, b. 26th February, 1758, 
and d. 18th September, 1811. 

I. Catherine. 
Mr. Baldwyn was s. at his decease by his 
elder son, 

William Baldwyn, esq. who, inheriting 
the estates of his maternal ancestors, as- 
sumed the surname and arms of Childe 
only. He espoused, 20th November, 1775, 
Annabella, second daughter of Sir Charlton 
Leighton, bart. .and by her, who died 21st 
January, 1816, had one son and one daugh- 
ter, viz. 

William-Lacon, his heir. 
Annabella, who m. Sumuel-Richard 
Alleyne, esq. and has three daugh- 
ters, viz. Annabella-Matilda, Caro- 
line-Charity, and Harriet. 
Mr. (Baldwyn) Childe died 3rd February, 
1824, and was s. by his son, the present 
William-Lacon Childe, esq. of Kiulet. 

jFamiliffi of JLarou anU CljiltJc. 

Tlie very ancient family of Lacon, whose 
name has at various periods been written 
Laken, Lakyn, Lakin, and Lacon, was 
seated at Lacon, in the county of Salop, at 
a remote era. Fourth in descent from Johu 



CIIll.UK, OF KINLRT. 



19.9 



Lakeii, lord of tlii" manor of LakiMi, or La- 
coii, ill till! 2lst year of Kuwakd 111., wlio 
was fifth in descent from Sir Jlobert tie 
Lakyn, also lord of the same manor, was 

iSiK KicHAKD Lakyn, knt. sherilf of Sa- 
lop, in 1415, who witnessed the Earl of 
Arundel's charter to Oswestry, Hth Hkniiy 
IV,, married Elizabeth, heiress of Sir fla- 
mond Peshale, of Willey, kiit. and was 
lather of 

Sir William Laken, knt. of Willey, 
sherilf of Salop, in 1452, whose son, 

KiCHAKD Lakkn, of Willey, served the 
same office in 1477. He was father, by 
Joan his wife, daughter of Thomas Hoorde, 
of 

SiK Thomas Lakkn, of Willey, who re- 
ceived the honour of knighthood, and was 
sheriff in 1510. He m. Mary, daughter of 
Sir Richard Corbet, of Morton Cor])ett, and 
liad four sons and live daughters, viz. 

I. Richard (Sir), his heir. 

II. Edward, d. s. p. 

III. William, s. p. 

IV. Launcelot, in. Elizabeth Gray, and 
was father of Christopher Lacon, of 
Kenley. 

I. Alice, m. to John Corbett. 

II. Agnes, m. to Kobert Uerington, of 
Salop. 

III. Dorothy, m. to Sir Richard Wal- 
wyn, knt. 

IV. Mary, married to Thomas Acton, of 
Sutton. 

V. Jane, m. first, to George Bromley, 
and secondly, to William Egerton. 

The eldest son and successor, 

Richard Laken, esq. of Willey, sheriff 
in 1540, wedded Agnes, daughter of Sir 
John Blount,* of Kiiilet, and was s. by his 
son, 

* The Blounts of Kinlet were a junior branch 
of the ancient family seated at Sodington, in the 
county of Worcester. 

SiK John Blount, knt. of Sodington, descended 
from the Lords of Guisnes (refer to family of 
Blount oi' Mriple Durham) m. first, Juliana Foul- 
hurst, by whom he had a son, John, progenitor 
of thfc present Sodington family, and secondly, 
Isabella, daughter and heir of Sir Bryan Corn- 
wall, of Kiulet, son of Sir Edmund Cornwall, 
by Elizabeth bis wife, daughter and co-heir of 
Sir Brjan Bramjiton, of Kinlet. By his second 
wife, Sir John Blount left at his decease, in 
1424, a son, 

John Blount, of Dodington, who m. Alice, 
daughter of Kynard Delabere, of Ilerefordsliire, 
and was s. at his demise in 14t'2, by his son, 

Hu.MPunEV Blount, of Uodington, who inhe- 
rited, from his maternal ancestors, the estate of 
Kinlet, in the county of Salop, and served the 
ofKce of sheriff for that shire in 1461. He wedded 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Robert Wilmington, 
knt. and widow of .lohii Delves, esq. of Delves 
Hall, and hud a son and successor. 



Rowland Lacon, cs(i. of Willey, high 
sherilf in 1571, who obtained the KiM.i.r 
estate by the devise of his uncle, Sir George 
IJlount, and wan father, by Ellen liis wife, 
daughter of William Brigges, of 

Sir Francis Lacon, knt. of Willey and 
Kinlet, high sheriff in Uil2. This g(Mitle- 
iiian, who sold considerable portions of the 
family propcn-ty, vi. Jane, youngest daughter 
of Anthony Browne, first Viscount Mon- 
tagu (by his second wife, Magdalen, daugh- 
ter of William, l^ord Dacre, of (iillesland), 
and was *. by his son, 

Rowland Lacon, esq. of Kinlet, whose 
devotion and services to Kiiiff Charlks I. 
caused a further dismemberment of the 
estates : the remnant fell, at his decease, to 
his only daughter, 

Sin Thomas Blount, of Kinlet, aged twenty- 
one years, at his father's decease, in 1477. 'I'his 
gentleman was high sheriff of Salop in 14iJ(), 
and received the honour of knighthood. He ra. 
Anne, daughter of Sir Bichard Croft, of Croft 
Castle, and had no fewer than twenty children. 
The eldest, 

Sir Joan Blount, of Kinlet, /). in 1481, suc- 
ceeded his father in the Kith of Henuy VI 11. 
He m. Catherine, daughter and heir of Sir Hugh 
Pershall, of Knightly, in Staffordshire, and had 
issue, 

I. George (Sir), his heir. 

II. Henry, of Bevvdley. 

III. William. 

I. Elizabeth, mother, by Henry VIII., of 
Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Bichmond. This 
lady, " who was thought," says Lord 
Herbert, of Cherbury, " for her rare or- 
naments of nature and education, to be the 
beauty and mistress-piece of her time," 
wedded first. Sir Gilbert Talboys, Lord 
Talboys, and secondly, Edward, Lord Clin- 
ton. 

II. Rosa, 7ti. to William Grisling, of Lin- 
colnsliire. 

III. Albora. 

IV. Agnes, m. as in the text, to Richard 
Laken, esq. of Willey. 

V. Isabella, m. to William Read. 

Sir John Blount was succeeded by his eldest 
son. 

Sir George Blount, knt. of Kinlet, who, ac- 
cording to the fashion of the day, served while a 
youth with distinction in the French and Scottish 
campaigns of Henry VIII. and Edward VI., 
and was high in favour at the court of the former 
monarch. He served the office of higli sheriff for 
Shropshire in 1564, and, niariying Christiana, or 
Constance, daughter of Sir Jolin Talbot, of Graf 
ton, had an only daughter, Dorothy, vi. first, 
to John Purslow.'esq. of Sidbury, and secondly, 
to Edward Bullock, esq. of Bradeley. Sir George 
Blount died in l38ii, and, for some cause unknown, 
devised Ids estates to his nephew, Roland Laken, 
esq. of Willey, " whom," says Mr. Blakensay, 
" he jirobablv 8i?!ected as being e<|ually with him- 
self descended from the Bramptons, the aucieut 
Lords of Ki det." 



200 



SEYxMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 



Anne Lacon; of Kinlet, who espoused Sir 
William Childe, kiit. LL.D. a master in 
Chancery. " My hopes," says Fuller, in 
his Worthies of Shropshire, 1662, speaking 
of the Lacons, " are according to my de- 
sires, tliat tliis ancient family is still extant 
in this county ; though, I suspect, shrewdly 
shattered in estate." Sir William Childe 
was a younger son of the old stock of Childe, 
of Northwick, in Worcestershire, a family 
seated for ages in that shire. His second 
son, 

Thomas Childe, esq. of the Birch, in the 
parish of Kinlet, was high sheriff of Shrop- 
shire in 1705. He left a son and successor, 

William Lacon Childe, esq. M.P. for 
the county of Salop, who wedded Catherine, 
daughter of Samuel Pytts, esq. of Kyre, in 
Worcestershire, and d. in 1756, leaving two 
daughters, the younger married — Wood- 
roft'e, esq. but d. s. p., while the elder, 



Catherine Childe, who inherited her fa- 
ther's estates, married, as already stated, 
Charles Baldwyn, esq. of Aqualate, and 
was grandmother of the present William 
Lacon Childe, esq. of Kinlet and Kyre. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, gu. a 
chev. ermine, between three eagles close 
arg., for Childe ; second, quarterly, per 
fesse, indented erm. and az., for Lacon ; 
third, arg. a saltier sa., for Baldwyn. 

Ci-est — An eagle, with wings expanded, 
argent, enveloped round the neck with a 
snake ppr. 

Estates — At Kinlet, in Shropshire, and 
Kyre, in the counties of Worcester and 
Hereford. 

Seats — Kinlet Hall, Shropshire, and Kyre 
House, Worcestershire. 



SEYMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 

SEYMOUR, AARON-CROSSLEY, esq. of Castletown House, in the Queen's 
County, b. 19th December, 1789, m. at Cheltenham, 3rd April, 1818, Anne, only 
daug^hter and heiress of .John Geale, esq.* of Mount Geale, in the county of Kil- 
kenny, by whom (who d. 28th February, 1825) he had issue, 

John-Crossley-Geale, b. 11th Nov. 1819. 

Catherine-Elizabeth-Frances. 
Emilia-Olivia- Anne, > , ., ,. , y„,,„p. 
Letitia- Anne-Adelaide, S > &• 

Mr. Seymour inherited from his father on the 19th of May, 1831. 



* By Anne, his wife, daughter of C. Jackson, esq. of Nottinghamshire, Mr. Geale was lier second 
husband ; her first, Mr. Kelly, an eminent barrister, fell in a duel with Col. Whaley, and left, (by the 
said Anne Jackson) an only daughter and heiress, Frances Kelly, who married Richard Drought, esq. 
of the Queen's County, and had several children. 

The family of Geale originally came from Lancashire, and settled in Ireland some considerable 
number of years back. John Geale, esq. of Mount Geale, in the county of Kilkenny, is the first we 
have any account of; and he appears to have made a slight alteration in the spelling of the name, 
wliich is usually written Gale by the Lancasliire, and all other branches of the family. He had 
several sons, one of whom emigrated to America, and was grandfather of Susanna Geale, 'who 
married Alan, first Lord Gardner, by whom she had a numerous issue. 

Benjamin Geale succeeded at Mount Geale. He was alderman and lord mayor of Dublin; and 
was twice the unsuccessful candidate in two sharply contested elections for the representation of that 
city. He married Anne,i eldest daughter of Frederick Falkiner, esq. of Abbot's-town, county of 
Dublin, by Elizabeth, daughter of James Hamilton, esq. of Bailiborough, in the county of Cavan, by 
whom he had three sons and two daughters, viz. 

I. John Geale, who succeeded at Mount Geale, and whose only daughter and lieir, Anne, mar- 
ried Aaron CnossLEY-SEVMOuu, esq. He died July 25, 18s!0. 

II. Frederick, deceased, who married Letitia, daughter of P. Brady, esq. and liud five sons and 
tliree daughters, viz. 

1. Benjamin, married Catherine, daugliter of Charles Wild, esq. (by Mary, daughter of 
Thomas Tipping, of Beaulieu, esq. and sister of Sophia, who married Charles, eighth 
Lord Blayney) and by her, who died in 1819, left issue. 
Q. Frederick, died unmarried. 
;>. John, died in Iftl.i. 

Daniel, married Anno, daughter of Benjamin Bickley, esq., of Bristol. 
Henry, died in 1H18. 



4. 
5. 



SEYMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 



201 



Hmcaqc. 




This family, now settled for nearly three 
luuulred years in Ireland, claims to be a 
branch of the great house of Seymour,* so 
memorable in the eventful times of Henry 
VIII. and Edward VI., for the rapidity of 
its rise, the vastness of its power, and the 
depth of its fall. 

Sir John Seymour, eldest son and heir 
of Sir Henry Seymour, by his first wife, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir George Darell, 
of Littlecote in Wilts, married Margery, 
second daughter of Sir Henry Wentworth, 
K.B.,of Nettlested, in the county of Sufl'olk, 
and dying in 1536, f left issue, 

I. John, who died unm. 15th July, 1520. 
ir. Edward, Duke of Somerset, one 
day the proud and potent Protector, 
ruling without rivalry, and without 
control, the next a convicted and de- 
capitated traitor, despoiled and at- 
tainted. From this unfortunate noble- 
man the extant ducal family of 
Somerset, and the Marquesses of 
Hertford, directly derive. 



III. Henry, (Sir) of whom presently. 

IV. Thomas, Lord High Admiral of 
England, who became the second 
Inisband of the Queen Doivaf/cr, 
Katharine Pakr, atul was raised to 
tlie peerage as JJaron Seymour, of 
Siull(!y. This nobleman was beheaded 
on Tower Hill, lOth March, 1.54H-1>, 
under the authority of his brother, 
the Protector Somerset, {refer to 
Burke's Extinct and Dormant Peer- 
ape). 

V. John, I 7 vn 

VI. Antliony, S * ^ °' 

I. Jane, the third Queen Consort of 

Henry VIII, and mother of Kin<f 

Edward VI. -, 
n. Elizabeth, m. first, to Sir Anthony 

Oughtred, knt. and, secondly, to 

Gregory, Lord Cromwell. 

III. Margaret, died young. 

IV. Dorothy, the wife, first, of Sir Cle- 
ment Smith, knt. of Little Baddow, 
in Essex, and after his decease, of 
Thomas Leventhorpe, esq. of Shingey 
Hall, in Hertfordshire. 

Lady Seymour survived her husband, and 
died in the'year 1550. By her last will she 
bequeathed divers legacies of plate, jewels, 
&c. to her relations, and mentions Edward 
and Henry Seymour, sons of the Duke of 
Somerset, as her godsons. The sole exe- 
cutorship she confers on her second son, 

Sir Henry Seymour, who received the 
honor of knighthood at the coronation of his 
nephew, Kiiiff Edward VI., being one of 
the forty in substitution of knights of the 
Bath, who were not created for want of 
time to perform the ceremony. In 1551, 
then in the king's service, he obtained a 
grant of lands ; amongst which were the 



1. Letitia, married the Rev. William Bushe, rector of St. George's, Dublin, and of Teraple- 
pont, in the county of Cavan (son of Jervis Parker Bushe, esq. of Kilfaae, by Miss 
Grattan, sister of the Right Hon. Henry Grattan, of Tinnyhinch, in the county of Wick- 
low) younger brother of Jervis Bushe, who married Miss Latham, sister to the Countess 
of Listowel and daughter of John Latham, esq. of Meldrum, county of Tipperary ; and 
by her, who died at Clifton, in 1819, left issue two daughters, Isabella, and Letitia. 

2. Isabella, married, 1819, to James Thorpe, esq. of Dublin, brother of the Rev. Dr. 
Thorpe, who married. May, 1834, Anabel-Elizabeth, Countess of Pomfret, eldest daughter 
of Sir Richard Borough, bart. 

3. Elizabeth, married to her cousin, William Richardson, esq. an officer in the Horse 
Guards, and died in 18'20, without surviving issue. 

III. Daniel, who left a numerous issue, of whom Piers Geale, esq. tiie eldest son, married Miss 
Crofton, cousin to Sir Edward Crofton, bart. of Moate, in the county of Roscommon, and had 
issue Elizabeth, married to Sir Marcus Somerville, bart. of Somerville, county of Meath. 

I. Anne, died at ]\Iontaban, in France, unm. 

II. Elizabeth, d. unmarried. 

* For the early descent of the Seymouhs, refer to Burke's Extinct and Dormant Peerage, under the 
Duke of Somerset. 

t The remains of Sir John Seymour were interred in the church of Easton Priory, but that 
building Falling into ruin, thev were removed to the church of Great Bedwin, in W iltshire, where 
a monument stands erected to his memory by his grandson, Edward, Earl of Hertford. 



202 



SEYMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 



large manors of Marvell and Twyford, in 
the county of Southampton, with tlie parks 
and liouse of Marvell, wliich had constituted 
a i)ortiou of the estates of the bishopric of 
Winchester; and the next year he had a 
further mark of royal favor, in the acquisi- 
tion for life, through the generosity of the 
crown, of the manors of Somerford and 
Hurn, in the same county, Avith other lands, 
to tlie yearly value of £202. 6s. 9d. Sir 
Henry represented the county of Wilts in 
tlie parliament called by his nephew, and 
served the office of sheritT for the county of 
Southampton in 1568. Leading the retired 
life of a country gentleman, far removed 
from the turmoils of the court, and not 
taking any part in the politics of the period, 
tiiese grants alone appear to be the extent 
of Sir Henry's participation in the fortunes 
of his family. He m. Barbara, daughter of 
Thomas Morgan, esq. of Tredegar, and left 
one son, John (Sir), with several daugh- 
ters.* Speaking of Sir Henry Seymour, in 
his History of the Reformation, Heylin 
has the foUowingsingular narrative : "There 
goes a story that the priest officiating at 
Ouslebury (of which parish Marvelle was a 
part) after the mass had been abolished by 
the king's authority, was violently dragged 
thence by this Sir Henry, beaten and most 
reproachfully handled by him, his servants 
universally refusing to serve him as the in- 
struments of his rage and fury ; and that 
the poor priest, having after an opportunity 
to get into the church, did openly curse the 
said Sir Henry and his posterity, with bell, 
book, and candle, according to the use ob- 
served in the church of Rome, which, whe- 
ther it was so, or that the main foundation 



* Of whom Jane became the wife of Sir Ed- 
ward Rodney, of Stoke Rodney, and Pelton, in 
Somersetshire, the heiress of wliich family niiirried 
Sir Thomas Bridges, of Keinsham, a younger brancli 
of the Bridgeses, Dukes of Chandos. Lady Rod- 
ney had seventeen children, but her sons having 
no issue male, the honors in this branch became 
extinct. It was this Lady Rodney who, in con- 
junction with her son-in-law, Sir Theodore New- 
ton, of Bilton, in tlie county of Gloucester, bes- 
towed the choir organ (which now stands on the 
north side) upon the abbey church at Bath. Her 
eldest son married a daughter of Sir Robert 
Southwell, of Woodrising, in Norfolk. George 
llodnev, the second son, wedded Anne, daughter 
of Sir Tliomas Lnke, of Cannons, in INIiddlesex. 
She was widow of William Cecil, Lord Ros, who 
d. s. p. in 1618, and was involved with her mo- 
ther. Lady Lake, (daughter of Sir Williaiu Ry- 
ther, lord mayor of London) in fomenting disputes 
between his lordship and liis grandmotlier, tlie 
old ('ountess of Exeter, wliich eventually became 
so serious as to deprive Sir Thomas Lake, then 
Secretary of State, of the king's favor, and of all 
liis offices of emolument and lioiior. (For tliis 
extraordiir.irv aftair, see BuRK^'b ivUiiic/ I'cciagc.) 



of their estate being laid on sacrilege, conld 
promise no long blessing to it, certain it is, 
that his posterity was brought beneath a 
degree of poverty." Sir Henry dying in 
1578, was *. by his son, 

Sir John Seymour, knt. of Marvell, wlio 
had served the office of sheriff for Soutli- 
ampton, in 1568. This gentleman m. Susan, 
youngest daughter of Lord Chidiock Pow- 
lett, third son of William, Marquess of 
Winchester, (by his first wife, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir William Capel, progenitor 
of the extant. Earls of Essex) and left at his 
decease three sons, 

Edward,"! upon whom the downfall of 
Henry, r their family appears to have 
Thomas, J entailed the most woeful 
consequences, lowering the unfortu- 
nate brothers not only from tlieir 
grade in society, but reducing them 
to actual poverty, until, to quote 
Heylin again, " There remained 
not to any one of them one foot of 
land, or so much as a penny of money 
to supply their necessities, but what 
they have from the charity of the 
Marquis of Hertford, and the charity 
of the well disposed people which 
have atfection or relation to them." 
Having alienated tlieir paternal pro- 
perty, the three brothers emigrated 
to Irelaiul, and established them- 
selves at Limerick, then much fre- 
quented by settlers from England : 
the two younger, Henry and Thomas, 
dying without issue, the line of Ed- 
W;VRD, therefore, alone remains. 
Edward Seymour, the eldest son of 
Sir John Seymour and Susan Powlett, re- 
presentative of the Seymours of Marvell, 
espoused, prior to his settlement in Ireland, 
a daughter of Edward Onley, esti. of Cates- 
by, in Northamptonshire, and having several 
children, was s. at his decease by his eldest 
sou, 

Edward Seymour, who wedded a daugh- 
ter of William Hartwell, esq. an alderman 
of Limerick, and Mayor in 1659, and Iclt 
an only son, 

John Seymour, an alderman of the city 
of Limerick, who was chosen sheriff in 170S, 
and served the office of Mayor in 1720. 
This worthy citizen m. Jane, daughter of 
Sevmour Wroughton, esq. of Heskett, in 
Wiltshire, and had issue, 
I. John, his heir. 

H. William, m. Jane, second daughter 
of Mr. Alderman Edward Wiglit, of 
Limerick, (by liis second wife Miss 
Hawkeswortii) and left a son, 

John, in holy orders. Rector of 
J'alace, in the county of Linie- 
riik. This geulleman, ni. (.U'l/.- 
zle, youngest daughter and cu- 



SEYMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 



203 



heir of Willian Hobart, esq. of 
Ili<;li Mdimt, ill tlit^ nmiity oC 
('ork, and i^rcat <;raiul-(liiii;4lilt'r 
of Sir Miles Hobart, of Wilt- 
shire, l)v wlioiii he* had, 

1. William llohart.f an oflicer 
ill the (iOtli rejiiiiK'iit, wlio 
(lied num. in tlii' West Indies, 
ill 1797. 

2. MiciiAKi.,|/^8th November, 
I7()H, an atliniral ol'the royal 
navy, and a k.iii<;ht f;raiid 
cross of the Bath, who for 
his gallant services was 
created a baronet, 31st May, 
1809. .S'efUiiKKK's Peera(je 
nud Baroni'tiKje. 

3. Joliii, in holy orders, Rec- 
tor of Ulloa, in tlie Diocese 
of Cashell, m. Catherine, 
daii<;hter of — Millett, esq. 
of Fethard, in the county of 
Tipperary, and relict of 
James .lacob, es([. of Mow- 
barii ham, in the same county, 
by whom he left John, in 
holy orders, with Frances, 
the wife of the Rev. Mr. 
Foster, nephew to Sir Tho- 
mas Foster, bart. and Wil- 
helmina. 

4. Rieliard of the R. N. killed 
at tlie close of the action 
between the Amazon Fri- 
gate, Captain Parker, of 
whiclihe was first lieutenant, 
and the Belle Poule, French 
Frigate. 

5. Frances, m. to Robert 
Ormsby, esq. Captain Sligo 
Militia, and died in 1805, 
leaving an only son, Robert 
Ormsby, who is mai'ried, 
and has issue. 

III. James, sheriff of Limerick, in 172H, 
m. , daughter of Hezekial Hol- 

* The Rev. John Seymour was a man of ex- 
emplary piety, of most amiable disposition, and of 
ffreat learning. He was one of tlie domestic 
chajilains of Dr. Michial Cox, Archbisliop of 
Cashell, and at the time of his decease, July, 
17i).">, held the rectory of Abington, with the 
chancellorship of Emly. 

t Two years before his death, Captain Seymour 
made an extraordinary escape from the French 
prison ship, at Point a Petre, in Guadaloupe, by 
swimming- from her in the evening, in companj- 
with tlie master of a Bermuda vessel. Having 
reached the beach, and finding a canoe, they 
pushed otf, and were taken up the next day at 
noon, ofi" the Saints Isles, by the Bellona, ]Man-of- 
AVar. 

t Of Hio-h Mount, in the county of Cork, and 
>"iierv Park in Devonshire. 



land, esq. mayor of tliat city in 1713, 

Init had no surviving issue. 

IV. Kichard, shirilf of Limerick in 
1730. 

V. Walter, sherilV of Limerick in 1742, 
1)1. Miss Binden, daughter of David 
Biiideii, es(|. sheriff of Limerick in 
17lf). Without issue. 

Alderman John Seymour died in 1735, 
and was s. by liis eldest son, 

John Skymouk, escj. wlio resided in 
Dublin, and m. Frances, (ddest daugliter 
and co-heir of Aaron Crossley, esip*^ hy 
Madamoiselle Peraclieau, daughter of Pierre 
Andre Peracheau,t of Sauinur, and (by her 
who died in A|)ril, 17G0) left at his decease 
in 1754, an only son, his successor, 

Aaron Ckosslf.y Seymour, esq. of Castle- 
town House, in the Queen's County, who m. 
Margaret, second daughter of Matthew Cas- 
san, esq. of Sheffield in the same shire, by 
his first wife, Anne, daughter of Jonathan 

* Mr. Crossley was the son of Abraham Cross- 
ley, esq. a younger son of John Crossley, es(). 
of Scaytcliffe, near Todmorden, in Lancashire. 
He published " a Peerage," in folio, above one 
liundred and twenty years ago, which is now so 
scarce, that a copy is rarely to be met with. It 
was jirinted in Dublin in 1710, at which period 
the author held a situation of some importance in 
the Herald's otfice there, and was esteemed learned 
in antiquities. In the preface, he has preserved 
much of the history of the Irish branch of tlie 
Sej-mours, to whose representative his eldest 
daughter was then united, and upon his authority 
their descent from the family of the protector, as 
we have now detailed, is chiefly founded. Mr. 
Crossley further mentions, that Mrs. Seymour, 
the s:reat grandmother of his son-in-law, was then 
very far advanced in life, having endured all the 
horrors of the siege of Limerick, and that from her 
he ascertained that her husband had come from 
" Marvell,"in Hampshire, with many of the other 
particulars which he had embodied in his work. 

Susanna, the other daughter and co-heir of 
Aaron Crossley, married Clictwood Eustace, who 
succeeded to the dignity of Lord I'ortlester, of 
Harristoun, in the county of Kildare, and left, 
with two daughters, Elizabeth and Abigail, who 
both died unm. a son, William Eustace, successor 
to his father in the barony of Portlester, who m. 
Elizabeth, daughter of — Dalton, esq. but leav- 
ing no issue, the peerage at his decease became 
extinct. 

t Bv his wife, Madamoiselle Gabrielle Fonne- 
reau, of the citv of La Rochelle, sister of Zacharie 
Fonnereau, who fled on the revocation of the 
Edict of Nants, and settling in London, became 
the founder of the family of Fonnereau of Christ- 
Church Park, in Suffolk. iMadamoiselle Gabrielle 
abandoned La Belle France for a similar cause, 
and sought an asylum in Ireland, at the time that 
the La I'ouclie's and other families of resjiectaliility 
took refuge in that country. She was naturalized 
at the Court of Queen's Bencli in Dublin, on the 
lOtli February, 1710, upon taking the necessary 
oaths. 



204 



SEYMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 



Baldwin, esq. of Coolkerry, and Suraraer- 
hill, both also in the Queen's County, by 
which lady, who died, aged 81, on the 25th 
January, 1812, he had four sons, viz. 

I. John-Crossley, in holy orders, his 
heir. 

II. Matthew-Cassan, of Lodge, near 
Drogheda, m. first, Frances Smith, 
niece of Graves Cholmley, esq. of 
Flatten, by whom (who d. in 1811) 
he had 

Aaron-Crossley, in the service of 

the East India Company, died in 

India, unm. 
Graves-Cholmley, also in the East 

India Company service, and now 

deceased. 
Matthew, ? i .i •, , 
Toh \ dead. 

He wedded, secondly, Maria, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Roger Curtis, of 
Mount Hanover, in the county of 
Meath, but left no other issue. 

III. Aaron-Crossley, in the East India 
Company civil service, register to the 
secretary of the revenue and judicial 
departments at Bengal, m. first, 
Maria, daughter and sole heir of Dr. 
Hogarth, and left by her, who rf. 31st 
July, 1816, an only daughter, Frances- 
Maria, who m. her cousin, John 
Crossley Seymour, esq. of Coolna- 
gower. Mr. Aaron Seymour wedded 
secondly, Mrs. Browne, and has left 
issue by that lady. 

IV. Stephen, Captain of the Pegasus 
frigate, R. N. signalized himself un- 
der Lord Howe, on the 1st of June, 
1794, and was lost at sea a few years 
after, aged 28. 

Mr. Seymour d. in 1787, and was *. by 
his eldest son, 

The Rev. John Crossley Seymour, 
vicar of Cahirelley, in the diocese of Cashell. 
This gentleman, m. in January, 1789, Cathe- 
rine, eldest daughter and co-heir (with her 
sister Frances, living unmarried) of the 
Rev. Edward Wight, Rector of Meelick, in 
the county, and of St. Munchins, in the 
city of Limerick,* by whom he had a nume- 
rous progeny (twenty four children) of which 
lived to maturity the following eight sons 
and seven daughters. 

I. Aaron Crossley, his successor. 

II. Edward Wight, h. in January, 1791, 
m. in 1821, Margaret, daughter of 
Peter Roe, esq. of Rockville, in the 
county of Dublin, and has John- 
Wight-Edward, and other issue. 

III. John-Crossley, of Coolnagower, in 

* By Frances, his wife, elder daughter and co- 
heir of Willian Ho])art, esq. of lli<;h Mount, in 
the county of Cork, grandson of bir Miles llobart, 
of Wiltshire. 



the Queen's County, m. his cousin, 
Frances-Maria, only daughter of 
Aaron Crossley Seymour, esq. of the 
East India Company's service, and 
has issue. 

IV. Matthew-Cassan. 

V. Stephen-Sheffield, m. Selina, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Hart, of Durrow, and is 
now deceased. 

VI. William-Hobart, deceased. 

VII. Michael, in holy orders. 

VIII. Richard Hobart. 

I. Frances, m. 28th November, 1816, to 
Joseph Thomas Keane, esq. and has 
issue. 

II. Jane, deceased. 

III. Margaretta-Eliza, d. aged twenty, 
19th June, 1819. 

IV. Catherine. 

V. Eliza. 

VI. Mary-Anne, m. in 1822, to Robert 
Guinness, esq. of Stillorgan park, in 
the county of Dublin. 

VII. Cliarlotte-Alicia, d. 19th April, 
1819. 

Tlie Rev. John-Crossley Seymour, who 
was a man of high and much respected 
character, died on the 19th May, 1831, and 
was *. by his eldest son, the present Aaron- 
Crossley Seymour, esq. of Castletown. 

Arms — Quarterly ; 1st, gu. two wings 
conjoined in lure, the tips downwards or, 
for Seymour. 2ud, per chev. or and vert, 
in chief a tau between two crosses patonce 
fitchee gu. in base a hind trippant arg. 
charged on the neck with a tau of the third, 
for Crossley. 3rd, gu. a chev. between 
three boars' heads couped or, for Wight. 
4th, sa. an estoile of eight points or, between 
two flanches erm. for Hobart. 

Crest — Out of a ducal coronet or, a phoenix 
in flames, ppr. with wings expanded or. 

Motto — Foy pour devoir. 

Estates — In the counties of Cork, Lime- 
rick, Dublin, and Queen's County. 

Seat — Castletown House, Queen's County. 

iFamilg of W^i^i^X. of 312aig^tfirlti. 

Edward Wight, who accompanied Ge- 
neral Ireton to Ireland, and settled in Lime- 
rick, was elected sherifl' of that city in 1676, 
became subsequently an alderman, and 
served the office of mayor in 1694 and 17] 1. 
During his occupancy of the civic chair, 
money became very scarce in Limerick, 
and an act was passed authorizing him to 
have coin struck at the Limerick mint. 
Some years after he returned to England, 
and brought back with him to Ireland eleven 
sisters, all of wliom married into tlie most 
respectable families amongst the English 
settlers in Linu'riok, and in the records that 
remain, we find tlie names of Ticrney, Pike, 
Piggot, llobart, Nicholson, Stevens, Daxou, 



SEYMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 



205 



Hickman, TIarfvvoll, TTollaiul,* and Odoll. 
Aldcrnian Kdward Wight m. 'first, Miss 
Hoaro,t of a liit;lily iTSpcctahlt' family, long 
seated in Limerick, and had two sons, viz. 

I. Kiee, wlio died in 1737, leaving- a 
son, John Wight, and a daughter, 
Sarah, ni. to Mr. Dujiont, of Cork. 
The descendants of John Wightemi- 
grated to the West Indies, where this 
branch has become extinct in the 
male line. 

II. KiciiAKD, in boly orders, rector of 
Kathronan, and archdeacon of Lime- 
rick. He died in 1762, leaving one 
son, and two daughters, viz. 

1. Edward, also rector of Rath- 
ronan, and archdeacon of Lime- 
rick. He m. Miss JJurgli, relict 
of Michael Cox, esq. nephew of 
Dr. Michael Cox, archbishop of 
Cashell, and grandson of Sir 
Richard Cox, bart. Lord Chan- 
cellor of Ireland. He left issue, 
Edward Wight, in holy or- 
ders, rector of Rathronan, 
who m. his cousin Mary, 
daughter of the Rev. Wil- 
liam John Bowen, of Bow- 
en's Court, and had one son, 
Edward, and a daughter, 
Catherine, both died unm. 

Catherine Wight, married to 
Thomas Spring, esq. of 
Castlemain, only son of 
Thomas Spring, esq. by 
Hannah, his wife, youngest 
daughter of Francis An- 
nesley, esq. of Ballysonan, 
in the county of Kildare, 
and had an only child, 

* Miss Wight, who m. — Holland, esq. of 
Limerick, left, with two daughters, a son, Alder- 
man Holland, whose grand-daughter, Elizabeth 
Holland, wedded Ralph Ouseley, esq. and was 
mother of the present Sir Gore Ouseley, bart. 

t From a brother of this lady descended the 
Rev. Dr.ANF. Hoare, a gentleman of great bene- 
volence and philanthropy, under whose super- 
intendance the cathedral of Limerick was much 
improved and beautified in 1752. Mr. Hoare 
was one of the original founders of the county 
hospital, and the house of industry. He m. Miss 
Ingram, eldest daughter of alderman John Ingram, 
of Limerick, and sister of the Rev. Jacob Ingram, 
cliancellor of St. Mary's Catherine, grandaughter 
of Dr. Thomas Smyth, Bishop of Limerick, and 
niece of Dr. Arthur Smyth, Archbishop of Dublin. 
The Rev. Deane Hoare left two sons, viz. 

I. John IIoare, in holy orders, rector of 
Rath Keale, chancellor of St. Mary's, and 
vicar general of the diocese of Limerick. 
He m, Rachel, daughter of Sir Edward 
Newenham, bart. and died in 1813, aged 
forty-seven, leaving issue. 



Catiikrim. SpRixr, who 
wt'ddcd in I7H.>, Ste- 
phen E<hvard Rice, esq. 
of Mount Trenchard, in 
the county of Limerick, 
and left issue, the Right 

Hon. TlKJMAS Sl'RlNCi 

RiCR, M. P. for Cam- 
bridge, and Mary Rice, 
VI. to Sir Aubrey de 
Vere, bart. of Currah. 
Elizabeth, m. to Molesworth 
Greene, esq. of Mountpelier, 
near Dublin, but d. s. p. 
1. Elizabeth, m. to Bartholomew 
Gibbins, esq. of Gibbins Grove, 
in the county of Cork, and had 
five sons and four daughters, viz. 

Richard Gibbins, in holy or- 
ders, who m. first, Miss 
Hyde, dau. of Arthur Hyde, 
esq. of Castle Hyde, M. P. 
for the county of Cork, and 
secondly, Cc'itherine, sister 
to William Odell, esq. of 
the Grove, M. P. for the 
county of Limerick. By 
the latter he had a daughter, 
Jane, the wife of Thomas 
Odell, esq. and two sons, 
Bartholomew (who m. Miss 
Smith) and Thomas, in holy 
orders, (wlio »«. Miss Ro- 
berts,]: of Charleville). 

Bartholomew Gibbins, whow. 
Miss Armstead, of Cork, but 
died issueless. His widow 
espoused George Wade, esq. 

Edward Gibbins, colonel in 
the Hon. East India Com- 
pany service, died unm. 



II. William Hoare, in holy orders, minister 
of St. George's, and vicar general of the 
diocese of Limerick, b. 31st October, 1773, 
who m. Miss Guinness, sister of Arthur 
Guinness, esq. of Beaumont, in the county 
of Dublin. 

if: J. B. Roberts, esq. of Charleville, in the 
county of Cork, left five daughters, viz. 

1. Catherine Roberts. 

2. Sarah Roberts, m. to Charles Dudley 
Oliver, esq. (son of John Oliver, D. D. 
Archdeacon of Ardagh, by Miss Ryder, 
daughter of the Archbishop of Tuam) 
nephew of the Riglit Hon. Silver Oliver, 
of Castle Oliver, in the county of Lime- 
rick, and brother to Alicia, \iscountess 
Lifford, and Robert Dudley Oliver, Ad- 
miral of the Royal Navy. 

3. Charlotte Roberts, m. to the Rev. Dr. 
Townley, of Margate. 

4. Mary Roberts, in. to Bowles Reeves, esq. 

5. Agnes Roberts, m, to the Rev Thomas 
Gibbins. 



206 



SEYMOUR, OF CASTLETOWN. 



Arthur Gibbins, also colonel 
in the Hon. East India Com- 
pany service, who m. in 
1 802, Catherine, daughter of 
John Cuthbert, esq. of Cork, 
and has a daughter, Mary. 

Thomas Gibbins, an eminent 
physician, who d. unm. 

Mary Gibbins, m. to William 
Yielding, esq. of the county 
of Kerry, nephew of William 
Yielding, esq. of Bellvue, 
in the county of Limerick, 
whose daughter, Millicent 
Agnes, m. Sir Rowland 
Blennerhasset, bt. of Blen- 
nerville, in Kerry. 
Catherine, m. to William 
Crofts, and left four daugh- 
ters. 
Jane. 

Elizabeth, married to colonel 
Roberts. 
2. Catherine, m. to the Rev. Wil- 
liam John Bowen, of Bowens 
Ford, in the county of Cork, and 
had three daughters, viz. 

Mary Bowen, m. to her cousin, 
the Rev. Edward Wight, 
rector of Rathronan. 
Elizabeth Bowen, m. to Lul- 
lum Batwell, esq. of the 
county of Cork, and left 
issue, Andrew Batwell, m. 
Miss Galway, daughter of 
John Galway, esq. of Mal- 
low ; and Jane Batwell, the 
wife of Edward Massey, esq. 
of Glenville. 
Jane Bowen, m. to John Fitz- 
maurice, esq. of Lixnaw, in 
Kerry, grandson of the Hon. 
James Fitzmaurice, brother 
of Thomas, first Earl of 
Kerry. 
Mr. Alderman Wight, married secondly. 
Miss Bindon, daughter of Alderman Henry 
Bindon, by whom he had no issue ; and 
thirdly. Miss Hawkesworth, and had four 
other sons and three daughters, viz. 
John, of whom presently. 
Thomas, died unm. 

Williamson, in holy orders, who m. first, 
Miss Dupont; and secondly, Barbara, 
daughter of Sir George Mitchell, and 
left issue, Edward, John, Elizabeth, 
m. to William Galway, esq. and 
Philicia, to Dr. Aikenhead, of Cork. 
George, married, and left issue, Picmar 
Wight, who m. his cousin Mary, 
daughter of Alderman John Wight. 

Frances, m. to AVilliam Hobart, esq. 
eldest son of AVilliam Ilobart, esq. 
of Dunmore, in the county of Water- 



ford, by his wife, Miss Hawkesworth 
and left issue. 
Jane, m. to William Seymour, esq. and 
had a son, the Rev. John Seymour, 
father of the Admiral Sir Michael 
Seymour, bart. 
Judith, «t._to William M'Cormack, esq. 
but d. s.p. 
The alderman died in 1723. His eldest son, 
by his third marriage, 

John Wight, esq. seated at Wightfield, 
near Limerick, was sheriff of Limerick in 
1729, and filled the civic chair in 1741. He 
tn. his cousin, Frances, daughter of William 
Hobart,* esq. of Dunmore, in the county of 
Waterford, and had issue, 

Edward, in holy orders, rector of 
Melick, and St. Munchins, in Lime- 
rick, w. his cousin Frances, daughter 
of William Hobart, esq. of High 
Mount, in the county of Cork, and of 
Mount Melick, in the King's County, 
by Avhom he left at his demise, vita 
patris, in 1775, two sons and two 
daughters, 

Hobart, died unm. 
- John, also died unm. 

Catherine, m. (as already stated) 
to the Rev. John Crossley 
Seymour. 
Frances. 
Eliza, 7H. to Sexten Baylee, esq. alder- 
man and mayor of Limerick in 1758, 
uncle of the late Henry Baylee, esq. 
of Loughgur, and had issue, 

Sexten Baylee, who m. Miss Anne 

* Edward Hobart, esq. the first of the family 
who settled in Ireland, was seated at Dunmore, 
in the county of Waterford. He married, and 
left two sons, 

William, his heir. 

Andrew, of Lackeasillage, in the county of 
Waterford, m. Sarah Alice, daughter of 
William Usher, esq. of the county of Water- 
ford (son of Arthur Usher, esq. by Judith, 
liis wife, daughter of Sir Robert Newco- 
nien, bart. of RIosstoun, in Longford) and 
had one son and one daughter, who both 
died unmarried. He died in 1765. 
The elder son, 

William Hobart, esq. of Dunmore, m. Miss 
Hawkesworth (whose sister wedded Alderman 
Edward Wight) and left at bis decease, in 1720, a 
daughter, Frances, in. to her cousin. Alderman 
John Wight, of Wightfield, and a son in minority, 
William Hoiiart, esq. of ]\Iount Melick, in 
the King's County, and of High Mount, in the 
county of Cork, who espoused his cousin, Frances, 
daughter of Mr. Alderman Wight, and left tvro 
daughters, his co-heirs, Frances, m. to her cousin. 
Rev. .Edward Wight, and Grizzle, m. to her 
cousin, tiie Rev. John Seymour : in the descen- 
dants of these marriages, the representation of the 
Hobart f\miily now rests, viz. in Aaron Crossley 
Seymour, escj. and Sir Michael Seymour, bart. to 
whom also the estate descends. , 



lUDDELL, OF FELTON PARK. 



207 



Tavorner ; aiul secondly, Fli/a, 
relict of Walter VVidenliaiu, esq. 
IJy the latter lie has issue, .loliii, 
Pery, luliuiiinl, and .Jane. 
Pery Hayh^e, died unni. 
Kliza I Jay lee, m. first, to captain 
Matthew Plaince, and secondly, 
to \V. H. Hayiee, esq. She 
died .V. />. in IH'M. 
Jane, died iinni. 



Mary, •/«. to her cousin, IMckmar 
W'i<»ht, esq. and di(!d at an advance<l 
af;(\ in \H'M), havinjj had issue, 
(ieorgc Wi^ht, died uiim. 
John Wight, who m. Catherine, 
dauy,hter of Henry IJowen, es(|. 
of IJowen's Court. 
Criz/.el Wi^ht, ?«. to the Rev. 
Thomas .lones, and has issue. 
Alderman John Wight died in 1782. 



RIDDELL, OF FELTON PARK. 



RTDDELL, THOMAS, esq. of Felton Park and Swinhurnc Castle, both in the 
county of Nortluinibcrland, b. 18th May, 1802, m. 15th October, 1827, Mary, 
daughter of the late Willhim Throckmorton, esq. of Lincoln's inn, and has four sons, 
viz. 

Thomas-Wiixiam, b. 14th October, 1828. 
John-GifTard, h. 10th January, 1830. 
Walter, b. 17th July, 1831. 
Robert, b. 24th August, 1832. 



Mr. Riddell succeeded his father on the 9th March, 1833. 
of the peace for Northumberland. 



lie is in the commission 



HLmfflgc. 




The ancient family of Riddell derives 
from 

Sir Jordan de Ridel, (brother of Gal- 
fred de Ridel, Baron of Blaye) who held a 
moiety of the lordship of Tilmouth, in Nor- 
tiuimberland, in the 17th of Edward I. In 
the next reign (8th of Edward II.), 

Sir William dr Ridrll filled the impor- 
tant office of sherill' for the county of Nor- 
thumberland, and was appointed by patent, 
dated 5th June, 1314, from Bishop" Kellaw, 



Constable of Norham castle. He m. Emma, 
and had two sons, namely, 

I. William, who held the manor of 
Tilmouth. He d. 4th Edward III. 
leaving- three daughters, his coheirs, 

Isabella, b. in 1299, m. to Alan 

Claverynge. 
CoNSTANTiA, b. in 1.303, m. to Sir 

John Kyngeston, knt. 
Joan, b. in 1307, m. to Gerard 

Widdrington. 

II. Hugh. 
The younger, 

Hugh de Ridel, living in the 4th Ed- 
ward III., 1329, was father of 

Thomas de Ridel, who made his will in 
1358, and left a son, 

Thomas Ridell, father of 

Thomas Ridell, who wedded one of the 
daughters and coheirs of Harbotel, of Nor- 
thumberland, and left a son and heir, 

John Ridell, who was sherift" of New- 
castle upon Tyne, in 1478. He m. — , and 
had issue, 

Thomas, his heir. 
Peter. 

William, sheriff" of Newcastle in 1.500. 
The eldest son, 

Thomas Ridell,. was thrice mayor of 



208 



RIDDELL, OF FELTON PARK. 



Newcastle in the years 1510, 1521, and 
1526. He wedded Eleanor, daughter of 
Ralph Claxton, esq., and sister of William 
Claxton, of Wynyard, and by her (who m. 
for her second husband Edward Swinburne) 
had a son and successor, 

Pktek Ridell, living a merchant at 
Newcastle in 1549, who m. Dorothy, eldest 
dauohter of John Brandling, mayor of the 
same borough in ISOJ), and sister of Sir 
Ralph Brandling, knt., {see vol. ii, p. 39) 
and had issue, 

I. Thomas, his heir, who d. s. p. 

II. Peter, of Newcastle,wedded Eleanor, 
daughter of John Swinburne, of the 
same place, and had 

William, b. in 1581. 

Peter, b. in 1591. 

Thomas, b. in 1599. 

Barbara, b. in 1584, m. first, in 
1603, to John Sotheron, and se- 
condly, to Anthony Theobald. 

III. William, of whom presently. 

I. Eleanor, m. to Henry Lawe. 

II. Katherine, m. in 1580 to Anthony 
Lawe. 

The youngest son, 

William Ridel, of Newcastle, merchant 
adventurer, sheriff of that borough in 1575, 
and mayor in 1582, 1590, and 1595. This 
worshipful citizen married twice ; by his 
first wife, Anne, daughter and heir of Wil- 
liam Lawson, he had an only son, Thomas, 
(Sir) his heir. By the second, Barbara, 
daughter of Alderman Bertram Anderson, 
(who d. in 1627, and was buried on the 11th 
November, her will bears date 30th October, 
3rd Charles I.) he had eight other sons and 
a daughter, viz. 

Peter (Sir), sheriff of Newcastle in 
1604, mayor in 1619 and 1635. Mem- 
ber of parliament for the borough in 
1623, 1626, 1628, and 1640, m. first, 
Isabel,* daughter of Mr. Alderman 
Atkinson, of Newcastle, and had by 
that lady, who d. in 1614, four sons 
andfourdaughters. Sir Peter wedded, 
secondly, Mary, second daughter and 
coheir of Thomas Surtees, esq. (lieir 
male of the Dinsdale family) and had 
two more daughters, Anne, m. in 1638, 
to Cuthbert Carr, esq. of St. Helen 
Auckland, in Durham, and Isabel, 
b. in 1618. 
Henry, b. in 1574, d. at Elbinge, in 

Germany, issueless. 
William, b. in 1578, married, and had 

five sons and as many daughters, 
George, b. in 1580. 
Robert, b. in 1582, d. young. 

• Her sister married the Right Rev. William 
James, Bishop of Durham. 



Michael, b. in 1583, d. in 1613, pro- 
bably 5. p. 
John, b. in 1585. 

Robert, b. in 1590, of Newcastle, died 
in 1635 without issue, seised of cer- 
tain lands in Lanchester, leaving his 
brother, Sir Peter, his heir. He had 
married, in 1621, Jane Cole, who 
survived his widow until 1651. 
Alice, b. in 1587. 
The only son of the first marriage. 

Sir Thomas Ridel, knight of Gateshead, 
in the Palatinate of Durham, was sheriff of 
Newcastle in 1601, mayor in 1604 and 1616, 
and member of parliament for the borough 
in 1620, and again with his brother. Sir 
Peter Ridel in 1628. He m. Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir John Conyers, knight of 
Sockburn, and had issue, 

I. William (Sir),'his heir, who in the 
time of Elizabeth, was one of the 
grand lessees in trust for the corpo- 
ration of Newcastle, of the lordships 
of Gateshead, andWhickham. He 
171. first, Katherine, daughter of Sir 
Henry Widdrington, of Widdrington, 
and had an only surviving child, 

William, of Gateshead, who died 
1698, leaving by Isabel, his first 
wife, a daughter, 
Jane, the wife of Mark Ridell, 
esq. 
and by Margaret, his second 
wife, a son, and another daughter, 

viz. 

William, of Gateshead, who d. 

s. p. in 1710. 
Catherine, who died unm. in 
1750. 

II. Thomas (Sir). 

III. Peter, d. s. p. 

IV. George, b. in 1602. D. C. L. Judge 
Advocate in the Array of the Mar- 
quess of Newcastle, and during the 
siege of Hull in 1645, m. Jane, dau. 
and co-heir of — Eysdale, chancellor 
of the diocese of York, and had a 
son, Thomas, and a daughter, Mar- 
garet. 

V. Robert, b. in 1612, m. a French 
lady, named Magdalen. 

VI. Ephraim, b. in 1615. 

I. Anne, m. to Sir John Clavering, knt. 
of Callaly (see vol. i. p. 239). 

II. Elizabeth, d. in 1606. 

III. Mary, jn. to Sir Francis Radcliffe, 
bart. of Dilston. 

IV. Eleanor, b. in 1610. 

V. Jane, vi. to John Forcer, esq. of 
Harber House, in the county of 
Durham. 

The second son, (in whose descendant the 
representation eventually centred), 

Sir Thomas Ridell, knight of Fenham, 



RIDDEIX, OF FELTON. 



209 



wjis recorder of Newcastle, and representa- 
tive of thel)orouu;li in ();irlianioiit, in (lie IStli 
of Jamks I. J)niin<;- tlie tronbies of the 
ensuinj;- reign, Sir Tliomas espoused, uitli 
extraordinary zeal, the royal cause. He 
commanded a re|;iment of foot in the service 
of the king, was governor of Tyncmoutli 
Castle, and so distinguished, that a reward 
of one thousand pounds was ofl'ered for his 
apprehension. He eflected liis escape, how- 
ever, in a small fishing smack from Ber- 
wick, and died at Antwerp in 1652, " a 
banished man," his lordship of Tunstal 
having been previously sold to satisfy his 
composition. He m. in 1()29, Barbara, dau. 
of Sir Alexander Davison, knight of Blak- 
iston, and widow of Ralph Calverley, by 
whom he had issue, 

Thomas, his heir, baptized 17th June, 

1632. 
Ralph, h. in 1636. 

Barbara, h. in 1630. 

Anne, b. in 1632, m. to Francis, second 
son of Marmaduke Tunstal, esq. of 
Wyclifte, in the county of York. 

Elizabeth, b. in 1634, m. to Ralph Wil- 
son, esq. of Field House, near Gates- 
head. 

Margery, b. in 1639, living in 1661 a 
nun at Pointoise in France. 

Jane, b. in 1641. 

Eleanor, b. in 1643. 

Sir Thomas was s. by his eldest son, 

Thomas Riddell, esq. of Fenham, in the 
♦'ounty of Northumberland, which estate he 
sold in the year 1695, under an act of 
parliament, to John Orde, esq. of Newcastle, 
and purchasing Swinburne, settled there. 
He TO. Mary, eldest daughter of Edward 
Grey, esq. of Bichfield, in Northumberland, 
and had (with other daughters, who all died 
unra.) the following issue, 

I. Thomas, b. in 1656, ? , ., , 

n. William, b. in 1658,$ both rf. young. 

III. Edward, the heir. 

IV. Alexander, i. in 1663, 

V. Mark, a physician, sometime of 
Hunton, and afterwards of Morpeth, 
h. in 1665, m. Jane, daughter of Wil- 
liam Ridell, esq. of Gateshead, and 
had one son, Edward of Morpeth, 
living in 1731, when his (the Doc- 
tor's) will, which bears date in 1721, 
was proved. 

VI. John, d. in 1672. 
vii. Thomas. 

VTli. William. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to William Shaftoe, 
esq. of Bavington. 
Mr. Riddell d. about the year 1704, and was 
*. by his eldest surviving son, 

Edward Riddell, esq. of Swinburne 
Castle, b. in 1660, who wedded Dorothy, 



daughter of Robert Dallon, esq. of Thurn- 
ham, in Lancashire, and dying in i73J, was 
s. by his only son, 

Thomas Riddell, esq. of Swinburne 
Castle. This gentleman, who was involved 
in the rising of 1715, saved himself by es- 
(;apiiig from /jaiicast<!r Castle, but not being 
excepted from the general pardon, he was 
allowed to return to his estate, and reside 
there unmolested. He m. in 1726, Mary, 
daughter of William Widdrington, esq. of 
Cheesburn Grange, ami sister and co-heir of 
Ralph Widdrington, by whom he had issue, 
Thomas, his successor. 
Ralph, who inheriting the estates of his 
uncle, Ralph Widdrington, esq. be- 
came " of Cheesburn Grange." (See 
Riddell of Cheesburn Grange.) 

Dorothy, d. unm. 

Barbara, m. to — Nelson, esq. of Lan- 
cashire. 

, m. to — Maxwell, esq. of Kirkos- 

wald, N. B. 

He was s. at his decease by his elder son, 

Thomas RiDDELL,esq.of Swinburne Castle, 
who had been engaged with his father in the 
insurrection of 1715, and was carried up to 
London, where being with several others 
arraigned for high treason in 1716, he 
pleaded guilty, but experienced the royal 
mercy. He espoused Elizabeth, only dau. 
and heiress of Edward Horsley Wid- 
drington, esq. of Felton, in Northumber- 
land, by whom he acquired that estate, 
with Longhorsley, in the same county, and 
had issue, 

I. Thomas, heir to Swinburne. 

II. Edward, who inherited the estates 
of the Widdringtons, through his 
mother, and became " of Felton and 
Horsley." He m. 5th July, 1792, 
Isabella, daughter of William Salvin, 
esq. of Croxdale, but died s. p. on the 
26th January, in the next year, at 
Stella Hall, Durham. His widow 
married in 1803, Ralph Riddell, esq. 
of Cheesburn Grange. 

III. Ralph, heir to his elder brother, 
Thomas. 

I. Mary. 

II. Dorothy, d. unm. 

in. Elizabeth, m. to John Clifton, esq. 
of Lytham. 

IV. Anne, m. to Sir Walter Blount, 
hart, of Sodington. 

This Thomas Riddell sold Fenham Colliery 
to the Ord family, who had already pur- 
chased the feesimple of the land. He died 
in 1777, and was s. by his eldest son, 

Thomas Riddell, esq. of Swinburne Cas- 
tle, who TO. 19th April, 1790, Margaret, dau. 
of William Salvin, esq. of Croxdale, and 
had an only child, Thomas, who predeceased 



2.10 



RIDDELL, OF FELTON. 



him. He died himself in 1798, and was s. 
by his youngest and only surviving brother, 
Ralph RiDDELL,esq.of Felton and Hors- 
lev, whieh estates he had inherited at the 
decease of his brotlier Edward, issueless, in 
1793. He m. 23rd July, 1801, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Joseph Blount, esq. second son 
of Michael Blount, esq. of Maple Durham, 
(see page 170), and had issue, 

Thomas, his heir. 

Edward Widdrington, b. 4th September, 

1803. m. 1st July 1830, Catherine, 

daughter of Thomas Stapleton, esq. 

of Richmond, in the county of York. 
William, b. 5th February, 1807, in holy 

orders of the church of Rome. 
Henry, b. 24th February, 181.5. 
Charles-Francis, b. 1st October, 1817. 

Elizabeth-Anne. 
Mr. Riddell died on the 9th March, 18-33, 
and was succeeded by his eldest son, the 
present Thomas Riddell, esq. of Felton 
Park, and Swinburne Castle, both in the 
county of Northumberland. 



.ifamilj) of i^orsleg. 

The old and knightly race of HoRSLEY, 
from which the estates of Felton and Hors- 
ley have come, through the Widdringtons, 
to the Riddells, were land owners in Nor- 
thumberland* at a very remote period, pro- 
bably preceding the time of Henry HI. 
for Roger de Horsley occurs as a witness 
to a deed without a date, by which Roger de 
Merlay conveyed five bovates of land, situa- 
ted in Horsley, Sheles, andTodburn, to Adam 
de Plesseto and his heirs. 
The name of 

Sir John de Horsley, Knight Banneret, 
appears in a document written about 1522, 
as John Horsley, and as then dwelling in a 
place belonging to his father, over whose 
lands, to the value of fifty marks yearly he 
had the whole rule ; beside which, he him- 
self had lands, out of which he could dispend 
£40 a year, and serve the king with thirty 
horsemen. In 1547, he fought at Mussel- 
burgh, and was made a Banneret on the 
field of battle. In 1552, he was a commis- 
sioner of enclosures, in the East Marclies, at 
which time he was Captain of Bamborough 
Castle, and he and Sir John Foster had the 
appointment of the watch in that year, from 
Warnmouth to Doxford Burn. He left, with 
a daughter, Isabella, of whom presently, 
an only son, 

CiJTHBERT, of Horsley, member of par- 
liament for Northumberland in the 
7th of Edward VI. and 1st of Queen 
Mary, wliose name is to be found in 

* At Lonjc Horsley. 



a list of gentlemen, of the Middle 
Marches, made in 1550, and in 1552, 
amongst the Commissioners of Enclo- 
sures, in the same district. In 1568, 
he was proprietor of Scranwood, a 
moiety of the ville and manor of 
Horsley, Brinkheugh, &c. he had a 
daughter, Elizabeth, the wife of John 
Bell, of Bellasis, and a son and heir, 
John Horsley, esq. of Horsley, 
who m. Eleanor, daughter of 
William Hilton, esq. of Hilton 
Castle, in Durham, and dying 
about 1605, left 

George, of Horsley, who 
wedded Catherine, daughter 
of — Grey, of Chillingham, 
but died s. p. about 1615. 
Anne, m. to Robert Horsley, 
of Brinkheugh. 

The only daughter of Sir John de Horsley, 
Isabella Horsley, espoused Thomas 
Horsley, esq. of Brinkheugh, (whose arms 
were three horses' heads), and was mother 
of 

Lancelot Horsley, esq. of Brinkheugh, 
who m. Elizabeth, dau. of John Widdrington, 
esq. of Hauxley, and had two sons and three 
daughters, viz. 

Thomas (Sir) his heir. 
Robert, of Brinkheugh, who m. Anne, 
daughter of John Horsley, esq. 

Catherine, m. to — Fulwood, esq. s 

Margaret. 
Florentina. 
He died in 1609, and was s. by his elder 
son. 

Sir Thomas Horsley, knt. of Horsley, 
b. 25th August, 1612, who m. Eleanor, dau. 
of William Calverley, esq. of Calverley, and 
had issue, 

William, who wedded Rebecca, dau. 
of Robert Salvin esq. of Durham, but 
died without issue, in his (Sir Tho- 
mas's) life time. 

Dorothy, of whom presently. 

Mary. 
Amongst the guests at Horsley, Kenet 
mentions the reception of General Monk by 
Sir Thomas, in the following words — " Ge- 
neral Monk was at Wooler, 1st January, 
1601 ; at Whittingham the next day, and in 
his way to Morpeth, on the 3rd he was en- 
tertained, with his whole train, by this honest 
old knight at his house, very kindly and 
nobly," and again lie says, " the night be- 
fore we came to Morpeth, we had good 
quarters, and were contented with what the 
house afl'orded. The gentleman was of the 
Romish religion, and informed us that 
Lambert's forces had quartered there, and 
told us plainly, he had ratlier they should 
have prevailed. We had so much of good 
manners as not to be angry with him in his 



LONC^ WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



211 



own house, or for his private opinion." Sir 
Thomas served tlie office of sheriff for Nor- 
flmniberland, about the year ](iG4. Mis 
M ill bears date in l(iKf>. His ebb'St (biiinhfer, 

DoKOTiiv IIoKSLi: Y, wj. first, about l();V>, 
Robert L'Isle, escj. but by liim, who died in 
1067, bad no issue. Slie wedded secondly, 
the Hon. I^dward Widdrington, son of Sir 
^\ illiani Widdrinnton.of Widdriu<;ton, F^ord 
\Vid<lrin{;ton,(see Bukke's Extinct Peerat/e) 
and by that gentleman, who fell at llie Battle 
of the Boyne, left, with three daughters, a 
sou and successor, 

lv/>\VAKD WiDDKiNGTON, esq. ofFelton,t. 
in l()r)S, who m. Elizabetli,* daughter of 
Caryl, third Viscount Molyneux, and left at 
his decease, in 1705, with two daughters, 
Theresa, 7M. to Sir William Wheeler, bart. 
of Leamington, Hastang, in the county of 
Warwick, and Bridget, a son and successor, 

Edward Horslky Widdrington, esq. of 
Felton, whose will was proved in 1763. He 

* Sister of Anne, wife of William Widdrington, 
esq. of Cheesburn Grange. 



m. Kli/.abt.tli, (iiiugbter of Humphrey Weld, 
esq. of Lnlwordi Castle, in the county of 
Dorset, and left an only daughter and 
heiress, 

Ei.i/ABiTii Widdrington, who married 
Thomas Riunii.L, esq. as stated under Rid- 
del!. 

Arms — Arg. a fess between three Rye 
sheaves, az. 

Ci-est — A demi-lion couped or, holding a 
rye sheaf. 

Motto — Deu8 solus auget aristas. 

Estates— FcWon and Long Horsley, in 
Northumberland, acquired by the marriage 
of the present proprietor's grandfather, with 
Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Edward 
Horsley Widdrington, esq. Swinburne, 
purchased in 1695, by T. Riddell, esq. of 
Fenham, and Little Swinburne, purchased by 
the late R. Riddell, esq. 

Seats — Felton Park, and Swinburne Cas- 
tle, Northumberland. 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



WELLESLEY-LONG-TYLNEY, WILLIAM-RICHARD-ARTHUR, esq. of 
Draycot, in the county of Wilts, b. October, 1813, inherited the estates from his 
mother, Catherine, sister and heiress of Sir James Tilney-Long', bart. 



Hintage. 




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The ancient family of Long, now repre- 
sented through his mother byMr.Wellesley 
(lor whose paternal descent refer to Burke's 



Peerage) flourished in the county of Wilts, 
for many generations, ' knyghtes,' as Cam- 
den says, ' and men of greate worship.' 
We find them first established at South 
Wraxall, in that county, but whether by 
grant, by purchase, or by marriage, does 
not distinctly appear.* The tradition men- 

* We shall give the account of their supposed 
origin in the words of Leland and Camden, pre- 
mising, however, that persons styled le I>ong and 
Longus, are to be met with in deeds considerably 
anterior to the time stated, as for example. Sir 
William le Long, a knigbt of Gloucestershire, 
temp. Henry III. bearing for bis arms, gules a 
saltire engrailed, or. Ayhner Long stated to have 
Iield one knight's fee, in Wilts, in the 1,5th of 
Henry II. Eobert I>ong, who held land at 
Langley Burrell, in the same countv, about the 
time of Henry III. Gilbert and .John Long, 
sons of Walter Long, said to have founded the 
hospital of St. .rohn, at Exeter, in the 23rd of 
Henry III. Leland writes as follows: 



212 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



tioned by that author, of tlipir alliance to 
the Preux faniily, is in some degree sup- 
ported by the close resemblance of the 
coat of arms (the coate of Preux being 
sa. semee of cross crosslets, or, 3 lioncels 
rampant argent) while the descents bear out 
the statement of Leland. However this may 
be, it is clear that they were of some repute 
as early as the time of Henry IV. and a 
monument of about that date in the church 
of Wraxall, sufficiently attests the respect- 
ability of one of their first alliances, the 
bearings on it being Long, impaling Berkley, 
quartering Seymour. Tradition begins the 
pedigree with a Long, married to a Stourton, 
to whom succeeded his son, married to a 
Berkley, of Beverstone, who was again suc- 
ceeded by his son, Roger Long, or le Long, 
married to a Seymour, or St. Maur. With- 
out dismissing these personages as alto- 
gether fabulous, (for there really are some 
grounds for a portion at least of the theory), 
we shall begin with the first known possessor 
of Wraxall, namely 

Robert Long, or Longe, who was in 
the commission of the peace in 1426, and 
was M. P. for Wiltshire in 1433. He m. 
Alice, daughter and heiress of Reginald 
Pophani,* of North Bradley, in the county 
of Wilts, and had issue, 

I. Henry, his heir. 

II. John, VI. Margaret, daughter of 
Edward Wayte, by the heiress of 



" The original setting up of the House of the 
Longes, came (as I learned from Mr. Boneham) 
by these means. One Long Thomas, a stoute 
felaw, was sette up by one of the old Lordes Hun- 
geifordes ; and after by cause this Thomas was 
cauUid long Thomas, Long after was usurped for 
the i name of the family. This Long Thomas 
master had sum lande by Hungreford's procu- 
ration. Then succeeded hym Robert and Henry. 
Then came one Thomas Long, descending of a 
younger brother, and good skille of the lawe, and 
had the inheritances of the aforesaid Longes. Syr 
Henry and Syr Richard Longe, were sunnes to 
this Thomas." 

Camden, in his Remains, says : 

" In respect of stature, I could recite to you 
other examples ; but I will only add this, which I 
have read, that a young gentleman of the house of 
Preux, being of tall stature, attending on tlie Lord 
Hungerford, Lord Treasurer of England, was 
among his fellows called Long H., who after pre- 
ferred to a good marriage by his Lord, was called 
H. Long, that name continued to his posterity, 
knights and men of greate worship." 

The name of Preux occurs in the roll of Battle 
Abbey, and the family was seated at Gidley Cas- 
tle, in Devonshire, soon after the conquest. Wil- 
liam lo Preux was member for Wilton, in Wilt- 
shire, 28th of Edward I. 

* The connection of this family of Popham, 



Draycot Cerne,t and sister and co- 
heir of Thomas Wayte, of the Tem- 
ple, and of Draycot, and had issue, 

1. Thomas, afterwards Sir Thomas. 

2. Richard, (Sir). 

3. William. 

III. Reginald, died before 1490. 
Robert Long died subsequently to 1459, 
(when we find him mentioned in the will of 
Robert, Lord Hungerford, son of the Lord 
Treasurer) and was succeeded by his son, 

Henry Long, of Wraxall, who was sheriff 
of Wilts in 1457, 1476 and 1483. He m. first, 
Joan, daughter of — Ernleigh, but by her, 
who died 1468, had no issue ; secondly, Mar- 
garet daughter of John Newburgh, of Lull- 
worth, in the county of Dorset, by whom 
also he had no issue, and tliirdly, another 
Joan, who survived him, and had likewise 
no issue. We find hira mentioned in the 
will of Margaret Lady Hungerford, the re- 
lict of Robert before mentioned, in 1479. 
He died October 20, 1490, and was buried 
in the chancel of the Church of Wraxall, 
being succeeded in his estates by his nephew. 

Sir Thomas Long, of Wraxall and 
Draycot, knt. Sheriff of Wilts in 1501, %vho 
was among the "great compaignye of noble 
men," who served under Edward, Duke of 
Buckingham, against Perkin Warbeck (see 
Hardyng's Chronicles). He received the 
honour of knighthood at the marriage of 
Prince Arthur, and married Mary, daughter 
of Sir George Darell, of Littlecote,| in the 
county of Wilts, and had issue, 



with that of the Judge, does not distinctly appear. 
There is, however, but little doubt of the affinity. 
A moiety of the manor of Barton Stacey, in Hants, 
was held by Robert Long, in the 25th of Henry 
VI. and by his son, John, in the 18th of Edward 
IV. which manor was held by Sir Philip Popham, 
and Elizabeth, his wife, in the 21st of Richard II. 

t The Cernes were Lords of Melcombe, in the 
county of Dorset, in the time of Richard I. and 
Galfridus de Cerne was Lord of Draycot, in the 
time of Henry III. The property, and with it 
the advowson, has descended, therefore, without 
alienation to the present possessor through six 
centuries, of which it was in the Long family for 
nearly four. The last of the Cemes, Lords of 
Draycot, (Richard de Cerne) died in the 8th of 
Henry VI. and was succeeded by John de Her- 
ringe, from whom the property passed, through 
the Waytes, to the Longs ; but by what inter- 
marriage is not exactly known. The other sister 
and co-heiress of Thomas Wayte, married Sir 
John Chalers, knt. who was sheriff of Berks in 
1449. Draycot was held by the service of being 
marshal at the coronation. 

X The Darells were settled in Wiltshire, by 
the marriage of William Darell, a younger son 
of Darell, of Sesay, in Yorkshire, with Elizabeth 
Calston, the heiress of Littlecote. The Calstons 
had previously intermarried with a co-heiress of 
St. Martin, One of the daughters of Sir George 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



213 



I. IIp.nry, his heir. 

II. Ricliiird, (Sir) kniglit* of Sliciiffay 
and llardwicic, ill tlic county ofdain- 
bridgc, };eiitleinaii of the privy cliaiii- 
bcr, captain of Guoriisoy, and master 
of tlie liawks and buclilionnds, in. 
]Vlar<j;aret, daughter and lieir of .John 
Donnington, esq. and relict of Sir 
Thomas Kitson, of Hengrave, in tlie 
county of Suffolk, knt. She died in 
1561, set. 52, having remarried John 
Bourchier, Earl of Jiath. Sir Richard 
had issue, 

Henry, h. March 22, 1534. 
Catharine, ni. Edward Fislier, esq. 

of Ickington, in the county of 

Warwick. 

Jane. 
Mary. 

Sir Richard died 1545, and was 

succeeded by his son, 

Hknry Long, esq.f of Shengay, 
M. P. for the county of Cam- 
bridge 1571, married Dorothy, 
daughter of Nicholas Clarke, of 
North Weston, in the county of 
Oxon, who remarried Sir Charles 
Morrison, of Cashiobury. Mr. 
Long died in 1573, and was s. 
by his only surviving daughter 
and heir, 

Elizabeth, m. to William, Lord 
Russell, of Thornhaugh, an- 
cestor to the Duke of Bed- 
ford. She died in 1611, and 
was buried at Watford. 

III. Thomas. 

I V. Robert, of Mawditt, parish of Som- 
erford, Wilts. 

V. John. 

VI. William. 

VII. Edward. 

I. Joan, m. Edward Mylle, esq. grand- 
son of Sir William Mylle, of Tre- 
Mylle, in the county of Gloucester. 

Darell married Sir John Seymour, grandfather to 
the Protector. The last of the Darells of Little- 
cote, William Darell, died s. p. in 1590, aged 
about 51. His next heir was Thomas, his brother, 
who was of Hungerford, and was father to Sir 
John Darell, of West Woodhay, Berks, created 
a baronet, I3th of June, 1622. 

* Sir llichard bore the canopy over Edward VI. 
at hisbaptism, and received large grants of Abbey 
lands at the dissolution of monasteries, viz. the hos- 
pital of St. Nicholas at Salisbury, Heading Place, 
in London, the manors of East Greenwich, in 
Kent, Filolshall and Coggeshall, in Essex, and 
great Saxham, in Suffolk, &c. &c. 

t Henry VIII. was his godfather (see Gage's 
Hengrave). He was buried in the church of St. 
Andrew's Wardrobe, under a "comely monument," 
as Stowe informs us, '' at the East end of the 
chancel," on which was the following inscription : 



Sir Thomas rf. in 1510, and was succeeded 

by his son. 

Sill Hknky Lo\(i, knt. of Wraxall 
and Draycot, Sh.riff of Wilts in 1512-26- 
37-42, and for Somerset in 1538, member 
for Wilts in 1552-3. Sir Henry was one of 
the attendants of Hknky VHL at the field 
of the Cloth of Cold, and was knighted fur 
making a gallant charge at Tlierouenne in 
Picardy, in the sight of Henry, when he 
received the grant of a new crest, viz. the 
lion's head with the hand in its mouth. His 
banner bears the motto, " Fortune soies 
eureux." He ni. first, Frideswide, dau. 
of Sir John Hungerford, of Down Anipney, 
great-grandson of the Lord Treasurer, and 
had issue, 

I. Thomas, d. s. p. 

II. John, d. in infancy. 

I. Elizabeth, m. Michael Quinton, of 
Bubton, Wilts, and had issue. 

II. Jane, m. Thomas Leversedge, of 
Frome Selwood, in the county of 
Somerset. 

He m. secondly, Eleanor, daughter of 
Richard Wrottesley, of Wrottesley, in the 
county of Stafford, and relict of Edmund 
Leversedge, of Frome Selwood, by her, 
who d. in 1543, he had issue, 

I. Robert, his heir. 

II. Benedict. 

III. Edmund, of Kelwayes, or Titherton 
Calloway, in the county of Wilts, »h. 
Susan, daughter of Nicholas Snell, 
of Kington St. Michael, in the same 
county, M. P. for Wilts, and who 
remarried Hugh Barret, of Tither- 
ton. He had issue, 

Henry. 
Cicely. 
Alice. 

IV. Anthony, of Ashley, in the parish 
of Box, in the county of Wilts, m. 
Alice, daughter of William Butler, 

Marmoreum decus hoc consortis munere grato, 
Non vita, verum nomine, Longus habet. 
Here lieth Henry Long, esq. of Sbingay, son and 
heir of Sir Richard Long, knt. gentleman of the 
privy chamber to King Henry VIII. the third 
son of Sir Thomas Long, knight, of Wiltshire, 
who married Dorothy, the daughter of Nicholas 
Clarke, esq. of Weston, and Elizabeth Ramsay, 
his wife, sole heir of Tliomas Ramsay, esq. of 
Hicham, her father, by whom he had issue, one 
son and three daughters. He died the loth day 
of April, anno Domini 1573, leaving alive, at that 
time of his death, Elizabeth, his sole daughter and 

heir. 

Dorothea uxor, conjugis amore posuit. 

Nomine Longus, vita brevis, inclitus ortu, 

Ingenio pricstans, ot pietatis amans. 

This conjugal memorial, of which the versification 

is in part defective, perished in the great tire. 



212 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



tioned by that autlior. of their alliance to 
tlie Preux family, is in some degree sup- 
ported by the close resemblance of the 
coat of arms (the coate of Preux being 
sa. semee of cross crosslets, or, 3 lioncels 
rampant argent) while the descents bear out 
the statement of Leland. However this may 
be, it is clear that they were of some repute 
as early as the time of Henry IV. and a 
monument of about that date in the church 
of Wraxall, sufficiently attests the respect- 
ability of one of their first alliances, the 
bearings on it being Long, impaling Berkley, 
quartering Seymour. Tradition begins the 
pedigree with a Long, married to a Stourton, 
to whom succeeded his son, married to a 
Berkley, of Beverstone, who was again suc- 
ceeded by his son, Roger Long, or le Long, 
married to a Seymour, or St. Maur. With- 
out dismissing tliese personages as alto- 
gether fabulous, (for there really are some 
grounds for a portion at least of the theory), 
we shall begin with the first known possessor 
of Wraxall, namely 

Robert Long, or Longe, who was in 
the commission of the peace in 1426, and 
was M. P. for Wiltshire in 1433. He m. 
Alice, daughter and heiress of Reginald 
Pophani,* of North Bradley, in the county 
of Wilts, and had issue, 

I. Henry, his heir. 

II. John, m. Margaret, daughter of 
Edward Wayte, by the heiress of 



Draycot Cerne,t and sister and co- 
heir of Thomas Wayte, of the Tem- 
ple, and of Draycot, and had issue, 

1. Thomas, afterwards Sir Thomas. 

2. Richard, (Sir). 

3. William. 

HI. Reginald, died before 1490, 
Robert Long died subsequently to 1459, 
(when we find him mentioned in the will of 
Robert, Lord Hungerford, son of the Lord 
Treasurer) and was succeeded by his son, 

Henry Long, of Wraxall, who was sheriff 
of Wilts in 1457, 1476 and 1483. He vu first, 
Joan, daughter of — Ernleigh, but by her, 
who died 1468, had no issue ; secondly, Mar- 
garet daughter of John Newburgh, of Lull- 
worth, in the county of Dorset, by whom 
also he had no issue, and thirdly, another 
Joan, who survived him, and had likewise 
no issue. We find him mentioned in the 
will of Margaret Lady Hungerford, the re- 
lict of Robert before mentioned, in 1479. 
He died October 20, 1490, and was buried 
in the chancel of the Church of Wraxall, 
being succeeded in his estates by his nephew. 
Sir Thomas Long, of Wraxall and 
Draycot, knt. Sheriff of Wilts in 1501, who 
was among the "great compaignye of noble 
men," who served under Edward, Duke of 
Buckingham, against Perkin Warbeck (see 
Hardyng's Chronicles). He received the 
honour of knighthood at the marriage of 
Prince Arthur, and married Mary, daughter 
of Sir George Darell, of Littlecote,]; in the 
county of Wilts, and had issue. 



" The original setting up of the House of the 
Longes, came (as I learned from Mr. Bonehnm) 
by these means. One Long Thomas, a stoute 
felaw, was sette up by one of the old Lordes Hun- 
gerfordes ; and after by cause this Thomas was 
caullid long Thomas, Long after was usurped for 
the i name of the family. This Long Thomas 
master had sum lande by Hungreford's procu- 
ration. Then succeeded hym Robert and Henry. 
Then came one Thomas Long, descending of a 
younger brother, and good skille of the lawe, and 
had the inheritances of the aforesaid Longes. Syr 
Henry and Syr Richard Longe, were sunnes to 
this Thomas." 

Camden, in his Remains, says : 

" In respect of stature, I could recite to you 
other examples ; but I will only add this, which I 
have read, that a j'oung gentleman of the house of 
Preux, being of tall stature, attending on tlie Lord 
Hungerford, Lord Treasurer of England, was 
among his fellows called Long H., who after pre- 
ferred to a good marriage by his Lord, was called 
H. Long, that name continued to his posterity, 
knights and men of greate worship." 

The name of Preux occurs in the roll of Battle 
Abbey, and tlie family was seated at Gidley Cas- 
tle, in Devonshire, soon after the conquest. Wil- 
liam le Preux was member for Wilton, in Wilt- 
shire, 28th of Edward I. 

* The connection of this family of Popham, 



with that of the Judge, does not distinctly appear. 
There is, however, but little doubt of the affinity. 
A moiety of the manor of Barton Stacey, in Hants, 
was held by Robert Long, in the 25th of Henry 
VI. and by his son, John, in the 18th of Edward 
IV. which manor was held by Sir Philip Popham, 
and Elizabeth, his wife, in the 21st of Richard II. 
t The Cemes were Lords of Melcombe, in the 
county of Dorset, in the time of Richard I. and 
Galfridus de Cerne was Lord of Draycot, in the 
time of Henry III. The property, and with it 
the advowson, has descended, therefore, without 
alienation to the present possessor through six 
centuries, of which it was in the Long family for 
nearly four. The last of the Cernes, Lords of 
Draycot, (Richard de Cerne) died in the 8th of 
Henry VL and was succeeded by John de Her- 
ringe, from whom the property passed, through 
the Waytes, to the Longs ; but by what inter- 
marriage is not exactly known. The other sister 
and co-heiress of Thomas Wayte, married Sir 
John Chalers, knt. who was sheriff of Berks in 
1449. Draycot was held by the service of being 
marshal at the coronation. 

X The Darells were settled in W^iltshire, by 
the marriage of William Darell, a younger son 
of Darell, of Sesay, in Yorkshire, with Elizabeth 
Calston, the heiress of Littlecote. The Calstons 
had previously intermarried with a co- heiress of 
St. Martin. One of the daughters of Sir George 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



213 



I. ITf.nry, liis heir. 

II. Kicliard, (Sir) kiiif;ht* of Sliengay 
and Hardwick, in tlie county of Cam- 
bridge, gentleman of the privy cham- 
ber, cajitain of Ciuernsey, and master 
of tlie hawks and I)U(;kh()iiiids, »«. 
Margaret, daughter and lieir of John 
Doniiington, esq. and relict of Sir 
Thomas Kitson, of Ilengrave, in the 
county of SulVolk, knt. She died in 
1561, <et. 52, having remarried John 
Bourchier, Earl of Bath. Sir Richard 
had issue, 

Henry, I>. March 22, 1534. 
Catharine, m. Edward Fisher, esq. 

of Ickington, in the county of 

Warwick. 

Jane. 
Mary. 

Sir Richard died 1545, and was 

succeeded by his son, 

Henry Long, esq.f of Shengay, 
M. P. for the county of Cam- 
bridge 1571, married Dorothy, 
daughter of Nicholas Clarke, of 
North Weston, in the county of 
Oxon, who remarried Sir Charles 
Morrison, of Cashiobury. Mr. 
Long died in 1573, and was s, 
by his only surviving daugliter 
and heir, 

Elizabeth, tn. to William, Lord 
Russell, of Thornhaugh, an- 
cestor to the Duke of Bed- 
ford. She died in 161 1 , and 
was buried at Watford. 

III. Thomas. 

IV. Robert, of Mawditt, parish of Som- 
erford, Wilts. 

V. John. 

VI. William. 

VII. Edward. 

I. Joan, m. Edward My lie, esq. grand- 
son of Sir William Mylle, of Tre- 
Mylle, in the county of Gloucester. 



Darell married Sir John Seymour, grandfather to 
the Protector. The last of the Darells of Little- 
cote, William Darell, died s. p. in 1590, aged 
about 51. His next heir was Thomas, his brother, 
who was of Hungerford, and was father to Sir 
.lohn Darell, of West Woodhay, Berks, created 
a baronet, I3th of June, 1622. 

* Sir Richard bore the canopy over Edward VI. 
nt his baptism, and received large grants of Abbey 
lands at the dissolution of monasteries, viz. the hos- 
pital of St. Nicholas at Salisbury, Reading Place, 
in London, the manors of East Greenwich, in 
Kent, Filolshall and Coggeshall, in Essex, and 
great Saxham, in Suffolk, &lc. &c. 

t Henry VIII. was his godfather (see Gage's 
Hengrave). He was buried in the church of St. 
Andrew's Wardrobe, under a "comely monument," 
as Stowe informs us, " at the East end of the 
chancel," on which was the following inscription : 



Sir Thomas d. in 1510, and was succeeded 
by liis son. 

Sir Henry Long, knt. of Wraxall 
and Draycot, Sheriff of Wilts in 1512-26- 
37-42, and for Somerset in 1538, member 
for Wilts in 1552-3. Sir I^Ienry was one of 
the attendants of Henry VHL at the field 
of the Cloth of Gold, and was knighted for 
making a gallant charge at Therouenne in 
Picardy, in the sight of Henry, when he 
received the grant of a new crest, viz. the 
lion's head with the hand in its mouth. His 
banner bears the motto, " Fortune soies 
eureux." He m. first, Frideswide, dau. 
of Sir John Hungerford, of Down Ampney, 
great-grandson of the Lord Treasurer, and 
had issue, 

I. Thomas, d. s. p. 

II. John, d. in infancy. 

I. Elizabeth, m. Michael Quinton, of 
Bubton, Wilts, and had issue. 

II. Jane, m. Thomas Leversedge, of 
Frome Selwood, in the county of 
Somerset. 

He m. secondly, Eleanor, daughter of 
Richard Wrottesley, of Wrottesley, in the 
county of Stafford, and relict of Edmund 
Leversedge, of Frome Selwood, by her, 
who d. in 1543, he had issue, 

I. Robert, his heir. 

II. Benedict. 

III. Edmund, of Kelwayes, or Titherton 
Calloway, in the county of Wilts, jh. 
Susan, daughter of Nicholas Snell, 
of Kington St. Michael, in the same 
county, M. P. for Wilts, and who 
remarried Hugh Barret, of Tither- 
ton. He had issue, 

Henry. 
Cicely. 
Alice. 

IV. Anthony, of Ashley, in the parish 
of Box, in the county of Wilts, m. 
Alice, daughter of William Butler, 

Marmoreum decus hoc consortis munere grato, 
Non vit&, veriim nomine, Longus habet. 
Here lieth Henry Long, esq. of Shingay, son and 
heir of Sir Richard Long, knt. gentleman of the 
privy chamber to King Henry VIII. the third 
son of Sir Thomas Long, knight, of \\'iltshire, 
who married Dorothy, the daughter of Nicholas 
Clarke, esq. of Weston, and Elizabeth Ramsay, 
his wife, sole heir of Thomas Ramsay, esq. of 
Hicham, her father, by whom he had issue, one 
son and three daughters. He died the 15th day 
of April, anno Domini 1573, leaving alive, at that 
time of his death, Elizabeth, his sole daughter and 
heir. 

Dorothea uxor, conjugis amore posuit> 

Nomine Longus, vita brevis, inclitus ortu, 

Ingenio prajstans, et pietatis amans. 

This conjugal memorial, of which the versification 

is in part defective, perished in the great fire. 



216 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



of Waller Lord Hungerford, and 
d. s. p. ill 1647. 
John, eventual heir. 
Walter, of Bristol, h. in 1623; 
d. llth October, 1669. His son, 
by Barbara his wife, 

Walter, of Wraxall, died in 
1731, aged 84, bequeathing 
the estate of Wraxall, Sec. 
to the son of his cousin, Ca- 
tharine, the wife of John 
Long, of Monkton. 
Edward, of Trowbridge, b. in 1626, 
m. Elizabeth, daughter of the 
Rev. Thomas Twist, and d. s. p. 
in 1650. 
Hesther, m. to John Aubrey, of 
Netherham, and had issue. 
The eldest surviving son, 

John Long, esq. of Wraxall, who 
died 23rd February, 1652, m. 
twice ; by the first wife he had a 
daughter, Mary, in. to John 
Aubrey, and by the second, 
Catharine, dau. of John Paynter, 
who wedded secondly, Edward 
Aubrey, of Wraxall, one son 
and three daughters, viz. 

Hope Long, esq. of Wraxall, 
who m. first, Mary, dau. 
of John Long, of Monkton, 
and grand-daughter of Ed- 
ward Long, and had issue, 
John, born in 1672, d. s. p. 
Catharine, b. in 1674, m. 
to Michael Tidcombe, 
esq. and had issue.* 
He wedded secondly, Grace, 
relict of — Blanchard, of 
Preston, in the county of 
Somerset, but by her had 
no issue. Mr. Hope Long 
died in 1715, when the es- 
tates passed to his cousin, 
Walter Long, esq. son of 
Walter, of Bristol. 
Catharine, wi. to John Long, 
esq. grandson of Edward 
Long, of Monkton,! and had 
issue. 
Elizabeth. 

Anne, 7)i. to Henry Long, esq. 
of Melksham, son of Richard 

* The representation of the elder branch of the 
Longs is in the descendants of this marriage, if 
any exist. If not, it vests in tlie present Sir 
Bourchier Wrey, the issue of Catharine, wife of 
John I^ong, bein^; now extinct. 

t This family is alluded to in a note (vol. ii, p. 
165). Its most distinguished members were Sir 
Walter Long, bart. of Whaddon, the celebrated 
parliamentarian, and Sir Lislebone Long, knt. 
of Stratton in Somersetshire, speaker of the House 
ol° Commoas on Chute's illness, in 1638. 



Long, of CoUingbourne, 
Wilts, and had issue.* 
II. Thomas, who d. s. p. 
I, Barbara, m. to Morice Berkeley, 
of Beverstone Castle, Gloucester- 
shire, and had issue. 

Sir Walter wedded, secondly, Catharine,! 
daughter of Sir John Thynne, of Longleat, 
and by her, who m. for her second husband. 
Sir Edward Fox, of Gwernoga, in Mont- 
gomeryshire, had issue, 

I. Walter, of whom presently, as an- 
cestor to the Draycot line. 

II. Thomas, who had an only son slain 
at Tangiers. 

III. Charles, died an infant. 

IV. Henry, slain at the Isle of Rhe, in 
1672. 

V. Robert, (Sir) secretary of state, 
auditor of the Exchequer, and a privy 
councillor, created a Baronet, 1st 
September, 1662, M. P. for Tew- 
kesbury in 1658, died unm. 13th July, 
1673. Sir Robert was a great 
favourite of the Queen, and is fre- 
quently mentioned, but in no friendly 
terms, by Clarendon. His arms may 
be seen in glass in the hall at Lin- 
coln's Inn. 

I. Anne, m. to Somerset Fox, esq. of 
Kaynham, in Shropshire, son of Sir 
Edward Fox, of Gwernoga, by Eliza- 
beth, his wife, daughter of Sir Charles 
Somerset. 

II. Olivia, m. to colonel Fowler, of 
the county of Stafford. 



* Richard Long, of CoUingbourne, was the 
direct ancestor of R. G. Long, esq. of Rowd 
Ashton, late M. P. for Wilts. Sir Bourchier 
Wrey is the representative of Henrj' Long of 
Melksham, and Walter Long, esq. now M. P. for 
Wilts (the son of ftlr. R. G. Long) is therefore 
(through his mother, who is Sir Bourchier Wrey's 
sister) descended from John Long, of Wraxall, 
who died in 1652. Mr. Long of Rowd Ashton 
is the present possessor of Wraxall, which he in- 
herited under the will of Walter Long, grandson 
of Catharine, sister of Hope Long. 

t The story of the separation of the two proper- 
ties of Wraxall and Draycot, by the machinations 
of this lady, who had endeavoured to secure both 
for her son AV alter, is thus related by Aubrey in 
his miscellanies : 

" Sir Walter Long, of Draycot, (grandfather of 
Sir James Long) had two wives ; the first a dau. 
ot'Sir — Packington, in Worcestershire, by whom 
he had a son. I lis second wife was a daughter 
of Sir John Thjmne, of Long-Leat, by whom he 
liad several sons and daughters. The second wife 
did use much artifice to render the son by the 
first wife (who had not much Promethean fire) 
odious to his father ; she would get her acquaint- 
ance to make him drunk, and then expose him in 
that condition to his father ; in fine she never left 
oft' her attempts, till she got Sir Walter to disin- 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



:17 



III. Frances. 

IV. Jane, m. to William Jordan, of 
Whitley, in Wilts. 

V. Elizabeth, m. to William Wisdom, 
of Oxfordshire. 

V). Dorothy, m. to Ralph Goodwin, 
of Ludlow, a learne<l autlior, and, 
aecordiiig to Aubrey, an excellent 
poet. 

Sir Walter Lonp died in IfUO, and was *. 
at Wraxall by his son Joiiu before men- 
tioned. His eldest son by his second mar- 
riage, 

Sir Walter Long, knt. succeeded to 
Draycot. He was M.P. for Wilts, and for 
Westbury in 1625; m. first, Anne, daughter 
of James Ley, Earl of Marlborough, Lord 
High Treasurer of England, and had issue, 

James, his heir. 
He m. secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of 

herit Lira. She laid the scene for the doing this 
at Bath, at the assizes, where was her brother, 
Sir Egrimond 'J'hynne, an eminent Serjeant-at-law, 
who drew up the writing ; and his clerk was to 
sit up all night to engross it ; as lie was writing, 
he perceived a shadow on the parchment from the 
candle ; he looked up, and there appeared a hand, 
which immediately vanished ; he was startled at 
it, but thought it might be only his fancy, being 
sleepy, so he writ on ; by and by a fine white hand 
interposed between the writing and the candle 
(he could discern it was a woman's hand) but 
vanished as before ; I have forgot, it appeared a 
third time. But with that the clerk threw down 
his pen, and would engross no more, but goes and 
tells his master of it, and absolutely refused to do 
it. But it was done by somebody, and Sir Wal- 
ter Long was prevailed with to seal and sign it. 
He lived not long after ; and his body did not go 
quiet to the g-rave, it being arrested at the church 
porch by the trustees of the first lady. The heir's 
relations took his part, and commenced a suit 
against Sir Walter (the second son) and com- 
pelled Inm to accept of a moiety of the estate ; so 
the eldest son kept south Wraxall, and Sir Wal- 
ter, the second son, Draycot Cernes, &c. This 
was about the middle of the reign oi'Klng James I." 
Sir Walter's will was proved in 1610, and bears 
out this statement. Supernatural agencies were 
very active against this lady. " Sir Walter Long's 
(of Draycott, in Wilts) widow," says Aubrey, "did 
make a solemn promise to him, on his death bed, 
that she wouldnot marry after his decease. But not 
long after, one Sir — Fox, a very beautiful young 
gentleman, did win her love ; so that notwithstand- 
ing her promise aforesaid, she married him. She 
married at South Wraxall, where the picture of Sir 
Walter hung over the parlour door, as it doth now 
at Draycot. As Sir — Fox led his bride by the 
hand from the church (which is near to the house) 
into the parlour, the string of tlie picture broke, 
and the picture fell on her shoulder, and cracked 
in the fall : (it was painted on wood as was the 
fashion in those days). This made her ladyship 
reflect on her promise, and drew some tears from 
her eyes." 



George Master, esq. of Cirencester, and 
by her (who remarried Edward Uldisworth, 
oi" IJradley, county of Gloucester, and died 
1()6H, ag(!(l 68, being buried at Wotton- 
under-edge,) had issue, 

Walter, of Marlborough, a captain in 
the army of Charles L d. \(i73, s. p. 
Sir Walter cl. 1G.'}7, and was succeeded by 
liis son, 

Sir James Long, bart.* of Draycot, b. 

Hi 17, succeeded to the baronetcy on the 

death of his uncle Sir Robert, agreeably to 

the limitation, m. Dorothy, daughter of Sir 

Edward Leech, knt, of Shipley, county of 

Derby, and by her, who d. 1710, had issue, 

James, who predeceased his father, 

leaving by his first wife, Susan, 

daughter of Colonel Giles Strang- 

wayes, of Melbury, several children,! 

who all d, s. p. excepting James, 

(successor to his^ grandfather ; and 

* He was the friend of Aubrey, who writes, ' I 
should be both orator and soldier to give this 
honoured friend of mine, a gentleman absolute in 
all numbers, his due character.' He says that he 
was of Westminster School, and afterwards of 
Magdalen College, Oxford, that his wife was a 
" most elegant beautie and wit," and that he 
commanded a regiment of horse during the civil 
wars. In this character, although the worthy 
antiquary would have him dedicated " tam marti 
quam mercurio," he does not appear to have been 
fortunate, his whole regiment having been cap- 
tured by Waller and Cromwell, near Devizes, in 
1645. Clarendon says, " by reason of his great 
defect of courage and conduct," but Clarendon 
had a quarrel with his uncle the secretary, as 
appears in various parts of his history, and other 
accounts exonerate Sir James from blame. 

Aubrey continues the summing up of his friend's 
character as follows. " Good sword-man ; admi- 
rable extempore orator ; great memorie ; great 
historian and romanceer ; great falconer and for 
horsemanship. For insects exceedingly curious, 
and searching long since in natural things. Oli- 
ver, Protector, hawking at Hounslowe heath, dis- 
coursing with him, fell in love with his company, 
and commanded him to weai-e his sword, and to 
meet him hawking, which made the strict cava- 
liers look on him with an evil eye." 

His love of ' natural things' seems to have been 
inherited from his grandfather, who, " about the 
beginning of King James, digged for silver," at 
Draycot, " through blue clay, and got £20 worth, 
but at £60 charge or better ! !" 

t His daughter Anne, who died unmarried 
22nd December, 1711, was a distinguished person 
in the fashionable world, both for her beauty^ and 
her accomplishments. She figures in " The Bri- 
tish Court," a poem published in 1707. Lord 
Wharton wrote the following verses round one of 
the glasses at the Kit-cat club in compliment to 
her : 

" Fill the glass ; let the haut-boys sound 

While bright Longy's health goes round. 

With eternal beauty blest. 

Drink your glass, and think the rest." 



218 



LONG-WELLESLEY, OF DRAYCOT CERNE. 



by his second wife, Mary, relict of 
— Kightley, of Ireland, a daughter, 
Mary, «'• to Colonel Butler of that 
kingdom) his heir. 
Jane, d. 1651, tet. 11. 
Jane, (/. 1692, s. p. 
Margaret, m. Sir Richard Mason, of 

Bishop's Castle, county of Salop. 
Dorothy, m. Sir Henry Heron, K.B. of 
Cressy Hall, county of Lincoln, and 
had issue. 
Deborah, d. s. p. 
Sir James Long died February, 1691-2, and 
was s. by his grandson. 

Sir James Long, bart. of Draycot, M.P. 
for Chippenham in 1705, 7, 8, and 10, and 
for Wootton Basset in 1714, b. 1681, m. 
Henrietta, daughter of Fulke, Lord Brooke, 
and by her, who died in 1765, had issue, 
James, d. 1708, s. p. 
Robert, his heir. 
Susan. 
Rachael. 
Jane, d. 1708. 
Dorothy, d. 1757. 
Sir James d. March 16, 1729, and was suc- 
ceeded by his son. 

Sir Robert Long, bart. of Draycot, 
M.P. for Wootton Basset, 1734, and for 
Wilts, h. 1705, wi. Emma, daughter and heir 
of Richard Child, Earl of Tylney, of Wan- 
stead, county of Essex, and Tylney Hall, 
county of Hants, and by her, who died 
8th March, 1758, had issue, 

I. James, his heir. 

II. Robert, d. 1739. 

III. Richard, d. young. 

IV. Charles, of Grittleton, county of 
Wilts, m. Hannah, daughter of Tho- 
mas Phipps, esq. of Heywood,Wilts, 
who remarried James Dawkins, esq. 
eldest son of Henry Dawkins, esq. 
of Standlynch, county of Wilts. 
He died 1783, and had 'issue, 

Emma, m. William Scrope, esq. 
of Castle Combe, county of 
Wilts, and has issue an only 
daughter, married to George 



The ' British Court' commemorates her in the 
following rather lame lines : 

" Long is discovered by her sweet regard, 
With the same pleasure seen that she is heard, 
JNIodest, but not precise, free, but not wild, 
Neither affected, too reserved, nor mild. 
She corresponded with Swift from her place of 
retirement at Lynn, where she had gone in con- 
sequence of pecuniary distresses. Her last letter 
to him is dated November IStli, 1711, and it 
a]ipears that she had assumed the name of Smyth. 
'I'he Dean laments her death with great feeling. He 
severely censures " her brute of a brother, Sir 
James Long," and says that he had ordered a 
paragraph to be put in the Post Boy, giving an 
account of her death, and making honourable 
mention of her. She is frequently noticed in his 
works. 



Poulett Thomson, esq. M. P. for 
Stroud, who assumed the name 
of Scrope on his marriage. 

I. Dorothy. 

II. Emma. 

Sir Robert d. Feb. 10, 1767, was buried at 
Draycot, and succeeded by his son. 

Sir James Long, bart. of Draycot, who 
assumed the additional name of Tylney, 
M.P. for Wilts, b. 1736, m. first Harriett, 
fourth daughter of Jacob Bouverie, Viscount 
Folkestone, and by her, who d. 13th Nov. 
1777, had no issue. He m. secondly, Ca- 
tharine, daughter of Other Windsor, fourth 
earl of Plymouth, and by her, who d. 1823, 
had issue, 

James Tylney, his heir. 
Catharine, successor to her brother. 
Dorothy, living in 1835. 
Emma, living in 1835. 
Sir James Tylney Longdied 28th November, 
1794, aged fifty-eight, and was succeeded 
l)y his son, 
"SiR James Tylney Long, bart of Dray- 
cot, who died September 14th, 1805, aged 
eleven, being the last known male descen- 
dant of the Longs of Wraxall and Draycot. 
He was buried at Draycot. His extensive 
estates devolved on his eldest sister, 

Catharine Long, of Draycot,Wanstead, 
&c. b. in 1789, who m. the Hon. William 
Wellesley-Pole, only son of William, 
Lord Maryborough, and had issue, 

William-Richard-Arthur, her heir. 
James-Fitzroy-Henry, b. August, 1815. 
Victoria- Catharine-Mary, b. May 6th 
1818. 
Mrs. Long-Wellesley died in 1826, and 
was s. by her son, the present William- 
Richard-Arthur Tylney-Long-Welles- 
ley, esq. of Draycot. 

Arms — Quarterly, first and fourth, gu. a 
cross arg. between five plates in each quar- 
ter, for Wellesley. Second and third, 
quarterly, first, sable sem6e of cross-cross- 
lets, a lion rampant, argent (Long); second, 
argent, on a chief, gules, a bezant between 
two bucks' heads, cabossed, or, (Popham); 
third, gules, a pair of wings, or, (Seymour) ; 
fourth, gules, a chevron engrailed, ermine, 
betwet n three eagles close, argent, (Child, 
Earl Tylney). 

Ci-cst— For Wellesley, out of a ducal 
coronet, or, a demi-lion rampant gu. holding 
a forked pennon. For Long, out of a ducal 
coronet, or, a demi-lion rampant, argent. 
Another, granted to Sir Henry Long, by 
Henry YIH. for his services in a gallant 
charge at Therouenne, in Picardy, viz. on a 
wreath a lion's head, argent, in its mouth a 
hand erased, gules. 

EsUttfs — Draycot, in the county of Wilts, 
Tylney Hall, in the county of Hants, and 
Wanstead, in the county of Essex. 



219 



BETTON, OF GREAT BERWICK. 



BETTON, RICHARD, esq. b. 3rd October, 1808; m. on the 13th October, 1831, 
Charlotte- Margaretta, yoiin<yest daughter of the late Richard Salwey, esq. of Moor 
Park, near Ludlow, county of Salop. 



Ufneac^e. 




f 







This family is one of the most ancient in 
the county of Salop, and is presumed to 
have been originally seated at Betton 
Strange, near Shrewsbury, 

By deed, dated the 2nd of Richard II. 
(1378), we learn that John de Betton was 
then dead, having left Margaret, his widow, 
and Richard de Betton, his son and heir. 
This Richard was father of 

William Bet ton, of Great Berwick, near 
Shrewsbury, whose residence there in the 
year 1403 is proved by the records in the 
Exchequer of the town of Shrewsbury. The 
celebrated battle of Shrewsbury was fought 
close to his estate on the 20th of July in 
tiiat year; and on the evening preceding 
the battle, the renowned Henry Hotspur 
took, possession of the house of William 
Betton, and made it his head quarters, to 
the great loss and annoyance of the pro- 
prietor, who suffered much by the contri- 
butions levied upon him by that impetuous 
young nobleman and his followers. An 
anecdote in accordance witli the superstition 
of that period is connected with Hot- 
spur's sojourn here. In the morning pre- 
vious to the battle, his forces having moved 
about a mile from Great Berwick towards 
the scene of action, and Hotspur having 
placed himself at tlieir head, he perceived 
that an engagement was unavoidable, on 
which he called for his favourite sword. His 



attendants informed him that it was left 
behind at Berwick, of which village it does 
not appear that he had till then learned the 
name. At these words he turned pale, and 
said, " I perceive that my plough is draw- 
ing to its last furrow ; for a wizard told me 
in Northumberland, that I should perish at 
Berwick, which I vainly interpreted of that 
town in the north." The result of tiie battle 
is matter of history, and universally known. 
William Betton was succeeded at Great 
Berwick by his son, also named 

W^iLLiAM Betton, who was living there 
in 1470, and was succeeded by his son, 

Richard Betton, who was of Great 
Berwick in 1494. He was father of 

Thomas Betton, of Great Berwick, liv- 
ing in 1543, whose son and heir, 

Richard Bettoj, of Great Berwick, m. 
Eleanor Jackes, and was bailiif of Shrews- 
bury in 1613, in which year he died. His 
eldest son, 

Richard Betton, esq. of Great Berwick, 
had a numerous issue, of which the eldest 
son, 

Richard Betton, esq. of Great Berwick, 
married Eleanor, daughter of Edward Pur- 
cell, esq. of Onslow, in the county of Salop, 
and had, with other issue, a son and heir, 

Richard Betton, esq. baptized at St. 
Mary's, Shrewsbury, 6th February, 1614-16, 
who by his wife, Elizabeth, had issue, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II. John, whose son, James Betton, was 
father of John Betton, the father of 
Sir John Betton, knt. late of Shrews- 
bury. 

III. Nathaniel, whose son, John, was 
father of 

Nathaniel Betton, esq. late of 
Shrewsbury, who by Mary, his 
wife, had issue, 

1. John Betton, who entered 
the army, and was a captain 
in the 3rd Dragoon Guards, 
ill which regiment he served 
in the Peninsula, and died 
at Merida in Spain, on the 



220 



BETTON, OF GREAT BERWICK. 



20th November, 1809, aged 
thirty-one. 

2. Richard Betton, of Shrews- 
bury, who died unmarried 
in 1825. 

3. Nathaniel Betton, now of 
Shrewsbury'. 

1. Mary, married Thomas G. 
Gwyn, esq. of Shrewsbury. 
Mr. Betton was succeeded at Great Berwick 
by his eldest son, 

Richard Betton, esq. who died in 1726, 
and was succeeded by his only surviving 
son, 

Richard Betton, esq. of Great Berwick, 
born in 1684, 7W. 20th February, 1706-7, 
Dorothy, daughter of Edward Lloyd, esq. 
of Leaton, in the county of Salop, by whom 
he had issue, 

Richard, his heir, born in 1710. 
Elizabeth, married John Watkins, esq. 
of Shotton. 
Dying in 1764, Mr. Betton was succeeded 
by his only sod, 

Richard Betton, esq. of Great Berwick, 
who married Mary, daughter of Charles 
Maddox, esq. of Whitcott, in the county of 
Salop, and had issue, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II, Charles, of Whitchurch, near Ross, 
in the county of Hereford, who mar- 
ried Miss Mary Young, by whom he 
had, with daughters, an only son, 

Charles Betton, who married, first. 
Miss Mary Anne Bird, secondly. 
Miss Mary Butcher, and had 
issue, 
Joseph. 

Mary . 

I. Anne, who married Thomas Bayley, 
esq. of Preston Brockhurst. 
Mr. Betton died in 1767, and was succeeded 
by his eldest son, 

Richard Betton, esq. of Great Berwick, 
/). in 1744, who married Priscilla, daughter 
and eventually sole heir of John Bright, 
esq. of Totterton House, in the county of 
Salop, by whom he had issue, 

I. Richard, his heir. 

II. John Bright Betton, M.A. vicar of 
Lydbury North, born in 1773, who, 
in succeeding to the Totterton, &c. 
estates, took by royal sign manual, 
dated I2th October, 1807, the name 
of Bright, and used the arms of 
Bright only. He married, on the 



22nd January, 1806, Mary, eldest 
daughter of Thomas Beale, esq. of 
Heath House, and dying on the 22nd 
December, 1833, left issue, 

1. John Bright, born 10th No- 
vember, 1811, his only son and 
heir. 

1. Eliza. 

2. Mary. 

3. Frances. 

4. Amelia. 

5. Louisa. 

Mr. Betton died on the 7th February, 1790, 
and was succeeded in the Great Berwick 
and other estates by his eldest son, 

Richard Betton, esq. b. 16th Nov. 
1768, major in the Shropshire regiment of 
militia, who married, on the 17th February, 
1795, Mary-Anne, daughter of the Rev. 
Aaron Foster, of Wells, in the county of 
Somerset, by whom he had issue, 
I. Richard, his heir. 

I. Mary- Anne, married, 8th December, 
1825, her first cousin, Thomas Foster, 
esq. (son of the Rev. R. Foster, of 
Wells, in the county of Somerset), 
lieutenant of the Royal Engineers, 
and has issue, 

1. Arabella - Laetitia Foster, born 
29th August, 1827. 

2. Geraldine-Harriett Foster, born 
4th October, 1832. 

II. Harriett, married, 18th March, 1829, 
Thomas H. Rimington, esq. lieu- 
tenant of the Royal Engineers, only 
son of General Rimington, of the 
Artillery, by whom she has a daugh- 
ter, 

Charlotte-Mary-Anne Rimington, 
born 2nd October, 1833. 
Major Betton died on the 15th June, 1819, 
and was succeeded by his only son, Richard 
Betton, esq. the present representative of 
the family, who, in 1831, sold the Great 
Berwick estate to the Hon. Henry Went- 
worth Powys, of Berwick Leyborne, brother 
of the present Earl of Denbigh. 

Arms — Arg. two pales sa. each charged 
with three crosslets fitchee or. 

Crest — A demi-lion rampant. 

Motto — Nunquara non paratus. 

Estates — Newton, Bromlovv, Aston Pigott, 
all in Shropshire. 

Seat — Overton, near Ludlow, in the county 
of Salop. 



221 



LYSONS, OF HEMPSTED. 



LYSONS, The Revercyid SAMUEL, of Hempsted Court, in the county of Glou- 
cester, b. 17th March, 1806, m. 1st January, 1834, Eliza-Sophia-Theresa-Henrietta, 
eldest daughter of Major-general Sir Lorenzo Moore, K.C.H. and C.B. and has a 



daughter. 



Alice-Euzabf.th. 



Mr. Lysons succeeded his father 3rd January, 1834. 
in the commission of the peace for Gloucestershire, 



He is rector of Rodmarton, and 



Uincagc. 




This family, which has been established 
for nearly three centuries in the county of 
Gloucester, is traditionally said to have mi- 
grated thither from Wales. Leland, in his 
Itinerary, makes mention of the Lysans as 
inhabiting the town of Neath, in Glamor- 
ganshire, temp. Henry VIIL then in re- 
duced circumstances. " One Lysan, a 
gentilman of auncient stok but mene landes 
about XL li by the yere dwellith in the 
towne of Nethe. The Lysans say that 
theire familie was there in fame before the 
conquest of the Normans." And in the 
cathedral church of Llandaff one of the 
stalls is entitled Sancti Dulbritii sive Doc- 
toris Lysons, founded temp. Henry VIIL 
Lewis Leysaunce, or Lysons, was sheriff 
of Gloucester 4th Edward VI. and master 
of Margaret's Hospital in that city, 2nd and 
3rd Mary. 

In the register of burials for Westbury 
upon Severn, where the family settled about 
the year 1550, occur the names of John Ly- 
sons, interred 3rd January, 1587, and Alice, 
his wife, buried 2nd May, 1598. 

William Leyson, Lison, or Lysons (for 
the name is written in several different ways 
in the registers), supposed to have been a 



son of .John and Alice, bought an estate 
called Netherlay, or the Lower Lay, in the 
parish of Westbury on Severn, in the year 
1606. He m. a lady named Anne, and had 



issue, 
I. 
II 



John, his heir. 

Arthur, of Hempsted, in the county 
of Gloucester. 

III. Thomas, of Worcester, mayor of 
that city in 1651, who proclaimed, in 
conjunction with Mr. James Bridges, 
the sheriff, on the 23rd August, 1651 , 
Charles the Second, king of Great 
Britain, for which he was prosecuted 
by the parliament,* and confined in 
Warwick Castle, whence he was sent, 
with Major-general Massey, the Earl 
of Traquair, and other prisoners, to 
London to take his trial. On the re- 
storation. King Charles II. granted, 
by letters patent, to Thomas Lysons, 
second son of this loyal citizen, cer- 
tain customs arising out of the port 
of Kingston upon Hull. 

IV. Daniel, of whom presently. 
The fourth son, 

Daniel Lysons, esq. born in November, 
1604, m. Sarah, daughter of — Clutterbuck, 
esq. of King's Stanley, and died in 1674, 
leaving a son and successor, 

Daniel Lysons, esq. born in 1643, who 
wedded Anne, daughter of Nicholas Webb, 
esq. and was succeeded at his decease, in 
1681, by his son, 

Daniel Lysons, esq. of Hempsted, born 
in 1672, who rebuilt the manor-house there. 
He m. in 1693, Elizabeth, daughter and co- 
heir of Thomas Ridler, esq. and left, with 
seven other children, who died s. p. 

Daniel, his heir. 

John, LL.D. fellow of Magdalen col- 
lege, Oxford. 

* Vide Boscobel. 



222 



LYSONS, OF HEMPSTED. 



The eldest son, 

Daniel Lysons, esq. of Henipsted, born 
1st December, 1697, m. 20th February, 
1725, Elizabeth, daugbter of Samuel Mee, 
esq. of Gloucester, and had issue, 
Daniel, bis heir. 
Samuel, successor to his brother. 

Elizabeth, ni. to John Reeve, esq. 
Mary, m. to Stephen Woodifield, esq. 
Anne, ) 

Hester, > «ho died unmarried. 
Priscilla, ) 
The elder son and successor, 

Daniel Lysons, M. D. of Hempsted 
Court, fellow of All Souls college, Oxford, 
born 21st March, 1727, m. 6th December, 
1768, Mary, daughter of Richard Rogers, 
esq. of Dowdeswell, in the county of Glou- 
cester, but dying without issue was suc- 
ceeded by his brother. 

The Rev. Samuel Lysons, M.A. born 
2Sth December, 1730, rector of Rodmarton 
and Cherington, who in. Mary, daugbter of 
Samuel Peach, esq. of Chalford, in Glou- 
cestershire, and had issue, 
i. Daniel, his lieir. 

II. Samuel, born 17th May, 1763, the 
eminent writer on British topography 
and antiquities. In 1784, having 
previously become a member of the 
Inner Temple, Mr. Lysons came to 
London, and there practised as a 
special pleader until 1798, when he 
was called to the bar. In 1786 he 
was elected a member of the Society 
of Antiquaries, and it may be justly 
said that no individual ever more 
zealously or more successfully sup- 
ported its character and usefulness. 
During eleven years he held the ho- 
norary office of director, and was 
eventually appointed one of its vice- 
presidents. In 1797 he became a 
member of the Royal Society ; and 
in 1810 was selected for its vice-pre- 
sident and director. " Till the be- 
ginning of the year 1804," says Mr. 
Jerdan, in his interesting account of 
this distinguished antiquary, " Mr. 
Lysons continued to practise with 
considerable success at the bar, and 
went the Oxford circuit, notwith- 
standing his increasing distaste to 
what he often forcibly termed, 
' brawling in a court |of justice.' 
At that period, however, an event 
occurred which led him to the unin- 
terrupted pursuit of those ol)jects for 
which his mind was so peculiarly 
framed. At the close of the preced- 
ing year, the oflice of keeper of the 
records in the Tower had become 
vacant, and was -onferrcd upon 



liini." This appointment he held 
until his death, in 1819. The works 
of Mr. Lysons relate principally to 
the Roman antiquities of Britain, in- 
cluding " Reliquiae Brittanico-Ro- 
manae ;" " Roman Remains disco- 
vered at Woodchester," &c. He 
also published a volume of Miscella- 
neous Antiquities of Gloucestershire; 
and, in conjunction with his brother, 
the Rev. Daniel Lysons, the earlier 
volumes of that great topographical 
work, the " Magna Britannia." 
There were but few eminent men of 
liis day, either as literary characters 
or patrons of literature, that Mr. 
Lysons did not number among his 
friends and acquaintance. On a 
short visit to London in the summer 
of 1784, to enter at the Temple, he 
was the bearer of an introductory 
letter from Mrs. Thrale to Dr. John- 
son, who in his reply, dated the 26th 
June, says, " this morning I saw Mr. 
Lysons ; he is an agreeable young 
man, and likely enough to do all he 
designs. I received him as one sent 
by you ought to be received, and I 
hope he will tell you he was satis- 
fied." In the first week that he came 
to settle in London he was introduced 
to Sir Joseph Banks, with whom he 
continued on terms of intimate friend- 
ship till his death. His introduction 
to Horace Walpole occurred about 
the same time, and with Sir Thomas 
Lawrence he continued ever in cor- 
dial friendship. To his profound 
knowledge of history and antiquities 
Mr. Lysons united great classical 
learning ; and the comprehensive 
powers of his memory assisted him 
in his labours, and gave peculiar 
charms to his conversation. He died 
unmarried in 1819, esteemed and re- 
spected as a son, a brother, and a 
friend. 

I. Mary, born in 1675, m. to Charles 
Brandon Trye, esq. F. R. S. of 
Leckhampton Court, in the county 
of Gloucester, (See vol. i. p. 604.) 

II. Elizabeth, born in 1772, w. to John 
Marshall Collard, esq. 

Mr. Lysons died in 1804, and was *. in the 
family estates and in the rectory of Rod- 
maiton by his son, 

The Rev. Daniel Lysons, M.A.,F.R.S., 
F.A.S., H.S. and L.S. of Hempsted Court, 
a celebrated topographer and antiquary, 
author of the " Environs of London," and 
several other works, and joint author with 
his brother of the " Magna Britannia," b. 
28th April, 1762, m. first, in 1801, Sarah, 
eldest daughter of Lieutenant-colonel Tho- 
mas Carteret Hardy, of the York Fusileers, 



LEIGH, OF STONELEIGH. 



223 



and by her, who died in 1808, had two sons 
and two (l:uij;hters, viz. 

Danitl, died in 1814, aged ten years. 
Samuel, lieir. 

Sarah, »;. .')th OcIoIkt, 18:?1, to the 
Kev. John llayf^arth, rector of L'p- 
hani, Hants, and died 18th May, 
18.^:^, leavin>>; one daup;hter. 
Cliarlotte, ni. at Naples, 14th Novem- 
ber, 182.^, to Sir James ('arnegie, 
hart, of Southesk, N. IJ. and has 
three sons. 
He wedded, secondly, Josepha-Catherine- 
Snsanna, daughter of Jolm Gilbert-Cooper, 
esq. of Tlinrgarton Priory, Notts, and had 
by her, 

Daniel, born 1st \ugust, 1816, ensign 
in the 1st, or Royal Regiment of In- 
fantry. 



Cathci'ine -Susanna. 

Mr. Lysons died 3rd January, 18.14, and 
was succeeded by his eldest son, the jiresent 
Rev. Sami'ix Lysons, of Hempsted Court. 

Arms — Gu. on a chief az. a bend nebule, 
from which issue the rays of the sun ppr. 

Crest — No crest is assigned to this family 
in tlie herald's visitation in 1672, but they 
have borne for nearly three centuries, Tiie 
sun rising out of a bank of clouds ppr. 

Motto — Valebit. 

Estates — Hempsted and Longney, toge- 
ther with the rectory of Rodmarton, in the 
county of Gloucester. 

Seat — Hempsted Court, near Gloucester. 



LEIGH, OF STONELEIGH. 



'^^^ 



LEIGH, CHANDOS, esq. of Stoneleigh Abbey, in the county of Warwick, and of 

Adlestrop, in Gloucestershire, b. 27th June, 1791 ; 
m. 8th June, 1819, Margarette, daughter of the Rev. 
William-Shippen Willes,* of Astrop House, in the 
county of Northampton, and has issue, 

William-Henuy, b. 17th January, 1824. 
Edward-Chandos, b. at Stoneleigh Abbey, 22nd 
December, 1832. 

Julia- Anna-Eliza. 

Emma-Margarette. 

Caroline-Eliza,?, • 
4 ^ c twins. 

Augusta, ) 

Mary. 

Louisa-Georgina. 

Mr. Leigh succeeded his father on the 27th October, 
1823. In the literary world Mr. Chandos Leigh i.s 
known as the author of some popular poetic works. 




Hintnge. 



Tliis is a branch of the great Cheshire 
family of Leigh, founded by 

Sir Thomas Li;i(iH, knt.f lord mayor of 
London in 15.58, who was brought up by 
Sir Rowland Hill, a merchant and alder- 
man of the same city, and obtained the hand of 
that opulent citizen's favourite niece, Alice, 
daughter of John Uarker, otherwise Cove- 
dale, of Wolverton, and with her the greater 

* Son of .Judge Willes, and grandson of the 
chief justice. 

t Great-great-grandson of Sir Peter Leigb, 
kuig ht-banneret, who fell at Aoincourt in 1413. 



part of his wealth. I Sir Thomas was 
knighted during his mayoralty, and dying 
17th November, 1571, (will proved 14th 
December following ; inquisition 24th Oc- 
tober, 1572), was buried in Mercer's Clia- 
pel, § London. His widow survived him 

J The chief part of Sir Rowland's estate Was 
entailed upon the issue of the marriage. 
j Upon Lis tomb is the following epitaph : 
Sir Thomas Leigh hi civil life. 
All offices did beare, 
Which in this citv worshipfuU 
Or honorable were : 



224 



LEIGH, OF STONELEIGH. 



two and thirty years; she resided at Stone- 
leish, and lived to see her children s chil- 
dren to the fourth generation. She was 
buried in 1603 at that place, where she had 
founded an hospital for five poor men and 
five poor women, all of them to be un- 
married persons, and to be nominated after 
her decease by her third son, and his heirs 
for ever. Sir Thomas Leigh had issue, 

I, Rowland, his heir. 

II. Richard, living in 1568 ; d. in 15/0, 

V If) 

ill. Thomas, of Stoneleigh, who was 
knighted by Queen Elizabeth, and 
created a baronet on the institution 
of the order in 1611. He d. 1st 
February, 1625, (will proved 24th 
May, 1626), and was s. by his grand- 
son, , , , 
Sir Thomas Leigh, the second ba- 
ronet, who was elevated to the 
peerage by Kint^ Charles I. 
(patent dated at Oxford 1st July, 
1643), as Baron Leigh, of Stone- 
leigh. He ni. Mary, one of the 
daughters and co-heirs of Sir 
Thomas Egerton, niece of John, 
first earl of Bridgewater, and 
grand-daughter of Lord Chan- 
cellor Egerton, Viscount Brack- 
ley, and dying 22nd February, 
1672, was s. by his grandson, 
Thomas, second J^ord Leigh, of 
Stoneleigh,* who m. first, Eliza- 
beth, dau. of Richard Brown, 
esq. of Shingleton, in the county 
of Kent, but by that lady had 
no issue. He espoused, se- 
condly, the Hon. Eleanor Wat- 
son, eldest daughter of Edward, 
second Lord Rockingham, by 
the Lady Anne Wentworth, dau. 
of the celebrated earl of Straf- 
ford, and had (with daughters) 
two surviving sons, namely, 
Edward, his successor. 
Charles, who inherited the es- 
tates of his uncle, the Hon. 
Charles Leigh, of Leighton 



Whom as God blessed with great wealth, 
So losses did he feele ; 
Yet never changed he constant minde, 
Tho' fortune turn'd her wheele. 

Learning he lov'd and helpt the poore 
To thenTthat knew him deere ; 
For whom his lady and loving wife 
I'his tomb hath builded here. 
• His Lordship had three sisters ; 

,. Honora, m. first, to Sir William Egerton, 
and secondly, to Hugh, Lord Willoughby, 
of Parham. 
n. Mary, m. to Arden Bagot, esq. of Pipe 

ilall, Warwickshire. 
III. Jane, m. to William, Viscount Tracey. 



Buzzard. He ?n. the Lady 
Barbara Lumley, daughter 
of Richard, earl of Scar- 
borough, but died 28th July, 
1749, without issue (will 
dated 30th July, 1748; 
proved 7th Sept. 1749). 
His lordship d. in November, 
1710, and was s. by his elder son, 
Edward, third Lord Leigh, b. 13th 
January, 1684, who m. Mary, 
daughter and heir of Thomas 
Holbech, esq. of Fillongley, in 
Warwickshire, (see vol. i. p. 
660) and dying 16th March, 
1737-8, was s. by his only sur- 
viving son, 
Thomas, fourth Lord Leigh. This 
nobleman m. first, Maria-Re- 
becca, daughter of John Craven, 
esq. and sister of William, fifth 
Lord Craven, by whom he had 
(with three sons, all named 
Thomas, who died young) 
Edward, his successor. 
Mary, who inherited Stone- 
leigh, at the decease of her 
brother s. p. in 1786, which 
property came to the Rei>. 
Thomas Leigh at her de- 
cease 2nd July, 1806. 
His lordship wedded, secondly, 
Catherine, daughter of Rowland 
Berkeley, esq. of Cotheridge, in 
Worcestershire, and had another 
daughter, Anne, m. to Andrew 
Hacket, esq. She aied of the 
small pox s. p. Lord Leigh d. 
30th November, 1749, (will dated 
23rd June, 1748; codicil 2nd 
November, 1749; proved 7th 
April, 1750), and was s. by his 
only surviving son, 
Edward, fifth Lord Leigh, b. 1st 
March, 1742, and d. at Stone- 
leigh unmarried, 26th March, 
1786,when the Barony of Leigh 
became extinct. 
IV. William (Sir), of Newnham Regis, 
in the county of Warwick, who m. 
Catherine, daughter of Sir James 
Harrington, knt. of Exton, in Rut- 
landshire, and was s. by his son. 
Sir Francis Leigh, K. B. who jn. 
Margaret, or Mary, daughter of 
the Lord Chancellor Egerton, 
Baron EUcsmere and Viscount 
Brackley, and had issue, 

Francis, created a baronet in 
1618, Baron Dunsmore in 
1628, and Earl of Chi- 
chester in 1644, (refer to 
Burke's Extinct and Dor- 
mant Peerar/e). 



LEIGH, OF STONELEIGH. 



Robert, il. s. p. ajjcd sixly- 
tlsrec; in Kki.J ; willjuoved 
23rd November, 1672. 

Alice, m. to Joliii Scriinshire, 

esq. 
Julian, m. to Sir Richard New- 

(liiiate, bart. 

r. Mary, ?». first, to Richard Cobbe, 
and secondly to Robert Andrews, of 
London. 

H. Alice, wj. to Thomas Connye, of 
Basingtliorpe, in Lincolnshire. 

III. Katherine, m. to Edward Barber, 
serg;eant-at-law, of the county of 
Somerset. 

IV. Winifred, m. to Sir George Bond, 
knt. of London. 

The eldest son and heir (of Sir Thomas 
Leigh and Alice Barber), 

Rowland Leigh, esq. of Longborough, 
in the county of Warwick, (living .30tli 
September, 1596), m. first, Margery, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Lowe, citizen and vintner of 
London, and had an only daughter, Eliza- 
beth, who wedded, first, — Haumer, and 
secondly, — Broughton. He espoused, se- 
condly, Catherine, daughter of Sir Richard 
Berkeley, knt. of Stoke Giflard, in Glou- 
cestershire, and had two sons and two 
daughters, viz. 

William, his heir. 

Thomas, baptized at Tirley, in the 
county of Gloucester, 13th Septem- 
ber, 1579 ; married, but died issue- 
less ; administration granted 27th 
October, 1599, to Frances, his widow. 

, m. to William Deane, esq. of 

Nethercote, in Oxfordshire ; their 
daughter and heir, 

Dorothy Deane, ni. Sir Richard 
Harrison, of Hurst, in Berk- 
shire. 
, m, to — Bolton, and d. s. p. 

Rowland Leigh was s. by his only surviving 
son, 

William Leigh, esq. of Longborough, 
who m. Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William 
A^' horwood, knt. of Sandwell Castle, in the 
county of Stafford, and by her (who d. 23rd 
Mai-ch, 1664-5, aged eighty-three) had issue, 

I. William, his successor. 

II. Thomas, buried at Adlestrop, 1st 
August, 1612. 

III. George, a captain in the service of 
King Charles I. in 1632, m. the 
relict of —Harrison, of Hurst. 

I. Catherine, baptized at Adlestrop, 
22nd July, 1610. 

II. Isabella, baptized 4th August, 1612, 
m. first, to Gerrvase Warmshey, of 
Worcester, gent. ; and, secondly, to 



both d. unm. 



Sir John Covert, bart. of Haugham, 
ill Sussex. 

III. Elizabeth, bai)tized22ndMay, 1615, 
m. to .lohn Chamberlain, esq. of 
Maugersbury, near Stowe, in Glou- 
cestershire. 

IV. Anne, baptized 29th February, 
1619, in. first, to William Hodges, 
gent, of Brodwell, in the county of 
Gloucester ; secondly, to — Water- 
wick ; and, thirdly, to John Croft. 

Mr. Leigh d. at the age of forty-six, in 16.32, 
(will proved 14th October in that year), was 
buried at Longborough, and*, by his eldest 
sou, 

William Leigh, esq. of Adlestrop, in the 
county of Gloucester, who m. first, Mar- 
garet, daughter of Sir William Guise, knt. 
of Elmore, in Gloucestershire, and had four 
sons and a daughter, viz. 

William, who in. a lady named Bird, 

and had (with a daughter, who died 

young) a son, AVilliam. 
Thomas, died unmarried in 1660, aged 

about twenty-two. 
George,; 
.John, 
Elizabeth, baptized 21st July, 1636, m. 

to Gideon Harvey, M. D. and had 

issue ; she d. in 1694. 

He wedded, secondly, a daughter of — San- 
ders, gent, of Warwick, but by her had no 
issue ; and, thirdly, Joan, daughter of Tho- 
mas Perrjr, esq. of the city of Gloucester, 
and had 

Theophilus, of whom presently. 

Joseph, "^ 

Benjamin, 

Perry, 

William, 

Thomas, - 

Thomas, of University College, Cam- 
bridge, b. 23rd December, 1674, d. 
unm. 1st March, 1688. 

Sarah, b. 14th September, 1656, in. to 
Henry Wright, esq. and had a son, 
Thomas Wright, who wedded his 
cousin Cassandra, daughter of 
Theophilus Leigh, esq. of Adle- 
strop. 
Martha, b. at Adlestrop 24th October, 

1660. 
Anne, b. 16th February, 1661. 
William Leigh d. on the 17th June, 1690, 
aged eightj'-six, at Adlestrop, and was bu- 
ried there on the 21st of the same montii.' 
The eldest son of his third marriage, 

Theophilus Leigh, esq. of Adlestrop, 
in. first, Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir 
of Sir William Craven, knt. of Lenchwick, 
in the county of Worcester, (license for 
marriage dated 16th December, 1673, the 
lady aged twenty-one), and had, with se- 

Q 



all died unm. 



226 



LEIGH, OF STONELEIGH. 



veral other cliildreii, all of whom died in 
infancy, Typliena, b. in 1678, living un- 
married in I722. He wedded, secondly, 
(hy license dated 26th November, 1689), 
the Honourable Mary Brydges, daughter of 
James, eiglitli Lord Chandos, of Sudeley, 
and by tliat lady (who d. i3th June, 1703, 
aged thirty-eight) had 

I. William, his heir. 

II. .James, colonel of a regiment, b. 17th 
and baptized at Adlestrop I8th Sep- 
tember, 1692, d. unm. 16th January, 
1713-14. 

III. Theophilus, in holy orders, D. D. 
Master of Baliol College, Oxford, 
i.28th, and bapt. 29th October, 1693, 
m. Anne, only daughter of Edward 
Bee, esq. of Beckley, in Oxford- 
shire, and had issue, 

James, b. in 1733, d. in 1736. 
Edward, b. 4th December, 1738. 

Mary, b. 20th July, and bapt. at 
Adlestrop 20th August, 1731, m. 
at Oxford 3rd November, 1762, 
to her first cousin, the Rev, Tho- 
mas Leigh, LL.B. rector of 
Broadwell and Adlestrop, and 
d. s.p. 2nd February, 1797. 

Anne, buried 8th March, 17.36. 

Cassandra, buried 30th April, 1740. 

Cassandra, i. 27th January, 1742-3, 
m. to the Rev. Samuel Cooke, 
M.A. vicar of Little Bookham, 
Surrey. 

IV. Thomas, in holy orders, D.D. rec- 
tor of Harden, in the county of Ox- 
ford, b. 16th, and bapt. at Adlestrop 
21st December, 1696, m. Jane, dan. 
of Doctor Walker, (a physician), of 
Oxford, and had two sons and three 
daughters, namely, 

James, who took the surname of 
Perrott, m. Jane Cholmondeley, 
and d.s.p. 

Thomas. 

Jane, m. to — Cooper. 

Cassandra, m. to — Austin. 
Doctor Thomas Leigh d. in February, 
1764. 

V. Henry, b. 2nd, and bapt. at Adle- 
strop 4th January, 1697, d. unm. 

VI. Charles, in holy orders, rector of 
Lanwarne, in Herefordshire, b. 23rd, 
and bapt. 28th November, 1700, m. 

' Anne, daughter of — Rosse, of Ross, 

in that county, and dying in May, 
1766, was buried at Rosse. 

I. Emma, b. in the parish of St. Mar- 
garet's, Westminster, 5th October, 
1690, baptized there, m. Peter Wal- 
do, D.D. 

II. Elizabeth, b. 29th November, 1691. 



III. Cassandra, b. 28th, and bapt. 29th 
November, 1696, 7/1. to her cousin- 
german, Thomas Wright, esq. 

IV. Maria, b. 2nd, and bapt. 4th April, 
1699, tn. to Sir Hungerford Hos- 
kyns, bart. 

V. Catherine, b. 19th, bapt. 34th March, 
1701-2. 

VI. Anne, b. 13th, and bapt. 14th June, 
1703, m. to the Rev. John Hoskyns. 

Theophilus Leigh d. 10th February, 1724-5, 
was buried at Adlestrop 19th of the same 
month, (will proved 3rd July, 1725), and s. 
by his eldest son, 

William Leigh, esq. of Adlestrop, b. at 
St. Margaret's, Westminster, 3rd Novem- 
ber, 1691, who m. Mary, daughter of Ro- 
bert Lord, esq. of York Buildings, and by 
her (who d. 10th July, 1756, aged sixty- 
one) had issue, 

I. James, his heir. 

II. William, rector of Little Ilford, 
Essex, b. in the parish of St. George, 
Westminster, 1st April, 1732, d. unm. 
2nd April, 1764, buried at Adlestrop. 

III. Thomas, LL.B. rector of Broad- 
well and Adlestrop, and fellow of 
Magdalen College, Oxford, b. and 
bapt. at Adlestrop 22nd July, 1734, 
771. at Oxford 3rd November, 1762, 
Mary, eldest daughter of Dr. Theo- 
philus Leigh, but d. s. p. 

I. Cassandra, born in the parish of St. 
INIartin in the Fields 11th April, 1723, 
m. 8th September, 1739, to Sir Ed- 
ward Turner, bart. of Ambrosden, 
in the county of Oxford. 

II. Mary, d. unm. in February, and 
buried 3rd March, 1768. 

III. Elizabeth, bapt. 6th December, 
1735, d. unm. in April, 1818, and 
buried at Adlestrop. 

Mr. Lcigli d. 9th December, 1757, aged 
sixty-six, was buried at Adlestrop, and *. 
by his son, 

James Leigh, esq. of Adlestrop, bapt. at 
Longborough 7th July, 1724, who m. at 
Luggershall, Wilts, lOth March, 17-55, the 
Lady Caroline Bridges, eldest daughter of 
Henry, duke of Chandos, by Mary his first 
wife, eldest daughter and co-heir of Charles, 
earl of Aylesbury, and left at his decease, 
31st March, 1774, (he was buried at Adle- 
strop), an only child and successor, 

James Henry Leigh, esq. of Adlestrop, 
b. 8th February, 1765, who inherited the 
Stoneleigh estates in 1806. He m. 8th De- 
cember, 1786, at Broughton, in Oxfordshire, 
the Hon. Julia-Judith Twislcton, eldest dau. 
of Thomas, Lord Saye and Sele, and had 
issue, 

I. Chandos, his heir. 

I. Julia. 



BACGK, OF STRADSETT. 



2-27 



II. Caroliiie-Eliza, vi. to James-Uullcr 
East, esq. 

III. Mary, »«. to Frodcrick-Acton Col- 
ville, esq. 

IV. Augusta, III. to Clmrles-Lennox- 
Grenville Berkeley, esq. and second 
son of Admiral the lion. Sir George 
Uerkeley, by Lady Emily Lenox. 

Mr. Leigh died at Stoneleigh Abbey 27th 
October, 1823, was buried at Adlestrop, and 
succeeded by his son, the present Chandos 



Lkioh, esq. of Stoneleigh Abbey and Adle- 
strop. 

Arms — (Ju. a cross eng. arg. in the dex- 
ter canton a lozenge of the second. 

Crest — A unicorn's head erased argent, 
armed and crincd or. 

Estates — In the counties of Warwick, 
Stafford, Bedford, Chester and Gloucester. 

Scnts — Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwickshire ; 
Adlestrop, Gloucestershire. 



^ BAGGE, OF STRADSETT. 

BAGGE, WILLIAM, esq. of Stradsett, in the county of Norfolk, b. 17th June, 
1810; VI. 11th July, 1833, Frances, fourth daughter of the late Sir Thomas Pres- 
ton, bart. of Beeston Hall, and has a daughter, 

Frances-Henrietta. 

Mr. Ba2:g;e succeeded his father, 3rd June, 1827. • 



Umeage. 




The family of Bagge is of Northern ex- 
traction, and a branch of the old Swedish 
.stock of the same name which still con- 
tinues in that kingdom. It was esta- 
blished in England about three hundred 
years ago, and has held lands in Norfolk 
since 1560. The first recorded ancestor, 

Simon Bagge, married and had two sons, 
Simon, AI.A. of Caius College, Cambridge, 
who died unm. and 

John Bagge, of Cockley Cley, b. in 1561, 
who married a lady named Susannah, and 
dying in 1625, was s. by his son, 

John Bagge, esq. of Stradsett, who was 
father, by Mary his wife, of another 

John Bagge, esq. of Stradsett, who wed- 
ded Sarah, daughter of — Gynn, esq. and 
had issue. 



I. William, his heir. 

II. Charles, m. Barbara, daughter of E. 
Elsden, esq. and had a son, Charles, 
D.D. who espoused Anne, daughter 
of Thomas Warner, esq. of Walsing- 
ham, and had issue. 

I. Sarah, m. to Maxey Allen, esq. and 
had issue. 
The elder son, 

William Bagge, esq. of Stradsett, h. in 
1700, married Jane, only child and heiress 
of Peter Dixon, esq. of Islington Hall, in 
Norfolk, and had issue, 

I. William, who d. unm. in 1801. 

II. Thomas, heir. 

I. Jane, d. unm. in 1791. 

II. Susan, d. unm. in 1800. 

III. Elizabeth, in. to the Rev. Richard 
Hamond, second son of A. Hamond, 
esq. of High House, Norfolk. 

The second son, 

Thomas Bagge, esq. of Stradsett Hall, 
h. in 1740, m. first, Pleasance, daughter and 
co-heiress (with her sisters, the wives of 
Anthony Hamond, esq. of High House, and 
of Samuel Browne, esq.*) of Philip Case, 



* This gentleman had, by Miss Case, two 
daughters, 

Hester Browne, m. to Sir Jacob Astley, bart. 

of iMelton Constable. 
Pleasance Browne, m. to Edward-Roo-er 
Pratt, esq. of Ryston. (See vol. i. p. 231 ). 



228 



WALMESLEY, OF SHOLLEY. 



esq. 
viz. 



and liad two sons and two daughters, 



I. Thomas-Philip, his heir, 
ir. William. 

I. Pleasance, m. to the Rev. Dr. Hut- 
ton, rector of Gaywood, and d. in 
1830, leaving issue. 

II. Jane, m. to Sir Thomas Preston, 
bart. of Beeston Hall, and has issue. 

Mr. Bagoe wedded, secondly, Anne, daugh- 
ter of Thomas-Lee Warner, esq. of Wal- 
singham, and widow of Dr. Charles Bagge, 
by whom he had another daughter, 

III. Anne, m. in July, 1829, to Capt.Wil- 
liam Fitzroy, eldest son of Lieut. 
Gen. the Hon. William Fitzroy, and 
grandson of the first Lord Southamp- 
ton. 

He d. in Augast, in 1807, and was s. by his 
son, 

Thomas-Philip Bagge, esq. of Stradsett, 
who m. in April, 1808, Grace, youngest 
daughter of Richard Salisbury, esq. of Lan- 
caster, and by her (who d. 27th January, 
1834) had issue, 

Thomas-Philip, b. 29th January, 1809, 

d. in February, 1816, 
William, successor to his father. 



Richard, twin with William, b. in 1810. 
Edward, twin with Pleasance, b. 2nd 

December, 1812. 
Henry-Case, in the Hon. East India 
Company's civil service, b. 22nd No- 
vember, 1814. 
Arthur, died young, in 1828. 
Philip-Salisbury, b. 18th October, 1817. 
Maria, m. 17th June, 1831, to Henry 
Villebois, esq. eldest son of H. Vil- 
lebois, esq. of Marhani House, Nor- 
folk. 
Pleasance. 
Mr. Bagge died 3rd June, 1827, and was 
succeeded by his eldest surviving son, the 
present William Bagge, esq. of Stradsett 
Hall. 

Arms — Lozengy, gu. and arg. on a chief 
or, three cinquefoils az. 

Crest — Two wings. 

Motto — Spes est in Deo. 

Estates — All in Norfolk, comprising 
Stradsett, Islington, Gaywood, and Mint- 
lynn. 

Seat— Stradsett Hall, Norfolk. 



WALMESLEY, OF SHOLLEY. 

WALMESLEY, THOMAS-GEORGE, esq. of Sholley, in the county of Lan- 
caster, b. 16th August, 179.5, m. 4th May, 1824, Miss Susan-Elizabeth Trusler, of 
Slindon, in Sussex, and has surviving issue, 

Anthony, b. 25th November, 1826. 
John, b. 26th January, 1830. 

Mr. Walmesley succeeded his father. 



Hineaaf. 




The following extract from an old parch- 
ment, dated in 1640, exhibits the source 
whence the family, of which we are about 
to treat, derived a portion of its early inhe- 
ritance : 

" It doth appear by a deed, maid in the 
4th year of Richard ye first, the land now 
in our possession in IJicarsteth and Hough- 
ton, wear given in free mariage by Wil- 
liam, son of William, son of Simon de 
BiCARSTETH, of Bicarsteth, with Ann, his 
daughter, wlio did marrie Ralph, son of 
Henry Mossocke, wch messuage was 
called Tenescohenet, and by some old deeds 
Heathen Head ; and the crest then belong- 
ing to Mossocke was an oake wth achornes 



WALMESLEY, OF SHOLLEY. 



229 



Rowiiip; upon ye moss, in tlu; form of n 
barrel : sprung out of the moutli." 

" The next marriage wo find any mention 
of is Henry, the son of Thomas Mossocke, 
wlio (lid marry Johan, the first daugliter of 
Alen Norres, in the reign of Hknry ye 
first, wth whom lie had severall lands in 
Wolfall, Walton, Speake, Ditton and Hip- 
ton/' 

" The next to this we find anything of, is 
Henry, son of Thomas Mossocke, who did 
marry one of the daughters of Philip Wett- 
vall, of Choaviston, in Cheshire, knt. by 
whom he had land there to the value of forty 
pounds p: an: which was by his son sould 
to the Lord Chancellor Egerton : this mar- 
riage was solemnized in the reign of Philip 
and Mary." 

" Then Thomas, son of ys Henry, did 
marrie with Margrett, daughter of Lau- 
rance Ireland, of Lidiatt, esq. and Ann, 
one of the daughters of MoUinux of the 
Wood, esq. in the begining of Queen Eli- 
zabeth's raign, by whom he was to haue 
the reversion of a lease wthout impeach- 
ment of waste of Conschoe for thirty and 
one years, but he dieing before it fell, his 
heir being an infant was defeated of it." 

" Henry Mossock, son of Thomas, did 
niarrig Jane, the daughter of John More, of 
Bankhall, esq. Her mother being the 
daughter of Edward Scasbrick, of Seas- 
brick, esq. in the reign of K. James ye st: 
by whom he had in portion 400 and 50 
pounds." 

" Thomas, son of Henry, did marrie the 
youngest daughter of Thomas Berrington, 
of Molte Hall, in ye county of Salope, esq. 
in ye raign of our soveraign Lord Charles 
ye st : an : 1638. And to a second wife he 
married, Ann Urmestone, the daughter of 
Richard Urmestone, ye year 1650 being 
of West Leight, and having no heirs it fell 
to his brother Henry, who never marriing, it 
came to Richard Walmesley, of Showley, 
his father, Thomas Walmesley, haveing 
married y« sister of ye said Thomas and 
Henry Mossocke." 

Thomas Walmesley, living in the twenty- 
second of Henry VH. m. Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of William Travers, of Neathby, in the 
county of Lancaster, and was father of ano- 
ther 

Thomas Walmesley', living in the twenty- 
eighth of Henry VHI. who wedded Mar- 
garet, daughter of — Livesay, of Livesay, 
in Lancashire, and died on the 17th of 
April, 1584, having had eight sons and two 
daughters, viz. 

1. Thomas (Sir), an eminent lawyer 
and serjeant-at-law in Elizabeth's 
reign, and one of the judges of the 



court of Common Pleas in that of 
Kiuif James L Sir Thomas founded 
the family of Di'NKENilALiill, now ex- 
tinct, for wiiich see conclusion. 

M. Richard, of Sholay. 

III. Robert, of Coldecots, in the county 
of Lancaster. This gentleman m. 
Isabell, daughter of Ralph Parkin- 
son,' of Chiping, in the same shire, 
and had two sons, 

1. Thomas, who inherited Colde- 
cotes, 6. in 1661, m. first, Eliza- 
beth, daughter and sole heir of 
Richard Grimshaw, of New- 
house ; and secondly, Katharine, 
daughter of — Hall, of Bland- 
ford, in Cheshire. By the for- 
mer he had issue, 

Robert, of Oldcots, thirty-five 
years ,of age 13th Septem- 
ber, 1664, vi. Anne, daugh- 
ter of — Tliornton, of 
Thornton, in Yorkshire. 

Richard. 

Charles. 

Isabell. 

Anne, m. <o William Crom- 
back, of Clei-k Hill, Lanca- 
shire. 

2. Richard, of Holcroft, in Lan- 
cashire, who had a son, 

Thomas, b. in 1651. 

IV. Edward, of Banister Hall, in the 
county of Lancaster, »h. Anne, daugh- 
ter of Hawkesworth, of Hawkes- 
worth, in Yorkshire, and died about 
the year 1601. He had issue, 

1. Thomas, who ?n. Frances, daugh- 
ter of Edward Stanley, of Moor 
Hall, in the county of Lancas- 
ter. 

2. Edward, of Banister Hall, liv- 
ing in 1664, then seventy-one 
years of age. He m. Dorothy, 
daughter of Christopher Ander- 
ton, of Horwich, in Lancashire, 
and widow of William Walton, 
of Walton in the Dale. 

3. Richard, d. young. 

1. Rosamund, m. to Thomas Wink- 
ley, of Bellington, Lancashire. 

2. Jane, m. to Richard Craven, 
of Dinkley, Lancashire. 

3. Elizabeth, ni. to Robert Hop- 
kinson, of Preston. 

V. William, merchant, of London, died 
without issue. 

VI. Nicholas, merchant, of London, m. 
Sarah, daughter of Sir Thomas Kem- 
ble, who served the ofHce of lord 
mayor, and left a son, Thomas, of 
Chafout St. Peter's, Bucks, who »«. 



230 



WALMESLEY, OF SHOLLEY. 



Elizabeth, daughter of — Ellis, of 

London. 
vn. Henry, a priest, 
vm. John, of Gray's Inn, barrister-at- 

lavv. 

I. Alice, m. to — Hothersall, of Ho- 
thersall, in Lancashire. 

II. Elizabeth, m. to — Nowell, of 
Measley, in the same county, gent. 

The second son, 

Richard Walmf.sley, esq. of Sholay, or 
Sholley, marrying Margaret, daughter of 
William Walmesley, esq. of Fishwick, in 
Lancashire, had two sons, Thomas, who d. 
unmarried, and his successor at his decease, 
about the year 1(509, 

Richard Walmesley, esq. of Sholley, h. 
in 1598, who wedded Ellen, daughter of 
\Mlliam Gerrard, esq. of Radborne, and 
had issue, 

I. Richard, who died in his father's 
lifetime, leaving by his wife, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Thomas South- 
worth, of Samsbury, in Lancashire, 
an only child, 

Elizabeth, the wife of Thomas 
Cottam, of Dilworth. 

II. Gerard, d. young. 

III. Thomas, who inherited Sholley. 

IV. John, m. first, Anne, dau. of Laur. 
Bryers, of Buckshaw, and had an only 
dau.m. to Rich. Chorley,of Hartwood 
Green, whose descendants are now 
all extinct. He wedded, secondly, 
Margaret Plesington, and from tliat 
marriage the Walmesleys of West- 
wood House. (See vol. i. p. 278.) 

V. ^^ illiara,) , .i / .,^„„„ 

--, V both d. young. 

VI. George, S jo 

I. Margaret, this lady lived to an ad- 
vanced age. 

II. Janet, m. to John Sherborne, esq. of 
Balyhall, in Lancashire, and d. with- 



out surviving issue. 



He was s. at his decease by his third, but 
eldest surviving son, 

Thomas Walmesley, esq. of Sholley, 
living in 16G4, who m. Elizabeth, tiie 
heiress of the Mossockes, as mentioned in 
the introduction. She was the daughter of 
Henry Mossocke, of Cunscough, near 
Ormskirk, and brought that estate into the 
family of her husband. They had a daugh- 
ter, Anne, who died a nun, in Flanders, and 
a son and heir, 

Richard AValmesi.ey, esq. of Sholley, b. 
in le.'iG, living in 1733, who wedded Jane 
Houghton, of Park Hall, sister of William 
Houghton, esq. and by her (who d. 13th 
November, 1722) had issue. 



I. Thomas, his successor. 

II. William, d. s. p. 16th March, 1752. 

hi. John, living in 1733, died without 

issue. 

IV. Edward, killed at sea. 

V. Richard, living in 1733, in holy 
orders, d. at Ormskirk, 5th May, 
1735. 

VI. Robert, lost at sea. 

VII. Charles, died a prisoner at Liver- 
pool in 1716. 

VIII. Henry, d. in 1734, without issue, 

IX. James, d. 7th April, 1777. 

X. Francis, died in returning from In- 
dia, in April, 1760, left no issue. 

I. Elizabeth, d. unm. in 1733. 

II. Anne, d. unm. in 1732. 

III. Margaret, b. 7th January, 1700, m. 
to William Colgrave, esq. and d. in 
1768. 

IV. Dorotliy, d. young. 
He was s. by his eldest son, 

Thomas Walmesley, esq. of Sholley, b. 
21st October, 1685, who m. (in London) 
Mary, daughter of William Colgrave, esq. 
and had issue, 

Richard, b. 14th December, 1709, liv- 
ing in 1733, but d. unm. in the life- 
time of his father. 
Thomas-Colgrave, his father's heir. 
Joseph, b. 7th October, 1715, died at 

Liverpool in April, 1759, s. p. 
Francis, b. 11th April, 1758, died at 
Dolhvort, in Lorrain, being subprior 
of the monastery. 

Mary, d. unm. 
Mr. W^almesley d. 20th April, 1756, and 
was s. by his eldest surviving son, 

Thomas-Colgrave Walmesley, esq. of 
Sholley, b. 28th August, 1713. This gen- 
tleman m. lUth April, 1758, Miss Elizabeth 
Turner, of Hainpstead Heath, and left at 
his decease, 12th May, 1775, 

I. Richard-Joseph, his heir. 

II. Thomas-William, b. iOth Septem- 
ber, 1767, died at Richmond, in 
Surrey, 5tii January, 1825, and bu- 
ried in the vault at Moorfields chapel, 
London. 

III. ]{obeit, a monk of La Trappe, b. 
12lh February, 1770. 

I. Catherine, b. 17th April, 1759, died 
7th January, 1785, num. 

II. Elizabeth-Mercy-Magdakn, 6.22nd 
July, 1760, (/. 26th August, 1787, 
never having enjoyed health or hap- 
piness after the death of her elder 
sister. Both were interred in the 
vault of the Turners, at Hampstead. 



WALMESLEY, OF SHOLLEY. 



231 



III. Mercy, b. I7tli October, 17(il, died 
2.'3r(l Marcli, 1807, iiiiin. 

i\'. Anno, h. 7tli l''(l)riiin V, I7G3, died 
uiim.-2(Jtli October, ISI i. 

V. Frances, b. Ifith February, 1772, in. 
at Hannnersiiiitli ciuircli, to Nicbohis 
Sell)y, esq. 

VI. Hlleii-Monica. 

He d. 12tb May, 1775, was buried at In- 

gatestone cliiircli, and s. by bis eldest son, 

RiCHAKD .JosKiMi Wai,mk.si,k.y, esq. of 
Sliolley, b. 2'2nd August, 17(M, wbo wt;d- 
ded, 2.^tli Aujiiist, 17!M, at Ilaniniersmitb 
cliurcli. Miss Maiiby, and bad four sons and 
a daugbter, viz. 

Thomas-Gkokgk, liis bcir. 

Ricbard, b. 25tb Novenil)er, 1796, »m. 

Miss Marianne Lescher, of Hamp- 

stead. 
Henry, b. 1st November, 1799, m. 1st 

May, 1832, Miss Mary Havers, of 

Beacons. 
Micbael, b. 5tb April, 1800. 

Frances. 

Mr. Walmesley was s. by bis eldest son, 
tbe present Thomas-Geokgk Walmesley, 
esq. of SboUey. 



SlSaalnifsIrj). of DunfernljalgO- 

EXTINCT IN THE MALE LINE. 

Tiiis, tbe elder branch of tbe family, 
sprang from 

Sill Thomas Walmesley, knt. of Dun- 
kenbal2,b, in tbe county of Lancaster, an 
eminent lawyer in tbe reigns of Elizabeth 
and James I. In tbe former, (ttnio 1580, he 
was called by writ to tbe degree of serjeant- 
at-law, and in tbe latter, lOtb May, 1589, 
made one of tbe judges of tbe court of 
Common Pleas. Sir Thomas m. Anne, only 
daugbter and heiress of Robert Sbuttel- 
wortb, esq. of Hackinge, in Lancashire, by 
Jane, bis wife, tbe sister and heir of Ri- 
chard Browne, gent, of Ribleton Hall, in tbe 
same county, and by her (wbo died at Dun- 
kenbalgb, 19tb April, 1635) left at bis de- 
cease, in tbe lOth of James I. (be was bu- 
ried at Blackburn, "under a fair monu- 
ment," which was demolished by tbe par- 
liamentary army about 1644) an only son 
and heir, 

Thomas Walmesley, esq. of Dunken- 
lialgb, living in 1614, wbo m. first, Eleanor, 
<laugbter of Sir John Danvers,* knt. by his 

* His second son, Sir IIenhy Danvers, was 
created Haron Danvers, and Earl of Danby, but 
dving' unm. '2()th January, l<)l-.'>, tliose honours 
exjiiied, (BunKii's L\i(iiic( (i/id Doi-minil Peerage.) 



wife, Elizabeth, youngest of tlie four daugh- 
ters and co-heirs of .lobii Nevil, Lord Lati- 
mer, and by lier, wbo died in Sipteniber, 
l(jOl, iiad two sons and two daughters, viz. 

I. John, (I. in April, 1600, and was bu- 
ried at Cowtiiorp25tb of that moiitli. 

II. Thomas (Sir), knii;bte(l lltli y\u- 
gnst, 1617, wbo m. Juliana, (biugbter 
of Sir Ricbard Molyneiix, bart. of 
Septon, in Lancashire, and sister of 
tbe first ViscoiiMl Molyneux, by 
whom (who died in October, 1668) 
he had issue, viz. 

1. RicHAUD, successor to his 
grandfather. 

2. Thomas,? , 

3. John, V^-yo""g- 

4. William, of Lowerball, wbo 
bad three wives, but died s. p. 

1. Ainie, d. unm. in 1644. 

2. Juliana, m. to Francis Viscount 
Caiiington, and d. without issue. 

3. Eleanor, m. to Sir Godfrey 
Copley, bart. 

I. Elizabeth, m. to Ricbard Sberborn, 
esq. of Stonyhurst, in Lancashire, 
but d. 12th December, 1666, without 
issue. 

II. Anne, m. first, to William Middle- 
ton, esq. of Stockeld, in tbe county of 
York ; and secondly, to Sir Edward 
Osborne, bart. of Kiveton, in the 
same county. By tbe latter she left 
an only son, 

Sir Thomas Osborne, bart. who 
was advanced to the peerage as 
A^iscount Latimer, Earl of 
Danby, Marquess of Carmar- 
then, and Duke of Leeds (see 
Bukke's Peerage nnd Baronet- 
age). 
Pie wedded, secondly, Mary Houghton, sis- 
ter of Sir Richard Houghton, bart. of 
Houghton Tower, and had another son, 

III. Charles, of Selby, in Yorkshire, 
wbo had two wives: first, Mary, 
daugbter, of Thomas Cbernock, esq. 
of Astley ; and second, Anne, ^laugh- 
ter of — Clerk, esq. of Yorkshire 
(she re-married Charles Fairfax, of 
York), but had no issue. He d. in 
1672. 

Mr. Walmesley died I2tb March. 1641, was 
buried in tbe parish church of Blackburn, 
and s. by bis grandson, 

Richard Walmesley, esq. of Dunken- 
halgh, who wedded Mary, daughter and co- 
heir of Bartholomew Fromonds, esq. of 
Cbeame. By this lady (wbo died in 1687, 
and was buried at Paris) lie acquired an 
estate of four hundred pounds per annum, 
and had issue. 



232 



MORRTCE, OF BETSHANGER. 



I. Thomas, who died at Paris 26th 
August, 1677, in the lifetime of his 

fatlier. 

II. Richard, died at Rome, s. p. 23rd 
November, 1680. 

III. Charles, died at St. Omers, 2nd 
June, 1680, s. p. 

IV. Bartholomew, eventual heir. 

I. Mary, a nun at Paris, living in 1708. 

II. Juliana, vi. to William Diccenson, 
esq. of Wrightington, in Lancashire. 

III. Anne, a nun at Paris. 

IV. Elianora-Mathea, living in 1708, 
m. to Thomas Clifton, esq. of Clifton 
and Lytham. 

He died 26th April, 1679, was buried at 
Blackburn, and succeeded by his son, 

Bartholomew Walmesley, esq. of Dun- 
kenhalgh. This gentleman m. Dorothy, 
daughter and co-heir of John Smith, esq. 
and by her (who died 1st November, 1689, 
and was interred at Bezeres, in Provence) 
had surviving issue, 

Francis, his heir. 

Catherine, m. first, IstMarch, 1711-12, 
to Robert Lord Petre, and secondly, 



to Charles Lord Stourton. By the 
former she had an only son, Robert- 
James, eighth Lord Petre ; by the 
latter no issue. 

Mr. Walmesley died 29th December, 1701, 
and was s. by his son, 

Francis Walmesley, esq. of Dunken- 
halgh, h. 13th October, 1696, who died with- 
out issue, when the male line of this elder 
branch of the Walmesleys expiued, and 
Catherine, his sister, became sole heir to the 
real and personal fortune. The former, com- 
prising the great estates in Yorkshire and 
Lancashire, passed into the family of Petre, 
and the latter, consisting of an enormous 
funded property, devolved on that of Stour- 
ton. 

Arms — Gu. on a chief erm. two hurts. 

Crest — A lion statant guardant, ducally 
crowned gu. granted 20th August, 1560, in 
the reign of Elizabeth. The Walmesleys 
were long in possession of the arms prior 
to the grant of this crest, which was given 
to them, having lost their former one. 

Estates — In Lancashire. 

Seat — Sholley. 



MORRICE, OF BETSHANGER. 



MORRICE, FREDERICK-EDWARD, esq. of Betshanger House, in the 

county of Kent, b. 8th December, 1778, m. 6th June, 1816, EHzabeth, daughter of 

the late Henry Ellison, esq. of Hebburn Hall, in the palatinate of Durham, and has 

one son, 

Frederick-Francis-James, b. 12th March, 1820. 

Mr. Morrice, who succeeded his father 9th January, 1815, is a magistrate, and 
deputy-lieutenant for the county of Kent. 



1lmrc^c^c. 




The family of Morrice is of great anti- 
quity, and can be traced in lineal descent 
from Athelstan Glodrydd,* prince of 
Ferlys, betwixt Wye and Severn, who 
sprung from the old princes of Powys, and 
who, through his mother, Rheingar, daugh- 
ter and heir of Grono ap Tudor Trevor, was 
eighth in a direct line from CaradocVriech- 
fras, lord of Hereford, one of the knights of 
King Arthur's Round Table. Athelstan 
wedded Gw ladys, daughter and heir of Ryn, 
lord of Regain, and was father of 

' Athelstan Glodrydd was godson of Athel- 
stan, king of England, and founded the fourth 
royal tribe of Wales. 



MOIUUCE, OF BETSHANGER. 



233 



KYD\V(iAN AP Elystan,* prince of Fcrljs, 
who »«. Eleii, daii}i;liU'r of — Urockwel, lord 
of Powis, and liad a son, 

Idnekth ap Kydwgav, lord of Radnor, 
prince of Ferlys, who was father, by Gwen 
llian, daughter of Foreth ap Owen, lord of 

Keveliog, of 

GvvRGENAY AP Idnehth, lord of Radnor, 
prince of Ferlys, who Jii. Flen, daunhter 
and heir of Riiys ap Aron, lord of Langa- 
then, and from this marriage lineally de- 
scended f 

MoRYS AP Morgan, who wedded Ellen, 
daughter of levan ap Guifddoy, sprung 
from a common ancestor with himself, and 
had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. GrulTytli, d. s. p. 

III. Philip, fl. s. p. 

IV. levan, from whom derived the 
MoRicRS of Werrington. (See con- 
clusion.) 

The eldest son, 

William Morys, captain in the royal 
navy, married a lady, presumed, from the 
arms upon the plate in the possession of the 
present Mr. Morrice, to have been of the 
Devonshire family of Martyn, and had a 
son and successor, 

William Morricr, esq. who wedded 
Jane, daughter of .John Castell, esq. of Ash- 
bury, Devon, and had three sons and one 
daughter, viz. 



* The Earl of Cadogan also derives from Ky- 
dwgan ap Ely stun. 

t The intermediate descent was as follows : 

Gwrgenay ap Idnerth =Ellen, daughter of Rhys 
I ap Aron 

Howell ap Madoc =Elinor, dau. of Warren 

ap David Voel 

Philip dorddy of Llin-=Eva, daughter of Kin 



went, in Radnorshire 



Crygdryer, lord of 
Harp ton 



David, second son of=Joan, dau. and heir of 



Philip dorddy 



Owen ap Kinrychan 
ap Llawddon 



levan Phellip, of Caron=jMargaret, daughter of 

levan ap Meredyth 



Rees ap levan 
Morgan ap Rees 



=iMallt, daughter and co- 
heir of levan Gwrgan 



=Gwellian, dau. of Uavid 
ap Gttun ap levan- 
ddv 



Morys ap Morgan. 



William, 0. in IG70, captain in the 

army, d. s. p. 
Salmon, of whom presently. 

Bezabiel, living in 1740, who died 
without issue. His widow survived 
until 17L»0. 

Jane, in. to Captain Martyn, R.N. and 
died without issue. 

Captain Morrice died in 1680. His second 
son, 

Salmon Morrice, esq. entering the royal 
navy, distinguished himself in various 
commands, and attained the rank of 
admiral of the White. He m. Elizabeth, 
daughter and sole heir of William Wright, 
esq. a naval commissioner, and by her, 
who died in 173.3, had issue, 

Wright, born at Betshanger, m. Sarah, 
daughter of Thomas Peke, esq. of 
Hills Court, in Ash, but died issue- 
less in the lifetime of his father. 

William, heir to his father. 

Sarah. 

Elizabeth, m. to Thomas Boteler, esq. 

Jane. 

Maria-Susanna. 

Admiral Morrice, who purchased the estate 
of Betshanger, in the county of Kent, in 
1712, died in 1740, was buried at Betshan- 
ger, and succeeded by his only surviving 
son, 

William Morrice, esq. of Betshanger, 
who m. Mary, daughter and heir of Robert 
Chadwick, esq. captain R. N. of Northfleet, 
(see family of C/tadivick of Healey), and had 
three sons, William, his heir; James, suc- 
cessor to his brother ; and Thomas, lieute- 
nant R.N. died unmarried. Mr. Morrice 
died in 1758 (his widow surviving until 
1803), and was succeeded by his son, 

William Morrice, esq. of Betshanger, 
born 24th May, 1733, lieutenant-colonel of 
the 10th Dragoons, at whose decease, unm. 
in 1787, the estates devolved on his bro- 
ther. 

The Rev. James Morrice, M. A. rector 
of Betshanger, and vicar of Flower, in 
Northamptonshire, born in July, 1739. 
This gentleman espoused Maria Col tee Dn- 
carel, daughter of the late Adrian Coltee 
Ducarel, es([. and niece of Andrew Coltee 
Ducarel, LL.D. of Doctors Commons. By 
her, who died 12th September, 1834, he 
had two sons and three daughters, viz. 

Frederick-Edward, his heir. 

Andrew-Ducarcl, rector of Betshanger? 
married, and has a son, William, 
born 9th February, 1815, and other 
issue. 

Charlotte-Elizabeth, m. to Henry Bon- 



234 



MORRICE, OF BETSHANGER. 



ham, esq. of Portland-place, M. P. 
for Sandwich, and has issue. 

Maria-Margaret, tn. to Thomas Halli- 
day, esq. of Wimpole-street, and has 
issue. 

Theodosia-Frances, m. to Edward Ver- 
non, esq. of Cheshire, and has issue. 

Mr. Morrice died 9th January, 1815, and 
was succeeded by his son, the present Fre- 
derick-Edward Morrice, esq. of Bets- 
hanger, the direct descendant of Vreich- 
fras, lord of Hereford, one of the knights 
of King Arthur's Round Table. 

Arms — Quarterly : first, gu. a lion ram- 
pant, reguardant or, for Morrice ; second, 
per bend ermine, and ermine all over a lion 
rampant or, for Tudor Trevor ; third, arg. 
three boars' heads couped sable, two and 
one, for Cadogan ; fourth, gu. an escut- 
cheon within an orle of martlets, arg. 
Chadwick, quartering the ensigns of forty- 
six families, including Okeden, Healey, 
Carwarden, Mavesyn, Westcote Lyttelton, 
Quatermain, Grey of Rotherfield, Fitz- 
Osborn, Yvery, Vernon, Venables, Avenel, 
Baliol, Camviile, Marmion, Tuberville, 
Meyric, Morgan Gam, Pembridge, Bagot, 
and Malory. 

Crest — On a rest a falcon proper, beaked 
and belled, or. 

Estates — In Kent. 

Seat — Betshanger, near Sandwich. 



ifHoritf. of ffiSacrrtntjlon. 

Ievan Morice, youngest son of Morys 
ap Morgan, and brother to William Morys, 
the progenitor of the Kentisli f;iniily, was 
fellow of All Souls, Oxford, doctor of laws, 
and chancellor of Exeter, in 1594. He m. 
Mary, daughter of John Castle, esq. of 
Ashbury, in Devon, and by her (who wed- 
ded, secondly. Sir Nicholas Prideaux, knt. 
of Souldon) left at his decease, in 1605, a 
son, 

Sir William Morice, born in the parish 
of St. Martin, Exeter, 6th November, 16()'2, 
who was left under the guardianship of his 
mother. At the age of eighteen, he was 
entered a fellow commoner of Exeter Col- 
lege, Oxford, and there pursued his studies 
with such diligence and success, that Dr. 
Prideaux, at that time rector of Exeter, 
would frequently say tliat though Morice 
was but little in stature, yet in time he would 
come to be great in tlie state. "Sir U'il- 
liam," says an almost contemporaneous wri- 



ter,* *' having proceeded bachelor of arts, 
retired into his county, and lived with his 
mother at Chuston, in West Putford, a small 
parish, six miles to the west of Bytheford, 
where he most sedulously followed his stu- 
dies ; and his mother, till her decease, which 
was in October, 1647, managing all his con- 
cerns, he had leisure to furnish himself 
with all sorts of good literature. Soon after 
his return home, he was married to one of 
the grand-daughters of Sir Nicholas Pri- 
deaux ; and in the year 1640 his name was 
inserted in the commission of the peace for 
Devon. In 1645, he was chosen knight of 
the shire for Devon, to serve in the long- 
parliament, but did not take his seat until 
General Monk restored the secludt d mem- 
bers. In 1651, he was made high sheritf, 
having, during the previous year, settled 
his family at Werrington, on the borders of 
Cornwall, which estate he had purchased 
from Sir Francis Drake, bart. of Buckland. 
In 1658, he was chosen a burgess for New- 
port, in Cornwall, and being related, by his 
wife, to General Monk, he contracted an 
acquaintance with him, and so far recom- 
mended himself to the general's esteem, 
that, on his coming to England, he made 
choice of him for his chief, if not only, con- 
fidant in the management of the great affair 
of the king's restoration, wherefore, in Fe- 
bruary, 1659, Morice received from his 
majesty, by the hands of Sir John Gran- 
ville, the signet of secretary of state ; and, 
in 1660, on the king's landing, was honoured 
with knighthood. In 1661, Sir William 
became M. P. for Plymouth ; and, in 1668, 
having continued in the no less laborious 
than honourable office of principal secre- 
tary of state, for more than seven years, 
being also well stricken in years, and know- 
ing, that between the bustles of life and the 
business of death there ought to be allowed 
a certain space of time, fully satiated with 
the delights and glories of the court, pru- 
dently craved his majesty's leave that he 
might withdraw from thence : and so, with 
the king's gracious consent, he resigned his 
secretaryship, and was succeeded therein 
by Sir John Trevor. Which done, Sir 
William retreated into his own country, 
and passed the remainder of his days in a 
quiet retirement, at his house at Werring- 
ton, where he erected a fair library, valued 
at £1200: nor was lie wanting in works of 
charity, for he built and endowed an alms- 
house for six poor people, in the parish of 
Sutcombe, near Holdsworthy, where each 
of the occupants liatli two fair rooms, and 
two shillings a week duly paid them. There 
was one thing singular in this lionourable 



• Prince. 



BRISCO, OF COGIIURST. 



235 



gentleman, that altlioiiii,li he kept a domes- 
tic chajjlain in his lamily, yet (wlieii pre- 
sent) he was al\va\ s iiis own chaplain at his 
table, notwithstanding; several (li\ ines were 
there; and if a clergyman pretended to say 
grace. Sir William' nsed to say, 'Hold, 
man, 1 am king, priest, and prophet, in my 
own house.' " 

Sir William m. as already stated, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Humphrey Prideaux, esq. 
of Souldon, and had issue, 

I. William, his heir. 

II. John, a Turkey merchant, who m. 
Miss Lowther, and was father of 

John Morice, M.P. for Newport, 
temp. GiiORGE I. who m. Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Sir Jeft'rey Jef- 
freys, ahiermaii of London, and 
dying in 1734-5, left a daughter, 
his eventual heiress, m. in 1740, 
to Jeffrey Jeffreys, esq. of the 
Priory, Brecon. 

III. Humphrey, a Hamburgh merchant, 
who m. a daughter of the Lincoln- 
shire family of Trollope, and had a 
son, Humphrey, sub-governor of the 
Bank, and M.P. for Grampound. 

IV. Nicholas, died unm. 

I. Thomasine, ni. to Sir Walter Moyle, 
of Bake, in Cornwall. 

II. Gertrude, m. to Sir Robert Cotton, 
knt. of Hatley St. George. 

III. Elizabeth, died unm. 

IV. Anne, m. to Sir John Pole, bart. of 
Shute. 

Sir William d. 12th December, 1676, and 
was s. by his son, 

William Morice, of Werrington, who 
was created a Baronet 13th Charles II. 
He m. first, Gertrude, daughter of Sir John 



Bampfyldc, bart. of Poltimore, and had by 
her one son and tuo daughters, namely, 

I. William, who m. Anne, daughter 
and co-heir of Richard Lower, M.l). 
but predeceased his father s.p. 

I. Mary, m. to Sir John Carew, of An- 
thony. 

II. Gertrude, m. to Sir Walter Younjr, 
bart. 

Sir William wedded, secondly, a daughter 
of Richard Reynell, esq. of Ogwell, in 
Devon, and by her had an only son. 

Sir Nicholas Morice, second Baronet of 
Werrington, M.P. for Newport in the reigns 
of Qneeii Anne, and her two immediate suc- 
cessors. This gentleman espoused the Lady 
Catherine Herbert, eldest daughter of 
Thomas, Eai'l of Pembroke, and by her 
(who died in 1716) had one son and two 
daughters, namely, 

I. William, his heir. 

I. Catherine, m. to Sir John St. Aubin, 
bart. of Clowanee, in Cornwall. 

II. Barbara, »m. in 1728, to Sir John 
Molesworth, bart. of Pencarrow, in 
Cornwall. 

Sir Nicholas d. in 1726, and was s. by his 
only son. 

Sir William Morice, third Baronet of 
Werrington, M.P. successively for New- 
port and Launceston, who m. first, 1731, 
Lady Lucy Wharton, daughter of Thomas, 
Marquis of Wharton ; and, secondly, Anne, 
daughter of Thomas Bury, esq. of Bury 
Narber, in Devonshire, but dying without 
issue the baronetcy expired, while his great 
estates were inherited by the families of St. 
Aubin and Molesworth. Werrington is now 
the property of the Duke of Northumber- 
land. 



BRISCO, OF COGHURST. 



BRISCO, MUSGRAVE, esq. of Coghurst, in the county of Su.ssex, b. \5th 
April, 1791; m. 8th October, 1828, Frances, daui--hter of the late Heni-y Wood- 
gate, esq. of Spring Grove, Pembury, Kent, by the Honorable Georgina Hamilton, 
his wife, sister to the present Viscount Boyne. 

Mr. Brisco, who is a magistrate and deputy-lieutenant for the counties of Sussex 
and York, succeeded his father 25th January il 1834. 



236 



BRISCO, OF COGHURST. 



Hineadc. 




This is a junior branch of the house of 
Crofton Hall, in Cumberland, now repre- 
sented by Sir Wastell Briscoe, bart. The 
surname was originally De Birkskeugh, 
from the family's dwelling at Birkskeugh, 
or Birkswoodj^iear Newbiggin, in a lord- 
ship belonging to the priory of Carlisle, 
which lands, or a great portion of them, 
remain in the chief's possession. 

Robert Brisco, great grandson of Ro- 
bert Brisco, of Brisco, was living in the 
reign of Edward I. His younger son, 

Isold Brisco, wedded Margaret, daugh- 
ter and lieiress of Sir John Crofton, and 
thus acquired the manors of Crofton, Win- 
how, and Dundraw. He was father of 

Christopher Brisco, of Crofton. It ap- 
pears by an arbitrament between the prior 
of Carlisle and this Christopher, concern- 
ing the manor of Brisco, that the said manor 
should remain to the prior and his succes- 
sors, paying to the said Christopher one 
hundred nierks ; and the capital messuage, 
with the woods for building, should continue 
with the said Christopher and his lieirs. This 
Christopher kept fourteen soldiers at Brisco- 
thorn upon Esk. He was taken prisoner 
at the burning of Wigton ; and upon that 
and similar occasions was compelled to 
mortgage a considerable part of his estate. 
His son and successor, 

Robert Brisco, of Crofton, ni. Isabel, 
daughter of William Dykes, of Warthole, 
and had five sons and two daughters, viz. 

I. Thomas, a priest. 

II. Robert, successor to his father. 

III. Isold, who served against the Sara- 
cens, and died a hermit. 

IV. Edward, ancestor of the families of 
Westward and Aldenham, Herts. 

V. Alexander, progenitor of the Bris- 
coes of Yarvvell, Northamptonshire. 

I. Syth, m. to Richard Brown. 



II. Susan, Ml. to Robert Ellis, of Bot- 
hill. 
The second son and heir, 

Robert Brisco, of Crofton, vi. Catha- 
rine, daughter of Clement Skelton, of Pe- 
trel Wray, and had a son, 

John Brisco, of Crofton, who wedded 
Janet, daughter of Thomas Salkeld, of 
Corby, and was father of 

Richard Brisco, of Crofton, who had, 
by his wife, a daughter, of Leigh, of Fri- 
sengton, and had two sons, Robert, liis 
heir, and Leonard, whose son, Robert, mar- 
rying the heiress of Coldhall, founded that 
branch, now extinct. The elder, 

Robert Brisco, of Crofton, who was 
slain at the battle of Soltoun Moss, temp. 
Henry VIII. left a son and successor, 

John Brisco, esq. of Crofton, who es- 
poused Anne, daughter of William Mus- 
grave, esq. of Havton Castle, in Cumber- 
land, a branch of the ancient Northern 
family seated at Hartley Castle, which 
acquired the lordship and estate of Hayton 
in the reign of Henry VI. by marriage 
with the daughter and heiress of W^illiam 
Covel. John Brisco purchased Leigh's 
part of the manor of Orton, in Cumberland, 
from Sir Wilfrid Lavvson, and Maud his 
wife, widow of Thomas Leigh, of Isell ; and 
another third portion from Thomas Blen- 
nerhassett, of Carlisle. He was 5. by his son, 
William Brisco, esq. of Crofton, who 
completed the purchase of the manor of 
Orton. He wedded Jane, daughter of Wil- 
liam Orfeur, esq. of Highclose, and was 
father of 

John Brisco, esq. of Crofton. This gen- 
tleman 771. Mary, daughter of Sir John 
Braithwaite, of Burneshead, and had, with 
other children, who died unmarried, 

I. W^ILLIAM, his heir. 

II. John, who 7)1. Judith Bewley. 
HI. Edward, a merchant in London, 

who wt. Miss Tolson, of the ancient 
family of Tolson, of Bridekirke. 

I. Dorothy, >h. to Sir John Ponsonby, 
knt. of'Haugh Heale, who settled 
in Ireland, daring the protectorate of 
Cromwell, and acquired great estates 
in that kingdom. His son, William 
Ponsonby, esq. of Besborough, M.P. 
for the county of Kilkenny, was ele- 
vated to the" peerage of Ireland as 
Baron Besboroigh in 1721. 

II. Grace, in. to Clement Skelton, esq. 
of Petrel Wray. 

III. INLary, >n. to the Rev. Joseph Ni- 
cholson. 



BRISCO, OF COGFIURST. 



237 



IV. Agiu'S, m. to Williiim Raysoii, of 
Diilston. 
Tlie eldest son, 

William liKi.sco,esq.of Crofton, 7m. first, 
Susanna, (Ian<ilitt'r of Sir Kandal Cranlirld, 
by whom he had one son, who died yoimu; ; 
and, secondly, Susanna, dau<;hter of Fran- 
cis Brown, alderman of London, and had 
issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. William, a merchant in London, d. 
s.p. 

III. Thomas, who m. Jane, daupjlitor of 
Lancelot Fletcher, esq. of Tallan- 
tere, and widow of Major Crisp, and 
had issue. 

William Brisco was *. by his son, 

John Bkisco, esq. of Crofton, who ?»?. 
Mercy, daughter of Mr. Alderman William 
Johnson, of Newcastle on Tyne and Kib- 
biesworth, and had six sons and four daugh- 
ters, viz. 

I. William, died unm. 

II. John, heir. 

III. Thomas, died unm. 

IV. Nathaniel, died unm. 

V. Richard. 

VI. Henry. 

I. Margaret, m. to George LangstalT, 
gent. 

II. Susanna, m. to the Rev. David Bell, 
rector of Aspatric. 

III. Abigail, m. to Henry Brisco, esq. 
of Backborough, in Ireland. 

IV. Mary. 

Mr. Brisco was s. at liis decease by liis 
eldest son, 

John Brisco, esq. of Crofton, living 
towards the close of the seventeenth cen- 
tury, who wedded Catharine, second daugh- 
ter of Sir Richard Musgrave, bart. of Hay- 
ton Castle, by Dorothy his wife, daughter 
and co-heir of William James, esq. of 
Washington, in Durham, grandson of Bishop 
James, and had issue, 

1. Richard, who m. Miss Lamplugh, 
but predeceased his father without 
issue. 

n. John, D.D. of Crofton Hall, rector 
of Orton and vicar of Aspatrie, m. 
Catharine, daughter of John Hylton, 
esq. of Hylton Castle, and was father 
of John Brisco, esq. of Crofton Hall, 
created a baronet in 1782. (See 
Burke's Peerage and Baronetage.) 

III. William, rector of Dessington. 

IV. Musgrave, of whom presently. 

V. James, of Beaumaris. 

VI. Wastell, who went to Jamaica, and 
married Mrs. Campbell. 

VII. Ralph, m. Dorothy, daughter of 
the Rev. Jonathan Rowland. 



I. Dorothy, »"• to Kichard Laiiiplugh, 
(•S(|. of Riliton. 

II. Catlicriiic, m. to John Holme, gent, 
of Cvurlisle. 

The fourth son, 

Musgrave Brisco, esq. captain in the 
army, m. Mary, only daughter and heiress 
of Fdward Dyne,* esq. of Coghurst and 
Lankhurst, in Sussex, by whom he had 
issue, 

I. Richard, in holy orders, d.s.p. 
If. John, in the East India Company's 
service, died unm. 

III. Edward-Dyne, captain in the pro- 
vincial cavalry, a deputy lieutenant 
for the West Riding of Yorkshire, 
died unm. 

IV. Wastell, of whom presently. 

The fourth but only son to leave issue, 

Wastel Brisco, esq. of Coghurst, in 
Sussex, was captain in the Coldstream 
guards, a deputy lieutenant for the counties 

* The family of Dyne was one of respectabi- 
lity in Sussex. 

James Dvne, seated in that county, man-ied, 
and had two sons, viz. 
John, Lis lieir. 

Thomas, of East Grinstead, in Sussex, whose 
daughter, Timothea, m. her cousin, John 
Dyne, esq. and died in 1682. 
The elder son, 

John Dvne, gent, of Ashettesford, in Kent, m. 
Margaret, daughter of — Baker, of Westwell, in 
the same county, and dying in 1646, (he was 
buried at Bethersden), was s. by his son, 

John Dyne, esq. of Westfield, Sussex, who 
wedded his cousin-german, Timothea, daughter 
and co-heir of Thomas Dyne, esq. of East Grin- 
stead, and bad issue, 

I. Edward, his heir. 

II. Thomas, successor to his brother, 
lii. John. 

IV. James, baptized at Westfield 20th Fe- 
bruary, 1653, who married and had issue. 

V. William, buried at Westfield in 1666. 

VI. Henry, bapt. '2nd July, 1668. 

I. Timothea, baptized 8th June, 1658. 

II. ftlargaret, bapt. 20th October, 1661, and 
died 1663. 

John Dyne dying in 1678, was buried at West- 
field, and s. by his son, 

Edward Dyne, esq. of Westfield, aged four- 
teen in 1662, at whose decease, unmarried, the 
estates devolved on his brother, 

Thomas Dyne, esq. of Westfield and Lank- 
hurst, baptized April, 1651, at Westfield, who m. 
Joanna, daughter of — Elkin, and dying in 1723, 
was s. by his son, 

Edward Dyne, esq. of Lankhurst, jurat of 
Hastings, who in. Marv, daughter of William 
Fletcher, esq. of Conghurst or Coghurst, in Sus- 
sex, and left at his decease, in 1732, an only 
daughter and heiress, 

Mary- Fletcher Dyne, b. in 1714; m. as in 
the text, to INIusgrave Brisco, esq. 



238 



BIGLAND, OF BIGLAND. 



of Sussex and York, and in the commission 
of the peace for the former. He m. •24th 
October, 1785, Sarah, daughter of— Goul- 
bourn, esq. and had issue, 

I. MusGRAVE, his heir. 

II. Wastel, of Bohemia House, near 
Hastings, b. 16th November, 1792 ; 
m. in June 1822, Maria, daughter of 
.Tohn Lade, esq. of Boughton House, 
Kent, and has surviving issue, 

1. Wastel, h. 29th July, 1824. 

2. Arthur. 

3. Musgrave-Dyne. 

1. Maria. 

2. Eliza. 

3. Sarah. 

Mr. Wastel Brisco, who is a magis- 
trate and deputy-lieutenant for Sus- 



sex, possesses an estate in Lincoln- 
shire, as well as in tliat county. 
I. Sarah, m. 7th June, 1810, to William 
Camac, esq. of Mansfield Street and 
of Hastings. 

Mr. Brisco d. 25th January, 1834, and was 
s. by his eldest son, the present Musgrave 
Brisco, esq. of Coghurst. 

Arms — Arg. three greyhounds courant in 
pale sa. Quartering the ensigns of Crofton, 
Whinnos, Skelton, Dyne, and Fletcher. 

Crest — A greyhound courant, in pursuit 
of a hare. 

Motto — Grata sume manu. 

Estates — In Sussex and Yorkshire. 

Town Residence— 3H, Devonshire Place. 

Seat — Coghurst, near Hastings. 



BIGLAND, OF BIGLAND. 




BIGLAND, GEORGE, esq. of Bigland Hall, in the county of Lancaster, b. 6th 
April, 1782, succeeded his father. Mr. Bigland is a deputy-lieutenant for Lanca- 
shire. 

Umeagc. 

ing in his paw an ear of Big-wheat," may 
possibly allude to the acquisition of the es- 
tate by grant from one of the feudal lords 
of that period, who is said to have carried a 
similar bearing. It was not unusual in those 
times to permit a follower to assume part 
of his chieftain's arms. From the remains 
still existing of many old towers on the 
coast of Lancashire, it may be inferred that 
the county was subject to incursions from 
the northern powers, and thence a satisfac- 
tory reason may be derived why the family 
documents of the Biglands do not ascend to 
an earlier era than to the date when the at- 
tested pedigree commences. Besides, it 
does not appear that the herald's visitations 
went north of the sands, beyond which Big- 
land Hall is situatid; and West, the histo- 
ry ^. n 1 e^t i • >„♦ fo^; rian of many neighbouring families, strictly 
The Biglands, one of the most ancient f ami- •""'"• ""i -^ ,^« +i,„,„'?..u^ ^ithJ.r- livp.l 
T • T 1 • * Ait;^.. offi,..,.c in havp confined himselt to those who either lived, 
liesinLancaslnre tradition aftirms to have con..iderable property in the 

been seated at Bigland* so early as the Nor- "i , . •' 'r ,\ „.„„_ m, . , i,^\v,„,;i^ i.^,,. 
* 1 .1 ^;„ ,.„^f "oiJnn hn]i\- district ot 1' urness. Ihat the lanuly, liow- 
man conquest; and theircrest, a lion, hoia- 



* In front of the kitchen chimney at Big;land 
Hall, the only very ancient part of the house, is an 
old oak beam, with rude carved work upon it, and 
in very peculiar characters, the initials, 1. 13. M. 15. 
1167. At Arundel Castle is now preserved a 



piece of an old carved coat of arms in stone, with 
some characters very similar, in the peculiar for- 
mation, to those at lUglaiul. It was discovered 
among some ruins near the castle, and is sup- 
posed to he above seven hundred years old. 



BIGLAND, OF BIGLANU. 



239 



ever, was of rniik and iiilliK'ncc in the i)ait 
of tlie country wlicro it resided, its inter- 
marriages witii tlie I'restons of llolker, tlie 
Saiulys of Fnrness, the Beliiiii;lianis of 
I'eurns, tlio Tliornboron<;lis of Hanipsfield, 
the Daltons of Thurnliani, tlie U'ilsons ol' 
Dailiani Tower, tlu' llnthllestons of Milium 
Castle, tlie JJradd\lls of ('oneshead Priory, 
&e. sufficiently attest. The first recorded 
ancestor, 

Kdwarp Bycjlande, of Byglande, in the 
parish of Cartmel, Lancashire, living about 
the time of Henry VII. married, and had 
issue, 

I. Henky, his heir. 

U. Edward, of Cartmel, who married 
and had two sons, Edward and John. 
The latter, 

.John Bigland, settled in the 
county of Essex, and died at 
Chelmsford in October, 15.59, 
leaving a daughter, Thomasin, 
the wife of Charles Dubbes, and 
a son, 

Edward Bigland, who m. at 

Chelmsford, in Essex, 8th 
August, 1575, Margaret 
Neale, and was succeeded 
by his son. 

The Rev. Edward Bigland, 
M.A. rector of Leake, in 
the county of Nottingham, 
who tn. Mary, daughter and 
heir of — Bendish, esq. and 
died in 1650, leaving, with 
other issue, a daughter, 
Anne, m. in 1639, to John 
Barwell, esq. of Garradon, 
in Leicestershire, and a son, 

Edward Bigland, esq. of 
Grays Inn, in Middlesex, 
and of Long Whatton, in 
Leicestershire, sergeant at 
law, and M.P. for Notting- 
ham. He tn. Anne, only 
dau. and eventual heiress of 
Peter Richier, M.D. and d. 
in 1704, leaving (with two 
daughters, Mary, m. to Ro- 
bert Wilmot, esq. of I)uf- 
field, grandson of Sir Ni- 
cholas Wilmot, bart. of Os- 
maston, and Anna-Berthia, 
the wife of John Arden, 
esq. of Arden, in Cheshire) 
a son and successor, 

Henry Bigland, esq. of Long 
Whatton and Frolesworth, 
in the county of Leicester, 
who m. Orme, daughter of 
Charles Whinyates, esq. of 
Peterborough, and had issue, 
1. Edward, his heir. 



2. Henry, died at Bermu- 
das, unmarried. 

1. Ornie, born in I70H, ?/;. 
first, 4th April, 17;J2, to 
Isaac Bayley, esq. of 
Chesterton, in the 
county of Huntingdon ; 
and secondly, to Coo- 
per Thornhill, esq. of 
Stilton. She died in 
1767, leaving by her 
first husband two sons, 

John Bayley, of 
Peterborough,who 
m. Sarah, daugh- 
ter of White Ken- 
net, esq. and 
grand-daughter of 
Dr. Kennet, bi- 
shop of Peterbo- 
rough, and had a 
son, the present 
Sir John Bay- 
ley, bart. late 
one of the ba- 
rons of the 
Court of Ex- 
chequer, born 
1763. 
Isaac Bayley, who 
m. Mary, daughter 
of Edward Big- 
land, esq. of Long 
Whatton. 

2. Anne - Bethia, died 
young. 

Henry Bigland was interred 
at Clerkenwell, and suc- 
ceeded by his son, 

Edward Bigland, esq. of 
Long Whatton and Peter- 
borough, born in 1710, who 
>M. first, Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Charles Pitfield, esq. 
of Hoxton, but by her, who 
died in 1738, had no issue ; 
and secondly, Mary, daugh- 
ter of Robert Depupe, of 
Dogsthorpe, and relict of 
White Kennet, by %vliom he 
had one ,son and three 
daughters, viz. 

Edward, of Frolesworth 
and Peterborough, born 
in 1745, died unm. 
Mary, born at Peterbo- 
rough, 26th March, 



1744, 



m. 



in 1772 to 



Isaac Baylej\ esq. 

Orme, born at Peterbo- 
rough, 9th March, 1747, 
m. in 1772, to Roger 
Darvall, esq. 

Lucy-Eliza, born at Pe- 



240 



BIGLAND, OF BIGLAND. 



terborough, 5th Octo- 
ber, 1754, m. in 1778, 
to Wright Tlionias 
Squire, esq. of Peter- 
borough. 
The elder son and successor of Edward Byg- 
lande, of Byglande, 

Henky BiGLAND, of Bigland, espoused 
Jenett, daughter of George Preston, living 
in 1560, and died before 24th November, 
15th Henry VIII. leaving a son and sue- 

Edward Bigland, of Bigland, who wed- 
ded a daughter of the ancient family of 
Sandys, of Furness Fell, anjj had three 
sons and two daughters, viz. 

I. Henry, his heir. 

II. George, of Cartmel, married Agnes, 
daughter of George Denton, of Cum- 
berland, and was father of 

James, of Cartmel, m. 2nd Sep- 
tember, 1621, Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Backhouse of Eversham, 
in Westmoreland, and hence de- 
rives, in the female line, the 
present Sir Ralph Bigland, 
Garter King of Arms. 

III. James. 



I. Janet. 

II. Margaret. 
Edward Bigland died in 1563, was interred 
at Cartmel, and succeeded by his eldest 

son, 

Henry Bigland, esq. of Bigland, who 
m. Isabel, daughter of — Bellingham, esq. 
of Westmoreland, and by her, who died in 
1622, had issue, 

I. George, his heir. 

II. James, of Grange, in the parish of 
Cartmel, m. there, 2nd June, 1600, 
Jennet, daughter of Harrison, esq. of 
Cartmel, and dying 27th Noveml)er, 
1623, left, with five daughters, a 
son, 

Henry, of Grange, born in 1607, 
who m. Anne daughter of Row- 
land Thornborough, esq. of 
Hampsfield, in Lancashire, by 
Jane, his wife, daughter of 
Xliomas Dalton, esq. of Thurn- 
liam, and had issue, 

1. Henry, a legatee in the 
will of Henry Bigland, of 
Bigland, for £UW>, on con- 
dition that lie did not go 
with his father to Ireland. 

2. James. 

3. George. 

1. Jane. 
III. Henry, of Cartmel. 

Henry Bigland died in 1616, and was s. by 
his son, 

George Bigland, esq. of Bigland, who 



7n. 15th October, 1608, Isabel, daughter of 
John Myers, of Cartmel, and had issue, 

I. James, his heir. 

II. John, successor to his brother. 

III. Thomas, d. unm. 1646. 

IV. Henry, baptized 1621, d. unm. in 
1646. 

V. George, baptized 2nd September, 
1630, (/. unm. 1685. 

VI. Edward, d. unm. 

I. Anne, baptized 2nd March, 1612, 
m. to Edward Robinson, esq. of New- 
by Bridge. 

II. Sarah, baptized 26th February, 
1615, m. to — Atkinson, esq. of 
Westmoreland. 

III. Isabel, baptized 15th February, 
1618, m. to — Battersby, esq. 

IV. Bridget, baptized 5th August, 1627, 
m. to William Kilner, esq. 

George Bigland died in 1644, and was bu- 
ried at Cartmel, 29th October. His will 
bears date 1st June, 1643, and was proved 
at Richmond 1st February in the foUow^ing 
year. His widow survived until April, 
1645, when she was buried at Cartmel, leav- 
ing many legacies, and among others a be- 
quest to the grammar-school in that town. 
The eldest son and successor, 

James Bigland, esq. of Bigland, Burn- 
barrow, and Ellerside, died unmarried in 
1645, and was s. by his brother, 

John Bigland, esq. of Bigland, Burn- 
barrow, and Ellerside, baptized at Cartmel, 
17th June, 1610. This gentleman wedded 
Jane, daughter of Thomas Fletcher, esq. of 
Winander, by Mary, his wife, daughter of 
William Knipe, esq. of Broughton Hall, 
and had issue, 

I. George, his heir. 

II. Thomas, successor to his brother. 

III. Henry, a merchant at Hamburgh, 
born in 1651, died unmarried. 

IV. James. 

V. John. 

VI. Edward, living in 1693. 

VII. William, d. v. p. unm. 

I. Mary, died during her father's life- 
time, unm. 

II. Anne, born in 1660, wi. to Edw^ard 
Kellet, esq. of Mireside. 

III. Isabel, d. unm. 

IV. Sarah, d. unm. 
Mr. Bigland's will bears date 6th April, 
1670, and devises all his estates in Lanca- 
shire and Westmoreland, chargeable with 
certain legacies, to his eldest son, 

George Bkjland, esq. of Bigland, bap- 
tized at Cartmel, .30th October, 1647, who 
erected and endnwrd the free-school at 
Browedge, near Bigland. He died unm. in 
1685 (his will bears date 18th May in that 
year), and was s. by his brother, 



BRAY, OF SHERK. 



241 



Thomas Biuland, esq. of Ui^laiid, liiip- 
tized at Caitiiit'l 22ud April, HMO, wlio m. 
ill 1687, Elizalx'tli, (la(ij;liUT and iiciross of 
tlie Rev. William Wilson, rector of VVinan- 
der, a scion of the Wilsons of J)alliam 
Tower, and had issue, 

I. John, his heir. 

II. Henry, born in 1693, died uiini. bu- 
ried at Kendal. 

in. Thomas, born in 1698, died unm. 

buried at Kendal. 
IV. GiiOiUiK, successor to Lis brother 

John. 

I. Jane, born in 1C88, died unmarried 
in 1712, buried in Kendal church, 
where a monument is erected to her 
memory. Slie left a legacy to Cart- 
mel scliool, to wliich foundation the 
Bigland family were considerable 
contributors. 

II. Sarah, died unm. in October, 1767. 

III. Elizabeth, m. to — Stedman, of 
Richmond-on-Swale. 

IV. Dorothy, m. Robert Thornton, mer- 
chant, of Lancaster. 

Mr. Bigland was s. by his eldest son, 

John Bigland, esq. of Bigland, baptized 
22nd February, 1690, who espoused Doro- 
thy, daughter and heir of the Rev. William 
Wells, by Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of 
Thomas Huddleston, esq. of Milium Castle, 
but dying issueless, in 1747, the estates de- 
volved on his only surviving brother, 

George Bigland, esq. of Bigland, bap- 
tized 30th November, 1701. This gentle- 
man 7M. at Desington, 7th April, 1749, 
Mary,* daughter of John Fox, gent, of 
Whitehaven, by Mary, his wife, daughter 
and coheir of Edward Towerson, and had 
two sons, viz. 

I. George, his heir. 

II. Thomas, born in 1751, died in No- 
vember, 1829. 

Mr. Bigland died suddenly at Wheaten- 
hurst, in Gloucestershire, upon his return 
from Bristol, where he had been for the be- 
nefit of his health, on the 20th September, 
1752, and was s. by his son, 

* This lady married, after Mr, Bigland's de- 
cease, Thomas Sunderland, esq. 



George Bigland, esq. of Bigland, born 
at Bigland, 5th May, 17.'>0, who vi. first, in 
1781, Anne, second dau. and co-heir of Ro- 
bert W^atters, esq. of Whitehaven, liigli- 
sherilf for Cumberland, and had by lier, 
who d. in 1783, one son, 

I. (JEoR(ii;, liis lieir. 

lie m. secondly, at Ulverstone, 23rd Novem- 
ber, 1784, Sarah, daughter of John Gale, 
esq. of Whitehaven, high-sherilf for ('uin- 
berland, and sister of the late Wilson Brad- 
dyll, esq. of Conishead Priory, and by lier, 
who died in 1830, had two sons and four 
daughters, namely, 

II. John, captain in the Royal Lanca- 
shire Militia, in. in 1828. 

III. Wilson-Braddyll, captain R. N.tw. 
8th January, 1822, Emily, second 
daughter of the late Samuel Leeke, 
esq. a magistrate and deputy-lieute- 
nant for Hants, and sister of Captain 
Sir Henry Leeke, R. N. By this 
lady he has issue, 

1. George-Selsey, born 27th Sep- 
tember, 1822. 

2. Wilson-Henry •'John, born 7th 
January, 1824. 

1. Sophia-Georgiana. 

I. Sarah, wt. to Pudsey Dawson, esq. of 
Lancliif Hall, Yorkshire, and died at 
Bigland, 26th December, 1816. 

II. Georgina, died in 1820, and was bu- 
ried at York, unm. 

III. Mary, died at Bigland, in 1812, 
unmarried. 

IV. Dorothy, died at Bigland, unm. 
Mr. Bigland died in January, 1831, was in- 
terred at York, and succeeded by his eldest 
son, the present George Bigland, esq. of 
Bigland. 

Arms — Az. two ears of Big- wheat or, 
quartering arg. three wolves' heads sa. lor 
Wilson. 

Crest — A lion passant, reguardant, gu. 
holding in his fore-paw an ear of Big-wheat, 
as in the arms. 

Mottoes — Above the crest. Gratitude : 
below the shield, Spes labor levis. 

Estates — In Lancashire. 

Seat — Bigland Hall, near Cartmel. 



BRAY, OF SHERE. 



BRAY, EDWARD, esq. of Shere, in the county of Surrey, b. 20th July, 1793 , 
succeeded his grandfather, William Bray, the county historian, at the decease of 



that gentleman in 1812 



R 



242 



BRAY, OF BHERE. 



Hincaar. 







The name of the Sieur de Bray occurs 
in tlie Roll of Battle Abbey, amongst the 
associates in arms of the Conqueror, and 
although the authenticity of that celebrated 
record has in niany instances been ques- 
tioned, in this the statement is confirmed by 
the fact of Wiu.iam de Bray being one of 
the subscribing witnesses to the charter of 
the year 1088, conferred by the Norman on 
the Abbey he had founded in commemora- 
tion of his triumph at Hastings. No grant 
of lands appears however in Domesday 
Book to the Brays ; but that the family sup- 
plied sheriffs* to Northamptonshire, Bed- 
fordshire, Bucks, and some other counties 
between 1202 and 1273, is fully established. 

William de Bray witnessed tlie charter 
to Battle Abbey in 1088. 

Ralph de Bray was sheriff of the coun- 
ties of Northampton, Southampton, Somer- 
set, Dorset, Oxford, Leicester, Bedford, and 
Bucks, in the reigns of the Kiiu/s John 
and Henry HI. that is between the years 
1202 and 1234. In tlie 17th of the latter 
monarch, in the great quarrel between the 
King and Hubert do Burgh, Earl of Kent, 
Hubert having taken sanctuary t in the 

• The sheriff of a county is an officer of high 
rank and importance in the present day, but was 
of still higher at the time when much of the reve- 
nues of the Crown arose from escheats, the levy 
of which required tlie assistance of tlie sheriff, 
who was responsible to the king for the produce. 

t From the time of the Saxon kings, churches 
and churchyards, under certain modifications, af- 
forded sanc'tuarv to offenders, with the exception 
of those guilty of sacrilege or treason. 1 he cri- 
minal within forty days was oldiged to cloathe 
himself in sackcloth, confess his crime before the 
coroner, solemnly abjure the realm, and taking a 
cross in his hand repair to an appointed port, em- 
bark and depart the country. If apprehended, or 
brought back in his way thither within forty days, 
Le had a right to plead privilege of sanctuary, 



chapel of Brentwood, in Essex, belonging 
to the Abbot of Waltham, Henry appointed 
Ralph de Bray and Ralph de Norwich (jus- 
ticiarios nostros) to receive from the earl 
an abjuration of the king's realm, if he 
would not go out of sanctuary, and appear 
in the king's courts and abide the judgment 
there ; or to do him justice in the king's 
court if he would quit sanctuary, and ap- 
pear therein according to the agreement 
between the king and him. 

In the 44th of Henry III. 1260, 

William de Bray was possessed of two 
knights' fees in WoUaston, and obtained a 
weekly market on Thursday at his manor 
there, and a fair every year on the eve of 
the invention of the Holy Cross and two 
days following. He was succeeded by 

Sir Robert de Bray, one of the knights 
returned as having £40 a year in land, in 
the county of Northampton, summoned to 
attend Kinc/ Edward I. in his wars in Scot- 
land, and again by King Edward II. This 
Sir Robert, under the designation of Sir 
Robert de Bray, of WoUaston, attended the 
sheriff of Northampton, in 1304, to arrest 
Nicholas, Lord Seagrave, on his lordship's 
return from the Continent, he having left 
England without the king's license, to settle 
a dispute in the court of the King of France 
between himself and John de Cornwell. Sir 
Robert de Bray, amongst bis other trusts, 
was ranger of Sancy Forest, in Northamp- 
tonshire. He was s. by his son, 

Sir James de Bray, living /(??»/). Richard 
I. and of Kiitf] John, whose son, 

Anselm de Bray, was s. by his son, 



and to demand a free passage. Should the of- 
fender neglect this appeal to the coroner, and 
remained in the sanctuary, when the forty days 
limited had expired, it became an act of felony in 
any one to afford him sustenance. The coroner 
was to take the abjuration of the criminal at the 
church in the following form : 

" This hear then, Sir Coroner, that 1 

am a murderer of one or more, a 
stealer of sheep, (or any thing else), and because 
I have done many such evils and robberies in 
this land, 1 do abjure the realm of our Edward, 
King of England, and 1 shall hasten me towards 
the port of which tlmu hast given me ; 

and that 1 shall not go out of the highway, and 
if 1 do I will that 1 be taken as a robber and a 
felon of our lord tlie king, and that at such place 
I will diligently seek for passage, and that I will 
tarry there but one flood or ebb, if I can have 
p,^ssage ; and unless I can have it in such a place 
1 will go every day into the sea up to my knees 
assaying to pass over ; and unless 1 can do this, 
within forty days, 1 will put myself again into the 
church, as a robber and felon of our lord the king, 
so God me help and his holy judgment." 



BRAV, OF SHERE. 



243 



William de Bray, whose son. 

Thomas de Bray, marrii-d for his second 
wife the daughter of — Biaxby, and left a 
son, 

William Bkay, fatlicr of 

Edmi'nd Bkay, whosi- son. 

Sir Richard JJray, is said by some to 
have been of tiic privy roiincil to Henry 
VI. ; by otiiers he is called tlie Kinj;'s Phy- 
sician ; the former is the more probable, as 
lie was buried in Worcester cathedral. He 
had two wives; by the fust, Margaret, dau. 
of John Sandes, esq. of Furnes Felles, in 
Lancashire, lie had an only son, 

John (Sir), whose only daughter and 
heir, 

Margaret Bray, espoused Sir 
A^'illialn Sandys, summoned to 
parliament in 1529, as Baron 
Sandys, of the Vhie, and con- 
veyed to his lordsliip a consi- 
derable estate.* The barony of 
Sandys fell into ahei/ance, on the 
decease of the eightli lord, about 
the year 1700, and it so con- 
tinues. (See Burke's Extinct 
Peeruf/e). 

By the second, Joan, Sir Richard had two 

other sons, namely, 

1. Reginald (Sir), who being in the 
service of Margaret, Countess of 
Richmond, X was confidentially em- 
ployed in the negotiations preceding 
the enterprize of her son, the earl, 
which placed that prince on the throne 
as Henry YII. Sir Reginald was 
made a knight banneret at Bosworth, 
and afterwards one of the knights of 
the body to tlie new king, who fur- 
ther rewarded his fidelity and zeal 



* There is an old room at the \'ine wainscotted, 
on wh'cli Margaret Bray's arms with those of 
Sandys appear carved in several places ; they re- 
main also on some stones of tlie now ruined cha- 
pel of the Holv Ghost, near Basingstoke, and on 
a wall in Basing-stoke church. On the subject of 
Lord Sandys' alliance with the heiress of Bray, 
tradition preserves the following distich : 

My Lord Sandys, my Lord Sandys, 
Lift up both your hands, 

And down on your knees and pray, 
That when you come from France, 
You may lead up the dance, 

With good Mistress ^largery Bray. 

X Reginald Bray was receiver-general to Sir 
Henry Stafford, the second husband of the Coun- 
tess, (see Tudor, fvarl of Richmond, Bvrke's Et- 
tinct Peerage), who by his will bequeathed to him 
(Reginald) his grissel courser. Brav continued 
after the death of Sir Henry, in the service of the 
noble widow, and on her subsequent marriage 
with Lord Stanley, was put in trust for her dower 
of five hundred marks per annum. 



b\ large grants § of land, and by 
conferring upon liim the order of the 
Bath, and finally that of the (jARTER. 
He was also of the privy council, 
and h( Id for one year the office of 
Lord Treasurcr.|| He m. Catherine, 
daughter of Nicholas Hussey; but 
dying w ithout issue, devised the jiiiii- 
ci[)al part of his landed estate be- 
tween liis nephew, Edmund Bray, 
and his niece, Margaret, the wife 
of Lord Sandys. Sir Reginald laid 
the first stone of Henry t/ie Se- 
venth's Chapel, at Westminster, on 
the 24th January, 1502-3, and died 
on the 5tli August, in the same year. 
By his will he directed that his body 
should be buried in the chapel, on 
the south side of the church of Our 
Ladie and St. George, in the castle 



§ The manor of Shere, Vacherv, and Cranlev, 
in Surrey, had long been in possession of the 
euils of Ormonde, but reverting to the Crown on 
the attainder of James the fiftli earl, who was 
likewise Earl of Wiltshire, in 1461, Edward IV. 
granted this manor to John Touchet, Lord Aud- 
ley, who died 26th November, 1491, and was 
buried in the chancel of the church at Shere. 
Notwithstanding the attainder of the Farl of Or- 
monde and Wilts, and the grant of the manor to 
Lord Audley, the earl's brother attempted at least 
to recover the estate ; for by his deed dated 28th 
January, in the 1st of Henry VIL he granted to 
Sir Reginald Bray, kut. the manor of Shere, and 
the mauor and lordship of Vachery, in Cranlev, 
reserving the libei'ty of hunting, and taking beasts 
of chase in the park of Vachery, at his pleasure ; 
also liberty of lodging in the manor-house of 
Shere, for himself, servants, and horses, whenever 
he pleased. To hold to Sir Reginald and Ids as- 
signs for life, he finding a chaplain, and a chanti-y 
priest yearly to celebrate divine service in the 
chapel of the manor of Vacherv, and not cutting 
any great timber except for building repairs. Sir 
Reginald does not however appear at any time to 
have had the actual possession of the manor, as 
we find Lord Audley erjoving it after the at- 
tainder of Ormonde, and his son James, Lord 
Audley inheriting those lands with his title. This 
James was the Lord Audley so notorious as the 
leader of the Cornish rebels, defeated bv King 
Henry at Blackheath, and subsequently beheaded 
and attainted. We further lind his son, by his 
second wife. Sir James Audley, suffering a reco- 
very in the Hilary Term next following the at- 
tainder of his father, and selling the estate to Sir 
Reginald Brav. 

II Sir Reginald " bore in his arms fsavs Brydces 
in the Historv of Northamptonshire) a Thorn, 
with a Crown in the middle, in memorv, it is 
supposed, of his finding the crown (of Kii)g 
Richard) in a bush in Bosworth field." Of this 
device there was, in the last century-, when 
Brvdges wrote (he died in 1724), a represen- 
tation in the hall window of Stenf, one of the 
manors, part of the forfeited estates of the Lord 
Lovel, granted to Sir Reginald Bray. 



244 



BRAY, OF SHERE. 



of Windsor, whicli he had new made 
v/itli that intent, and also in honour 
of Almiglity God.* 
11. John. 
The younger son, 

John Bray, esq. who was hurled in the 

chancel of the church at Chelsea, vi. , 

and had, with a daughter, the wife of Sir 
John N orris, three sons, 

I. Edmund (Sir), who inherited a large 
portion of his uncle Sir Reginald 
Bray's property, which was con- 
firmed under a deed of settlement, 
made between himself and Sir Wil- 
liam Sandys and his wife Dame Mar- 
gery Sandys, in adjustment of a dis- 
pute between the parties regarding 
the lands of the deceased. This Ed- 
mund was about the age of eighteen 
at the death of Sir Reginald, who 
had acted as his guardian and took 
care of his education. He m. Jane,f 
daughter and heir of Richard Haly- 
well, esq, and had John, his heir, 
with several daughters. In the 6th 
of Henry VIII. (1515) he was she- 
riff of the county of Bedford, and 
was summoned to parliament as Ba- 
KON Bray, of Eaton-Bray, in that 
county, on the 3rd November, 21st 
of the same monarch. (See Burke's 
Extinct and Dormant Peerage.) 

II. Edward (Sir), of whom presently. 

* That the chapel of St. George, at Windsor, 
owes much to the skill as well as to the liberality 
and magnificence of Sir Reginald there can be 
little doubt. His arms, sometimes singly, some- 
times impaling those of Hussey (the family of his 
wife), his device of a flax or hemp breaker, the 
initials of his name, and those of his wife, in so 
many parts of the ceiling and windows, could 
not have been so placed without a more than ordi- 
nary claim to the distinction. His will that his 
executors should finish the chapel, according to 
the form and intention of the foundation, would 
seem to refer to a planned drawing in his posses- 
sion, and shows that the work had been carried 
on at his own expense. 

t Sir Reginald Bray purchased the wardship 
of this young lady, that she might become the 
wife of his nephew, as appears by deed dated 
12th February, 1497, made between the said Sir 
Reginald and Sir John Norbury, her grandfather, 
in contemplation of "a marriage to be had be- 
tween Edmund Bray, son of .lohn Brav, brother 
of the same Sir Reginald, and Jane Halywell, 
daughter and heir presumptive of Richard Haly- 
well, esq. cousin and heir apparent of Sir John 
Norbury, (that is to say), daughter of Anne, who 
was the daughter of the said Sir John Norbury." 
In consideraticii 'of three hundred marks paid by 
Sir Reginald, Sir John settled immense estates 
)ipon his said heir, in the counties of Warwick, 
Worcester, Surrey, and Hants. 



III. Reginald, wlio m. Anne, daugh- 
ter and heiress of Richard Moning- 
ton, esq. of Barrington, in Glouces- 
tershire, and had, with four other 
sons,* 

Edmond Bray, of Barrington, 
who wedded Agnes, daughter 
and heir of Edmond Harnian, 
of Taynton, and had, with four 
daughters, three sons, viz. 

1. Edmond, his heir, 

2. Silvester, who was settled 
at Fifield. 

3. John, who purchased Fi- 
field from his brother Sil- 
vester, 

The eldest son, 

Edmond Bray, of Barrington, m. 
Dorothy, daughter of Sir John 
Tracy, of Todington, and had, 
with a daughter, one son, his 
successor, 

Sir Giles Bray, of Barrington, 
who received the honour of 
knighthood. He married Anne, 
daughter of Richard Chetwood, 
and was succeeded by his son. 

Sir Edmond Bray, knt. of Bar- 
rington, father of 

Reginald Bray, esq. of Barring- 
ton, who left four sons, and was 
succeeded by the eldest, 

Edmond Bray, esq. of Barrington, 
who m. Frances, daughter and 
co-heir of Sir John Morgan, of 
Llantarnam, in Monmouthshire, 
and had two sons and three 
daughters, viz